Military Review

Kofer: man, revolver, rifle

74

Here it is: the long-awaited and original Kofer revolver. Frame lettering


Little is known about this man, not only in our country, but also in his homeland, in the United States. And all because he did, on the one hand, really little, and on the other, a big step forward in the development of small arms weapons... Only in this race he was immediately overtaken. And once you have overtaken, it means that you become one of the laggards. And who is interested in them? Is that only historians, and then - after many years.

However, we also found people at VO, and in considerable numbers, who were interested, first of all, in his revolver. And so they asked me to write about him. Moreover, the topic of the weapons of the southern states in the war of 1861-1865. the story about him fits completely.

Here is just a problem with the illustrative material. The photos that exist are copyright, and the end of their authorship can not be found. There are photos from auctions, but they have their own specifics - most simply do not answer, unless you want to buy something from them. As a result, I had to turn to the relevant literature. Books such as Confederate Weapons (William A. Ambach III and Edward N. Simmons. Stockpole Company, Harrisburg, PA) and Confederate Long Barrels and Pistols (Richard Tylor Hill and Richard Edward Anthony. Charlotte Publishing, North Caroline). Moreover, it turned out that the materials published by them are practically identical.


Here is one of these books: Confederate Long-Barreled Weapons and Pistols. Richard Taylor Hill and Richard Edward Anthony. Charlotte Publishing. North Carolina

Well, now you can tell about Kofer himself ...

According to family genealogical records, the ancestors of Thomas W. Cofer settled in Tidewater, Virginia around the middle of the XNUMXth century, near what is now Smithfield, Isle of Wight. As for the surname, it was written as Copfer in various records until the end of the XNUMXth century, but then “p” was somehow lost and they began to write simply Cofer.

Kofer: man, revolver, rifle

Note that this was the time when patents for the improvement of weapons poured like a horn of plenty. For example, one of these "improvements": the revolver of GV Gedney dated July 29, 1862. The hardener is activated on it not by a lever, but by a trigger guard. He shoots paper cartridges with a glued-in bullet. And he also has only one brand tube directly under the trigger, on which the capsule must be put on before firing. Very economical design.

Thomas Rennes Kofer himself was born on March 22, 1828. He did not receive a long education, like any farm guy in those days, but he learned to read and write, and everyone notes his handwriting as excellent. In addition, he was able to write clear and convincing letters, which even today is given to many with considerable difficulty.


Original patent by Brethel and Frisbee for a top-trigger revolver.

Kofer had a cousin Pembroke Decatur Gwaltney who became a gunsmith. Moreover, in 1859, when Kofer was 31 years old, his brother already had his own arms company, PD Gwaltney & Company. Although it is understandable that it is quite small.

It is quite logical to assume that young Kofer was apprenticed to his cousin at a fairly early age. Later he began to work with him on a partnership basis. And then independently. He first worked in Portsmouth, then moved to Norfolk.

There was at that time Oruzheiny Boulevard, and 8th Union Street was both the city center and a business center at the same time. And it was there that his company was located, known as TW Cofer & Co from Portsmouth. And it is obvious that he was quite capable of producing a number of quite high quality revolvers. But he, apparently, never sought either to obtain a state contract for their manufacture, or to state or private financial support for their production.

One can only assume that Kofer was satisfied with the income he received from repairing and selling weapons in Norfolk at the start of the war, and made no real attempt to expand his business. However, already on July 19, 1861 (that is, just 49 days after the creation of the federal patent office of the Confederation) Kofer applied for a patent.


And here is the patent of Kofer himself. Filed July 19, 1861. Received August 12, 1861.

On paperwork, he used the services of a certain James S. French of Washington, who had been associated with the United States Patent Office for many years, and advertised in the Richmond newspapers. And Mr. French really knew his business, since Kofer received his patent. The ninth in a row issued by the Confederate Patent Office. And at the same time in the shortest possible time: August 12, that is, just 25 days after the submission of documents.

In doing so, he even managed to bypass Rollin White's patent, although for the Confederate Patent Office this, most likely, did not matter at all and did not matter in principle.


Diagram from Kofer patent.

The working model, which was required under Confederate patent law, was to be a revolver made under the Cofer patent, as shown in the patent.


Revolver Kofer, Type I and next to it its cartridges.
Photo from the book "Long-Barreled Weapons and Confederate Pistols."

But was this revolver produced, that's what matters?

Regarding the answer to this question, it is known that in March 1862, a division of the Confederate Signal Corps of 127 people was formed in Norfolk. After that, many years later, a revolver with a holster and with the inscription:

"On July 21, 1864, this revolver and holster were captured from the Rebel liaison officer, Captain S. H. Merrill, 11th Maine."

We know Norfolk and Portsmouth were captured by the Yankees on May 9, 1862. And with them the Kofer enterprise.

But between these dates there were about 42 weeks, during which it was quite possible to start producing it. Focusing on the average labor input, American historians believe that during this time 140 pieces of Kofer revolvers could have been produced.

Until recently, it was also believed that, since Kofer never had contracts with the Confederate army, all of his products were sold only on the civilian market. However, according to recent discoveries in the archives of the Confederation, Kofer received at least one order from the southern state government for 82 revolvers at $ 40 each, which were transferred to the 5th Virginia Cavalry.

After the end of the war, Kofer was listed as a gunsmith in the Norfolk-Portsmouth reference books from 1869 to 1875. He first worked in Market Square and then at 13 Union Street in Norfolk.

He died on July 23, 1885 at the age of 57 and was buried in the old Oak Grove Cemetery in Portsmouth. Oddly enough, his family remembers him not for being a gunsmith, but for inventing a mechanism for dispersing common houseflies.
Today, of course, we are accustomed to window grids, but then this invention of his enjoyed a moderate but success. From time to time, these machines can still be found in antique stores.

TV Kofer remains for us, in the final analysis, a figure visible through the "tarnished glass". He appeared only momentarily, thanks to a handful of revolvers and cartridges, his patent, several letters, army orders and court notices. But the fact that he also did something important on the way to modern and advanced small arms systems is undoubted.


Disassembled Kofer revolver Type I. The structure of his drum is clearly visible. Only two of them have survived to this day - the 36th and 33rd caliber. How many of them were released in total is unknown.

Now let's see what is so special about Thomas Kofer? And how did he manage to get around Rollin White's seemingly impenetrable patent?

At first glance, this is a regular .36 caliber revolver with a simple shiny brass frame, a blued steel barrel and cylinder. The barrel is octagonal along its entire length, and the cylinder has six chambers.

The manufacturer's name "TW COFER'S PATENT 1861" is stamped in two lines on the top of the frame, and "PORTSMOUTH, VA" is on the top of the case.


At first glance, the drum of a Kofer revolver looks like one whole. But in reality this is not at all the case.
Photo from the book "Long-Barreled Weapons and Confederate Pistols."

But the most interesting thing, however, is in the Kofer revolver inside the drum. The fact is that it consists of two parts and only the first part has chambers drilled through. The second part has a smaller diameter holes for the primers. Thus, being interconnected. Namely, this was the only way the Kofer drum could function without violating Rollin White's patent.


Cartridges of the second type.
Photo from the book "Long-Barreled Weapons and Confederate Pistols."

For this drum, Kofer also created special metal cartridges of two types at once.

In the first type, the cartridge had the form of a cylinder with a draft tube protruding from the back, on which a conventional capsule was put on. The cartridge itself was inserted into the front of the drum, but the brand tube with the capsule fell into the holes in the rear. It is believed that when assembled, such a cartridge was dangerous if dropped or hit. Therefore, a circuit cap was invented for the capsule.

On the second type, the manufacturer changed the shape of the sleeve, making a recess in its rear part, inside which the brand tube was located. Now she was protected from impact by the sides of the hull. For this cartridge, Kofer invented a revolver with a drum from one piece with holes of a smaller diameter in the back for brand tubes with primers. In fact, it was already a real unitary cartridge only now without a rim.

The improved design, in which the drum was a single piece instead of two parts, was embodied in Type II. Even fewer such revolvers have survived - only one. Since it does not have a serial number, the researchers assume that it was a prototype that never went into production.


Revolver Kofer, type III.
Photo from the book "Long-Barreled Weapons and Confederate Pistols."

The third type of Kofer revolver is a conventional capsule revolver with a recooler, similar to all other revolvers of that time. From most of the Kolt army revolvers, he, like all other Kofer models, differed only in the nipple trigger and a solid brass frame.


Stamp on the frame.
Photo from the book "Long-Barreled Weapons and Confederate Pistols."

To date, only 13 Kofer revolvers are known, about most of which there is practically no information. They are very rarely put up for sale by antique dealers, but if they do appear on the market, then their price is always higher than that of any other weapon of the Confederate States. It happens that they cost $ 100 or more.

More recently, an original rifle of his own design and under his own original cartridge was also discovered.

It was arranged very simply: a rectangular frame with the same through hole was screwed onto the table in the breech, in which the bolt moves across the body from right to left - a massive rectangular piece of metal drilled through for a long striker. At the bottom it has a leaf spring that holds the bolt in place. The hammer is located behind the frame. And that's all.

The identification mark is located on the left side of the block and includes the inscription “TW COFER” (inlaid with gold semi-italics) and “PAT. 12 august 1861 "above the inscription" PORTSMOUTH, VA ". (A notable feature of the lettering is that it turns upside down when the shutter unit is inserted in place.)

And the date of August 12, 1861 is significant in that Kofer on this day received a patent No. 9 of the Confederate States of America for his revolver.

However, what does the revolver patent have to do with this rifle? It is completely incomprehensible. Unless she fired his own revolving cartridges.

PS


The author expresses his heartfelt gratitude to V.N. Popov for his assistance in preparing materials for this article, without which work on it could have dragged on for a much longer period.
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  1. Simargl
    Simargl 10 January 2021 05: 44
    +10
    https://topwar.ru/uploads/posts/2020-12/1609047868_8_-revolver-kofera-tip-i-v-razobrannom-vide.jpg
    Disassembled Kofer Revolver Type I
    It is not completely disassembled: its frame is torn and the barrel is torn out.
  2. Hunter 2
    Hunter 2 10 January 2021 06: 58
    +9
    Well, that's it, Nikolaevich has a holiday today drinks !!! For a very long time He was waiting for an article about Kofer and He Himself helped with the materials on it, for which Thanks to him as well as Vyacheslav Olegovich hi.
    Yes, Rarity - This rare sample of Confederate weapons really does not get on the market, well-known samples wander from one "closed" collection to another, a dream for Weapons Collectors ... Article - Excellent, deservedly goes to the Favorites folder!
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 10 January 2021 07: 41
      +7
      I join Alexey!
      Vyacheslav Olegovich and Viktor Nikolaevich are just great fellows, they fulfilled the aspirations of the regulars of the "branch" for coffee with milk, and even Sunday!
      Let's count - the day was a success, hello everyone!
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 10 January 2021 12: 15
      +6
      Alexey, hi. hi
      What kind of Nikolaevich did you mean? As I understand it, Viktor Nikolaevich helped Vyacheslav "with the materials", and Vladimir "waited a long time for the article." love This is me not as a boring thing, but for justice. drinks
      1. Hunter 2
        Hunter 2 10 January 2021 12: 23
        +5
        Quote: Sea Cat
        Alexey, hi. hi
        What kind of Nikolaevich did you mean?

        belay Oops! We'll have to declare Gratitude - All Nikolaevich fellow it's too late to sort them!
        Greetings Konstantin hi !
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 10 January 2021 12: 30
          +4
          Right! "An affectionate word and the cat is pleased" (c) smile drinks
  3. 3x3zsave
    3x3zsave 10 January 2021 07: 44
    +8
    82 revolvers for $ 40 each
    Something a little expensive ... Or inflation?
    Thank you, Vyacheslav Olegovich and Victor Nikolaevich!
    1. Hunter 2
      Hunter 2 10 January 2021 07: 55
      +6
      Quote: 3x3zsave
      82 revolvers for $ 40 each
      Something a little expensive ... Or inflation?

      Anton Greetings hi ! By the way, indeed, Kofer cost twice as much ($ 40 and, respectively, $ 20) no less interesting Savage revolver! Perhaps this is the mystery of his "small-scale" production!
      1. 3x3zsave
        3x3zsave 10 January 2021 08: 04
        +6
        Hello, Alexey!
        Or corruption?
        In general, I just started thinking: what banknotes were in circulation in the Confederation?
        1. Hunter 2
          Hunter 2 10 January 2021 08: 21
          +6
          Quote: 3x3zsave

          Or corruption?
          In general, I just started thinking: what banknotes were in circulation in the Confederation?

          In my opinion, the volume of issued revolvers is too "insignificant" for corruption, although ...
          Since the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederates began to produce their own dollars, both Banknotes and Coins, only inflation in four years of the war became simply prohibitive! This raises the question ... $ 40 - Which ones? request
          1. bubalik
            bubalik 10 January 2021 08: 28
            +7
            only inflation in four years of war has become simply prohibitive

            inflation during the war jumped to 4000 percent in the South (in the North, prices rose by only 60 percent during the war). So, the banknotes of the South were essentially government loan bonds, which were planned to be redeemed six months after the conclusion of the peace (which was honestly warned by the inscription on every banknote issued after September 1861)(C)
            1. 3x3zsave
              3x3zsave 10 January 2021 08: 46
              +6
              Thank you Sergey! It remains to find out the date of the transaction and it will be possible to estimate the real value of these revolvers.
              1. bubalik
                bubalik 10 January 2021 09: 08
                +6
                find out the date of the deal

                ,,, the network said that in May 1862
                1. 3x3zsave
                  3x3zsave 10 January 2021 09: 25
                  +4
                  No, Sergei, you can't count. The progression of inflation is unknown, even the average one, without peak surges.
                  1. bubalik
                    bubalik 10 January 2021 09: 31
                    +4
                    ,,, take the average over 4 years (1861-1865), 4000 percent what requestabout at least ,,, math is not my strong point crying
                    1. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave 10 January 2021 09: 35
                      +4
                      Already tried it, it turns out garbage. It turns out that the revolver was worth less than 40 pre-war cents.
                      1. Undecim
                        Undecim 10 January 2021 10: 36
                        +11
                        inflation during the war jumped to 4000 percent in the South
                        Good day everyone. In fact, the issue is more complicated, with inflation reaching 9000 percent in the South and 80 percent in the North.
                        With regard to the South in time, the process looked like this.

                        Pricing is not directly related to inflation.
                        Try looking at https://eh.net/page/4/?s=first+bank+of+the+united+states.
                        There is also a good book, Ball, Douglas B. Financial Failure and Confederate Defeat. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991.
                        Реферат к ней https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/inflation-confederacy#:~:text=During%20the%20war%2C%20prices%20in,was%20only%20about%2080%20percent.&text=The%20inflation%20in%20the%20Confederacy,of%20the%20war%20upon%20southerners.
                      2. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave 10 January 2021 11: 07
                        +3
                        Thank you, Victor Nikolaevich! English is not good for me, but I'll try.
                        Pricing is not directly related to inflation.
                        This is just understandable.
                    2. bubalik
                      bubalik 10 January 2021 10: 36
                      +4
                      ,,, for one gold dollar in 1864 was given $ 22 issued by the Confederation. ,,, By the end of 1861, the paper dollar of the Confederation was quoted at 90 cents in gold; in 1862 that figure dropped to 40 cents; in 1863 - up to 6 cents.
                      ,,,November 16, 1864. They paid seven dollars [Confederate money] for a pound of coffee, six dollars an ounce for indigo, twenty dollars a sheet of paper, five dollars a linen thread worth ten cents, six dollars for pins
                    3. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave 10 January 2021 11: 03
                      +3
                      That is, if we assume that the Confederate dollar in May 1862 was worth 65 cents in gold, we get the amount of 26 pre-war dollars per item. It's not cheap anyway.
                    4. bubalik
                      bubalik 10 January 2021 11: 58
                      +3
                      at 26 pre-war dollars

                      ,,,why not smile The Colt Army Model 1860 was worth $ 20, while an ounce of gold on the New York Stock Exchange in 1862 was $ 20,67.
                    5. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave 10 January 2021 13: 29
                      +3
                      Different markets and different purchasing power of the monetary unit. I think on April 12, 1861, the cost of cotton skyrocketed in New York and fell in Georgia.
              2. bubalik
                bubalik 10 January 2021 11: 08
                +5
                ,,, yes in the South it was not very that with the economy.
                ,,,farmers were outraged by the prices of government purchases and reduced crops, hid their crops and their livestock. The Confederation is increasingly adopting a tithe-based taxation system, that is, 10% of the crop must be transferred to the government. Voluntary submission was difficult to achieve, and fierce resistance broke out in the mountainous regions.
                ,,, leads to parallels.
                Even after the harvest in the fall of 1918, various methods of preparing food were tested in the village: private purchases, natural exchange of products, government purchases at fixed prices. By decree of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee of October 30, an attempt was made to introduce a tax in kind on peasants, but it was not possible to collect the tax in kind. The best results were given by the survey. The peasants were obliged to surrender to the state at fixed prices all surpluses of grain and other agricultural products in excess of the established minimum standards provided for meeting personal and economic needs. Under the onslaught of appropriation, the kulaks and middle peasants reduced the sown areas and livestock, diligently hid their products, did not deliberately create surpluses.
              3. 3x3zsave
                3x3zsave 10 January 2021 11: 22
                +5
                ,,, leads to parallels.
                It would be strange if it were different. If my memory serves me, one of Jacqueria's reasons was the same.
              4. kalibr
                10 January 2021 15: 45
                +5
                Quote: bubalik
                Under the onslaught of the allotment, the kulaks and middle peasants reduced the sown area and livestock, diligently hid their products, deliberately did not create surpluses

                That is why its peasantry has become obsolete! Whatever hurts from the state! Such freedom should not be allowed!
  • 3x3zsave
    3x3zsave 10 January 2021 08: 32
    +5
    $ 40 - Which ones?
    Here I am about the same ... Nuances, little things ...
    Microhistory, in general ... A few words can generate a whole study.
    1. bubalik
      bubalik 10 January 2021 08: 35
      +7
      ,,, it seems there is a similarity or it seemed belay request



      5 dollars. Capitol in Rinda, Virginia, capital of the Confederation, and portrait of C. G. Memminger, Treasury Secretary
      1. 3x3zsave
        3x3zsave 10 January 2021 08: 48
        +5
        In general, yes, the size is only different, most likely.
      2. vladcub
        vladcub 10 January 2021 22: 15
        +1
        There is a certain similarity: size and design, but there are differences. The main thing: we did not print portraits of finance ministers
  • kalibr
    10 January 2021 08: 48
    +10
    There's a reason to reread Gone With the Wind, right?
    1. Hunter 2
      Hunter 2 10 January 2021 08: 53
      +4
      Quote: kalibr
      There's a reason to reread Gone With the Wind, right?

      Vyacheslav Olegovich hi By the way, indeed, gold Dollars were perfectly used by both sides of the Civil War (the episode of the charity ball from "Gone with the Wind" is indicative ... in fact, like the Silver Coins (the Confederates successfully minted almost 1 million pieces, pre-war sample).
      1. kalibr
        10 January 2021 09: 07
        +8
        That's why I remembered! Precious metals have always been in price.
        1. 3x3zsave
          3x3zsave 10 January 2021 14: 59
          +2
          Everything is relative. Essay D. London "Thousand Dozen".
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 10 January 2021 12: 17
      +3
      Vyacheslav, thanks. smile Is there no photograph of the rifle? No, I understand that it is as simple as "orange" and the whole trick is in the cartridge, but it's still interesting.
      1. kalibr
        10 January 2021 15: 42
        +4
        Quote: Sea Cat
        Vyacheslav, thank you. Is there no photograph of the rifle? No, I understand that it is as simple as "orange" and the whole trick is in the cartridge, but it's still interesting.

        I would have given! Required.
      2. Undecim
        Undecim 10 January 2021 15: 51
        +8
        Is there no photograph of the rifle?
        Is.


        1. Catfish
          Catfish 10 January 2021 15: 58
          +3
          Thank you Vic, pretty awkward creature.
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 10 January 2021 16: 05
            +9
            Just now I found information that Kofer was making shotguns as well.

            Moreover, he imported them to Europe and placed orders for production at European factories.
            Pictured is a 12-gauge Kofer double-barreled shotgun made in Liege, Belgium.
            1. Catfish
              Catfish 10 January 2021 16: 48
              +3
              Double-barreled guns, too, for his "original" cartridge? Somehow the photo is not very clear.
            2. Hunter 2
              Hunter 2 10 January 2021 16: 56
              +4
              A Very Elegant Shotgun! English stock - Classic, more difficult to manufacture than the "pistol" grip.
              Thanks for the Photo! hi
        2. 3x3zsave
          3x3zsave 10 January 2021 16: 12
          +3
          Hmmm. Perhaps I anticipate events, but there are no words about rifles in the article ...
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 10 January 2021 16: 19
            +5
            More recently, an original rifle of his own design and under his own original cartridge was also discovered.
            This is from the article.
            1. 3x3zsave
              3x3zsave 10 January 2021 16: 26
              +3
              In any case, the headline is discordant with the content in terms of long-trunk coverage.
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 10 January 2021 16: 46
                +2
                Kofer: man, revolver, rifle


                There is also a rifle in the title. smile
          2. vladcub
            vladcub 10 January 2021 22: 09
            +2
            Perhaps V. Oh, will he tell you about rifles separately?
            1. 3x3zsave
              3x3zsave 10 January 2021 22: 16
              +2
              Maybe. But in my personal, pretentious opinion, this material became the best in the "revolving" cycle.
        3. Mordvin 3
          Mordvin 3 10 January 2021 16: 53
          0
          Quote: Undecim
          Is there no photograph of the rifle?
          Is.

          It is unclear how the shutter works.
  • cat Rusich
    cat Rusich 10 January 2021 22: 21
    +2
    Quote: 3x3zsave
    what banknotes were in circulation in the Confederation?
    Numismatics Corner ...
    $ 2,5 from Missouri
    $ 2,5 from Missouri
    $ 4 from Missouri
    $ 4 from Missouri
    $ 5 from North. Carolina
    $ 5 from North. Carolina
    25 cents from North. Carolina
    25 cents from North. Carolina
    25 cents from South. Carolina
    25 cents from South. Carolina.
    Here is an example of CSA banknotes - there are others with the usual denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100 dollars bully
  • Crowe
    Crowe 10 January 2021 07: 45
    +16
    An interesting topic, thank you! What can I say ... did not take off from Kofer. War, a mess, and the high cost of a complex revolver. The Confederates and so the industry did not work so hot, because the southern states were mainly agricultural and practically did not have a technical base, them to establish production of "Spiller and Burr"

    with Greenswold & Gunnison,

    which were simpler and more familiar, was also not very successful. With a huge shortage of weapons, any, the most outdated samples, even homemade ones, were used.
    As a result, about 13-15 pieces of these "Kofers" are wandering around the world at a huge price, which is not surprising at all, because a rarity.
    1. kalibr
      10 January 2021 08: 46
      +13
      In fact, the southerners used everything that fired. There will be more material about revolvers that came to the South from Europe. The most famous of these is "Le Ma", the favorite revolver of Confederate General Tutan de Beauregard. Material is being written about him ... The main thing is that we managed to get very interesting photos!
      1. The comment was deleted.
      2. Crowe
        Crowe 10 January 2021 09: 16
        +14
        Ooooh, "Le-Ma" ...

        favorite revolver of Confederate General Tutan de Beauregard.

        Not only him, not only him ... Every southerner officer dreamed of getting such a revolver ... And other no less famous Frenchmen Lefosche and Perin, and the English Adams, Trenter and Kerr? And the same "baby Deringer"?

        from which actor John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865, shot in the back of the head of the US President Abraham Lincoln, avenging the North for the defeat of the Confederation of Southerners? The topic is bottomless and interesting, I look forward to your materials on it!
        1. kalibr
          10 January 2021 10: 00
          +9
          Quote: Crowe
          other no less famous Frenchmen Lefoshe with Perin, and English Adams, Trenter and Kerr? And the same "baby Deringer"?

          All this will happen, but not overnight. And today the main thing is not to write - there is a sea of ​​information. The main thing is to find a public domain photo or get permission to use museum or private photos.
  • Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I 10 January 2021 09: 11
    +14
    Great article "about Kofer"! For that, tremendous gratitude to Vyacheslav Olegovich, since I was among the initiators of the appeal to him with a request to tell about Kofer ... "a man and a revolver"!
    Finally, a little touch ...
    1. kalibr
      10 January 2021 10: 06
      +8
      I like the transmission of this "tailed". It will be necessary to try to arrange something similar in Penza. We will get even with the virus ... By the way, he talks very well - just learn the language!
      1. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 10 January 2021 10: 44
        +6
        Yes ... the language is "weigh"! Maybe to Rio de Janeiro to bring, and maybe to the village of Gadyukino! On the Internet, you can find textual representations of Forgotten Weapons videos ... then the Internet translator "turns on" ... Of course, you yourself understand what kind of translation there is, but you can understand, even more so if you do not "touch" the topic from scratch! I did it sometimes and I succeeded ...
        1. kalibr
          10 January 2021 11: 41
          +4
          Quote: Nikolaevich I
          Of course, you yourself understand what kind of translation there is, but you can understand it, especially if you do not "touch" the topic from scratch! I did it sometimes and I succeeded ...

          Yes, that is also possible. But I cannot afford to waste time on such a difficult path.
    2. kalibr
      10 January 2021 12: 11
      +5
      I am glad that you were satisfied. Having given your word, hold on, as they say ... Although it does not always work out. One museum, for example, is silent, and one archive answered, but set such conditions, such a headache that it’s on the topic ...
      1. Cowbra
        Cowbra 10 January 2021 16: 27
        +1
        I remember you thought about the Russian-Japanese) Right - I am. I would have listened to you ... If you are thinking.
        1. kalibr
          10 January 2021 21: 10
          +1
          There is a problem in Russian-Japanese. There is a folder, if there are Japanese prints, a photo from my Penza museum. But ... we need photos from publications of that time. And now, because of the virus, they cannot be approached.
      2. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 10 January 2021 22: 53
        +1
        Yes, you are a man of your word! I am sure that other "New Year gifts" from the "customized" list will appear in the near future! hi
        1. kalibr
          11 January 2021 07: 09
          +1
          Quote: Nikolaevich I
          "new Year gifts"

          Without any doubt!
          1. vladcub
            vladcub 11 January 2021 08: 46
            +2
            Q. Oh, thank you for keeping your word. I know an active site visitor who will be glad of your publications
  • Cowbra
    Cowbra 10 January 2021 11: 10
    +1
    Vyacheslav: And there is a topic for brass ... But you can also in revolvers
    1. kalibr
      10 January 2021 12: 09
      +4
      Quote: Cowbra
      And there is a topic for brass ...

      Yes, but too voluminous and largely not military.
      1. The comment was deleted.
  • John22
    John22 10 January 2021 18: 02
    +3
    I understood from the article (informative, of course) that Kofer's only merit is that he bypassed White's patent. And that's it! But no one else used his developments.
    1. kalibr
      10 January 2021 21: 11
      +3
      Quote: John22
      But no one else used his developments.

      Yes, the person took a step into the future and he passed practically unnoticed.
  • vladcub
    vladcub 10 January 2021 21: 49
    +2
    Quote: Sea Cat
    Right! "An affectionate word and the cat is pleased" (c) smile drinks

    Especially if you beg yourself. Our cat has praise, and if you do not beg for praise, then he was offended and does not see you point-blank. Mine spoiled him and thoroughly
  • vladcub
    vladcub 10 January 2021 21: 57
    +4
    Comrades, on your behalf and on my own behalf, thanks to V.N. for sharing the material with V.O. I hope that they will have fruitful cooperation in the future
  • vladcub
    vladcub 10 January 2021 22: 02
    +1
    Quote: Sea Cat
    Kofer: man, revolver, rifle


    There is also a rifle in the title. smile

    And in the text about the rifle, the cat cried
    1. kalibr
      11 January 2021 07: 10
      +1
      Quote: vladcub
      And in the text about the rifle, the cat cried

      Well, you know, what they are rich with, they are glad ...
  • vladcub
    vladcub 10 January 2021 22: 05
    +1
    Quote: mordvin xnumx
    Quote: Undecim
    Is there no photograph of the rifle?
    Is.

    It is unclear how the shutter works.

    I think about it myself
  • vladcub
    vladcub 10 January 2021 22: 25
    +4
    "Died at the age of 57" by today's standards, still young. Perhaps, if he had chewed longer, then he would have done more, but so ... The feeling that the person has not fully revealed
  • Mihaylov
    Mihaylov 11 January 2021 12: 27
    +1
    To date, only 13 Kofer revolvers are known, about most of which there is practically no information. They are very rarely put up for sale by antique dealers, but if they do appear on the market, then their price is always higher than that of any other weapon of the Confederate States. It happens that they cost $ 100 or more.

    Here is interesting: are there any fakes? At this price, there should be ... hi
  • Alien From
    Alien From 11 January 2021 20: 56
    0
    Thank you dear Vyacheslav! As always, everything is with sense, feeling, arrangement! Thank you for your work! hi