Military Review

Defeat of the Far Eastern Army. How the "Chita plug" was eliminated

35
Defeat of the Far Eastern Army. How the "Chita plug" was eliminated

100 years ago, Soviet troops inflicted a decisive defeat on the White Far Eastern Army and liberated Chita. Ataman Semyonov and the remnants of his army fled to Manchuria.


General situation in Transbaikalia


Before his arrest, in January 1920, the "supreme ruler" Kolchak handed over to General Semyonov the entirety of military and state power on the territory of the "Russian eastern outskirts". Ataman Grigory Semyonov formed the Chita government. In February 1920, the remnants of Kolchak's army merged with Semyonov's units. The White Far Eastern Army was created under the command of General Voitsekhovsky. Then he quarreled with the supreme commander and the army was led by Lokhvitsky. The army consisted of three corps: 1st Transbaikal Corps (Chita Rifle and Manchurian Special Ataman Semenov Division), 2nd Siberian Corps (Irkutsk and Omsk Rifle Divisions, Volunteer Brigade and Siberian Cossack Regiment), 3rd Volga Corps (Ufa , Consolidated rifle and Orenburg Cossack divisions, Volzhskaya consolidated separate named after General Kappel and the 1st separate cavalry brigade). Also, Semyonov's army was supported by local Transbaikal, Amur and Ussuri Cossacks, the Asian Cavalry Division of Baron von Ungern.

The Red Army stopped at the edge of Lake Baikal. This was due to military and political reasons. The Soviet troops were quite capable of finishing off the White Guards and White Cossacks in Transbaikalia. However, here the interests of Soviet Russia clashed with the plans of Japan. The Japanese played their own game during the Russian Civil War. When the United States and other Entente powers began to withdraw from Siberia and the Far East, Japan remained. The Japanese wanted to preserve the buffer puppet formations in the Far East, to include them in the orbit of the Japanese Empire. The Japanese had a strong, well-armed and disciplined army in Russia. They could actively support the anti-Soviet, White Guard forces, create a strong threat to the Soviets like Kolchak's army. With the continuing turmoil in the country and the war with Finland and Poland, Moscow could not afford a war with the Japanese Empire.

Therefore, the Soviet government came up with an interesting move. In April 1920, the buffer Far Eastern Republic (FER) was established with its capital in Verkhne-Udinsk (now Ulan-Ude). The FER included the Amur, Trans-Baikal, Kamchatka, Primorsk and Sakhalin regions. The rights of Russia in the CER zone were transferred to her. But at first, the power of the Provisional Government of the Far Eastern Republic actually extended only to the territory of Western Transbaikalia. Only in August 1920 did the executive committee of the Amur Region agree to submit to the Provisional Government of the Far Eastern Republic. At the same time, the western and eastern regions of the Far Eastern Republic were divided by the "Chita plug" - the regions of Chita, Sretensk and Nerchinsk occupied by the Semyonovites and the Japanese. Formally, it was an independent state with all the appropriate symbols and institutions, with a capitalist economy, but de facto completely subordinate to Moscow. On the basis of Soviet divisions and red partisans, the People's Revolutionary Army (NRA) was created. The creation of the FER made it possible to avoid a war with Japan and, at the same time, with the help of the NRA, finish off the White Guards in the Far East.


Grigory Mikhailovich Semyonov, head of the Chita government of the Russian eastern outskirts, commander-in-chief of the Far Eastern Army


Commander of the Far Eastern Army, Chief of Staff General Nikolai Alexandrovich Lokhvitsky

Chita operations


The strength of the White Far Eastern Army in March-April 1920 in the Chita region was about 20 thousand soldiers with about 80 guns and 500 machine guns. The ongoing peasant war, the actions of the red partisans forced the white command to keep more than half of its forces in the Nerchinskaya and Sretenka regions. To the west of Chita and in the city itself there were about 8,5 soldiers. Also, the whites were supported by the Japanese 5th Infantry Division - over 5 thousand people with 18 guns.

In order to eliminate the "Chita plug", the DRA government organized an offensive. The NRA under the command of Heinrich Eikhe at that time included the 1st Irkutsk Infantry Division, the partisan detachments of Morozov, Zykin, Burlov, and others. The Transbaikal Infantry Division and the Transbaikal Cavalry Brigade were in the stage of formation. The first Chita operation involved about 10 thousand soldiers with 24 guns and 72 machine guns. Before the start of the operation, on April 4-5, the red partisans attacked and for several hours captured the Sretensk station, diverting the enemy's attention to the eastern flank. On April 10-13, the offensive of the main forces of the People's Revolutionary Army began. Since the Japanese took up positions along the railway, the Reds inflicted the main blow from the north through the passes of the Yablonevy Range. Here the left column under the command of Burov (more than 6 thousand people) advanced. Lebedev's right column (2,7 thousand people) was supposed to go along the railway line. It came out to Chita from the southwest. The Japanese withdrew to Chita, Lebedev's detachment went to the Gongota station, where the Reds were stopped by the Whites and the Japanese.

The 1st brigade of the Irkutsk division crossed the passes and descended into the Chitinka river valley. The NRA troops began to advance from the north to Chita. From the northwest and west, the offensive was supported by the 2nd and 3rd brigades of the NRA. The White Guards rolled back to Chita, the threat of their decisive defeat arose. On April 12, Burov's detachment broke through to the northern outskirts of Chita, but under pressure from the Japanese, the people's army retreated. As a result, the Semyonov regime was held out only with the help of the Japanese invaders. In addition, the NRA did not have a decisive superiority in numbers and weapons.

By the beginning of the second Chita operation, the NRA was significantly strengthened. To coordinate actions with the partisans, the Amur Front was created on April 22 (commander D.S.Shilov, then S.M. Seryshev). He numbered 20 thousand bayonets and sabers. Now the White Army had to fight on two fronts. However, the enemy also grew stronger. The Japanese Chita group was reinforced by an infantry regiment and a combined detachment of 3 deployed across the Manchuria station. The NRA command divided the troops into three parts: the right column under the command of Kuznetsov was advancing around Chita from the south; the middle column of Neumann from the west; the left column of Burov - from the north and north-east. Partisan detachments of the Amur Front operated on Sretensk and Nerchinsk. The main blow was delivered: from the north - the Burov detachment (1st and 2nd brigades of the 1st Irkutsk division) and from the south - the Neumann column (3rd brigade). The offensive began on April 25, but by early May it had already failed. The failure was caused by control errors, inconsistency in the actions of the three columns and the Amur partisans. As a result, the Semyonovites were able to carry out a maneuver along the internal operational lines, transfer reinforcements and drive back the enemy.



Defeat of the Far Eastern Army


In the summer of 1920, the position of the FER was strengthened, and the position of the Semenov government worsened. In June-July 1920, the White Guards launched their last broad offensive in Transbaikalia. Ungern's division operated in the direction of the Aleksandrovsky and Nerchinsky factories in coordination with the 3rd rifle corps of General Molchanov. White could not succeed. In August, Baron von Ungern took his detachment to Mongolia. The Amur front received reinforcements in the form of a group of military and political advisers. The partisan units will be reorganized into regular regiments. The combat capability and discipline of the troops of the Amur Front has increased significantly. The expansion of the scope of the partisan movement created a real threat of losing the Japanese army's communications along the Manchurian road. Also, Western countries put pressure on Tokyo. The Japanese government was forced to negotiate with the FER authorities. Negotiations began on May 24 at the Gongota station and proceeded with great difficulty. An armistice was concluded in July. The Japanese began to evacuate troops from Chita and Sretensk. First of all, the Japanese left the eastern regions of Transbaikalia.

At the same time, units of the 2nd Rifle Corps of the White Far Eastern Army were evacuated from these areas, which were relocated to the Adrianovka-Olovyannaya area. In connection with the evacuation of the Japanese army, a split arose in the ranks of the white command. In August-September 1920, discussions began on the evacuation of the White Army. Most of the commanders believed that it was necessary to leave Transbaikalia for Primorye. It was not only the military support of the Japanese, but their supply lines. Without supplies, the Far Eastern Army was doomed. In Primorye, since World War II, warehouses with weapons, ammunition and equipment. Commander-in-Chief Semyonov believed that the White Guards would survive in Transbaikalia even without the Japanese and the Reds would not break through Chita. The Far Eastern army at that time consisted of about 35 thousand bayonets and sabers, 40 guns, 18 armored trains. But the army was weakened by disagreements among the command, the departure of the Japanese, which caused a drop in the spirit of the soldiers. There was also hope for the possibility of an agreement with the FER, which caused the decomposition of the troops.

A neutral zone was established to the west of Chita. Therefore, the center of gravity of the struggle against the Semyonovites was transferred to the zone of operations of the Amur Front. The front consisted of up to 30 thousand soldiers, 35 guns, 2 armored trains. The NRA command planned to hide behind self-defense squads, partisans, who allegedly did not recognize either white or red. The offensive of the Amur Front was covered by a "people uprising". The partisans began active operations north and south of Chita on October 1, 1920. By the time the Japanese troops were withdrawn from Chita on October 15, 1920, NRA units took up their initial positions and began a decisive offensive. The main blow was delivered along the line Nerchinsk - Karymskaya station. This blow came as a surprise to White. In Chita, they got used to a rather long (during the Civil War) peaceful pause. Negotiations were conducted between Chita and Verkhe-Udinsk. In Transbaikalia, they began to believe in the "independence" of the Far Eastern Republic from Soviet Russia, in the possibility of elections to the Constituent Assembly, which would unite Transbaikalia and the Far East. The former Kappelites, led by General Voitsekhovsky, even suggested including their corps (2nd and 3rd corps) in the NRA. However, all these negotiations only concealed the preparation of the people's army for a decisive strike.

On the morning of October 19, the 5th brigade struck at the station of Urulga, which was defended by the White Guard brigade. The enemy was surprised by the appearance of 4 tanks, secretly taken out by the underground workers of Vladivostok from military warehouses and brought to Transbaikalia. Taking Urulga and Kaidalovo, the Reds captured the Chinese patrol the next day, intercepting the Chita-Manchuria railway. On the evening of the 21st, the people's army went to the outskirts of Chita. On the same day, on the eastern flank, the Reds took Karymskaya and Makkaveevo. The Whites began to evacuate from Chita, where the day before the uprising of the Red fighting squads. Molchanov's 3rd corps left the city without a fight. Ataman Semyonov himself, having abandoned his army, fled from Chita in an airplane.

On the morning of October 22, 1920, units of the NRA occupied Chita. Semyonovtsy, having managed to break through to Karymskaya, destroyed armored trains at the Kruchina station, crossed the river. Ingoda and moved south along the Akshinsky tract. After that, the main events shifted to the Manchurian branch, where the 2nd and 1st corps of the Far Eastern Army were located. The white command made a desperate attempt to turn the battle in their favor in order to carry out the evacuation in favorable conditions. On October 22, units of the 2nd corps attacked Agu and tried to break through to Karymskaya. For three days stubborn battles lasted, counterattacks by the White Guards were repelled. On October 28, the 2nd Amur Rifle Division struck at Mogoytui. Under the threat of encirclement, White retreated to Tin, but could not hold out there either. The possibility arose of a new "cauldron" created by the breakthrough of units of the 1st Amur division in Byrka, the Semyonovites retreated to Borza, then to Matsievskaya. The red cavalry cut off the enemy's ability to retreat to Manchuria by rail. The remnants of the White Army tried to recapture Matsievska, but could not. Desperate to escape along the railroad, the White Guards were forced to leave across the steppe, abandoning 12 armored trains, heavy weapons (guns and machine guns) and the bulk of the ammunition.


In November, the defeated units of the Far Eastern Army under the command of General Verzhbitsky went to Manchuria. During the movement along the Chinese Eastern Railway, the white units were mostly disarmed by the Chinese authorities. The White Guards settled in the strip of the Chinese Eastern Railway and in Harbin, which was then considered a "Russian" city. Part of the Semyonov Cossacks in the form of white partisan detachments settled in Buryatia, Mongolia and Tuva. Another part went over to the side of the Red Army or the Red partisans. Semyonov tried to restore his power, but was turned away by most of the commanders. Then the ataman went to Primorye, where the Japanese were still standing and power belonged to the coalition government. But even there he was not accepted and sent away. In 1921, under the guise of workers, many former Kapelev and Semyonovites arrived in Primorye and in the spring seized power in Vladivostok.

Thus, the "Chita plug" was eliminated. Chita became the new capital of the Far Eastern Republic, its western and eastern parts were united.
Author:
Photos used:
https://ru.wikipedia.org/
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  1. boris epstein
    boris epstein 19 October 2020 09: 06
    +5
    "The surprise for the enemy was the appearance of 4 tanks, secretly taken out by the underground workers of Vladivostok from military warehouses and brought to Transbaikalia"
    Yes, this operation is already interesting in itself. First they had to be stolen from the warehouses. They could only take them out by rail in front of the Americans, Czechoslovakians, Japanese and White Guards. Around Baikal is about 1600 km from Vladivostok to Chita. And at the same time, it was also necessary to fill the locomotive with water and load with coal, inspect the train, have people on call along the entire line (station attendants, telegraph operators and telephone operators), have a replacement train crew (people need to eat, drink, sleep)!
    1. fuxila
      fuxila 19 October 2020 12: 06
      10
      The tanks were delivered to Vladivostok by the Americans and installed in covered wagons. According to the documents, the carriages were loaded with American Red Cross cargo. The railway workers replaced the wagons, replacing the loaded ones with empty ones, and the wagons with tanks, under the guise of a train with bread, were sent to Blagoveshchensk. There they were commissioned and sent to the front.
    2. Daniil Konovalenko
      Daniil Konovalenko 19 October 2020 12: 11
      +2
      A.I.Denikin, being in the occupied territory of France, under the control of the Gestapo, having no means of coexistence, could send a wagon of medicines for the Red Army and write another letter to J.V. Stalin, and put on top of the boxes, they say, accept the gift. And here, given the general confusion and collapse of the whites, why not take out the tanks? smile
      1. bober1982
        bober1982 19 October 2020 14: 26
        +1
        Quote: Daniil Konovalenko
        send a wagon of medicines for the Red Army and write another letter to I.V. Stalin

        He did not send a wagon with medicines, and he did not send a letter to Stalin.
        1. Daniil Konovalenko
          Daniil Konovalenko 19 October 2020 14: 52
          +3
          Really? laughing And the bike is as tenacious ... laughing
          1. bober1982
            bober1982 19 October 2020 15: 03
            -2
            Quote: Daniil Konovalenko
            And the bike is as tenacious

            Not really a bike, they just refused his help, he offered.
            1. Daniil Konovalenko
              Daniil Konovalenko 19 October 2020 15: 10
              +3
              This is nothing else ... laughing Tell us how it happened ..
              1. bober1982
                bober1982 19 October 2020 15: 11
                -1
                Quote: Daniil Konovalenko
                Tell us how it happened ..

                I don’t know, I was not present.
                1. Daniil Konovalenko
                  Daniil Konovalenko 19 October 2020 16: 00
                  +3
                  just refused his help, he offered.
                  ... What kind of help, in what form did he offer, who refused? How did he get in touch with the Soviet leadership? Don't you know this if you write what you offered, but refused his help?
                  1. bober1982
                    bober1982 19 October 2020 17: 06
                    -1
                    Quote: Daniil Konovalenko
                    What help, in what form did he offer, who refused?

                    A carriage with medicines, through the Soviet embassy, ​​the Soviet government.
              2. Sergey Oreshin
                Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 17: 32
                0
                I read in one book dedicated to Denikin (but I’ll say right away - I don’t vouch for the reliability!) That Denikin offered (either through the Soviet or through the Swedish embassy) a carriage of medicines for the Red Army, and the State Defense Committee decided: to accept the carriage, but nowhere publish and not mention who it came from.
                1. mat-vey
                  mat-vey 19 October 2020 17: 36
                  +1
                  Quote: Sergey Oreshin
                  I read in one book dedicated to Denikin (but I’ll say right away - I don’t vouch for the reliability!) That Denikin suggested (either through the Soviet, or through the Swedish embassy)

                  In what period is this event attributed?
                  1. Sergey Oreshin
                    Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 22: 16
                    0
                    I read it for a long time, I don't remember exactly, but it seems after the liberation of France by the allies from the Germans.
                    I will repeat once again - I cannot vouch for the reliability of these data!
                2. parusnik
                  parusnik 19 October 2020 18: 05
                  +7
                  Denikin offered (either through the Soviet, or through the Swedish embassy) a carriage of medicines for the Red Army
                  .. I was interested in your general conversation. Let's figure it out all the same. France is half occupied, the other half is under the rule of the Vichy government. Could the Soviet embassy be in the occupied territory? I think not. Did the Soviet government maintain diplomatic relations with the government in Vichy? I think not. The Swedish embassy or representation remains in Paris. Could Denikin go there? Theoretically he could. But he was under the supervision of the Gestapo, as correctly indicated in The first comment. He could have applied in writing, but since he was under supervision, his correspondence was watched. Next, to raise funds for medicines. Denikin had no money, he was in poverty, and he writes about it himself. Organize a collection. Secretly, and even such a number You can't collect medicines in the occupied territory. Well, let's say I collected them, agreed with the Swedes, how would I send them? Through the Eastern Front? Turkey? Spain, Portugal? Denmark? People also need paperwork, and if Denikin made a proposal somehow, he would have indicated it in his memoirs or notes, but this is not the case. hi
                  1. mat-vey
                    mat-vey 19 October 2020 18: 29
                    +4
                    So I had the same thoughts ... well, in peacetime you can do this, but during a war from the occupied territory, if you use intelligence and then a lot of questions, but to a private supervised person ...
                    1. parusnik
                      parusnik 19 October 2020 18: 48
                      +4
                      Moreover, which refused to cooperate with the Germans .... I am interested in another thing where the ears grow from such fakes. For example, a fake about the fact that Catherine II, sold Alaska to the United States, appeared long before the song of the group "Lube". was there any reason?
                      1. not main
                        not main 19 October 2020 23: 57
                        +2
                        Quote: parusnik
                        Moreover, which refused to cooperate with the Germans .... I am interested in another thing where the ears grow from such fakes. For example, a fake about the fact that Catherine II, sold Alaska to the United States, appeared long before the song of the group "Lube". was there any reason?

                        Yes, no! And the ears grow from illiteracy, when this song was performed by "Lube", the majority of the population knew Peter1 and Catherine 2, And who knew Aleksandrov? (and there were three of them!) I'm not talking about Pavel and Nikolay1, but Nikolai 1 belongs to the phrase: "Where the Russian flag has been raised at least once, it should not be lowered!"
                      2. your1970
                        your1970 20 October 2020 09: 51
                        +1
                        Quote: parusnik
                        For example, a fake about the fact that Catherine II, sold Alaska to the United States, appeared long before the song of the group "Lube". Did they have any reason?

                        Quote: non-primary
                        And the ears grow from illiteracy, when this song was performed by "Lube", the majority of the population knew Peter 1 and Catherine 2, and who knew Alexandrov?

                        Um ...... are you serious ?? !!!! illiteracy??
                        Then you now praised the Unified State Exam - and called education in the USSR zero ...
                        For at the time of the song (1990!!!! ) there was not only the Unified State Exam - but even the Russian Federation, and the education was exclusively Soviet
                      3. not main
                        not main 20 October 2020 20: 09
                        0
                        Quote: your1970
                        Hmm ...... are you serious ?? !!!! about illiteracy ???
                        Then you now praised the Unified State Exam - and called education in the USSR zero ...
                        For at the time the song was performed (1990 !!!!) there was not only the Unified State Exam, but even the Russian Federation, and the education was exclusively Soviet

                        Seriously enough! The USSR had an excellent educational system! But she had one flaw: the Romanov and Rurikovech dynasties did not fit into the ideology of the CPSU! And who did we know? It's funny to say, but I personally "studied" this side of Our History from fiction! We knew when and where the party congresses were held, but in our history we have fornicated in three pines.
                      4. your1970
                        your1970 20 October 2020 23: 45
                        +1
                        Quote: non-primary
                        the dynasties of the Romanovs and Rurikovechs did not fit into the ideology of the CPSU!
                        - I'll tell you a secret, a terrible secret - in the history textbooks under the CPSU there was much more information about the tsars - than now ...
                        Quote: non-primary
                        And who did we know? It's funny to say, but I personally "studied" this side of Our History from fiction!
                        - Pikul wasn't enough for you - who wrote about all the kings of Russia in general? Yes, it was difficult to get it - but you could take it to read for the evening
                      5. not main
                        not main 21 October 2020 19: 00
                        0
                        Quote: your1970
                        Pikul was not enough for you, who wrote about all the kings of Russia in general?

                        Basically, I was guided by him.
          2. Lynx2000
            Lynx2000 20 October 2020 02: 32
            0
            recourse
            Theoretically, during the war, the cargo could be purchased, formed and shipped.
            Personally, money can not be collected, but using personal authority (a guarantee of decency) through proxies to collect money. It is possible to have such people in Switzerland, North / South America. The banking system worked during the Second World War.
            The cargo could be formed in the indicated countries, at least in Australia.
            Since the cargo is peaceful, under the auspices of the Red Cross, after customs, it is sent through these countries as part of convoys, or by a separate steamer through Iran (merchant ships operated flights).

            We must not forget smuggling, which during the world wars did not disdain conditionally neutral states, organized criminal groups, and small smugglers.

            The question is whether it really happened, and if it did, it doesn't matter what everyone knew about it. The main thing is that during the war, Soviet / foreign citizens sincerely helped the Soviet Union without counting on "glory".
        2. Moskovit
          Moskovit 20 October 2020 07: 19
          +5
          This story was written by a certain Yu.N. Gordeev in his book about Denikin, published already in 1993. This tale was picked up and carried. She got into Yandex-Zen and immediately became true).
          Naturally, anyone who is a little bit familiar with the history of Denikin's life and the order in occupied France will simply laugh. But the common man in the street believes.
          1. your1970
            your1970 20 October 2020 09: 57
            +3
            I heard this story back in the early 80s, namely about a letter, a wagon of medicines and "to take help, but from where - do not indicate"
            And more
            Quote: Lynx2000
            Theoretically, during the war, the cargo could be purchased, formed and shipped.
            - Swiss watch companies supplied watches throughout the war ... some companies supplied only to the Germans, some only to the British, some to everyone ("Business is nothing personal"). Now imagine how land Switzerland sent watches to the Island !!!
            and these are quite large volumes
  • Sergey Oreshin
    Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 09: 15
    +5
    Quote: Boris Epstein
    Yes, this operation is already interesting in itself.

    In fact, not even 4, but 10 tanks were taken to the partisans' location. The operation was really very beautifully executed, I would even say, filigree!
    True, by that time the Czechs and Americans had evacuated, power in Primorye belonged to the Primorsky Regional Zemstvo Council, where the influence of the communists was strong, but the Japanese posts still had to be bypassed somehow
  • Sergey Oreshin
    Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 09: 16
    +8
    As for the fact that all the Trans-Baikal, Amur and Ussuri Cossacks supported Semyonov - a complete mess. With his bandit antics, he got so many Cossacks that they went to the Red partisans.
    Moreover, the first Red detachments among the Far Eastern Cossacks appeared at the end of 1917 and took an active part in the battles with the Whites and the interventionists in 1918.
    1. mat-vey
      mat-vey 19 October 2020 16: 16
      +5
      Quote: Sergey Oreshin
      As for the fact that all the Transbaikal, Amur and Ussuri Cossacks supported Semyonov - a complete mess

      And the most disgusting - my great-grandfather (four Georges) was in the red partisans and was ...
      Lazo personally awarded a golden checker ...
  • moreman78
    moreman78 19 October 2020 14: 09
    +2
    By the way, the weekend of the films "Dauria" and "The End of the Taiga Emperor" was timed to coincide with this event at Zvezda!
    1. Sergey Oreshin
      Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 14: 16
      +1
      Will you show this weekend or have it shown last?
      1. moreman78
        moreman78 19 October 2020 15: 36
        +2
        In the past they showed. Dauria already twice - on Saturday and Sunday.
        1. Sergey Oreshin
          Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 15: 51
          +1
          Eh, sorry I missed
          1. gsev
            gsev 19 October 2020 20: 35
            +1
            Quote: Sergey Oreshin
            In the past they showed. Dauria already twice - on Saturday and Sunday.

            If you carefully read the book "Dauria", you can see that the author has shown all the horrors of revolution, interclass confrontation, material inequality, fratricidal civil war. For example, I believe that the author sought to show the flaws of the October Revolution and the Bolsheviks in the civil war. Before the revolution, the Cossack village lives and develops peacefully. After that, she practically became depopulated. On the other hand, a vivid picture is drawn of how a Cossack dies defending the property of bankers, and they leave his family without support.
  • Sergey Oreshin
    Sergey Oreshin 19 October 2020 22: 18
    +2
    Quote: parusnik
    I am interested in another, where the ears grow from such fakes.

    Most likely, some "belodels" were allowed in in order to put Denikin in a winning light
  • Shore Cannes
    Shore Cannes 20 October 2020 18: 42
    +2
    Yes, the Bolsheviks cannot be denied the ability to conduct a REAL POLITICIAN, unlike the Russian oligarchy, which has only plums and concerns.
  • Azamat Ramazanov
    Azamat Ramazanov 23 October 2020 09: 03
    +1
    They gave the Japanese and Semenovites a red army in snot