Military Review

Better than Smith & Wesson: Mervyn & Hubert's revolver

80
There were revolvers very similar to each other in appearance, but very different in design. For example, the Mervyn and Hubert revolvers could easily be confused from a distance with the Smith and Wesson revolvers. Nevertheless, these were samples of completely different design. weapons.


Better than Smith & Wesson: Mervyn & Hubert's revolver
An impeccable sample of the "Mervyn and Hubert" revolver "Pocket army chambered for 44-40" Winchester "cartridges manufactured by" Hopkins & Allen ", which nickel-plated it so well that it looks like new even after so many years!
(Photo courtesy of Alain Daubresse website www.littlegun.be)


Forget about a thousand comrades,
And hundreds of other chimeras
You will never find a friend,
Than your combat revolver!

He was only lying in his pocket,
In the final decisive hour
You will never be deceived
He will never betray you!

(Adam Lindsay Gordon, Australian poet and politician)


Weapons and firms. We continue our cycle "Arms and Firms".

And today we will talk about a completely unusual revolver, which, however, has become widespread in the United States - the revolver of Mervyn and Hubert. And outwardly, these revolvers practically copied one to one revolvers "Smith and Wesson", so from a distance, for example, they could not be distinguished.

Cautionary tale


And, note that история this one is very instructive. It shows once again that no matter how perfect the design of this or that device is, there is always a way to improve it even more, although it would seem that everything imaginable has already been achieved.

What, for example, were the claims to the Smith and Wesson revolver, besides its great weight?

For example, that when unloading, its extractor does not disassemble - where are the spent cartridges, and where are the loaded cartridges, and throws out everything. This is the first thing.

The second is that the upper barrel mount with the drum is gradually loosened up. Well, and the fact that this revolver has a very long barrel. It should be shorter.

But how is it? You go into battle with one, but in everyday life, so to speak, do you use another? Do you want to buy two revolvers? Expensive and impractical! Now, if you could change a long barrel for a short one?

So, the company "Smith and Wesson" did not manage to eliminate all these remarks in metal. But "Mervyn and Hubert" did it!

And it so happened that Joseph Mervyn worked as chief designer for Mervyn Hubert, who, incidentally, was engaged in the production of firearms in 1856 in partnership with a certain man named Bray.

In 1874, Joseph Mervyn turned the company down and began to cooperate with brothers William and Milan Hubert - half co-owners of the arms business of the Hopkins & Allen company. This is how the company "Mervyn Hubert & Co" was born, which began the production of revolvers under the brand name "Hopkins & Allen". By the way, this is the reason why the legendary American criminal Jesse James is called the "Hopkins and Allen" revolver, although in fact he had a "Mervyn Hubert and K" revolver.


Mervyn & Bray advertisement.

At first, the name "Hopkins and Allen" (well, they were not very good weapons before that) did not contribute to good sales of new images, although the revolvers "Mervyn and Hubert" were excellent in quality. However, Hopkins & Allen were excellent nickel plating craftsmen, which made their weapons quite attractive. So over time, nickel-plated revolvers also, as they say, "went".


"Mervyn and Hubert" "Pocket Army" chambered for 44-40 "Winchester" cartridges manufactured by "Hopkins & Allen". In the photo in the position with the barrel and drum pulled forward. The handle is "bird's beak".
(Photo courtesy of Alain Daubresse website www.littlegun.be)

Revolvers "Mervyn and Hubert" were produced in several looks: "Frontier" with a large frame, "Army Pocket", "Pocket", "Pocket with a small frame" and a clone "Smith and Wesson" model 1 called "Baby Merlin".


Advertising of the company "Mervyn & Hubert". Please note that the revolver is named automatic for promotional purposes. Simple people were then, to be sure! By the way, the figure clearly shows how spent cartridges fall out of it.

Model "Frontier" was born in 1876 as a revolver with an open frame and a single action trigger, designed to compete directly with the "Colt" 1873. This model was made for the .44 "Russian" cartridge. In the hope of concluding a contract with the Russian government and taking it away from the Smith & Wesson firm.

The second model appeared in 1878 (produced from 1878 to 1882). It is similar to the first, but was designed to use the 44-40 Winchester cartridge (known as Winchester 1873).

In 1883, a third model appeared, produced between 1883 and 1887. This version had a plate in the upper part of the barrel with a mount, which closed on the frame. That is, the barrel with the drum was attached to this revolver not at two points, as before, but at three. In addition, it was produced in both single and double acting.

In 1887, the 4th model also received a top barrel mount and was offered with three barrels of 3½, 5½ and 7 inches. Since the barrels of this revolver were interchangeable, many buyers purchased the revolver with two barrels: a longer barrel and a 3½-inch.

Frontier revolvers were chambered for .44 "Mervyn and Hubert", .44 "Russian" and 44-40WCF. They featured a bird-beak handle known as the "Skull Crusher" with a steel shoulder underneath that could be used in hand-to-hand combat.

The small-bezel pocket model was a scaled-down version of the .32 Mervyn & Hubert pocket model with a five-shooter and a three-inch barrel.


Engraved revolver with mother-of-pearl handle and open bezel in .44 caliber
(Photo Milestone Auctions)

The firm produced the Baby Mervyn in vain, since it was, in fact, a copy of the Smith & Wesson No. 1 revolver chambered in .22 Short with a seven-shooter.

The firm "Smith & Wesson" considered this a violation of their rights and filed a lawsuit. She won the trial. So the losing side had to pay royalties for every revolver sold earlier. The remaining revolvers had the Mervyn and Hubert marks removed. And they were all transferred to Smith & Wesson for disposal.


Complete disassembly of the "Pocket Model" revolver "Mervyn and Hubert".
Photo from the instruction manual.

Design


Well, now let's take a closer look at the very design of this revolver. Let's figure out what exactly allows us to speak of it as a weapon more perfect than the Smith and Wesson revolver.

The key innovation of all revolvers of this system, without exception, was the barrel rotating on the axis. That allowed the owner of the revolver to turn it 90 degrees, pull it forward with the drum and thus remove the spent cartridges. But only shot. Unused cartridges remained in the drum.

The fact is that in the Smith and Wesson revolver, the extractor was under the barrel, pushed forward by the force of the spring, then moved inward when the revolver was closed. In this case, all cartridges in the drum were extracted simultaneously.

Not so in the Mervyn & Hubert revolver. On it, the extractor disk was located on the axis of the drum at its very breech. When loading, the cartridges fell on it with their rims. And then, when the drum slid off them, they just fell out. But the cartridges with bullets remained in the drum, since the drum was extended exactly to the length of the empty sleeve.


This photo clearly shows the lower locking assembly of the frame and the button with which it could be opened.
(Photo courtesy of Alain Daubresse website www.littlegun.be)

The tight tolerances on the surface finish created a vacuum inside the axis. So, when the barrel and cylinder were pulled forward, it literally made the assembly retract back and click into place as soon as the barrel and drum were released.

In addition to this unique unloading system, pressing the barrel latch lever on the left side allowed the wearer to fully remove the barrel. This not only made cleaning easier, but also allowed the owner to swap barrels. In other words, use shorter barrels for concealed carry and longer combat barrels on the same revolver.

By the way, this revolver was also much easier to care for than the same Smith & Wesson. After all, he understood only three details. Of course, this precision required tight manufacturing tolerances - incredible for the tools of the day. But, nevertheless, we managed to get them!


Jesse James' revolver, 1873, with a Skullcrusher grip. The locking button for attaching the barrel and drum is clearly visible (it had to be moved to the trigger bracket) and the key located above, by pressing which the barrel was removed.

True, you have to pay for everything in life.

So, the revolvers of this company also had a certain, although not too significant (again, at that time) drawback: they were slowly loaded. That is, the casings were thrown out of them all at once, but the cartridges had to be inserted one at a time, for this, moving the latch on the body to the right. It was impossible otherwise, because even if someone had contrived and inserted the cartridges from the open drum, their caps would still rest against the extractor disk, and the revolver would have been impossible to close.


Downward sliding striker plate. As you can see, "Abadi's door" is not used here!
(Photo courtesy of Alain Daubresse website www.littlegun.be)

But since at that time almost all revolvers were loaded in the same way, no one paid much attention to this. For example, the police of different states armed with revolvers "Mervyn and Hubert" in the USA and were very pleased with them. They were also loved by gunfighters - both positive and negative characters of the Wild West, sheriffs and marshals who did not hesitate to pay a hundred dollars for them (while the same "Colt Peacemaker" cost only 12).


Another advertisement for a double-action Mervyn & Hubert revolver with a folding hammer spoke and two interchangeable barrels.

By the way, the release of small-caliber pocket samples at that time was fully justified: this was the demand of the market.

The fact is that people then washed much less often than now. And very rarely changed clothes. Therefore, bullets (even of small caliber), passing through the body, captured its fibers with a bunch of bacteria. Therefore, in combination with a primitive and often even completely absent medical care, death from infection was then more than real. So, even a modest .22 caliber was by no means as useless in those days as it is considered today.


This photo clearly shows how the cartridges are retained in the drum. Once the drum is fully pushed forward, the extractor ring can no longer hold the empty casings and they fall out. But the bullet cartridges remain in the drum. The bullets remaining in the chambers do not allow them to fall out.
(Photo courtesy of Alain Daubresse website www.littlegun.be)

PS
The author and administration of the VO website would like to express their heartfelt gratitude to Alain Daubresse for the information and photographs provided.
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  1. Hunter 2
    Hunter 2 12 January 2021 18: 07
    +6
    Excellent, Vyacheslav Olegovich - Pleased with a good article in the evening! good We will re-read and delve into the intricacies, and of course the Favorites!
  2. Thrifty
    Thrifty 12 January 2021 18: 16
    +4
    And how was he with the impact? More deadly than Smith and Wesson? Did the barrel wedge during the turn? Although, I liked the idea of ​​a rotating barrel too! hi PS - thanks for the article, but it is small, many aspects are not covered. ..
    1. kalibr
      12 January 2021 18: 20
      +10
      Quote: Thrifty
      Did the barrel wedge during the turn?

      If wedged, it would be noted. And then there were no such comments. And little ... I barely found this material. 44 Russian rounds, barrel length as Smith & Wesson. So the return is the same.
      1. Thrifty
        Thrifty 12 January 2021 18: 40
        0
        Caliber - so what about destructive power and recoil when firing? hi
        1. kalibr
          12 January 2021 19: 25
          +10
          Quote: Thrifty
          Caliber - so what about destructive power and recoil when firing?

          I don't know, I didn't shoot. The American police were pleased.
      2. venik
        venik 12 January 2021 18: 44
        +9
        Quote: kalibr
        And little ... I barely found this material.

        ========
        Clear! I have never heard ANYTHING about these revolvers! And the models are INTERESTING!
        Thank you! good
      3. The leader of the Redskins
        The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 19: 05
        +4
        I never tire of thanking you, Vyacheslav Olegovich, for the interesting reading. That's a paradox - I was never interested in revolvers, well, except for the revolver, but I still read with interest!))
      4. Crowe
        Crowe 12 January 2021 19: 29
        +12
        If wedged, it would be noted. And then there were no such comments.

        Yes, there were practically no comments. During the tests by the State Artillery Council, described by Arthur Corbin Gould in his 1888 book "American Pistols and Revolvers", the revolver was tested for work with dust and corrosion. First, it was sprinkled with fine sand and wiped by hand, after which he fired 12 shots, and at the same time freely reloaded and fired. Then the revolver was again covered with sand and made another 12 shots, all with the same good result. To check the action of the revolver in corrosion, it was cleaned of nickel plating and grease, and then placed on 10 minutes in a solution of ammonia. They took it out and let it lie in the open air for 48 hours. The revolver fired 12 test shots without any delay. Thought. Complicated. After all sorts of bullying (when the revolver turned into a piece of rusty iron), the testers fired all the same 12 cartridges. The test results were considered good.
        the name "Hopkins and Allen" (well, they weren't very good weapons before that) did not contribute to good sales of new images, although the revolvers "Mervyn and Hubert" were excellent in quality.

        Indeed, many later noted with some degree of regret that if Joseph Merwin and Halberts had not marked these revolvers with the brand of the manufacturer Hopkins and Allen (as you rightly noted from well-known manufacturers of inexpensive, but low-quality weapons), then Merwin & Hulbert would have been today also known as "Colt", "Smith & Wesson", "Remington" ...
  3. John22
    John22 12 January 2021 18: 40
    +10
    Yes, original design. Although, it was said that it is widespread in the states, but here it is little or completely unknown. Only A.B. Beetle in the book showed such a scheme for extracting spent cartridges. And in the description of revolvers, he is called Mervyn - Galbert.
    1. Astra wild2
      Astra wild2 12 January 2021 20: 09
      +7
      I have this book, but I have not memorized these extraction systems.
      1. John22
        John22 12 January 2021 20: 16
        +8
        Books by A.B. The beetle must be read and studied. In Soviet times, it was a window to the world of weapons. This is now the expanse of information, and then his books were a treasure.
        1. Astra wild2
          Astra wild2 12 January 2021 20: 20
          +7
          Her husband bought it in the 90s, I still grumbled then: cash was always, and then it was completely "tight". Then I got used to it, now the "girlfriend" is leafing through it
  4. Catfish
    Catfish 12 January 2021 18: 40
    +13
    Good evening friends. hi
    Thanks to Vyacheslav for the new thing that I learned about an old friend.
    So, the company "Smith and Wesson" did not manage to eliminate all these remarks in metal.

    A little later, all this was done by the grandson of Daniel Wesson in the company he founded Dan Wesson, the engineer Carl Lewis designed a new revolver, and it was produced under the name "Dan Wesson Model 12".

    Then a number of models of the same design were released - Model 15, Model 715 and Dan Wesson SuperMag model.
    Revolvers were produced from the late sixties to the early 21st century.
    1. Nikolaevich I
      Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 19: 17
      +9
      Quote: Sea Cat
      A little later, all this was done by the grandson of Daniel Wesson in the company he founded Dan Wesson,

      Eh, Constantine! A little ahead of me! But I'll get it back on the video!
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 12 January 2021 19: 22
        +8
        Volodya, hello! It was a provocation. I am writing a scribble and thinking to myself, well, Nikolaitch cannot but respond. smile
        By the way, you don't know what the name of Daniel's grandson was, I couldn't find it. After all, in memory of his grandfather, he named his typewriter Dan Wesson.
        1. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 21: 49
          +5
          Quote: Sea Cat
          After all, in memory of his grandfather, he named his typewriter Dan Wesson.

          Duc ... the point is that his name was the same ... Daniel Wesson ... only the second! That is to say, Daniel Wesson II! wink Only in articles he is called ... either a grandson, then a great-grandson! You can't figure it out without half a liter! Well, this thing is fixable ... tomorrow is Old New Year! Holiday greetings ! hi
          1. Catfish
            Catfish 12 January 2021 21: 58
            +4
            And you, too, with the Coming! smile Let's raise a glass to the Wesson family, they still made and are making good revolvers. Well, and for Horatio Smith. drinks
  5. Dimide
    Dimide 12 January 2021 18: 46
    +10
    Ingenious design and nothing to say
    1. Dimide
      Dimide 12 January 2021 21: 43
      +2
      A bit off topic, today I looked at the Desert Eagle as the "pepperbox" shoots, from charging to hitting the target
  6. Crowe
    Crowe 12 January 2021 18: 55
    +16
    Thank you, as always interesting!
    They were also loved by gunfighters - both positive and negative characters of the Wild West, sheriffs and marshals


    This photograph, taken in 1879 in Leadville, Colorado, shows two famous people in the Wild West: on the left is Joseph "White Eye" Anderson, who accompanied Wild Bill Hickock to Deadwood in 1876, and his friend E.B. Yankee Judd. Judd is armed with a Merwin & Hulbert revolver holstered.

    And this (I'm not afraid of a word) was a work of art presented to Konstantin Nikolaevich, who is a great prince and admiral-general of the Russian Fleet.
    1. Nikolaevich I
      Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 22: 12
      +7

      There is a video about the gift revolver ...
    2. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 January 2021 11: 42
      +1
      Is the plate more recent? Without "yatey"!
  7. Alien From
    Alien From 12 January 2021 19: 05
    +8
    Vyacheslav Olegovich! Simply the Coolest series of articles! Respect hi
    1. kalibr
      12 January 2021 19: 37
      +8
      The next article will be about Galan ... already on moderation.
      1. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 22: 52
        +6
        Vyacheslav Olegovich! There is one "situation" on which I can not collect the necessary information ... this is Sails Crispin's revolver! This gana reflects another attempt to circumvent Smith-Wesson's rights ... You may be better able to figure out the info!
        1. kalibr
          13 January 2021 08: 00
          +4
          Quote: Nikolaevich I
          Vyacheslav Olegovich! There is one "situation" on which I can not collect the necessary information ... this is Sails Crispin's revolver! This gana reflects another attempt to circumvent Smith-Wesson's rights ... You may be better able to figure out the info!

          Already done. All the information is there. But in order to get high-quality photos of the object, you need to request the Smithsonian Institution, and they are very difficult to work with and they ... they require payment for everything. Let's see what comes out of me ...
  8. Undecim
    Undecim 12 January 2021 19: 19
    +13
    And it so happened that Joseph Mervyn worked as chief designer for Mervyn Hubert, who, incidentally, was engaged in the production of firearms in 1856 in partnership with a certain man named Bray.
    Here you, Vyacheslav Olegovich, are a little "lost" in the labyrinths of the American arms business, which is not surprising, given how many firms existed there.
    The firm Merwin & Bray was founded by Joseph Mervyn and a certain Bray, whose traces have not yet been found. The company produced Cupfire revolvers.

    The company ceased operations with the end of the Civil War.
    Hopkins & Allen was founded in 1868 by a group of founders: Charles W. Allen, Charles A. Converse, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins, Charles W. Hopkins.
    In 1874 Charles A. Converse, who owned 50% of the assets, sold his stake in the company to the brothers William and Milan Hulbert. This is how Merwin, Hulbert, and Co.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 12 January 2021 19: 29
      +14
      Illustration from the book MODERN AMERICAN PISTOL AND REVOLVER 1888.
  9. Flooding
    Flooding 12 January 2021 19: 22
    +13
    I still remember my first revolver, piston.
    I just forgot how much the caps cost then.
    Something about 20 kopecks per pack.
    1. Mordvin 3
      Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 23: 11
      +5
      Quote: Flood
      I still remember my first revolver, piston.

      At first I had a piston submachine gun, then something like a TT, piston, and then a Nagant, like that.
      1. Flooding
        Flooding 13 January 2021 00: 05
        +5
        My father served in the police.
        When he brought me a toy Mauser, I was sure that I was holding a combat pistol.
        It was pure puppy delight.
        1. Mordvin 3
          Mordvin 3 13 January 2021 00: 10
          +5
          Quote: Flood
          When he brought me a toy Mauser, I was sure that I was holding a combat pistol.

          When I was accepted as a pioneer, my pocket was weighed out by a copy of the PM, made of cast iron, two kilos. It is good that it is not made of lead, I saw such forms of plaster for casting in the forest.
          1. Flooding
            Flooding 13 January 2021 00: 12
            +3
            Quote: Mordvin 3
            , my pocket was weighed out by a copy of the PM, made of cast iron, two kilos.

            Precisely, the boys had such in use. Remembered.
            And in a rather masterful performance.
  10. The comment was deleted.
  11. Astra wild2
    Astra wild2 12 January 2021 19: 45
    +6
    Vyacheslav Olegovich, accidentally pressed "armament" and here you are.
    Regarding: "22 gauge was by no means at that time, so useless" in my 22 gauge - 5,45 mm, very biting.
    I understand that 5,45 AK has a lot of energy, but PSM is also quite good. It is rather weak for the front, but good for self-defense. The coolest hulk will not want to swallow such a "seed".
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 12 January 2021 19: 51
      +8
      22 caliber - 5,45 mm
      Caliber .22 is 5,56 mm
      1. Mordvin 3
        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 19: 54
        +2
        Quote: Undecim
        Caliber .22 is 5,56 mm

        And I always thought that this is an ordinary small 5,6 side fight.
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 14
          +3
          There is no side fight, there is annular ignition.
          .22 LR, 5,6 × 15,6 mm - civilian cartridge.
          The military has 5,56.
          1. Mordvin 3
            Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 20: 16
            +4
            Quote: Undecim
            There is no side fight, there is annular ignition.

            That on the forehead, that on the forehead. Sideways. wink
            1. Undecim
              Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 19
              +5
              This is roughly the same as calling the hole indicated in the drawing as a hole. For a janitor - a Tajik - it doesn't matter, but an engineer won't understand.
              1. Mordvin 3
                Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 20: 24
                +7
                Quote: Undecim
                This is roughly the same as calling the hole indicated in the drawing as a hole.

                I don't quite agree. Whatever one may say, but the firing pin beats sideways. Even though there is rimfire. crying
                Quote: Undecim
                but the engineer will not understand.

                And the engineer will tell you where the hole is and where the hole is. winked
                1. Undecim
                  Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 35
                  +6
                  Whatever one may say, but the firing pin beats sideways.
                  And in the revolver it hits upwards. How to be here? Or is the top a kind of side?
                  1. Mordvin 3
                    Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 20: 39
                    +3
                    Quote: Undecim
                    And in the revolver it hits upwards. How to be here? Or is the top a kind of side?

                    Eh, no. Where up? The point of impact is usually in the center of the cartridge. Or depending on the cartridge.
                    1. Undecim
                      Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 44
                      +4
                      If the rimfire revolver is also in the center?
                      1. Mordvin 3
                        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 20: 46
                        +3
                        Quote: Undecim
                        If the rimfire revolver is also in the center?

                        Who are you kidding me? wink
                        Quote: Mordvin 3
                        depending on the cartridge.
                      2. Undecim
                        Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 47
                        +4
                        That is, still up, which is also a side?
                      3. Mordvin 3
                        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 20: 52
                        +3
                        Quote: Undecim
                        That is, still up, which is also a side?

                        And the bottom will also be sideways if you turn it. Now you got to the bottom ... Everything from the center has a side. If you turn. Huh?
                      4. Undecim
                        Undecim 12 January 2021 20: 59
                        +2
                        Side - one of the sides of an object, except for the top and bottom, front and back sides of it.
                        This is from the dictionary.
                      5. Mordvin 3
                        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 21: 02
                        +4
                        Quote: Undecim
                        This is from the dictionary.

                        Here, a vigorous trough, you dig deeper into terms ... crying Well, let it be rimfire, I don't mind at all. crying
                      6. Undecim
                        Undecim 12 January 2021 21: 05
                        +4
                        I'm glad I was able to convince you. True, Tajiks are not happy, but these are trifles.
                      7. Mordvin 3
                        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 21: 09
                        +2
                        Quote: Undecim
                        I'm glad I was able to convince you.

                        Oh-oh-oh .... You should work as a teacher-worker. laughing
                      8. Undecim
                        Undecim 12 January 2021 21: 19
                        +5
                        I still remember mine. He taught us a lot.
                      9. Mordvin 3
                        Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 22: 37
                        +2
                        Quote: Undecim
                        I still remember mine.

                        So do I.
        2. hohol95
          hohol95 12 January 2021 21: 17
          +7
          And the dent is always on the side ...
        3. Mordvin 3
          Mordvin 3 12 January 2021 22: 44
          +4
          Quote: hohol95
          And the dent is always on the side ...

          laughing good drinks
          It was Viktor Nikolaich who clung to me. winked
        4. hohol95
          hohol95 12 January 2021 22: 45
          +4
          It happens. We can all cling sometimes ...
  • Kote Pan Kokhanka
    Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 January 2021 15: 51
    +2
    Quote: Undecim
    Whatever one may say, but the firing pin beats sideways.
    And in the revolver it hits upwards. How to be here? Or is the top a kind of side?

    VikNik want to stand up for Vladimir!
    Cartridge (side fight, fire).


    Rimfire cartridge.

    I was taught that somewhere like that!
    Regards, Vlad!
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 13 January 2021 16: 21
      +4
      Doesn't work. The Lefoshe cartridge is a hairpin or Pinfire.
  • Undecim
    Undecim 12 January 2021 21: 02
    +6
    Oh, offended Tajik wipers minus !!!
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 January 2021 15: 52
      +3
      Quote: Undecim
      Oh, offended Tajik wipers minus !!!

      I maliciously give you a "plus"!
  • hohol95
    hohol95 12 January 2021 21: 04
    +6
    One foreman called THIS a mink and passed the safety exam successfully!
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 12 January 2021 21: 07
      +7
      No matter how many exams on labor protection have not passed - the question about THIS has never come across. Bad luck.
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 12 January 2021 21: 11
        +3
        The main thing is not to get asked about the "indicator" and "voltage indicator" when handing over electrical safety ... Or to show the "goose step" to fight with step voltage ... This is where the people tore all the "templates"!
      2. hohol95
        hohol95 12 January 2021 21: 19
        +7
        They did not want to torture the elderly foreman and, having shown the details with a hole on the drawing, asked what it was called. He answered - mink.
      3. Captain Pushkin
        Captain Pushkin 14 January 2021 13: 03
        0
        Quote: Undecim
        How many did not pass labor protection exams

        Didn't give up or didn’t give up? This is a different meaning. I didn’t give it up - I did it ...
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 14 January 2021 13: 35
          +1
          Fair remark. But ignorance of the device does not cancel the trunks.
  • AUL
    AUL 13 January 2021 10: 22
    +1
    Quote: Undecim
    For a janitor - a Tajik - it doesn't matter, but an engineer won't understand.

    He will understand, but he will say: The hole is in your well ... and the mechanism has a hole!
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 13 January 2021 10: 30
      +3
      Oh, now the Tajiks will throw some cons to you in the fight for the right to call a hole a hole.
      1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
        Kote Pan Kokhanka 13 January 2021 15: 54
        +3
        Quote: Undecim
        Oh, now the Tajiks will throw some cons to you in the fight for the right to call a hole a hole.

        There is another option - click!
        1. Fat
          Fat 14 January 2021 12: 39
          +2
          hi Well, it is necessary, as soon as the "opening" (this is technically competent) is not called ... wassat good
  • Astra wild2
    Astra wild2 12 January 2021 20: 15
    +4
    Moreover, is the cartridge more powerful? At least Magnum is a pretty serious thing. So my colleague told me: "horse, Ludaved"
  • Bormanxnumx
    Bormanxnumx 12 January 2021 20: 07
    +7
    Quote: Astra wild2
    Regarding: "22 gauge was by no means at that time, so useless" in my 22 gauge - 5,45 mm, very biting.
    I understand that 5,45 AK has a lot of energy, but PSM is quite good.

    In the described time period, a 22-gauge pistol cartridge is not even a .22lr, but a .22long or even a .22 short.
    1. yehat2
      yehat2 12 January 2021 22: 39
      +1
      besides the size of the cartridge itself, there were questions about gunpowder.
  • Astra wild2
    Astra wild2 12 January 2021 20: 06
    +5
    Vyacheslav Olegovich, you say that "better than Smith Weight" is really very original invented: the barrel has changed and the "new" old revolver.
    At the same time: "SW" is still alive, "Mervyn & Hubert" has not stood the test of time. Why? Perhaps financial difficulties, perhaps the heirs were unable to manage the company. And Mrs Colt did it
  • Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 21: 56
    +4
    Fir-trees! To the delight of VO readers, there have been so many "weapon" articles lately that I began to think about changing my avatar? Just to consult with the people ... suddenly they will be considered not modest enough ... or not according to feng shui ...
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 12 January 2021 22: 27
      +5
      And what is the joy of such an avatar?
      Better something really joyful.
      1. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 12 January 2021 22: 41
        +1
        Well ... convinced! yes I will not change! No. Is that "about revolvers" ... and nothing more! request
  • yehat2
    yehat2 12 January 2021 22: 37
    -4
    waiting for an article about a nickel-plated machine gun that is better than the mg-42 am
  • Andrey Pozdnyakov
    Andrey Pozdnyakov 13 January 2021 11: 00
    0
    Why Hubert? I was always sure that Halbert reads correctly
    1. kalibr
      13 January 2021 11: 45
      0
      Because Wikipedia gives it
    2. Fat
      Fat 14 January 2021 12: 45
      +1
      In English there is such a thing as "spelling", in short, sometimes, "Liverpool is written, but Manchester is read" (c) ... yes