Military Review

Can feathered sub-caliber shells or a cumulative jet "ricochet" from armor

66
Source: www.naukatehnika.com
Source: www.naukatehnika.com



By the way, the question is far from being idle. Previously, when talking about some ancient T-34, they always mentioned, they say, and his armor is tilted - a projectile will hit it and “ricochet”. However, this has been said and is being said about any tank over 60 years old. But everyone somehow forgot about modernity, which is in vain.

Current tanks the armor is still at an angle, just someone has more, and someone has less. So is it possible to get a ricochet when firing modern sub-caliber shells at this modern armor? Although, let's put it this way: can they give a rebound at all or not? And what about the cumulative jet of some kind of grenade, rocket or artillery shell?

Of course, in this material we will only talk about anti-tank ammunition. Any small-medium-caliber "trifle" does not count.

Feathered sub-caliber shells


Of course, one could recall the caliber armor-piercing "blanks" - they really were prone to ricochet more than anywhere else. However, of course, no one has been shooting them for a long time, with the exception of some countries like Yemen, where live SU-100s are still riding. In modern tank ammunition, these shells have long given way to feathered sub-caliber shells, which are the most dangerous in terms of lethality and effectiveness.

But we will not touch upon the ancient feathered armor-piercing sub-caliber projectiles (OBPS or BOPS, whichever is more convenient for you) based on hard alloys, since for more than thirty years plastic alloys based on uranium or tungsten have been the gold standard. So, no matter how strange it may sound, they are less sensitive to inclined armor and, if we are talking about a steel barrier, they overcome it even better than a vertically installed one, due to the “plug” knocked out at the final penetration site.

The active part of a Chinese 105-mm finned sub-caliber projectile and a pierced armor plate behind it. Source: dzen.ru
The active part of a Chinese 105-mm finned sub-caliber projectile and a pierced armor plate behind it. Source: dzen.ru

But if everything is more or less clear with breaking through inclined obstacles, then what about the rebound? Based on open sources, it is known that, until recently, we have practically not carried out research on this topic, since there was no particular need for them, but there are still some studies.

One-piece OBPS, in which the body is made monolithic and in itself acts as a core (for example, our "Leads" or American shells of the M829A1 ... 3 series), as well as shells with a long core inside - these are high-speed elongated and heavy strikers that apply maximum of its kinetic energy in a small area of ​​\u65b\uXNUMXbarmor. However, at an impact angle of XNUMX degrees or more, the process of their “biting” (the beginning of penetration into the armor plate) on the armor becomes less stable, and the further, the worse. Roughly speaking, the larger the angle, the more difficult it is for the projectile to cling to the armor, and the normalization of the penetration process leads to unnecessary damage (plastic deformation) of its head.

German 120mm OBPS for Leopard-2 guns. Source: warspot.ru
German 120mm OBPS for Leopard-2 guns. Source: warspot.ru

But even very large angles of inclination practically do not lead to a rebound. Even on armor set at 70–80 degrees from the vertical, a feathered sub-caliber projectile will still be able to “bite”. A confident OBPS ricochet is possible only if the armor plate is located almost horizontally - no more than 10-11 degrees from the horizontal. Here, of course, the probability of this phenomenon will be simply huge. According to this principle, for example, the frontal assembly of the hull of the American Abrams tank is made, the upper frontal part of which is installed with a very slight rise. But it is impossible to set it as an ideal example - it actually plays the role of a roof.

What's with the "cumulatives"?


Turning to the cumulative means of destruction of armored vehicles, it should be noted that considering the ricochet of the shells themselves is, in principle, meaningless. A shot is different for a shot, so some clear and generalized probability that a cumulative ammunition will not touch the armor of a tank or other vehicle with the contact element of the fuse and will not detonate is almost impossible simply because these very contact elements can be different. But the ricochet of the cumulative jet itself, which is the main damaging factor of shells of this type, is very interesting. Moreover, it is widely believed that this phenomenon does not exist in nature in principle.

HEAT projectile for a 125 mm tank gun. Source: iohotnik.ru
HEAT projectile for a 125 mm tank gun. Source: iohotnik.ru

So, the ricochet of the most cumulative jet still happens. Its appearance depends on many factors.

Firstly, from the hardness of the armor - the higher it is, the more likely it is to ricochet.

Secondly, from the distance between the armor and the detonating projectile, and here, of course, the greater the distance, the more likely the ricochet.

And thirdly, the chance of a ricochet increases with a decrease in the flight speed of the cumulative jet. The latter can be omitted to draw up a general picture.

But the main thing is again the angle of inclination of the armor. Scientific research on this topic was carried out in the laboratories of several research organizations in our country at once. Their results are in the public domain without restrictions on secrecy, so you can voice them.

Experimental work has shown that a ricochet of a cumulative jet of laboratory charges is possible when the armor plate is tilted within 3-5 degrees from the horizontal - that is, along the armor that is practically lying horizontally. At the same time, the cumulative jet, coming into contact with the armor, nevertheless penetrates a little into it, leaving a small hole, and then goes to the side, making a kind of “bounce” and eventually collapsing. You can see the phenomenon of this rebound in more detail in the image attached below.

X-ray pattern of a cumulative jet ricochet from a steel plate. Look from left to right. Source: "Particular questions of final ballistics" V.A. Grigoryan, A.N. Beloborodko and others.
X-ray pattern of a cumulative jet ricochet from a steel plate. Look from left to right. Source: V. A. Grigoryan, A. N. Beloborodko et al. “Particular issues of final ballistics”

However, it is not in vain that laboratory conditions and laboratory charges are mentioned here. The fact is that full-scale tests were not crowned with success. At what angles, up to 1 degree from the horizontal, they did not try to undermine real live shells - the rebound did not happen. So the situation turns out to be twofold: this phenomenon happens with a cumulative jet, but in battle the chances of a rebound are near zero, although what the hell is not joking - sometimes the most seemingly incredible happens. But you should not hope for it.

Conclusions


The conclusion from everything, in general, is very simple. We found out that feathered sub-caliber shells and even a HEAT jet can “ricochet” off armor. It's just like a phenomenon that exists in nature.

But the angles at which it occurs make it unlikely and even random, when, for example, a projectile "strikes" on the roof of a tank, and so on. Such an extreme inclination of the frontal armored parts most susceptible to shelling is simply impossible, so we can say with confidence that the armor of modern tanks cannot give conditions for the ricochet of shells and cumulative jets.
Author:
66 comments
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  1. merkava-2bet
    merkava-2bet 13 October 2022 03: 49
    0
    Such an extreme inclination of the frontal armored parts most susceptible to shelling is simply impossible, so we can say with confidence that the armor of modern tanks cannot give conditions for the ricochet of shells and cumulative jets.

    You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.
    1. Grandfather
      Grandfather 13 October 2022 03: 56
      -3
      Can feathered sub-caliber shells or a cumulative jet "ricochet" from armor
      no.
      1. Shurik70
        Shurik70 14 October 2022 23: 00
        +1
        The slope of the armor, in addition to ricochets, also "increases" the thickness of the armor.
        The cumulative jet needs to overcome more armor.
    2. Grandfather
      Grandfather 13 October 2022 03: 56
      -2
      Quote: merkava-2bet
      Such an extreme inclination of the frontal armored parts most susceptible to shelling is simply impossible, so we can say with confidence that the armor of modern tanks cannot give conditions for the ricochet of shells and cumulative jets.

      You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.

      tell me, maybe they will believe.
      1. Shurik70
        Shurik70 15 October 2022 14: 09
        0
        Quote: Dead Day
        Quote: merkava-2bet

        You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.

        tell me, maybe they will believe.

        You don't have to tell them anything.
    3. Vladimir_2U
      Vladimir_2U 13 October 2022 04: 47
      +3
      Quote: merkava-2bet
      You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.

      The sheet is good, and even better is the hole between this sheet and the armor of the tower. laughing
      By the way, the COP, due to a couple of times lower speed than that of BOPS, arrive in a small arc and the angle will be correspondingly smaller.
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 13 October 2022 05: 38
        0
        I’ll add about the wonderful first photo, does this look like an advanced explosive ammunition rack on Western tanks (Abrams, however)? laughing
        1. Bad_gr
          Bad_gr 13 October 2022 12: 16
          0
          Quote: Vladimir_2U
          I’ll add about the wonderful first photo, does this look like an advanced explosive ammunition rack on Western tanks (Abrams, however)?

          I’m wondering how he will feed the unitar into the cannon with such a grip?
      2. Bad_gr
        Bad_gr 13 October 2022 12: 09
        +3
        Quote: merkava-2bet
        You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.
        From armor with such a slope, the projectile will ricochet (or slide right on the armor) and hit ....
        1. Akuzenka
          Akuzenka 13 October 2022 13: 16
          +6
          From armor with such a slope, the projectile will ricochet (or slide right on the armor) and hit ....
          right into the bait, break the head of an African American, he will lose his sight and will not be able to drive a tank. laughing
        2. SincerityX
          SincerityX 25 November 2022 09: 48
          0
          ...In the breech of the gun, which will definitely break and you will run to repair it in smoke *experience of playing and YouTube in WT 4 days...*
    4. Revolver
      Revolver 13 October 2022 05: 08
      0
      Quote: merkava-2bet
      You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.

      And NLD at an angle to the eye no more than 30 °.
      1. merkava-2bet
        merkava-2bet 13 October 2022 11: 30
        +1
        And NLD at an angle to the eye no more than 30 °.

        It has a multi-layered array, which you will break through.
      2. NG inform
        NG inform 14 October 2022 01: 50
        0
        NLD with a small angle now has an advantage - which was pointed out by the author. Namely, in the final section of the breakdown - the slope creates a reduced resistance. The result can be seen in the illustration. If the scrap is uranium, then burning shot will fly into the tank.
    5. Edward Perov
      13 October 2022 07: 29
      +3
      Well, I’ll tell you, only this is actually the roof of the hull. About what was said. If you find at least one tank where the armor part most susceptible to shelling has such a slope, there will be another conversation. wink
      1. merkava-2bet
        merkava-2bet 13 October 2022 11: 02
        0
        Tank Merkava-4, Leclerc, Challenger-2, Leopard-2, especially the latest modifications, or the Swedish version of Strv-122.

        And here you can clearly see the VLD armor modules.
        http://btvt.info/3attackdefensemobility/armor_sweeden.htm
        There are a lot of interesting things here.
    6. The comment was deleted.
    7. Garm
      Garm 13 October 2022 16: 28
      0
      Abram a, you still need to get into the upper frontal sheet, how much does it make up a percentage in the frontal projection? Yes, and all the ricochets from him will go under the tower ...
    8. sifgame
      sifgame 13 October 2022 18: 54
      +2
      So he said, you probably did not read carefully.
    9. NG inform
      NG inform 14 October 2022 01: 47
      -1
      Recently they showed a simulation of the meeting of our penultimate version of scrap with Abrams' VLD - it struck. I think that in nature it will also break through - that's why they put the Trophy.
    10. Alt 22
      Alt 22 18 November 2022 08: 06
      0
      I would say field trials are needed winked
  2. Vladimir100
    Vladimir100 13 October 2022 04: 01
    -5
    Tanks are a dead end. Some alternative is needed.
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 October 2022 04: 22
      +1
      Quote: Vladimir100
      Tanks are a dead end. Some alternative is needed.

      More powerful tanks!!! wink
      1. Uncle lee
        Uncle lee 13 October 2022 04: 53
        +4
        Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
        More powerful tanks!!


        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 October 2022 11: 29
          0
          Quote: Uncle Lee
          Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
          More powerful tanks!!



          Perhaps I didn't express my idea correctly. Power is not weight and size, but efficiency
        2. Bad_gr
          Bad_gr 13 October 2022 12: 22
          +3
          Quote: Vladimir100
          Tanks are a dead end. Some alternative is needed.

          There are a lot of options:
          1. Dead duck
            Dead duck 13 October 2022 13: 09
            +2
            Small fry, these will crush them like cockroaches laughing

        3. Roman Efremov
          Roman Efremov 13 October 2022 19: 29
          0
          All this is nonsense, the fantasies of those who studied poorly at school. The laws of physics and geometry put an end to such tanks.
          1. SincerityX
            SincerityX 25 November 2022 09: 51
            +1
            Yeah, cubic increase in mass to volume)
            1. Roman Efremov
              Roman Efremov 25 November 2022 19: 41
              +1
              YES, that's right, it has long been known to everyone who studied
    2. Luminman
      Luminman 13 October 2022 06: 52
      -1
      Quote: Vladimir100
      Tanks are a dead end

      Tanks performed very well during WWII. They were the weapons of victory! But the generals, as you know, always prepare for the last war, which is why they rivet tanks, purely by inertia. Due to excessive attention to tanks and attack aircraft, we "overslept" the UAV. Hope we catch up...
      1. bairat
        bairat 13 October 2022 11: 24
        0
        therefore, tanks are riveted, purely by inertia.

        Well, not entirely out of inertia. Rain, snow, fog, anti-electronic warfare - UAVs will sit at the base. No one will cancel a war because of the weather.
        1. NG inform
          NG inform 14 October 2022 01: 53
          -1
          EW - radiates. Hypersonic gliders can be aimed at electronic warfare.
          If at the same time there are hundreds of waves of tens of thousands of Geraniums with the appropriate support of scouts and relays, then the war will end immediately. Budgets allow this to be organized.
          1. bairat
            bairat 14 October 2022 19: 59
            0
            Produce 100000 geraniums - a year will be spent on preparation. Then it turns out that the enemy has a super electronic warfare that jams and deactivates everything. And what to do with it?
            EW is therefore powerful because it can modulate the image of a decoy, and the gliders will hit into an open field.
            The budget seems to allow Elon Musk and Starlink to be repurchased, and once a day to change east and west on tablet maps. However, as history shows, only the incredible exertion of all the forces of the population and the state brings victory in the war. institutions. It's just that there is no less desire for victory, and easy decisions are not rolled.
            1. NG inform
              NG inform 14 October 2022 22: 45
              -1
              Now the guns of the 44th year are fighting. What to do with it?
              A million geraniums - they will still be needed, you need to install a plant that will produce them in large volumes.
              An electronic warfare decoy can only be modulated for one radar, not for a group.
          2. AlexTss
            AlexTss 15 October 2022 11: 22
            +1
            Hypersonic gliders can be aimed at electronic warfare.

            And detail what
            It seems that hypersonic gliders are only being put on ICBMs so far yes , and "induces" their INS ...
            1. NG inform
              NG inform 15 October 2022 11: 35
              0
              I generalized too much :) It seemed that Iskander was also a glider. quasi-ballistic trajectory.
      2. zenion
        zenion 13 October 2022 18: 08
        +1
        Luminman. The tank is a mobile pillbox. It has several types of weapons and can go where its design allows. A cousin before the war graduated from a tank school. Started the war on the T-34. The Germans at first did not understand how they could create such a tank. But he was, and the Germans did the same. So the tank went ahead and killed everything that came across, and the infantry behind the tank. The tank was also transported on its hump.
    3. vadimtt
      vadimtt 13 October 2022 09: 38
      0
      Well, in general, they have been trying to replace armor with speed for a long time. It seems like there are caterpillar tankettes, squeezing 120+ km / h along the intersection with the rollers moving more than a meter. But there is a problem with maneuvering and the presence of obstacles such as "concrete wall" in real life laughing
      Well, the chassis, even with a low wedge weight, staggers quickly.
      But by and large, if this is a drone, then the concept is quite alive.
  3. Thrifty
    Thrifty 13 October 2022 04: 40
    +3
    The author did not take into account one important factor, namely the speed of the projectile. Now all shells fly at a maximum speed of 1800 m / s, but in the case when the problem of increased wear of the tank barrel by about 25 percent due to an increase in speed to 2100-2300 m / s is solved, the ricochet as such will simply become impossible due to the higher kinetic energy of the projectile.
    1. Edward Perov
      13 October 2022 07: 16
      +3
      I took into account, but fiction in the comments - no. If, at a nominal speed at the same 1700 meters per second, the projectile can bite on an almost horizontal barrier, it will be torn apart.
      1. Eule
        Eule 13 October 2022 11: 05
        0
        If the speed at the moment of impact is greater than the speed of sound in the metal of the barrier, then yes, the interaction is according to the laws of hydrodynamics, and all sorts of interesting effects. Only now the trunk, even with plastic leading belts, will not live long at such speeds. Theoretically, the option is to combine gunpowder and electric acceleration by making a "muzzle attachment" in the form of a railgun on a conventional barrel, that is, 1800ms with gunpowder, and then a railgun. But there will be problems in the layout of the gun, and in cutting off the powder gases, so that the efficiency is not taken away by electrical breakdown on them.
        1. zenion
          zenion 13 October 2022 18: 14
          -1
          eule. It all depends on the cleanliness of the barrel and rifling, as well as the projectile. It would be nice not copper, but lead, but it melts. At the factory, one old man who made barrels did, but this was after the war, he covered the cutting device with his invention with something. It turned out to be a very slippery trunk, and he said that the stability of the trunk improved by 20 percent.
    2. Vladimir 290
      Vladimir 290 13 October 2022 08: 33
      0
      Yes, even at current speeds it is impossible. As far as I remember from the ammunition course, a modern sub-caliber projectile, when it hits the armor, behaves similarly to a liquid, that is, like, for example, when a jet of water is poured into a cup of water.
      1. NG inform
        NG inform 14 October 2022 01: 55
        0
        There are many simulations on YouTube, it is very interesting to see. The author of the article also said this (plastic alloys).
    3. NG inform
      NG inform 14 October 2022 01: 55
      0
      The speed limit of "powder" guns is about 2000 m / s. It has nothing to do with barrel wear.
  4. Vladimir_2U
    Vladimir_2U 13 October 2022 04: 43
    +1
    To be fair, I read in at least some reputable sources that "the probability of a rebound increases", no more. Basically, we are talking about a greater reduced thickness of the armor. By the way, this is clearly visible in the photo with the Chinese shell.


    they overcome it even better than the one installed vertically, due to the knocked-out “plug” in the final section of the penetration.
    Something did not understand the statement, what kind of cork and where did it go on the vertical armor?
    1. Edward Perov
      13 October 2022 07: 07
      +1
      Cork is an array of metal that is knocked out at the final section of penetration. It is clearly visible in the photo with the Chinese projectile. At the end of the penetration process, the channel of the hole sharply normalizes, that is, it becomes perpendicular to the armor, falling into the armored space. The thickness of this cork at an angle is very large, which cannot be achieved in a straight plate.
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 13 October 2022 08: 31
        0
        Quote: Eduard Perov
        Cork is an array of metal that is knocked out at the final section of penetration. It is clearly visible in the photo with the Chinese projectile.

        Clearly - the bulge at the bottom. hi
        Quote: Eduard Perov
        At the end of the penetration process, the channel of the hole sharply normalizes, that is, it becomes perpendicular to the armor, falling into the armored space. The thickness of this cork at an angle is very large, which cannot be achieved in a straight plate.
        I think that this is solved by the greater thickness and degree of heterogeneity of the plate. And the absence of a "cork" on a vertical sheet will not solve anything, because a shell would more than pierce it.
      2. Foul skeptic
        Foul skeptic 13 October 2022 16: 20
        0
        they are less sensitive to inclined armor and, if we are talking about a steel barrier, they overcome it even better than a vertical one, due to the “plug” knocked out at the final penetration site.

        What's with the "bump"? In inclined armor, the metal of the armor plate is simply washed out more easily from the channel formed when the projectile enters the plate, thereby not participating in the process of absorbing the energy of the projectile.
  5. KCA
    KCA 13 October 2022 06: 48
    0
    I didn’t understand, the tungsten alloy most used in military and industrial affairs is its oxide with cobalt - will it win, is it plastic? Get down and don't get up. Uranium is also very malleable in all its alloys, right? What can be ductile alloys for metals with high hardness?
    1. Grossvater
      Grossvater 13 October 2022 07: 09
      -1
      We got ahead. In general, the whole article resembles the classic: "I heard a ringing ...". Variations on the theme: the slope of the armor does not affect anything at all, they have been walking along the tyrnet for a very long time.
      1. Edward Perov
        13 October 2022 07: 24
        +2
        Yes, the professor and the former general director of the research institute did not hear the ringing, but decided to write a small chapter on ricochets about him in his book.

        The person did not know that he would be corrected in the comments. laughing
        1. Alt 22
          Alt 22 18 November 2022 08: 51
          -1
          I got great pleasure from reading the article, everything is accessible, concisely and logically presented in a language that is accessible even to non-professionals and non-scientists, thank you so much!
          You rarely see a combination of a good style, intelligence and knowledge of the topic!
          Write more!
    2. Edward Perov
      13 October 2022 07: 14
      +3
      You do not confuse armor with drills. There is no victory there and never was.

      Yes, alloys are plastic. When hitting the armor, the head part is plastically deformed and literally turns into a hinge, which does not allow the projectile to go up, as happens with solid cores. The result of this plasticity is that the core is smeared on the edges of the hole and loses its length. Roughly speaking, a core 500 mm long flew into the armor, and a piece 300 mm long flew out of it.
      1. Askold65
        Askold65 13 October 2022 15: 58
        0
        Quote: Eduard Perov
        Yes, alloys are plastic. When hitting the armor, the head part is plastically deformed and literally turns into a hinge, which does not allow the projectile to go up, as happens with solid cores. The result of this plasticity is that the core is smeared on the edges of the hole and loses its length. Roughly speaking, a core 500 mm long flew into the armor, and a piece 300 mm long flew out of it.

        Thanks for the article. But as I understand it, you told us about the effect of "plastic alloys", which are "smeared on the edges of the hole" in homogeneous armor. And how do such alloys behave in multilayer combined armor, consisting of materials of different structure. Will this cork get stuck somewhere between the sheets of such a package?
    3. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 October 2022 11: 27
      +1
      Quote: KCA
      I didn’t understand, the tungsten alloy most used in military and industrial affairs is its oxide with cobalt - will it win, is it plastic? Get down and don't get up. Uranium is also very malleable in all its alloys, right? What can be ductile alloys for metals with high hardness?

      Minus I corrected you. Himself about ten years ago ran into a similar rake. It turns out that plasticity and hardness of materials are different characteristics of the material.
      Sincerely.
      1. zenion
        zenion 13 October 2022 18: 19
        +1
        When on a lathe, the cutting speed increases, at high speeds, then the winner starts to melt, that VK, that TK.
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 October 2022 21: 13
          +1
          Quote: zenion
          When on a lathe, the cutting speed increases, at high speeds, then the winner starts to melt, that VK, that TK.

          Once, in my youth, I hung a clock in the boss's office! Under his strict guidance, "to the left or to the right" was found "petal". The Pobedite drill was soldered into the wall tightly, flush with the surface !!!
    4. Alexander Vorontsov
      Alexander Vorontsov 23 October 2022 11: 16
      0
      Quote: KCA
      I didn’t understand, the tungsten alloy most used in military and industrial affairs is its oxide with cobalt - will it win, is it plastic? Get down and don't get up. Uranium is also very malleable in all its alloys, right? What can be ductile alloys for metals with high hardness?

      This confusion arose due to the fact that the terminology from the technical literature that techies write for techies got into the public domain and people who do not specialize in physics can quite naturally misunderstand the context.

      For example, the cheapest ceramic bowl will have a higher hardness than a Japanese knife for 150 thousand.
      And with the cheapest hammer, you can endlessly hammer on the wall, but it will not crack (these are the characteristics of strength, impact strength and ductility).

      Or an analogy with a nail - it is important that when hitting it, if possible, it retains its structure and geometry and does not scatter into crumbs like ceramics, which are harder than both a hammer and a nail.

      Therefore, not only hardness is important, but a combination of characteristics.
      There is no sense in a ceramic nail, although its hardness will exceed the hardness of metal nails.
  6. Kostadinov
    Kostadinov 13 October 2022 11: 22
    +1
    So, no matter how strange it may sound, they are less sensitive to inclined armor and, if we are talking about a steel barrier, they overcome it even better than a vertically installed one, due to the “plug” knocked out at the final penetration site.

    1. It is impossible to overcome better inclined than vertical armor with any shells.
    2. It will bite the armor at a very large angle and inflict heavy damage for it, and the usual armor-piercing blunt-headed projectile is capable of if the armor is thinner enough than the caliber of the projectile.
    3. VLD Abrams 80 mm at 83 degrees will be very vulnerable to 125-152 mm cumulative ammunition from a long distance.
  7. Freeman
    Freeman 13 October 2022 13: 31
    +5
    Quote: Vladimir100
    Tanks are a dead end. Need some alternative.


    Eh! I didn’t want to “burn out” so that my “swallow” would not get into the mob. plans like SUVs, but - "I can not be silent!" feel

    Quote: merkava-2bet
    Such an extreme inclination of the frontal armored parts most susceptible to shelling is simply impossible, so we can say with confidence that the armor of modern tanks cannot give conditions for the ricochet of shells and cumulative jets.

    You tell this to M1 Abrams, with his VLD at an angle of 82 °.


    Instead of a thousand words ... wassat

  8. olgherd
    olgherd 13 October 2022 18: 50
    0
    Quote: Vladimir100
    Tanks are a dead end. Some alternative is needed.

    Warthander?
    I could not resist)))
  9. Roman Efremov
    Roman Efremov 13 October 2022 19: 25
    0
    Quote: Dead Day
    Can feathered sub-caliber shells or a cumulative jet "ricochet" from armor
    no.

    Absolutely not??? And if the armor plate is tilted 5 degrees from the horizontal (almost horizontal), will the core stick into it anyway? How about 3 degrees? On 2?
    1. agond
      agond 17 October 2022 09: 05
      0
      "A confident OBPS ricochet is possible only if the armor plate is located almost horizontally - no more than 10-11 degrees from the horizontal"
      Armor is known in the form of a vertical package of steel sheets laid at the required angle of 10 degrees, the sheets are laid with plastic and can slide and move relative to each other from the pressure created by the OBPS at the point of impact, while the OBPS begins to act on the lateral force causing it to ricochet over the layers of the package.
  10. TIR
    TIR 13 November 2022 17: 29
    -2
    Roofs and covers should not be done exactly horizontally, but with a slight slope. Then you can cover the top and reduce the height of the frontal parts. Let them be 5-10 cm lower in height than if the roofs were clearly horizontal, but in terms of mass, the gain will be several tons. Since the vertical frontal armor itself is heavy
  11. Andy_nsk
    Andy_nsk 30 November 2022 11: 32
    0
    I am trying to comprehend the physical prerequisites for why there is no rebound for BOPS. This is a tungsten crowbar, the density and hardness of which is much greater than that of steel, and it is embedded in steel, which is much more ductile than tungsten, like a plastic toothpick is stuck into plasticine. For a steel blank and armor, the ratio is different, the density is almost the same, and the hardness of an armor-piercing projectile is not much higher than the hardness of the armor, so ricochet is possible at a certain critical angle between the projectile and the armor.