Military Review

Air ram is not only a weapon of Soviet heroes

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Air ram is not only a weapon of Soviet heroes



This post is the result of my long-standing collaboration with the Samara historian Alexei Stepanov, who owned the idea of ​​this topic. We worked on the topic at the turn of the 80-90s, but then youth, youthful maximalism and lack of information did not allow us to complete the study with serious scientific work. Now, for more than 20 years, a lot of new information has opened up, but the intensity of passions has faded. Therefore, this article lost the then indignantly revealing pathos addressed to the Soviet historical “Pseudo-science”, but significantly replenished with specific information. In addition, today I have absolutely no desire to engage in scientific activity and create a serious, but boring scientific work, speckled with difficult reading links to sources. Therefore, I present to everyone interested a simple journalistic article about the heroes of air rams, who were not lucky to be born in the USSR, and therefore they lost the right to respect for their bravery among Russian people, who generally always valued courage and heroism. I warn you right away, since a lot has been written about Soviet rams, I will only talk about foreign "rammers", mentioning our only if they are superior - "not for the sake of humiliation, but for justice ..."

For a long time, Soviet official historical science, using the example of air rams, emphasized the special patriotic heroism of Soviet pilots, unattainable for representatives of other nations. In our literature in Soviet times, only domestic and Japanese air rams were always mentioned; moreover, if the rams of Soviet pilots seemed our propaganda to be heroic, conscious self-sacrifice, then the very same actions of the Japanese for some reason were called "fanaticism" and "doom." Thus, all Soviet pilots who committed a suicide attack were surrounded by a halo of heroes, and Japanese pilots, “kamikaze,” were surrounded by a halo of “antiheroes.” Representatives of other countries, in the heroism of the air ramming by Soviet researchers, were generally denied. This prejudice persisted until the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the legacy of many years of silencing the heroism of the pilots of other countries is still felt. “It is deeply symbolic that there wasn’t a single pilot in the praised Hitler’s Luftwaffe who consciously went into an air ram at a critical moment ... There is also no evidence of the use of the ram by American and English pilots,” he wrote in a special work in 1989 about rams major general aviation A.D. Zaitsev. “During the war, such a truly Russian, Soviet form of air combat as a ram was spread,” says the capital work on the history of Russian aviation, “The Air Force of the Motherland,” published in 1988. “An air ram is a standard of military feat. The diametrically opposite attitude to the ram was the first moral defeat of the vaunted Hitler aces, a harbinger of our victory ”- this is the opinion of the best Soviet ace of the Great Patriotic War, Ivan Kozhedub, expressed by him in 1990 (by the way, Kozhedub himself did not commit any rams). There are a lot of examples of such a nationalist approach to this problem. Soviet aviation history experts either did not know, or deliberately lied and hushed up data on rams committed by foreign pilots, although it was enough to refer to the memoirs of Soviet pilots or to foreign works on the history of aviation to make sure that ramming is a wider phenomenon, what seemed to our historians. Against the background of this attitude to history, there was no longer surprising confusion in Russian literature on such issues as: who made the second and third aerial rams in the world, who rammed the enemy for the first time at night, who made the first ground ram (the so-called “Gastello feat”), etc. etc. Today, information about the heroes of other countries has become available, and all people who are interested in the history of aviation have the opportunity to turn to the appropriate books to find out about their exploits. I publish this post for those who are new to aviation history, but would like to learn something about respectable people.

Russian pilot Peter Nesterov; the ram of Nesterov (postcard from the 1 World War I); Russian pilot Alexander Kozakov


It is well known that our compatriot Peter Nesterov, who destroyed 8 September 1914 g at the cost of his life the Austrian reconnaissance aircraft "Albatross", made the first air ram in the world. But the honor of the second ram in the world for a long time was attributed to N. Zherdev, who fought in 1938 in Spain, then A. Gubenko, who fought in China that same year. And only after the collapse of the Soviet Union in our literature appeared information about the real hero of the second air ram - Russian pilot of the 1 World War II Alexander Kozakov, who 18 of March 1915 r over the front line was hit by an Austrian Albatross with a ram attack. Moreover, Kozakov became the first pilot to survive a suicide strike on an enemy plane: on the damaged Moran, he managed to make a successful landing in the disposition of Russian troops. The long silence of Kozakov's achievement was due to the fact that later this most productive Russian ace of the 1 World War I (32 of victory) became a White Guard and fought against Soviet power. Such a hero, naturally, did not suit Soviet historians, and his name was removed from the history of Russian aviation for many decades, it turned out to be simply forgotten ...

However, even taking into account the hostility of Soviet historians to the White Guard Kozakov, they did not have the right to confer the title of "rammer No. 2" to either Zherdev or Gubenko, since even during 1 World War I several foreign pilots also made air rambles. For example, in September, 1916 F, flying on the DH2 fighter, captain of the British Aviation Eiselwood hit the German Albatross with a strike of the chassis of his fighter, and then landed "on the belly" at his airfield. In June, Canadian William Bishop 1917 r, having shot all the cartridges in battle, deliberately severed the wing racks of the German Albatross with a wing of his Newpora. The wings of the enemy from the impact folded, and the German fell to the ground; Bishop also safely reached the airfield. Subsequently, he became one of the best aces of the British Empire: he ended the war with aerial victories on 72 ...

But perhaps the most amazing air ram in the 1 World War was made by the Belgian Willy Coppens, who rammed the 8 in May with the 1918 in a German aerostat “Draken”. Having unsuccessfully shot all the cartridges in several attacks on the balloon, Coppens struck the wheels of his fighter, “Anrio”, over the “Draken”; the propeller blades also slashed along a tightly inflated canvas, and the Draken burst. At the same time, the HD-1 engine choked because of the gas that rushed into the hole of the torn cylinder, and Coppens did not die by a miracle. He was saved by the oncoming airflow, which unscrewed the screw with force and launched the Anrio engine when it rolled off the falling Draken. It was the first and only ram in the history of Belgian aviation.

Canadian ace William Bishop; HD-1 "Anrio" Coppens breaks down from the rammed by him "Draken"; Belgian ace Willy Coppens


After the end of World War 1, in the history of air ramming, of course, there was a break. Again the ram, as a means of destroying the enemy aircraft, the pilots remembered during the Spanish Civil War. At the very beginning of this war - in the summer of 1936 g - the republican pilot Lieutenant Urtubi, who was in a bind, fired all the cartridges at the Franco aircraft surrounding him, rammed an Italian fighter "Fiat" from a low-angle viewpoint on the slow-moving "Newpore". Both planes crumbled from impact; Urtubi managed to open a parachute, but on the ground he died from wounds received in battle. And about a year later (in July, 1937 d) on the other side of the globe - in China - a sea ram was held for the first time in the world, with a mass ram: at the very beginning of Japan’s aggression against China, 15 Chinese pilots sacrificed themselves, having fallen from the air at enemy landing ships and sinking 7 of them!

October 25 1937 r held the world's first night air ram. It was made in Spain by the Soviet volunteer pilot Yevgeny Stepanov, who in severe conditions destroyed the Italian Savoy-Marcheti bomber with the landing gear of his Chato biplane (I-15). Moreover, Stepanov rammed the enemy, having an almost full ammunition - an experienced pilot, he understood that his small-caliber machine guns could not shoot down a huge three-engined plane from one approach, and after a long line of bomber went to ram so as not to lose the enemy in the dark. After the attack, Eugene returned safely to the airfield, and in the morning in the area indicated by him, the Republicans found fragments of Marcheti ...

22 June 1939 r over Halkhin Gol, the first ram in Japanese aviation was made by the pilot Shogo Saito. Saito, who was squeezed "in the ticks" by Soviet aircraft, who had shot all the ammunition, made a breakthrough, cutting down part of the tail of the fighter closest to him, and escaped from the encirclement. And when, a month later, 21 July, rescuing his commander, Saito tried to ram the Soviet fighter again (the ram did not work - the Soviet pilot dodged the attack), the comrades gave him the nickname “King of rams”. "The king of rams" Shogo Saito, who had 25 victories in his account, died in July 1944 in New Guinea, fighting in the ranks of the infantry (after losing the plane) against the Americans ...

Soviet pilot Yevgeny Stepanov; Japanese pilot Shogo Saito; Polish pilot Leopold Pamula


The first air ram in the 2 World War I was committed not by the Soviet, as is commonly believed in us, but by the Polish pilot. This ram produced 1 September 1939 Mr. Deputy Commander of the Interceptors Brigade covering Warsaw, Lieutenant Colonel Leopold Pamula. He shot down in a battle with the superior forces of the enemy 2 bomber, he went on his damaged plane to ram one of the 3-x fighters attacking him Messerschmitt-109. After destroying the enemy, Pamula escaped by parachute and made a safe landing in the disposition of his troops. Six months after Pamula’s exploit, another foreign pilot made an air ram: February 28 1940 r in a fierce air battle over Karelia Finnish pilot Lieutenant Hutanantti rammed a Soviet fighter and died.

Pamula and Hutanantti were not the only foreign pilots who made rams at the beginning of World War II. During the German offensive on France and Holland, the pilot of the British Battle bomber N.M. Thomas accomplished the feat that we today call the “Gastello feat.” Trying to stop the swift German offensive, the Allied command on May 2, 12 ordered the destruction of the crossings across the Meuse north of Maastricht at any cost, along which enemy tank divisions. However, German fighters and anti-aircraft guns repulsed all the attacks of the British, inflicting terrifying losses on them. And then, in a desperate desire to stop the German tanks, the flight officer Thomas sent his battled "Battle" anti-aircraft gun to one of the bridges, having managed to inform the comrades about the decision ...

Six months later, another pilot repeated the "feat of Thomas." In Africa, 4 November 1940 r another Battle bomber pilot - Lieutenant Hutchinson was hit by anti-aircraft fire during the bombing of the Italian positions in Nyalli (Kenya). And then Hutchinson sent his “Battle” into the thick of the Italian infantry, destroying enemy soldiers near 20 at the cost of his own death. Eyewitnesses claimed that at the moment of the ram Hutchinson was alive - the British bomber was controlled by the pilot until the collision with the ground ...

During the Battle of England, the British fighter pilot Ray Holmes distinguished himself. During the German raid on London 15 September 1940 r one German bomber Dornier-17 broke through the British fighter barrier to Buckingham Palace - the residence of the King of Great Britain. The German was already preparing to drop bombs on an important goal when Ray appeared on his way on his Hurricane. Having dived on top of the enemy, Holmes, on an oncoming course, chopped off the tail of Dornier with his wing, but also received such heavy damage that he was forced to flee by parachute.

Ray Holmes in the cabin of his Hurricane; ram rae holmes


The next fighter pilots who went for the death risk victory were the Greeks Marino Mitralekses and Grigoris Valkanas. In the course of the Italian-Greek war 2 on November 1940 r over Thessaloniki Marino Mitralexes rammed an Italian bomber Kant Z-24 with his propeller PZL P-1007. After ramming, Mitralexes not only landed safely, but also managed to capture the crew of the bomber he had captured with the help of local residents! Volkanas accomplished his feat of 18 on November 1940. During a fierce group battle in the region of Morov (Albania), he shot all the bullets and went to ram an Italian fighter (both pilots died).

With the escalation of hostilities in 1941 (the attack on the USSR, the entry of Japan and the United States into war), ramming became quite common in aerial warfare. Moreover, these actions were characteristic not only of Soviet pilots - the ram was committed by pilots of almost all countries participating in the battles.

So, 22 December 1941 r fought as part of the British Air Force Australian sergeant Reed, having spent all the ammunition, rammed with his Brewster-239 the Japanese army fighter Ki-43, and was killed in a collision with him. At the end of February 1942 Mr. Dutchman J. Adam on the same Brewster also rammed a Japanese fighter, but survived.

Made the rams and pilots of the United States. Americans are very proud of their captain Colin Kelly, who in 1941 r was introduced by propagandists as the first "taraler" of the United States, who rammed the 10 of December with his B-17 bomber, the Japanese battleship Haruna. However, after the war, researchers found that Kelly did not commit any ramming. Nevertheless, the American really accomplished the feat, which, due to the pseudo-patriotic inventions of journalists, was unjustly forgotten. On that day, Kelly bombed the Nagara cruiser and distracted all the fighters of the Japanese squadron cover, providing an opportunity to calmly bomb the enemy with other aircraft. When Kelly was shot down, he tried to maintain control of the aircraft to the end, allowing the crew to leave the dead car. At the cost of his life, Kelly was saved by ten comrades, but he did not manage to escape himself ...

Based on this information, the first American pilot who actually committed the ram was Captain Fleming, commander of the Vindicedaytor bomber squadron of the United States Marine Corps. During the Battle of Midway 5 Jun 1942 g he led the attack of his squadron on the Japanese cruisers. On the approach to the goal, his plane was hit by an anti-aircraft projectile and caught fire, but the captain continued the attack and bombed. Seeing that the bombs of his subordinates did not hit the target (the squadron consisted of reservists and had poor training), Fleming turned around and again swooped on the enemy, crashing into a burning bomber on the cruiser Mikuma. The damaged ship lost its combat capability, and was soon finished off by other American bombers.

Another American who went to the ram was Major Ralph Cheli, who on August 18 1943 led his bomber group to attack the Japanese airfield Dagua (New Guinea). Almost immediately his B-25 "Mitchell" was hit; then Cheli sent his burning plane down and crashed into enemy aircraft on the ground, breaking five cars with the Mitchell hull. For this feat, Ralph Cheli was posthumously awarded the highest award of the USA - the Congressional Medal of Honor.

In the second half of the war, the British used many rambles, although perhaps in a somewhat peculiar way (but with no less risk to their own lives). German Lieutenant General Erich Schneider, when describing the use of V-1 airplanes against England, testifies: "Brave British pilots shot down projectiles either by attacking with cannon and machine guns or ramming them from the side." This way of fighting was chosen by British pilots not by accident: very often when firing a German projectile blew up, destroying the pilot who attacked him - after all, with the V-bomb, the radius of absolute destruction was about 100 meters, and to hit a small target moving with great speed from a greater distance is very difficult, almost impossible. Therefore, the British (also, of course, at the risk of dying) flew close to the Fau and pushed him to the ground with a wing kick on the wing. One wrong move, the slightest mistake in the calculation - and only a memory remained from the brave pilot ... That's exactly how the best English Fau hunter, Joseph Berry, acted, who destroyed German projectiles for 4 of the month of 59. October 2 1944 g he went on the attack on the 60 th "Fau", and this ram was his last ...

"Fou Slayer" by Joseph Berry
So Berry and many other British pilots rammed German Fau-1 projectiles


With the onset of raids by American bombers on Bulgaria, air ramming and Bulgarian aviators had to be made. On December 20 in the afternoon, 1943 r reflected the raid on Sofia 150 Liberator bombers, which were accompanied by 100 Lightning fighters, Lieutenant Dimitar Spisarevsky fired his entire Bf-109G-2 fighter into one of the Liberators, and a band, and a band, and then a band. , crashed into the fuselage of the second "Liberator", breaking it in half! Both planes crashed to the ground; Dimitar Spisarevsky died. The feat of Spisarevsky made him a national hero. This ram made an indelible impression on the Americans - after the death of Spisarevsky, the Americans were afraid of every approaching Bulgarian Messerschmitt ... Feat Dimitar 17 April 1944 r repeated Nedelcho Bonchev. In a fierce battle over Sofia against 350 B-17 bombers, covered by 150 fighters "Mustang", Lieutenant Nedelcho Bonchev shot down a 2 bomber from three destroyed by the Bulgarians in this battle. And the second plane Bonchev, having spent all the ammunition, rammed. At the time of the ramming strike, the Bulgarian pilot, together with the seat, was thrown out of Messerschmitt. With difficulty getting rid of the seat belts, Bonchev escaped by parachute. After Bulgaria moved to the side of the anti-fascist coalition, Nedelcho took part in the battles against Germany, but in October 1944 r was shot down and captured. During the evacuation of the concentration camp in the first days of May 1945 r, the hero was shot by a guard.

Bulgarian pilots Dimitar Spisarevsky and Nedelcho Bonchev


As noted above, we have heard a lot about the Japanese suicide bombers, for whom the ram was in fact the only weapons. However, it is necessary to say that the rams were carried out by Japanese pilots even before the appearance of the “kamikaze”, but then these acts were not planned and were carried out usually either in the heat of the battle, or in case of heavy damage to the aircraft, which excluded its return to the base. A striking example of the attempt of such a ram is the Japanese sea pilot Mitsuo Futida’s dramatic description in his book “The Battle of Midway Atoll” of the last attack by Lieutenant Commander Yiichi Tomonaga. The commander of the torpedo squadron of the aircraft carrier Hiryu Yoichi Tomonaga, who could well be called the predecessor of the kamikaze, 4 June 1942 r at the moment critical for the Japanese in the battle for Midway flew into battle on a heavily damaged torpedo bomber, who had one of the bak in the previous battle. At the same time Tomonaga was fully aware that he did not have enough fuel to return from the battlefield. During a torpedo attack on the enemy, Tomonaga tried to ram his flagship aircraft carrier, Yorktown, with his Kate, but, shot down by the entire artillery of the ship, fell apart into pieces just a few meters from the side ...

The predecessor of the "kamikaze" Yoichi Tomonaga
Attack torpedo "Kate", taken from the aircraft carrier "Yorktown" during the Battle of Midway Atoll.
Something like this was the last attack of Tomonaga (it is quite possible that it was his plane that was shot)


However, not all ramming attempts ended for the Japanese pilots as tragically. For example, 8 October 1943 r fighter pilot Satosi Anabuki on a lightweight Ki-43, armed with only two machine guns, managed to shoot down an American fighter and 2 B-3 four-engine bomber in one battle! And the third bomber spent the entire ammunition Anabuki destroyed ram attack. After this ram, the wounded Japanese managed to land his wrecked plane "on a forced one" on the coast of the Burmese Gulf. For his feat, Anabuki received an exotic for Europeans, but a reward quite familiar to the Japanese: the commander of the forces of the Burma district, General Kawabe, dedicated a poem of his own to the heroic pilot ...

A particularly “cool” “rammer” among the Japanese was 18-year-old junior lieutenant Masadziro Cavato, who flew aerial ram during his 4 combat career. The first victim of the suicide attacks of the Japanese was the B-25 bomber, which Kavato shot down Rabaul with a strike from his remaining Zero cartridges (the date of this ram is unknown to me). Paratrooper Masadziro 11 November 1943 g again rammed an American bomber, while receiving an injury. Then, in the 17 battle of December, 1943 of Mr. Kavato in a frontal attack rammed the Aerocobra fighter, and again escaped by parachute. The last time Masadziro Kavato rammed a X-NUMX February 6 of Rabeul was a four-engined Liberator B-1944 bomber, and again used his parachute to rescue. In March, 24 G seriously injured Kavato was captured by the Australians, and the war ended for him.

And less than a year before the capitulation of Japan - in October, 1944 - the “kamikaze” joined the battle. The first Kamikaze attack was carried out on 21 on October 1944 by Lieutenant Kuno, which damaged the ship Australia. And on October 25 1944, the first successful attack of the whole Kamikaze unit under the command of Lieutenant Yuki Seki took place, during which the aircraft carrier and cruiser were sunk, and the aircraft carrier 1 was damaged. But, although the main targets of the “kamikaze” were usually enemy ships, the Japanese had suicide squads and to intercept and destroy with ram attacks of the heavy American B-29 “Super Fortress” bombers. So, for example, in the 27 regiment of the 10 th division, a link of specially lightened Ki-44-2 planes under the command of Captain Matsuzaki was created, which had the poetic name "Sinten" ("Sky Shadow"). These “Sky Shadow Kamikazes” became a real nightmare for Americans who flew to bomb Japan ...

Since the end of World War 2 and to this day, historians and amateurs have argued: did the kamikaze movement make sense, was it successful enough. In official Soviet military-historical works, the 3 negative reasons for the emergence of Japanese suicide bombers were usually highlighted: the lack of modern technology and experienced personnel, fanaticism, and the “voluntary-compulsory” method of recruiting executors of a fatal departure. Fully agreeing with this, it is necessary, however, to recognize that under certain conditions this tactic brought some advantages. In that situation, when untrained pilots, hundreds and thousands, died without any sense from the crushing attacks of superbly trained American pilots, from the point of view of the Japanese command, it was undoubtedly advantageous that they would cause at least some damage to the enemy. It is impossible here not to take into account the special logic of the samurai spirit, implanted by the Japanese leadership as a model among the entire Japanese population. According to her, a warrior is born in order to die for his emperor and the “beautiful death” in battle was considered the pinnacle of his life. It was this incomprehensible logic for a European that prompted Japanese pilots at the beginning of the war to fly into battle without parachutes, but with samurai swords in the cockpits!

The advantage of suicide tactics was the fact that the range of "kamikaze" in comparison with conventional aircraft doubled (it was not necessary to save gasoline to return back). The enemy’s losses in people from suicide attacks were much greater than the losses of the kamikaze themselves; Moreover, these attacks undermined the morale of the Americans, who were so horrified by suicide bombers that the American command was forced to classify all the information about the “kamikaze” during the war in order to avoid complete demoralization of the personnel. After all, no one could feel protected from sudden attacks of suicide bombers - not even the crews of small ships. With the same gloomy stubbornness, the Japanese attacked everything that could swim. As a result, the results of the kamikaze activities were much more serious than the allied command then attempted to present (but about this - in conclusion).

Such attacks "kamikaze" terrified the American sailors


In Soviet times, in the domestic literature, not only was there never even a mention of air ramming by German pilots, but it was also repeatedly stated that it was impossible to accomplish such exploits by "cowardly fascists." And this practice continued in the new Russia right up to the middle of the 90-s, while thanks to the appearance in our country of new Western studies translated into Russian and the development of the Internet, it became impossible to deny the documented facts of the heroism of our main adversary. Today is already a proven fact: the German pilots during the years of the 2 World War I repeatedly used the ram to destroy enemy planes. But the long-term delay in the recognition of this fact by domestic researchers causes only surprise and annoyance: after all, to be convinced of this, even in Soviet times, it was enough just to look critically at least at domestic memoirs literature. In the memoirs of Soviet veteran pilots, from time to time there are references to frontal collisions over the battlefield, when the planes of the opposing sides collided with each other at counter angles. What is this if not mutual ram? And if in the initial period of the war the Germans almost did not use such a reception, then this does not speak of the lack of courage of the German pilots, but of the fact that they had at their disposal sufficiently effective weapons of traditional types that allowed them to destroy the enemy without exposing their lives to unnecessary additional risk.

I do not know all the facts of the rams committed by German pilots on different fronts of World War 2, especially since even those involved in the battles often find it difficult to say for sure whether it was a deliberate ram or an accidental clash in the confusion of high-speed maneuvering combat which recorded the rams). But even when listing the cases of ram victories of the German aces known to me, it is clear that in a hopeless situation the Germans bravely went on a deadly clash for them, often not sparing their lives for the sake of harming the enemy.
If we speak specifically about the facts known to me, then among the first German "tarasters" can be called Kurt Sohatzi, who 3 August 1941 from Kiev, reflecting the attack of the Soviet attack aircraft on the German positions, destroyed the "unstuckable Cement Bomb" IL-2 with a frontal ram attack. When Messerschmitt collided, Kurt lost half of his wing, and he had to hastily make an emergency landing right along the flight path. Sohatzi landed on Soviet territory and was captured; nevertheless, the command in absentia awarded him the highest honor of Germany - the Knight's Cross for the feat.

If at the beginning of the war the ramming actions of the German pilots who had been victorious on all fronts were rare exceptions, then in the second half of the war, when the situation was not in favor of Germany, the Germans began to use ram attacks more frequently. So, for example, 29 March 1944 g in the skies of Germany famous ace Luftwaffe Herman Graf rammed the American fighter "Mustang", while receiving severe injuries, put him on a hospital bed for two months. The next day, March 30, 1944, on the Eastern Front, repeated the "Gastello feat" of the German assault ace, Knight's Cross holder Alvin Boerst. In the area of ​​Yass, he on the anti-tank variant Ju-87 attacked a Soviet tank column, was hit by anti-aircraft guns and, dying, rammed the tank in front of him. Posthumously, Boers was awarded with Swords to the Knight's Cross. In the West 25 in May 1944 r a young pilot Oberfenrich Hubert Heckman on Bf.109G rammed Mustang captain Joe Bennett, decapitating the American fighter squadron, and then escaped by parachute. And 13 July 1944 r another famous ace - Walter Dahl - hit by a heavy American bomber B-17.

German pilots: Fighter ace Herman Graf and assault ace Alvin Boerst


There were Germans pilots who committed several rams. For example, in the skies of Germany, when repelling American raids, Hauptmann Werner Gert rammed enemy planes three times. In addition, the pilot of the assault squadron of the Udet squadron, Willy Maksimovich, became widely known, destroying American four-engine bombers with ram attacks 7 (!). Vili died over Pillau in an air battle against Soviet 20 fighters on April 1945.

But the cases listed above are only a small part of the air ramies committed by the Germans. In the conditions of the allied aviation’s full technical and quantitative superiority over the German war over the Germans, the Germans were forced to create units of their “kamikazes” (and even before the Japanese!). Already at the beginning of 1944, the formation of special fighter-assault squadrons for the destruction of the American bombers that bombed Germany began in the Luftwaffe. The entire personnel of these units, which included volunteers and ... penalty box, gave a written commitment to destroy at least one bomber on each sortie — if necessary, by means of ram attacks! It was precisely in such a squadron that Vili Maksimovich, mentioned above, entered, and Major Walter Dahl, already familiar to us, headed these units. The Germans were forced to resort to the tactics of mass rams precisely at that period when their former air superiority was nullified by the hordes of the heavy Allied Flying Forts, which were advancing from the west, and armadas of Soviet planes attacking from the east. It is clear that the Germans did not adopt such tactics from a good life; but this does not detract from the personal heroism of the German fighter pilots who voluntarily decided on self-sacrifice to save the German population, who died under the American and British bombs ...

Commander fighter-assault squadrons, Walter Dahl; Werner Gert, ramming the 3 Fortress; Willy Maksimovich, destroyed 7 "Fortresses"


The official adoption of ramming tactics required the Germans to create the appropriate equipment. Thus, all fighter-assault squadrons were equipped with a new modification of the FW-190 fighter with enhanced armor that protected the pilot from enemy bullets at the moment of approaching closely (actually the pilot was sitting in an armored box completely covering him from head to toe). The best test pilots practiced methods of rescuing a pilot from an aircraft damaged by a ram attack with the attack aircraft “rammers” —General Adolf Galland, the commander of German fighter aircraft, believed that attack fighters should not be suicide bombers and did everything possible to save these valuable pilots ...

The assault version of the FW-190 fighter, equipped with a fully armored cockpit and solid bulletproof glass, allowed German pilots
get close to the “Flying Fortresses” and produce a murderous ram


When the Germans, as allies of Japan, learned about the tactics of "kamikazes" and the high performance of units of Japanese suicide pilots, as well as the psychological effect produced by the "kamikazes" on the enemy, they decided to transfer the Eastern experience to the western lands. At the suggestion of Hitler’s favorite, the famous German test pilot Hanna Reitsch, and with the support of her husband, the observant-general of aviation, von Grimm, at the end of the war a manned shell aircraft was created for the pilot-suicide bomb ( which, however, had a chance to use the parachute over the target). These man-bombs were intended for massive strikes on London - Hitler hoped with total terror to force the UK to withdraw from the war. The Germans even created the first squad of German suicide bombers (1 volunteers) and began their training, but they did not have time to use their “kamikazes”. The inspirer of the idea and the commander of the detachment of Hana Reich came under another bombing of Berlin and landed in the hospital for a long time, and General Galland immediately dismissed the detachment, considering the idea of ​​a mortal terror to be madness ...

Manned analogue of the V-1 rocket - Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg, and the inspirer of the “German Kamikaze” idea, Hanna Reich


Conclusion:

So, based on the above, we can conclude that the ram, as a form of battle, was characteristic not only of Soviet pilots - the rams were made by pilots of almost all countries participating in the battles.

Another thing is that our pilots spent much more rams than the "foreigners." In total, during the war, the Soviet aviators, with the cost of killing 227 pilots and losing more than 400 airplanes, succeeded in destroying enemy aircraft in the air by ramming 635. In addition, Soviet pilots made 503 land and sea rammers, of which 286 was performed on attack aircraft with a crew of 2 man, and 119 - bombers with a crew of 3-4 man. Thus, according to the number of pilots who died during suicide attacks (no less than 1000 people!), The USSR, together with Japan, undoubtedly dominates the gloomy list of countries whose pilots widely sacrificed their lives to achieve victory over the enemy. However, it must be admitted that the Japanese still surpassed us in the sphere of the "purely Soviet form of battle." If we evaluate only the effectiveness of the “kamikaze” (1944 d operating since October), then at the price of more than 5000 Japanese pilots were sunk around 50 and damaged around 300 enemy warships, of which 3 sunk and 40 damaged were aircraft carriers with a huge number of aircraft on board .

So, in terms of the number of rams, the USSR and Japan are far ahead of the rest of the warring countries. Undoubtedly, this testifies to the courage and patriotism of the Soviet and Japanese pilots, however, in my opinion, does not detract from the same merits of the pilots of other countries involved in the war. When the situation was hopeless, not only the Russians and the Japanese, but also the British, Americans, Germans, Bulgarians, and so on. etc. went to the ram, risking their own lives for the sake of victory. But they went only in a hopeless situation; Regularly using complex expensive equipment as a banal “cleaver” is a stupid and expensive business. My opinion: the mass use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the preparedness of the flight personnel and command, constantly putting their pilots in a hopeless situation. In the air units of countries in which the command skillfully led units, creating an advantage in the forces in the right place, whose planes had high combat characteristics, and the pilots were well trained, the need to ram the enemy simply did not arise. But in the air units of countries in which the command was not able to concentrate forces on the main direction, in which the pilots could not really fly, and the planes had mediocre or even low flight characteristics, the ram became almost the main form of combat. That is why at the beginning of the war, the Germans who had the best aircraft, the best commanders and pilots did not actually use ramming. When the enemy created more sophisticated aircraft and surpassed the Germans quantitatively, and the Luftwaffe lost in the many battles of the most experienced pilots and did not have time to really train novices, the ramming method entered the arsenal of German aviation and reached the absurdity of "man-bombs" ready to fall on their heads civilians ...

In this regard, I would like to note that just at that time when the Japanese and Germans began the transition to the “kamikaze” tactics, in the Soviet Union, which also widely used air ramming, the commander of the USSR Air Force signed a very interesting order. It said: “To explain to the personnel of the Red Army air force that our fighters are superior to all existing types of German fighters in tactical flight data ... The use of a“ ram ”in air combat with enemy aircraft is not practical, therefore the“ ram ”should be used only in exceptional cases. " Leaving aside the qualities of Soviet fighters, the advantages of which over the enemy, it turned out, it was necessary to “explain” to front-line pilots, pay attention to the fact that at a time when the Japanese and German commanders tried to develop the line of using suicide bombers, the Soviet tried to stop the already existing trend Russian pilots to suicide attacks. And there was something to think about: it was only in August that 1944 d - the month preceding the appearance of the order - Soviet pilots made air ram more than in December 1941 g - during the critical period for the USSR fighting near Moscow! Even in April, the 1945 g, when Soviet aviation had absolute air supremacy, the Russian pilots used as many rams as in November 1942 g, when the offensive began at Stalingrad! And this despite the “clarified superiority” of the Soviet technology, the undoubted advantage of Russians in the number of fighters and, in general, the number of air rams that decreased from year to year (in 1941-42 - around 400 rams, in 1943-44 - around 200, rams , in 1945 g - more 20 rams). And everything is explained simply: with the keen desire to beat the enemy, the majority of young Soviet pilots simply did not really know how to fly and fight. Remember, this was well said in the film “Only old men go to battle”: “They still do not know how to fly, they also cannot shoot, but - EAGLES!”. It is for this reason that Boris Kovzan, who did not know how to turn on his onboard weapons at all, made 3 from his 4 rams. And it is for this reason that Ivan Kozhedub, an instructor of the aviation school who knew how to fly well, in 120 of the battles he conducted never rammed the enemy, even though his situations were very unprofitable. But Ivan Nikitovich coped with them without the “ax method”, because he had a high flight and combat training, and he had one of the best aircraft in the national aviation ...

Hubert Heckmann 25.05. 1944 r ramming Mustang captain Joe Bennett, depriving the American fighter squadron of leadership
Author:
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http://flugzojg.diary.ru/
114 comments
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  1. Bongo
    Bongo 24 September 2013 08: 36 New
    32
    One feels that the author has worked very well on the topic. In my opinion, it turned out, it is interesting, but the gravel is not biased.
    1. xetai9977
      xetai9977 24 September 2013 08: 44 New
      28
      You must always tell the truth. The author did a great job. Thank you for the work.
      1. erg
        erg 24 September 2013 13: 14 New
        +4
        In a collision, Messerschmitt Kurt lost half of his wing.
        The author apparently does not know that the monoplane belongs to Messerschmitt, there is only one wing. But two planes on opposite sides of the fuselage. The destruction of half a wing, that is, a whole plane on one side, is catastrophic for an airplane. You can’t make any emergency landing on it, just jump. I wrote this to the fact that an inattentive attitude to the corresponding terminology and generally to seemingly various trifles may cast doubt on the veracity of all the information contained in the article.
        1. Delta
          Delta 24 September 2013 14: 59 New
          +3
          Quote: erg
          The destruction of half a wing, that is, a whole plane on one side, is catastrophic for an airplane. You can’t make any emergency landing on it, just jump.


          look how a man landed a plane without a wing at all
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuBb9Y9yv2w

          Well, and how an Israeli pilot landed an F-15 without a wing. http://www.topnews.ru/photo_id_222_2.html

          True, many consider both of them to be lies and montage, but no one has yet given evidence of this.
          1. slacker
            slacker 24 September 2013 22: 54 New
            +2
            The profession of a military pilot everywhere and at all times is the profession of courageous and courageous people.
  2. bunta
    bunta 24 September 2013 09: 16 New
    +2
    Quote: xetai9977
    And everything is explained simply: with an acute desire to beat the enemy, most of the young Soviet pilots simply could not really fly and fight.


    Completely wrong conclusion. It turns out that the chest on the bunker and with a grenade under the tank is also from "inability" ?!
    1. xetai9977
      xetai9977 24 September 2013 12: 22 New
      +4
      You attributed to me words that I did not speak. Be careful.
    2. Doctorleg
      Doctorleg 24 September 2013 13: 58 New
      +6
      In fact, the author spoke about pilots and did not generalize. And in the case of the bunker and the tank - this is the fault of the authorities, who sent troops to attack without the support of artillery. In any case, subordinates are blown away
      1. Jack7691
        Jack7691 25 September 2013 17: 43 New
        +1
        The heroism of the soldiers is the result of the illiteracy of the commander.
    3. saygon66
      saygon66 24 September 2013 17: 15 New
      +4
      - The desire to win at any cost does not belong to any people exclusively.
      1. xetai9977
        xetai9977 24 September 2013 17: 53 New
        +3
        To tell the truth is not "praising the enemy." In Soviet times, it was said that the aces of their aces were Pokryshkin and Kozhedub. Kozhedub shot down 62 aircraft. Honor and praise to him. But for the sake of objectivity, one must sometimes say that the most productive was the German Erich Hartmann - 352 victories.
        1. Zifix
          Zifix 24 September 2013 18: 57 New
          +7
          For the sake of objectivity, it should be noted that the Germans had several ... original methods of counting victories.
          1. OffenroR
            OffenroR 24 September 2013 20: 14 New
            +4
            Quote: Zifix
            For the sake of objectivity, it should be noted that the Germans had several ... original methods of counting victories.

            If this is so (or tens of thousands of non-German planes crashed themselves?), Then why in the USSR and not only did they hide the successes of the Germans? If it was not true .... so they would say so. And where is the evidence? The allies have thoroughly "corrected" many documents after the war.
          2. tomas.09
            tomas.09 25 September 2013 11: 03 New
            -2
            They counted the mine by the number of engines on the plane. Something like this!!!
            1. Day 11
              Day 11 25 September 2013 11: 58 New
              +1
              This is a common mistake. They had a point system (counted by motors) and a PERSONAL account (number of shot down self-tovs). Points for rewarding, assignment, etc.
              1. OffenroR
                OffenroR 25 September 2013 18: 25 New
                +1
                To be honest, I did not know about this ... And on the open spaces of the Russian Internet you can find only mega anti-German articles about which Germans were suckers or "Germanic" articles ... And here and there the authors did not even hear about honesty .. .. are lying and can't stop ...
        2. Heccrbq .2
          Heccrbq .2 24 September 2013 22: 11 New
          +4
          For the sake of objectivity, it must be admitted that Pokryshkin was not very fond of colleagues, he was sharpened for "victory", he was covered up to a squadron of fighters, he only chose and destroyed the target without looking at the slaves. And Kozhedub, yeah, a hammer, he twisted his tail in Korea too, He shot down about 10 aircraft, but he was officially banned from flying there.
          1. The comment was deleted.
          2. OffenroR
            OffenroR 25 September 2013 18: 20 New
            +1
            If Kozhedub knocked down the Germans in such an amount .... well, to oppose the "poor Americans" against him)))
            1. Assistant
              Assistant 29 September 2013 01: 28 New
              +1
              So he was forbidden to fly in Korea. Generally. Therefore, he never officially flew there.
              And his opponents were not anyhow anyone. The American commanders also trained on the Germans at one time, at least they had two-digit accounts of the shot down.
              1. OffenroR
                OffenroR 29 September 2013 16: 39 New
                +2
                I meant that the Germans were stronger opponents than the Americans. And the Americans trained in the Japanese
              2. OffenroR
                OffenroR 30 September 2013 19: 56 New
                0
                Nobody has yet been able to "train" the Germans as well as the Russians.
    4. cdrt
      cdrt 25 September 2013 13: 32 New
      0
      It turns out that the chest on the bunker and with a grenade under the tank is also from "inability" ?!

      I would say the conclusion is not wrong, but half.
      From the ardent desire to destroy the enemy, and the lack of opportunities to do this by other means, well, or from the desire to save friends.
      It is clear that it will be easier for a more trained pilot to shoot the enemy.
      But in a situation where it is clear that you are dying, a brave man will go to take the enemy’s grave with him.

      Well ... no one canceled the phrase that the heroism of one is always the mistakes of someone else higher than standing
  3. Parabelum
    Parabelum 24 September 2013 09: 19 New
    +7
    "It is for this reason that Boris Kovzan, who did not even know how to turn on the on-board weapon, made 3 of his 4 rams," I do not believe that the pilot who learned how to pilot the plane well (to catch up with the enemy and get into it, you need the appropriate qualifications) did not show the switch on onboard weapons.
    1. Doctorleg
      Doctorleg 24 September 2013 10: 14 New
      +1
      The article does not say who rammed Kovzan - maybe they were bombers and catching them for an inexperienced pilot was easier than getting into
      1. Parabelum
        Parabelum 24 September 2013 11: 27 New
        +5
        This is already from the heading "If my grandmother would have ...."
        Bombers are also not sheep for the slaughter, they have airborne arrows for which it’s not difficult to shoot down a direct, non-maneuvering plane. Do you really believe that the person piloting 4 different planes was not told where his weapons turn on? Rave...
      2. Alex 241
        Alex 241 24 September 2013 23: 08 New
        +5
        During the war, shot down 28 enemy aircraft, one of them in the group, and 4 aircraft shot down by ram. In three cases, Kovzan on his MiG-3 aircraft returned to the airport. On August 13, 1942, on La-5, Captain Kovzan discovered a group of enemy bombers and fighters. In a battle with them, he was hit, injured his eyes, and then Kovzan directed his plane at an enemy bomber. From the blow, Kovzan was thrown out of the cockpit and from a height of 6000 meters with a parachute not fully opened, he fell into the swamp, breaking his leg and several ribs. Kovzan Boris
        1. Alex 241
          Alex 241 24 September 2013 23: 27 New
          +7
          Lt. Col. Dmitry Dyakov

          While on a business trip in Pruzhany, I accidentally discovered a monument, on the marble tablet of which was written: “To the pilot, deputy commander of the air squadron 33 fighter aviation regiment, senior lieutenant Gudimov Stepan Mitrofanovich, who made an air ram on June 22, 1941
          at 5 hours 20 minutes, from grateful descendants. "

          From the course of military history, everyone knows that on the first day of the war ZAPOVO aircraft suffered heavy losses, many of our aircraft were destroyed on the ground, and did not have time to take off. However, the date is carved on the monument - June 22, 5 hours 20 minutes! .. Agree
          that there are not so many monuments with such a date.
          1. Alex 241
            Alex 241 24 September 2013 23: 30 New
            +4
            This is May 1943. Captain Viktor Popov, fighter pilot and navigator of the 263th IAP, left the dining room with a cup of tea in his hands and sat on a bench that had been lovingly set in the thickets of lilacs on the edge of a field airfield before the war.

            At the captain Popov’s tunic, the medal “For Courage” and two orders of the Battle Red Banner. He received all three awards in two and a half months of fighting in the summer of 1942, when if he got out of the cockpit, he only took half an hour to remove his headset, rinse his burning face with ice water and put a piece of watermelon on his cheek.
          2. studentmati
            studentmati 24 September 2013 23: 41 New
            +3
            Quote: Alex 241
            Agree
            that there are not so many monuments with such a date.


            I agree, Sasha! For me, this particular fact is generally out of the ordinary. Moreover, many memorial and memorial plaques, and even the monuments of the Great Patriotic War, disappear without a trace from the maps of our cities.
          3. Day 11
            Day 11 24 September 2013 23: 51 New
            0
            For "alex 241" --- Sasha, I did not quite understand the photo you have given. This is a Ju-87R-2 from 2 Staffel I./StG who landed in Libya. November 3, Derna, Libya
            1. Alex 241
              Alex 241 24 September 2013 23: 56 New
              +1
              Denis, Sasha, I welcome this scan from an article by Dyakov. Here is a monument itself. It was born in 1913 in the village of Yagodnoye, now in the Kamyshin district of the Volgograd region. Russian. Member of the CPSU (b). He graduated from 7 classes and the school of FZU. He worked as a mechanic at the Stalingrad Tractor Plant. In the Red Army since 1934. He graduated from the aviation school of pilots. Member of the liberation campaign in Western Belarus and Bessarabia.
              Deputy Squadron Commander of the 33rd Fighter Aviation Regiment (10th Mixed Aviation Division, 4th Army Air Force, Western Special Military District) Lieutenant S.M. Gudimov at dawn on June 22, 1941, flew as part of a squadron on an I-16 aircraft to repel a German air raid on his airfield near the town of Kobrin, Brest region. In the air, our pilots met 20 He-111s, accompanied by a small group of Me-109s, and entered the battle. Soon they were joined by the other 3 squadrons returning from patrol. In this battle, the enemy lost 5 aircraft. One Heinkel shot down Gudimov. When the ammunition ran out, he went to ram another. He himself jumped out with a parachute, but the lines caught on the wreckage of the plane. Gudimov died. This happened at 5.20.
              Posthumously awarded the Order of the Patriotic War, 2 degrees.
              1. Nikolay78
                Nikolay78 25 September 2013 01: 30 New
                +3
                This monument stands in the city where I live
            2. Alex 241
              Alex 241 25 September 2013 00: 07 New
              +4
              Ram (air), Supermarine Spitfire and V-1. Spitfire (on the right) with the tip of the wing “picks up” and flips the V-1 (on the left); rocket gyroscopes are not able to return it after that to the course, it falls
  4. Alexander 1958
    Alexander 1958 24 September 2013 09: 23 New
    13
    Good morning! Thank you for the article! It is not often necessary to read materials of such quality. But there is a fly in the ointment in this barrel of honey, namely ...
    .... with an acute desire to beat the enemy, most of the young Soviet pilots simply could not really fly and fight ...
    .. It is for this reason that Boris Kovzan, who did not know how to turn on his on-board weapon, made 3 of his 4 battering rams ...
    With this last paragraph, the author spoiled the whole impression of the article. His Soviet pilots appear as idiots accidentally falling into the cockpit and not even able to turn on the armament of the aircraft.
    At the beginning of the war, German young pilots had an incomparably better training, but to say that with respect to 1944-45 is too much!
    I am not a pilot, but in my opinion it is much easier to shoot an enemy’s plane at a short distance than under enemy fire to approach him for a battering ram. They went to the ram either from without source or in the heat of battle, if the ammunition ran out. All the perpetrators of the ram are HEROES! and nefig blame them for lack of professionalism.
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 14: 43 New
      -4
      Thank you for the article! It’s not often necessary to read materials of such quality ...
      . It is for this reason that Boris Kovzan, who did not know how to turn on the on-board weapon, made 3 of his 4 battering rams ...
      With this last paragraph, the author spoiled the whole impression of the article. His Soviet pilots appear as idiots accidentally falling into the cockpit and not even able to turn on the armament of the aircraft.

      Maybe this is what this libel is written for? To defame our pilots, our Victory, our people, our country ...
      1. Doctorleg
        Doctorleg 24 September 2013 14: 54 New
        -1
        Today he plays jazz, and tomorrow he will sell his homeland :).
      2. cdrt
        cdrt 25 September 2013 16: 13 New
        0
        Maybe this is what this libel is written for? To defame our pilots, our Victory, our people, our country ...

        Shh ... they hear the enemy that you recognized them!

        If you do not have paranoia, this does not mean that they do not follow you laughing
  5. Chukcha
    Chukcha 24 September 2013 09: 26 New
    +5
    Very interesting information. Thanks to the author.
  6. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 10: 00 New
    +8
    It is strange why the author did not mention this famous case: on September 23, 1941, Hauptmann Steen from III./StG2 raised a Ju-87, by the way, "taken away" from Rudel together with his (Rudel) shooter Feltwebel Scharnovski (he damaged his car during an unsuccessful landing in the previous departure), to intercept the cruiser "Kirov" and during the attack was damaged by the ship's anti-aircraft artillery. Further, as the colleagues describe: "The returning pilots reported that they saw how the elevator was disabled by a direct hit of an anti-aircraft shell on Steen's plane. Probably, realizing that he would still not be able to get out of the dive, Steen did not drop a 1000-kilogram bomb, but, acting only with aileron and rudder, tried to ram the Kirov. However, he did not succeed, and the plane crashed into the water next to the side of the cruiser. There was a powerful explosion, as a result of which "Kirov" was still damaged. Hauptmann Steen and Feldwebel Scharnovski were killed. "
    1. Fitter65
      Fitter65 24 September 2013 11: 04 New
      +1
      Oh, it’s clear that a man read a fairy tale about Baron Vrundel, There’s also a bomb, which Srudel throws from a peak of 300 meters and displays a plane. It's not such a valuable book, especially if you understand the guts in aviation.
  7. Doctorleg
    Doctorleg 24 September 2013 10: 06 New
    +7
    In my opinion, a battering ram ram. It’s one thing to ram a bomber, which can cause great harm, another thing is to destroy a fighter; this is usually a 1 to 1 exchange. And it is beneficial to those who have more planes. As a result, those who ram does not have anything left.
    And no one accuses our pilots of unprofessionalism; this is their misfortune, not their fault. And getting into the plane is difficult - because not all were aces. But when the ammunition ended - then the ram
    1. Day 11
      Day 11 24 September 2013 10: 20 New
      +5
      In general, it is very difficult to "identify" a targeted ram and clash in the fever of air combat. For example, the proven collisions of German pilots: Reinhold Knack-collided on the night of February 4, 1943 on a Bf-110 with the downed Halifax.
      Gerhard Friedrich - March 16, 1945 on a Ju-88 collided with a Lancaster.
      Kotsiok Josef died on the night of September 27, 1943, when his Bf-110 collided with a downed Soviet plane (the type of our airplane was not installed).
      Adolf Brevers-December 19, 1944, allegedly during the landing approach on the Bf-110 collided with a "mosquito", and the "mosquito" crashed, and Brevers was able to land the plane (the question of who rammed whom)
      Rolf Kaldrak-3 feral 1942 in the area of ​​Toropets being on the Bf-110, collided with a downed MiG-1.
      1. igordok
        igordok 24 September 2013 16: 29 New
        +2
        Quote: Den 11
        In general, it is very difficult to "identify" a targeted ram and a collision in the heat of an air battle

        Somewhere met the concept of controlled and uncontrolled ram. In both cases, it is considered a battering ram.
    2. cdrt
      cdrt 25 September 2013 16: 37 New
      +1
      And no one accuses our pilots of unprofessionalism; this is their misfortune, not their fault. And getting into the plane is difficult - because not all were aces. But when the ammunition ended - then the ram

      Why is the fact that our young pilots were sent into battle from air raids up to 20 o'clock is considered a "vilification of heroes"? This is actually a fact for most of the war. It is probably pointless to even debate with the deniers - so much literature on the topic has been released.

      By the way, the Germans seemed to maintain a raid for young pilots under 100 hours until the fall of 1944, when the Allied aviation began to seriously crush synthetic fuel plants and airfields.

      Well ... different approaches - the mass Soviet (with cheap, which means mediocre aircraft), with pilots with little training and German - when the fighter is an elite hunter, with an excellent aircraft, with excellent training (of course, both sides had deviations we were elite guard regiments, the Germans had allies with the appearance of Spitfire IX, P-51D (yes, taking into account the standards of training pilots) they did not allow the mass qualitative superiority of the Germans).
      As a result, they actually knocked down more per person (even taking into account the "errors" of accounting, it is still more), but ours knocked out all the available pilots (in fact, this explains the difference in aircraft production).
      Well ... when I write "a mediocre plane" - of course the La-7 was a very good plane (that is, it was far from mediocre), but it appeared only by the end of the war in an experimental order + practice of flying with an open lantern (I'm not sure the truth that La-7 was massive - I only know about La-5 / La-5FN).

      And ... only a warrior cannot be considered a hero, even if he was heroic, but committed military crimes.
      If he didn’t mow, he acted as a hero.
      Maybe an enemy, but a hero.

      Article +100500
  8. Igarr
    Igarr 24 September 2013 10: 22 New
    +2
    If not for this stupid nonsense about .. Soviet science, quotes idiotic - it would be quite so normal.
    And then the beginning - spoils the rest of the impression.
    In the film "Only old men go to battle", quite so the Soviet film - clearly our pilot says - ".. we were told that the Germans do not go to the front, and cowards. And mine - did not turn away." This time.
    In the book of Pokryshkin A.I. "The sky of war" describes the episode how in the sky near Breslau the entire command post of a division or front (I forgot) - they witnessed a head-on collision between a German and our pilots. These are two.
    And it is offhand that memory remembers dead. And strain - and still find so much that the authors could not even dream of.
    Kamikaze .... fanaticism, etc. How else? If you are initially prepared for one single goal, one single departure?
    Our pilots were taught to fly, shoot down, and return. Even, for some reason, they laid parachutes. And the chassis was built into the aircraft.
    And the Japanese kamikaze.
    .
    Authors - some crazy about the truth .. idiots.
    The material is good. I'll take it to myself.
    1. Doctorleg
      Doctorleg 24 September 2013 14: 52 New
      10
      Why are these quotes idiotic? Everything was so and it was exactly what they said. You can just look at our forum - exactly the same we write - our heroes, and the Anglo-Saxons are cowards, and the Germans are cowards too. And the author gave specific quotes and authors. And the fact that there was such a phrase in Bykov's film - that's why he and Bykov. And his film is different from others and you can watch it repeatedly. But he was disliked by the authorities (not by people in power, but by the authorities). I read that that's why they didn't give him a color film either. And the official position was this - right after the war, the Germans were represented as idiots and cowards (for example, "Heavenly Slow Mover", "The Exploit of a Scout", then they decided that they had defeated an intelligent enemy , then they said that he fought stubbornly. But there were no words that they also had self-sacrifice and heroism. Heroism is only for ours. It may be right - in Russian, I have a feeling that heroism happens only with a right cause
  9. bunta
    bunta 24 September 2013 10: 27 New
    +4
    Meanwhile:

    The crash of Su-25 in the Kuban: the pilot died trying to save the plane.
    Earlier it was reported that on September 23 20.17 Moscow time, while performing a training flight, the Su-25 aircraft of the Southern Military District crashed as a result of an emergency. It was reported that the pilot managed to take the plane away from the nearest village and then catapulted. Victims and destruction on earth were avoided.

    Also apparently from inability?
  10. Fitter65
    Fitter65 24 September 2013 11: 00 New
    +6
    "... Boris Kovzan, who did not even know how to turn on the onboard weapon, made 3 of his 4 rams. And it is for this reason that the former instructor of the aviation school, Ivan Kozhedub, who was able to fly well, never rammed the enemy in 120 battles he fought, although he had situations not very profitable. "
    In reality, only I.D.I.O.T could write such a thing. Well done, a compilation of rams was done, although with some perseverance and the availability of the Internet, this did not take long. But how does the author think of training pilots for himself? At least for the sake of interest in the same Google looked at what the fighter’s cockpit looks like. The weapon control gadgets are located on the aircraft control stick, and last but not least the pilot is explained how to use them. Again, judging by what was written (in the article, not around the corner), Kovzan was also able to fly, because he could catch and ram an enemy plane 3 times, and it’s not the same as chasing a Lada on a Kruzak. Again, the author claims that I.N. Kozhedub only knew how to fly well as an instructor, but kept silent about shooting. What kind of sheep husbands write such articles, describing Westerners it is necessary to spit feces in side of the USSR / Russia. Or they think that without this article is of no value.
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 14: 25 New
      -3
      Without this, they will not be paid for the article ...
  11. revnagan
    revnagan 24 September 2013 11: 03 New
    -1
    I don’t even know what to say ... A strange feeling from the article. And unpleasant. In fact, like this: our heroes and well done. And the enemy ... they, and that’s it, and there they are dear to both the Fritz and the Yap , and others like them.
    1. Sadikoff
      Sadikoff 24 September 2013 15: 36 New
      +2
      Friends or strangers .... All people are human beings, once there were Gdrovites, were ours and Ukrainians, were ours and Georgians.
      As a result, we’ll unite anyway.
  12. Rider
    Rider 24 September 2013 11: 08 New
    +5
    well, the article (despite the slipping anti-Soviet notes) is not bad, only by comparing the number of rams perfect by Soviet pilots in 41/42 - 44gg rams, the author did not take into account (or did not want) the difference in situations on the fronts.

    the fact is that the same number of rams can be explained by the fact that in many sections of the fronts in 41/42 our fighter aircraft was absent as a class.

    take the beginning of the war, the data on the "destruction" of the Red Army Air Force at the airfields can be safely considered somewhat exaggerated.
    Certainly the losses incurred from the first strike were sensitive (and disastrous for some air units), but basically our aircraft died heroically in AIR battles with the enemy in late June and early July 41.
    the remains of the fighter units were drawn by the command for the defense of industrial centers (including Moscow air defense)
    this explains the fact that attack aircraft and bombers went into battle without fighter cover, and suffered tangible losses.
    almost the same situation prevailed near Stalingrad, where in September / August ALL front fighter aircraft totaled about 20 aircraft.
    what rams (or rather, their number) can be talked about here.
    hence the "similarity" of the ramming figures.

    to top it off, I want to express the thought gained in one of the books about aviation in the Second World War.
    Unfortunately, a large number of losses in the Red Army Air Force was also due to the formation system of the flight crew.
    the fact is that the Soviet air regiment, the field of reformation and further education, fought, as they say - to the stop, while the remaining materiel could be reduced to a squadron or even a unit.
    accordingly, only experienced pilots had a chance of survival. (not without exceptions of course)
    in the German units, the young pilot came to the regiment already leading the battle, and attached himself to a more mature pilot.
    where he could relatively safely gain combat experience.

    well, and at the end.
    small table on downed planes of countries participating in WW2

    British Air Force: 15 aircraft, 175 killed, 56 thousand sorties

    US Air Force: 41,575 aircraft, 40,061 killed
    including in Europe 27 694 planes, 30 099 killed, 1 693565 sorties

    USSR Air Force: 47 aircraft, 844 killed, 34 sorties

    Luftwaffe: 85 aircraft, 650 killed, 57 sorties on the Eastern Front.

    Sources.
    USSR - Krivosheev
    USA - IAAF
    Britain -RAF
    Germany is a bunch of sources, because in one place they are not kept.

    Everyone can draw conclusions independently.
    1. Igarr
      Igarr 24 September 2013 11: 25 New
      0
      Alexander, thanks ...
      Aircraft plate - shine!
      Especially the US and we .... the comparison is deadly.
      1. Rider
        Rider 24 September 2013 11: 37 New
        +1
        Quote: Igarr
        Aircraft plate - shine!


        data taken from here:http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/205/813676.html

        there are many more interesting numbers.

        Well, I advise you to read the book "I-16 for a hitman" which (despite the "fantastic" genre) describes the beginning of the war quite well for our Air Force.
    2. OffenroR
      OffenroR 24 September 2013 21: 05 New
      +3
      "Well, the article (in spite of the slipping anti-Soviet notes" If the exploits of Soviet pilots are equated with the German ones (the Germans are in no way inferior to the Russians as wars ... this is proven by history) where it is written immediately becomes "anti-Soviet" or "anti-Russian". ..
    3. cdrt
      cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 02 New
      0
      British Air Force: 15 aircraft, 175 killed, 56 thousand sorties

      US Air Force: 41,575 aircraft, 40,061 killed
      including in Europe 27 694 planes, 30 099 killed, 1 693565 sorties

      USSR Air Force: 47 aircraft, 844 killed, 34 sorties

      Luftwaffe: 85 aircraft, 650 killed, 57 sorties on the Eastern Front.




      http://militera.lib.ru/h/brofy_a/26.html

      In fact, it’s the figures for the losses of Americans in Europe in WWII that are different laughing

      By plane sorties steel coincides.
      But in terms of losses - it turns out that the losses of the US Air Force in Europe and the Mediterranean are about 18500 aircraft (and the total in the WWII at all theaters is about 23000 aircraft).
      Well, the number of downed Axis countries in Europe is approximately 30000 aircraft.
      So ... the conclusions can be very different (which your argument confirms - everyone will make them for himself) laughing
  13. Ivan_Ivanov
    Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 11: 09 New
    +4
    Manipulation №1:
    “..Who were not lucky to be born in the USSR, and therefore they lost the right to respect for their courage among Russian people ..”

    In fact, they lost the right to respect for the fact that they fought in the army of the aggressor who attacked our Motherland, fought in the ranks of those who destroyed our peaceful people, our cities and villages. The French, who fought in the Normandy-Niemen, who were also “unlucky to be born in the USSR,” earned the full right to respect.

    Manipulation №2
    “..If the rams of Soviet pilots seemed our propaganda to be heroic, self-sacrificing, then the very same actions of the Japanese were for some reason called“ fanaticism ”and“ doom ”

    The author pretends that he does not understand the difference between forced self-sacrifice and conscious suicide. Going into a ram of an enemy convoy in a doomed plane in battle is completely different than consciously flying out with a suicidal mission.

    Manipulation №3
    “An air ram is a standard of feat of arms. The diametrically opposite attitude to the ram was the first moral defeat of the vaunted Hitler aces, a harbinger of our victory ”- this is the opinion of the best Soviet ace of the Great Patriotic War, Ivan Kozhedub, expressed in 1990 (by the way, Kozhedub himself did not commit any rams)”

    What did the author mean by this? What Kozhedub is not worthy to argue on the topic of ram? But he is right. For the most part, Hitler’s aces had a different, opposite attitude to ram. At least due to the fact that with us they, known to us, fought in our territory, fought in foreign territory, in a war of aggression; and our pilots defended their land.

    Manipulation №4
    “I am publishing this post for those who are new to aviation history, but would like to learn something about respectable people.”

    Forgive me, but contrary to the imposition of dignity imposed by the author, I will not consider worthy people those who fought in the ranks of those who attacked my Motherland, who burned our people out with entire villages, who deliberately destroyed our civilians. Now, if they refused to fight in the current army, even if at the cost of their lives, they would deserve my respect.

    Manipulation №5
    “The first air ram in World War II was not committed by the Soviet, as is commonly believed, but by a Polish pilot.”

    All information from the war period must be checked and double-checked. Propaganda - it is not only Soviet propaganda, it is generally propaganda; and Polish as well. Recall how Polish dragoons on horseback defeated German tankers.
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 11: 20 New
      +4
      Manipulation №6
      “And then, in a desperate desire to stop the German tanks, the flight officer Thomas sent his battled“ Battle ”anti-aircraft guns ..."

      Of course, this is not a manipulation of this article, but generally a manipulation, in an array of articles on this topic. One sentence and we see which hero is an English pilot. And I recall hundreds of dirty articles of articles on the topic, what kind of Gastello a sucker and a worthless pilot crashed into the ground, stupidly killing his comrades and himself instead of leaving the plane, or at least letting his comrades leave it (and in general his feat ) Does everyone remember this dirt?
      Yeah, here at the end of the article is the same dirt that our pilots did not know how to fight, the command was criminally stupid, and there was no technique, so our pilots had to go to ram. But the English and German pilots (according to the author of the article) went on ramming solely because of their heroism .

      Manipulation №7
      “And then Hutchinson sent his" Battle "into the midst of the Italian infantry, at the cost of his own death, destroying about 20 enemy soldiers. Eyewitnesses claimed that at the time of the ram, Hutchinson was alive - the British bomber was controlled by the pilot until the collision with the ground ... "

      Why does the author call all Soviet propaganda propaganda, but nowhere does he say that TAM was propaganda too? ...

      Manipulation №8
      “In Soviet times, in Russian literature, not only was there never even a mention of aerial rams committed by German pilots, but it was also repeatedly stated that it was impossible to perform such feats by“ cowardly fascists ”

      Naturally. During the war, needed, needed propaganda, raising morale. And after the war, to say that the Germans also committed rams - to admit that people were manipulated, cause discontent. Is it so hard to understand? In addition, the Germans didn’t make rams on the Soviet front.

      Manipulation №9
      “.. it has become impossible to deny the documented facts of the heroism of our main adversary”

      The fact of the heroism of our adversary could consist only in one thing - their valuable freedom and even life, the refusal to fight against us. I can’t call the heroes of American pilots who committed aggression against Vietnam, or Yugoslavia, so that they do not commit.
      In addition, any collision of non-Soviet pilots by the author gives a battering ram. If we approach the actions of our pilots in the same way, then the number of Soviet pilots who rammed the Soviet pilots will increase significantly.
      1. Ivan_Ivanov
        Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 11: 26 New
        +6
        Manipulation №10
        “..In the number of pilots killed in suicide attacks (at least 1000 people!), The USSR, along with Japan, undoubtedly dominates the gloomy list of countries ..”

        We noticed that when the author speaks of Soviet pilots, they "died not in heroic attacks," but in "SUICIDOUS". It seems that he didn’t lie - but a manipulation of the face. And our list for some reason is not a LIST of HEROES, but a “gloomy list”. Why is the author so attached to the niches, and quite differently refers to the Germans, British, Americans? (Rhetorical question)

        Manipulation №11
        “My opinion: the massive use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the readiness of the flight personnel and command, which constantly put its pilots in a hopeless situation.”

        ABOUT! Here it is! Here, in order to bring the reader to this idea, this propaganda article was written. According to the author, “patriotism” and “heroism” are the tenth thing - the main thing (AGAIN!) Are stupid Soviet commanders, poor Soviet equipment, inept Soviet pilots and criminal command. Again these liberal, Rezun mantras. This is the real propaganda that the author uses, which acts bypassing consciousness. The author, that again we won not thanks, but contrary to ???

        “In the air units of countries where the command was able to skillfully lead units, creating an advantage in the forces in the right place, whose aircraft had high combat characteristics, and the pilots were well trained, the need to ram the enemy simply did not arise. But in the aviation parts of countries in which the command was not able to concentrate forces on the main direction, in which the pilots could not really fly, and the planes had mediocre or even low flight characteristics ...
        ..with an acute desire to beat the enemy, most of the young Soviet pilots simply could not really fly ...
        .. For this reason, Boris Kovzan, who did not know how to turn on his on-board weapon, made 3 of his 4 battering rams .. "

        Well ... Liberal propaganda defaming all of ours, everything Soviet, everything Russian, acting on emotions bypassing consciousness, is again manifested in all its vile fullness.
        1. Doctorleg
          Doctorleg 24 September 2013 15: 10 New
          +1
          Hmm! Hard case. you all texts where there is no addition in every paragraph "And our Heroes are better and more heroic, the technique is better, and the commanders are more talented and in general we have won" "Do you see the enemy propaganda? The war seems to be over. And yes, the list of the dead is gloomy. pilots, not German
          1. Ivan_Ivanov
            Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 15: 38 New
            +1
            Well, maybe you spit in our pilots, in the ancestors, in our army you call objectivity ...

            The war seems to be over and there is a winner, but Goebbels’s case lives on. Someone our victory is haunted. For him, any German ram, an English ram, an American ram is the heroic act of an ace pilot. And any of our rams - from inability, from the stupidity of command, from bad technology ...
            1. Doctorleg
              Doctorleg 24 September 2013 16: 16 New
              +4
              It seems we read one text, but we see different things. and there was no spitting
            2. The comment was deleted.
    2. OffenroR
      OffenroR 24 September 2013 21: 13 New
      +2
      "What did the author mean by this? That Kozhedub is not worthy to talk about ramming? But he is right. For the most part, Hitler's aces had a different, opposite attitude to ramming." --- This is because the Germans valued the pilot more than the plane .. .that is a fact ... there was even a decree not to sacrifice oneself to destroy the enemy.


      "At least due to the fact that they, known to us, fought with us on our territory, fought in foreign territory, in a war of conquest; and our pilots defended OWN Land." --- In 1945, the GERMANS were already defending their land)) And they fought fiercely everywhere. In a battle somewhere in the Kuban, 20000 Germans were killed, the battles were fought on the territory without a strategist. meaning ... and they did not retreat ... The question is ... why did they sacrifice themselves for the land they did not need? They would have taken and retreated ... as the Italians did ... or the Romanians ...
      1. cdrt
        cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 14 New
        +1
        The question is ... why did they sacrifice themselves for the land they did not need? They would take it and retreat ... how did the Italians .. or the Romanians ...

        The answer can probably be found in the text of a Russian author of the XVII century.
        He discussed in the text how to reform the Russian army laughing (is it familiar? laughing ).
        He wrote the following:
        "... the Germans outnumber us in strength, the Poles in bravery, the Tatars in greyhound ..."

        From this I deduced that since we are closest to the Poles, their type of formation of troops is closer to us (well, it doesn’t matter here).

        Conclusion - the Germans are traditionally probably from the most stubborn European nations, up to stubbornness (order above all else is their own proverb).
        We (and the Poles, on the whole, are apparently all Slavs) are braver, more reckless because of their greater emotionality, more fatal (this is again probably true for all our Muslims and Orthodox in comparison with Catholics and Protestants).
        1. OffenroR
          OffenroR 25 September 2013 18: 44 New
          +1
          I agree ... but not about bravery ... Russians in this area will be cooler than the Poles. And "bravery" (rather arrogance) brought the Poles to the point that by the end of the war every third Pole was in the afterlife ... Like the invaders resisted. ..and what is the result? The Germans crumpled them like a pack of cigarettes ... And once again about the courage, the Russians will go straight for the machine gun, and the German will use any method to destroy this machine gun but stay alive ... and while he waits artillery preparation or something like that - Russian tanks will roll up, press them into the ground and roll back playing the balalaika, remembering the bears left at home and washing it down with vodka wassat
  14. smiths xnumx
    smiths xnumx 24 September 2013 11: 11 New
    +1
    Well, the Bulgarians also committed two air rams during the Second World War ...
    Dimitar Svetozarov Spisarevsky was born on July 19, 1916 in the city of Dobrich. Since after the end of the First World War this region of Bulgaria left Romania, his family moved to Sofia, where Dimitar entered the Royal Military School.

    Spissarevsky was distinguished by an ardent character and was subjected to severe disciplinary punishments several times. So, even for a year he was expelled from school and sent as an ordinary to the infantry regiment. In the end, in 1938 he nevertheless finished school and received the rank of second lieutenant. In the autumn of the same year, Spisarevsky, among a group of 15 people, was sent to Germany to a flying school in Kaufbeiren. In March 1939, after completing the initial flight training course, five pilots, among them Spisarevsky, continued their studies at the Luftwaffe fighter school in Vernoichen. There Spisarevsky was included in the second lieutenant Stoyanov, who by that time had already received a pilot-instructor certificate. He was included in the 3rd air group of the 6th fighter regiment and, with his characteristic ardor, was eager to take part in repelling the raids of American bombers on Sofia . Lieutenant Spisarevsky made his first and, as it turned out, last sortie mission on December 20, 1943. On that day, 50 B-24Ds from the 15th U.S. Air Force participated in a raid on Sofia, which were covered by 60 R-38s. When an order for takeoff arrived in the 3rd air group, it turned out that the engine did not start on the Spfarevsky Bf-109G-2, and the squadron took off without it. As a result, he had to urgently transfer to another fighter, listed at the headquarters of the group. At the same time, Spisarevsky said to one of the mechanics: “If I am destined to die, then I would like to die in my plane, but first I must bring down at least one enemy.” Starting the engine, Spisarevsky took off and at maximum speed tried to catch up with his squadron. Over the village of Dolni-Pasarel, he collided with two B-24Ns from 376BG and attacked them on the fly. One bomber was immediately shot down, receiving a series of direct hits. The pilot of the second Liberator, seeing the Messerschmitt right in front of him, instinctively pulled the helm toward himself, trying to get away from the collision. However, the Bulgarian pilot also took the control stick over himself, and after a few moments his Bf-109G-2 crashed from below into the fuselage of a bomber behind the planes. There was a powerful explosion, and the burning debris of both aircraft fell to the ground near the village of Pancherevo. Posthumously, Dimitar Spisarevsky was awarded the rank of captain.

    Interestingly, the Japanese Embassy in Sofia asked the Bulgarian Ministry of Defense to report all the circumstances of the ramming committed by Spisarevsky. Then his actions were covered in detail in the Japanese press as an example to follow.
    1. smiths xnumx
      smiths xnumx 24 September 2013 11: 17 New
      +2
      Nedelcho Bonchev graduated from the pilot class of the Bulgarian military school and was sent to Piacenza (Italy) to improve flight skills. Returning to Bulgaria, he was trained at a fighter school. Since 1941, Bonchev-pilot of the 222nd yato, and soon - the commander of this squadron. He flew on the fighter B-534, D.520 and Bf 109G-6. He achieved his first success on December 20 when he knocked out the Liberator.

      Lieutenant Bonchev became famous on April 17, 1944. On that black day for Bulgarian aviation, 350 B-17s, under cover of 150 R-51s, approached Sofia. The pilots covering the capital, accustomed to the characteristic silhouettes of the two-frame R-38, took the Mustangs for their fighters. Using this, Americans shot down 9 planes (6 pilots died) and 7 damaged. Bulgarian fighters shot down 3 and shot down 8 bombers, another 9 enemy aircraft were damaged by anti-aircraft artillery. In that battle, Bonchev destroyed two Fortresses. The second, having consumed all the ammunition, he rammed. At the time of the strike, the Bulgarian pilot, along with the seat, was thrown out of the Messerschmitt. With great difficulty, he freed himself from seatbelts and used a parachute. After prolonged treatment in a military hospital in Sofia and at his relatives in the village of Mirkovo, Lieutenant Bonchev returned to his bracken.
      On September 9, Bulgaria began military operations on the side of the states of the anti-Hitler coalition, and its pilots were the first to engage in battle, striking at the retreating Wehrmacht troops. On October 10, in the area of ​​Kriva Palanka (Macedonia), the Bulgarian Messerschmitts stormed a mechanized convoy under heavy anti-aircraft fire. After one of the attacks, the aircraft manned by Bonchev began to smoke. The pilot climbed and jumped with a parachute. Unfortunately, it was not possible to avoid captivity. In the German camp in southern Germany, he was twice unsuccessfully offered to collaborate with the Bulgarian emigrant government of Professor Tsanko-va. In early May 1945, the Nazis began the evacuation of the camp. Bonchev was sick with pneumonia and walked with difficulty. They say he was shot by a woman from an SS unit escorting prisoners. Thus ended in less than 28 years his life path the second hero of air rams in the sky of Bulgaria. Posthumously he was awarded the highest Bulgarian honors.
      http://www.libma.ru/transport_i_aviacija/aviacija_i_vremja_1998_06/p9.php

  15. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 11: 23 New
    +3
    Dobele Anton. Bane 11.11.1943 In the area of ​​the Smolensk-Vitebsk highway, his FW-190A-4 W.Nr.147082 unexpectedly hit the wing of a JG51 fighter. Having lost control, the Fokke-Wulf Döbele rammed the IL-2, which he was going to attack. Also a difficult case
    1. Day 11
      Day 11 24 September 2013 12: 49 New
      +2
      I apologize, camarades, confused the photo. On the above, it’s Clara Vasilie (Romanian) on July 12, 1941, in a battle between I-16 and IAR-80 that the Soviet plane allegedly rammed, while the Soviet side claims that our pilot was actually ramming. Here is a photo of Anton Dobele
  16. Beck
    Beck 24 September 2013 11: 24 New
    +5
    Yeah. Such articles do not often appear. Without bias, informative, without exalting only ourselves, paying tribute to all who deserve it.
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 11: 30 New
      -3
      My opinion: the massive use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the preparedness of the flight personnel and command, which constantly put its pilots in a hopeless situation.
      ..Our pilots conducted a lot more rams than "foreigners" ..

      laughing
      This article is a liberal propaganda, anti-Soviet, anti-Russian high .. p, designed to defame us, our country, our Victory, the heroism of our grandfathers.
      Someone does not want to knead the obvious things, notice how they manipulate them ...
      1. TS3sta3
        TS3sta3 24 September 2013 16: 02 New
        +1
        Someone does not want to notice obvious things, to notice how they manipulate them ...

        the manipulation is so subtle that you hardly notice it, but it is postponed in the subcortex.
      2. cdrt
        cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 17 New
        0
        Someone does not want to knead the obvious things, notice how they manipulate them ...

        My dear ... you judging by the minuses of an extremist even for this site laughing
        Holier than the pope laughing
  17. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 11: 27 New
    +5
    And here is what Alfred Grislavsky says (www.airforce.ru/history/ww2/grislawsky/index.htm): "A.
    D. What do you know about rams? About cases when Soviet pilots found themselves without ammunition, or their planes were damaged, and they had no other chance to bring down the enemy, except to ram it?

    A.G. Never heard of that. There were German pilots who used ram in German air defense. But I did not hear about the Soviet ones in Russia. There were times when the planes collided, but it did not seem like it was conscious. I have never heard such a thing.
    HELL. In general, it is well known that Soviet pilots fired about five hundred rams on the entire front during the entire war. Really such cases have not met?

    A.G. No, I haven't heard of that. We did not have this in the Caucasus. Maybe in the north or in the central sector of the front, but we didn't have that. Never heard of it. "Lying ???
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 11: 35 New
      +2
      Why is it necessary to "lie"?
      German propaganda worked very well. No one told the German pilots, and the Germans in general, that the Russians commit such heroic acts as the Toran. To say this is to undermine the morale of their German pilots.
      1. OffenroR
        OffenroR 24 September 2013 21: 22 New
        +3
        Quote: Ivan_Ivanov
        Why is it necessary to "lie"?
        German propaganda worked very well. No one told the German pilots, and the Germans in general, that the Russians commit such heroic acts as the Toran. To say this is to undermine the morale of their German pilots.

        And against whom did the Soviet pilots make rams? Against the Martians ....? He says that there were no rams A GERMAN pilot who flew against the Soviet .... And the German leadership would not be able to hide the rams .... I'm afraid a lot of simple clashes were recorded as ram .. randomly .... or intentionally ... for propaganda purposes)))
  18. smiths xnumx
    smiths xnumx 24 September 2013 11: 29 New
    +2
    For the pilot-writer Lieutenant Minoru Shirota, this decision was plagued by the desperate situation of Japan, in which she found herself in early 1945. A year ago, the front was thousands of kilometers from the homeland in New Guinea. But now, a short year later, the front was only a few thousand feet - giant B-29 bombers tormented Japan. On January 4, 1945, when the alarm sounded announcing the arrival of a group of 78 B-29s of the 497th and 500th Bomber Groups over Nagoya, Shirota, having finished his last words on paper, ran to his favorite fighter "Hien" ... It took him about six minutes to gain height when he saw his enemy and instantly dived at him. The excitement of self-awareness as an Air Force pilot, the joy of flying, and pride in the nation, were all on the last lines of Minoru Shirota. A pilot and writer, he turned his creative talent into a pen and earned a large number of enthusiastic readers in all of warring Japan. Shirota thought of his fighter as a horse, of aerial combat, as of a knightly duel, of the pilots of his regiment, as of the knights of the Round Table, of his homeland of Japan as Camelot. Thanks to his numerous articles in newspapers and magazines, Shirota became an unofficial representative of the Japanese Air Force and a hero of impressionable Japanese youth. His readers followed his every word and deed. On that day, along with 43 Tony fighters from 55 senai from Komaki airfield and 56 senai from Itami airfield, 12 Zero fighters, 6 twin-engine Irving and 9 Judy dive-bomber fighters took off to intercept American bombers from Meiji airfield "from the 210th squared aviation of the fleet. Japanese fighters made 346 attacks, but did not achieve any results. When the surviving Japanese fighters, having fired off the ammunition, abandoned their attempts to interfere with the Americans, several single "Tony" fighters appeared over the formation of American bombers. The first "Hien" Minoru Shirota approached the 67-ton B-29 and began to dive with increasing speed, ignoring the barrage of fire from the defensive installations of the B-29. A few moments later, a Japanese fighter jet crashed between the fuselage and the No.3 B-29 "Leading Lady" No. 42-24766 882 Squadron, piloted by Major Wilbur "Barney" Hurlbutt. A terrible blow tore off the wing of a giant bomber and both aircraft tumbled down. Only the tail gunner Sergeant Harold T. Hedges managed to get out of the falling plane. Following Shirota in B-29 No. 42-24626 Jokers Wild, piloted by 1st Lieutenant John W. Lawson bumped into "Tony" Lt. Toshiro Wakui. A couple of minutes later, the "Hien" fighter, piloted by Sergeant Yoshio Takamuki, dived into another bomber, but missed, only slightly hooked on the giant, and with a broken wing managed to return to base. Downstairs, on the roof of one of the houses, one of Shirota's friend-writers made a film about the last fight of Japanese Exupery. Minoru Shirota at the last moment managed to leave the falling fighter with a parachute, but the next day without regaining consciousness he died from his injuries. The fighter writer became a hero of the nation and began a bloodbath of "patriotism" in the airspace over Japan.
    http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww2/ki61.html

    Ki.61-Ib from 59 Sentai 3 sensed at Fukuoka AFB. The emblem on the keel indicates belonging to the "Special Attacks" kamikaze units
    1. Rider
      Rider 24 September 2013 11: 44 New
      +1
      I will complement Kuznetsov’s colleague.

      (as well as all aviation enthusiasts)

      A pilot who loved only heaven and sake

      A drunkard and a dreamer, a brawler and a womanizer, an officer who does not recognize discipline outside of combat, this is all about the lieutenant of the Imperial Naval Aviation - Sadaaki Akamutsu "Tameya" nicknamed "Matsuchan" (Little Pine).
      What is interesting is that despite all its shortcomings, this Japanese pilot flew 8000 flight hours in the war and did not receive a single scratch. The number of aircraft he shot down is not exactly known, because firstly, the Japanese victory counting system is very peculiar and the aces should share their victories with the team, so according to official statistics the lieutenant has thirty victories, according to his colleagues 80, and he sober claimed 220 victories, and drunk 350.


      full article: http://alternathistory.org.ua/letchik-kotoryi-lyubil-tolko-nebo-i-sake
      1. smiths xnumx
        smiths xnumx 24 September 2013 12: 26 New
        0
        On June 7, 1943, junior lieutenant Endo Masuaki, surrounded by P-39 Aircobra fighters, rammed one of them, killing himself and destroying an American plane.
        On October 8, 1943, an army pilot Anabuki Sato-si rammed B-24 in Burma. Destroying the American bomber, Anabuki successfully made an emergency landing.
        We are proud of the Hero of the Soviet Union, Lieutenant B.I. Kovzan, master of ramming strikes. Four times he threw his fighter at enemy vehicles, destroying the enemy, it would seem, in hopeless situations.
        Japanese junior lieutenant Kawato Masajiro has the same number of rams. At the age of 18, he made his first ram, shooting down a B-25 over Rabaul. Having shot all the ammunition in the heat of battle, he sent his "Zero" into an American bomber from below, having managed to escape by parachute. On November 11, 1943, flying to intercept American bombers, he made a second ram, but was wounded himself. On December 17, Kawato attacked the R-39 Aircobra fighter. As a result of his frontal attack, the planes exploded, and the Japanese pilot escaped again using a parachute. For a long time, Kawato was hatching the idea of ​​ramming the B-24. Finally, on February 6 over Rabaul, he managed to carry out his plan. He struck a ramming blow on the tail unit of the bomber, destroying it, and he himself safely escaped by parachute. On March 9, 1945, seriously wounded, he was captured by the Australians, and after the war he returned to Japan.
        Throughout August 1944, the night fighter squadron of Lieutenant Minobe Tadashi, armed with two-seat Gekko (Irving) aircraft, unsuccessfully tried to shoot down at least one B-24. American "Liberators" bombarded the large seaport of Davao on the island of Mindanao (Southern Philippines) with enviable consistency almost every night. But luck turned away from the squadron. Inexperienced pilots were ashamed of their failures against the four-engine giants. The scoring was opened on September 5 by Warrant Officer Nakagawa Yoshimasa and his gunner, Senior Warrant Officer Osumi Isamu. Taking off to intercept just after midnight and catching the target, they found that the gun was jammed. Meanwhile, B-24, having bombed, calmly left.
        “I'm going to ram him!” Nakagawa said, sending the fighter to the enemy’s plane.
        - Come on! - immediately held him Osumi. The fighter propeller ripped open the fuselage of the bomber, which immediately lost control and began to fall. However, the fighter obeyed the rudders and continued to fly. A shard of glass from the broken cabin wounded Nakagawa's eye, but the pilot managed to land the car safely.
        http://wunderwaffe.narod.ru/HistoryBook/Kamikaze/10.htm

        1. Day 11
          Day 11 24 September 2013 12: 37 New
          +1
          Roma, about this Hungarian you have no information?
          1. smiths xnumx
            smiths xnumx 24 September 2013 13: 03 New
            +2
            According to Hungarian data, on July 12, 1941, the Hungarian Air Force lost its FIAT CR.16 (board V42) from a 265/2 squadron from an I-3 collision, the pilot of which escaped by parachute. Nothing is said about his "counterpart". In Soviet sources this event was not reflected in any way, and no information was given about any rams of that day on this sector of the front.
            http://www.tinlib.ru/transport_i_aviacija/aviacija_i_vremja_2003_05/p8.php
            1. Day 11
              Day 11 24 September 2013 13: 25 New
              +1
              Roma, read an interview with Alfred Grislavsky? If not, I highly recommend (link above)
  19. Vorkot cat
    Vorkot cat 24 September 2013 11: 30 New
    +2
    Many thanks to the author, article plus)

    Many of the above were unknown to me :)
  20. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 11: 55 New
    +4
    Here's how the Ram describes in Heinz Knoke's memoirs from JG 1:"There are only Sergeant Ickes, my wingman, and I. There is no way out. If this is the end, I will sell my life as dear as possible. I will go to the ram and take one of the Americans with me.
    Tracing lines cover us from all sides. Shells sprinkle onto my plane like hail, and it gradually loses speed.
    Ickes is right behind me. I make narrow circles. A Mustang sat on my tail. I can’t shake it off. My plane is so slow, as if it was too tired to fly further. A few more bursts flashed my rear fuselage.
    With the last effort of the engine, I sharply raised the plane up, then slowed down. The American did not expect this. He missed and now appeared in front of me and a little lower. I clearly saw the pilot's face when he turned around. He entered the peak too late. I'm right above him. If I don’t get there, I can ram him. I feel a chilling cold.
    The distance is shrinking quickly: only a few meters remain between us. My turn fell into his fuselage: I try to get into the pilot. His engine caught fire. We will go together! I felt a strong jolt from the first blow and saw how my right wing fell off. After a moment, I threw back the hatch and jumped. A furious wave of flame shot up behind me. Two explosions merged into one fireball.
    After a few moments, my parachute opened ... "
    http://militera.lib.ru/db/knoke/06.html
    1. Simple
      Simple 24 September 2013 14: 25 New
      +1
      Exposure:
      "... The distance is closing fast: there are only a few meters left between us ...."

      A similar case is shown on 25: 06 minute of the following video:

      (For people with a labile psyche, please do not watch.)


      1. Day 11
        Day 11 24 September 2013 14: 33 New
        +3
        Man, why spread it in German. You can also translate. Not all German-speaking
        1. Simple
          Simple 24 September 2013 14: 51 New
          +1
          Good afternoon Denis.

          Somehow I didn’t orient myself, as in Russian correctly enter into the search engine.
          I have to go to work already.
          If anything, then around midnight.
  21. Ivan_Ivanov
    Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 13: 35 New
    -2
    Quote: Bongo
    One feels that the author has worked very well on the topic. In my opinion, it turned out, it is interesting, but the gravel is not biased.

    Do you call this "bias"?
    My opinion: the massive use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the preparedness of the flight personnel and command, which constantly put its pilots in a hopeless situation.
    ..Our pilots conducted a lot more rams than "foreigners".


    This article is a liberal propaganda, anti-Soviet, Russophobic high .. p, designed to defame us, our country, our Victory, the heroism of our grandfathers.
    Whoever does not see this is either stupid like a cork, or the same agent provocateur, like the author of the article.
  22. Jober
    Jober 24 September 2013 13: 41 New
    +4
    The material is very interesting. But let's stop doing self-flagellation.
    Believe me, I'm tired of 25 years. The Japanese, who consider their kamikaze heroes, are unlikely to consider American rammers as such.
  23. Simple
    Simple 24 September 2013 14: 05 New
    +2
    The most important objects should be protected at all costs.







  24. de bouillon
    de bouillon 24 September 2013 14: 31 New
    -1
    Quote: Ivan_Ivanov
    Manipulation №10
    “..In the number of pilots killed in suicide attacks (at least 1000 people!), The USSR, along with Japan, undoubtedly dominates the gloomy list of countries ..”

    We noticed that when the author speaks of Soviet pilots, they "died not in heroic attacks," but in "SUICIDOUS". It seems that he didn’t lie - but a manipulation of the face. And our list for some reason is not a LIST of HEROES, but a “gloomy list”. Why is the author so attached to the niches, and quite differently refers to the Germans, British, Americans? (Rhetorical question)

    Manipulation №11
    “My opinion: the massive use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the readiness of the flight personnel and command, which constantly put its pilots in a hopeless situation.”

    ABOUT! Here it is! Here, in order to bring the reader to this idea, this propaganda article was written. According to the author, “patriotism” and “heroism” are the tenth thing - the main thing (AGAIN!) Are stupid Soviet commanders, poor Soviet equipment, inept Soviet pilots and criminal command. Again these liberal, Rezun mantras. This is the real propaganda that the author uses, which acts bypassing consciousness. The author, that again we won not thanks, but contrary to ???

    “In the air units of countries where the command was able to skillfully lead units, creating an advantage in the forces in the right place, whose aircraft had high combat characteristics, and the pilots were well trained, the need to ram the enemy simply did not arise. But in the aviation parts of countries in which the command was not able to concentrate forces on the main direction, in which the pilots could not really fly, and the planes had mediocre or even low flight characteristics ...
    ..with an acute desire to beat the enemy, most of the young Soviet pilots simply could not really fly ...
    .. For this reason, Boris Kovzan, who did not know how to turn on his on-board weapon, made 3 of his 4 battering rams .. "

    Well ... Liberal propaganda defaming all of ours, everything Soviet, everything Russian, acting on emotions bypassing consciousness, is again manifested in all its vile fullness.



    you are just a stubborn ba ..
    1. Ivan_Ivanov
      Ivan_Ivanov 24 September 2013 14: 51 New
      0
      Thank you for the attempt of insult, you have confirmed the correctness and indisputability of the arguments presented.
  25. pinecone
    pinecone 24 September 2013 14: 50 New
    +1
    And then, in a desperate desire to stop the German tanks, the flight officer Thomas sent his battled anti-aircraft “Battle” to one of the bridges, having managed to inform the comrades about the decision.

    To the authors. It would not hurt you to properly understand the military ranks of the personnel of the British Air Force. They do not have any "flight officers" and never had any. There is one thing: either a flight lieutenant (Air Force captain), or a flying officer (Air Force lieutenant).
    In addition, the Air Force is still not squadrons, but squadrons.
    And most importantly, less pathos in chanting the prowess of foreign pilots. A restrained, purely informative presentation style would be more appropriate in this case.
  26. tlauicol
    tlauicol 24 September 2013 14: 52 New
    +2
    By the way, the top B 17 managed to sit down !!! 1,5 hours to the base flew.
  27. Avenger711
    Avenger711 24 September 2013 15: 01 New
    +3
    Already in the 42nd year, when about 90 percent of the infantrymen on earth trained for at least 3 months before being sent to the front lines, it was argued that in 1944 the Soviet aviation, which did not bear heavy losses, sent those who could not fly into battle, that it was necessary to smoke something special.

    In a head-on collision, which, by the way, is better to go on an FW-190 than on a "Messer", and indeed a car with a star-shaped air-cooled engine, resistant to holes and covering the pilot, the time to turn away, a split second, there is clearly 95% of collisions namely collisions.

    In 1944, the problem manifested itself in full, that no performance characteristics allowed to catch up with the enemy, because the screw did not pull, everyone was easily torn off from each other, under these conditions an increase in the number of attempts to use each approach was possible.

    "Explain" superiority? I remember in the topic about the PTR I cited such a passage from the 41st year, how Zhukov's order to take and use these same PTRs, maybe 20 calculations will die, but at least one tank stumbled, since the normal cannon is dumb. Of course, the order does not say so, but the type of PTR is effective. And such orders, regardless of the real effectiveness of weapons in any warring sea army.
    1. cdrt
      cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 22 New
      0
      "Explain" superiority? I remember in the topic about the PTR I cited such a passage from the 41st year, how Zhukov's order to take and use these same PTRs, maybe 20 calculations will die, but at least one tank stumbled, since the normal cannon is dumb. Of course, the order does not say so, but the type of PTR is effective. And such orders, regardless of the real effectiveness of weapons in any warring sea army.

      I don’t know if it’s true or not ...
      But ... really - even if 20 die, the tank will be destroyed (on the scale of the war - a million soldiers for all released German tanks).
      You do not have the ability to respond with guns and tanks - you answer with the lives of soldiers.
      In war, as in war ... they kill and perish.
  28. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 15: 17 New
    +2
    Here's more info on rams by German pilots.
    Walter Dahl. Taran performed Dahl’s aviators on September 13, 1944,
    Breaking through the Lightning's barrier, they attacked a group of B-17s of about 30 vehicles. Walter managed to damage one Fortress from the very first approach, but during the second attack the weapon of his Focke-Wulf completely jammed, so the German ace decided to go to By a blow from the right plane between the rear upper machine-gun mount and the keel of the bomber, Dahl cut through the B-17, but he himself was forced to leave the fighter that had entered a tailspin with a parachute. An interesting moment - among his comrades, Walter had the nickname "Rammdahl" received perhaps
    after that case.
    Ludwig Francischet. June 14, 1941, a group of South African "Hurricane" from 1 Sqdn. The SAAF flew to storm the German airfield in El-Ghazal, and Bf-109s from JG 27 rose up against it. Among the assaults was the famous ace Captain Kenneth Driver, who distinguished himself in battles against the Italians in East Africa mainly as a specialist in ground targets. Driver Franciscet and went on the attack.
    pilots, according to all tournament canons, rushed at each other in the frontal, firing from all the trunks and by no means wanting to turn away.However, at the very last moment, Kenneth decided that a living hero is much better than a dead one, and began to go left and up, but Ludwig continued flight in a straight line, without thinking about any maneuvers. And since the distance was clearly insufficient for divergence, the "Messerschmitt"
    the end of the right plane along the right plane of the "harricane", and the latter was cut off by almost a third. The driver jumped out with a parachute, and Franciscet flew a little more (he also lists the "Maryland", shot down in the same battle a minute after the ramming) and made a safe landing. Then everything developed according to the same scenario as that of Galland and Bader: Ludwig was so courteous and hospitable to the captive South African that they easily found a common language, and
    a few hours later, no one would have thought that the two had recently tried to kill each other. When Driver mentioned his wife in a conversation, Franciskett immediately offered to write her a letter so that she would not worry too much about the fate of her husband. And that very evening the German flew into English territory and dropped the pennant with a letter over the British positions near Sidi Barrani. The driver (by the way, at the time of his defeat, he had 10 air victories) successfully survived the war in captivity and returned home.
    Wolfgang Martin - He was a "bomber" from KG 3, and rammed on May 13, 1944 over the city of Bürschen, destroying a B-17. Martin was piloted by the twin-engine Me-410. He died in a ram, and became famous in his time for destroying several dozen Soviet tanks on the Eastern Front, for which he was awarded the Knight's Cross. In total, he flew more than 400 sorties.
    Erwin Clausen. He rammed on October 4, 1943, destroying the Liberator, piloted by the commander of the 100 BS USAAF Major Eppert, 579 km north-west of Borkhum Island, and was himself killed. He made 561 sorties and shot down in aerial combat. 132 enemy aircraft.
    Willie Maksimovitz. He flew with Sturmstaffel 1 and further in IV (Sturm) / JG 3.23 March 1944 southeast of Münster shot down a B-17 with a ramming blow. In addition, he subsequently shot down another "fortress" in the same way, but the exact date and the circumstances of this battle are not known.
  29. Day 11
    Day 11 24 September 2013 15: 18 New
    0
    Hans Dortenmann won his first victory by shooting down a La-5 ram at low altitude on February 6, 1945. He rammed it intentionally by striking the enemy’s tail with a left-hand plane, this episode was personally watched and confirmed by the host Dortenmann Ulrich Venert, Hans himself after the battering ram retained control of the aircraft, flew to the Orsha airfield and made an emergency landing there. By the way, in the history of Dortenmann it remained as the most successful ace of those that flew on the FW-190D.
    Rudolf Zwecken. In the summer of 1944, flying with II / JG 300, he shot down a B-17 with a battering ram. At the same time, his Focke-Wulf lost a piece of the right plane more than a meter long, but Rudolph was able to bring the plane to the airfield, lower the landing gear and land The exact date of the ram is unknown.
    Johannes Seifert, commander of I / JG 26, rammed on November 25, 1943, when a group of FW-190s clashed over Bethune with about three dozen Lightning 55 FGs. During the battle, Seifert attacked First Lieutenant Manuel Aldekoa's plane and stabbed him with his right plane on one of the tail booms, and both cars for some time locked, and then collapsed during the fall. Both pilots were killed. It is difficult to say whether the German did it intentionally or by accident. It is possible that Aldekoa sat down on one of Seifert's comrades. tail, and otherwise it was no longer possible to remove it, although there is an option that Seifert shot down the enemy in the classical way from a very close distance, and then simply could not turn it away in time.
    Ernst Berngen, commander of I / JG 27, rammed on May 19, 1944. On that day, Hauptmann Berngen and his pilots intercepted a large group of American bombers over Magdeburg with fighter cover. During the battle, a large-caliber bullet fired either by a gunner from ", or some of the fighters, punched Ernst's right arm above the elbow, breaking a bone. The German decided to retreat, but then B-17 appeared right in front of him, so Berngen changed his mind and went to ram. True, quite understandable. For reasons, he could not strike with pinpoint accuracy, so his Bf-109 G fell apart, and the hero himself barely managed to escape and open the parachute (the injured arm was broken once more upon the impact), after which he lost consciousness. The doctors were able to save his life. Ernst, but the arm had to be amputated, so the ace's flying career ended there, and the headquarters began.
    Waldemar Radener On May 11, 1944, at the head of the seventh staffel JG 26, he fought a group of Liberators of 487 BG and managed to damage one bomber, and another rammed. At the same time, the German Focke-Wulf lost control and Waldemar jumped with a parachute , but the Americans were able to bring the B-24 with a broken tail to Britain and left the plane almost in sight of their own airfield (it was not possible to land in a car with such damage).
    Herman Witt of 5./JG 53. In air battles over Tunisia and Sicily, he won 8 aerial victories, and on July 6, 1943 over the Italian port of Augusta he destroyed an American Liberator with a ram and was killed in the process.
    Waldemar Busch of 8./JG 26 on May 11, 1944, shot down an American B-24 15 km north of Orleans in a ramming attack, while he himself was wounded. It is not known whether Bush was able to land his Focke-Wulf after the ram, or he I had to leave the plane with a parachute.
    Max Martin of 8./JG 26 rammed a British Spitfire over St. Omer on 17 September 1941 and was wounded in the process. However, it is possible that the ram was initiated by a British pilot.
    Feldfebel Reinhardt from the JG 1 headquarters in a battle on October 8, 1943, rammed an enemy aircraft (most likely P-47), was wounded, but was able to safely make an emergency landing. He was a follower of the famous ace Hans Philippe who died in the same battle (commander JG 1 ). The battle took place in the Bremen area.
    Thanks to the amateur historian Horst the Worst
    1. Day 11
      Day 11 24 September 2013 21: 18 New
      +2
      From the report of Hans-Ekkehardt Bob on his ram on April 17, 1943:
      “I launched after Group II headquarters as the leader of the 9th staffel JG 54 from the airfield in Oldenburg on April 17, 1943 at 12 hours after receiving information about the approach of American B-29s. Around 17:12 we found from 40 to 120 four-engine Boeing aircraft, sailing at an altitude of 150-7 thousand meters west of Wilhelmshaven. The enemy formation was heading south-southeast. We bypassed the bombers on the left to then carry out a frontal attack. As soon as we overtook them by a distance sufficient for In order to turn around and attack, the enemy turned to the left, so that we were on the right hand of the bombers. Then I slightly adjusted the direction of flight and launched a frontal attack along with the entire staffel. At the same time, the enemy continued to turn to the left, so I turned out to be in a very bad position, which did not allow expecting a positive result from the attack. Meanwhile, the B-8s attacked Bremen and turned first to the south and then to the west. Now I carried out a new attack, and went straight ahead toleading group. I opened fire from 17 meters on the right B-500 and continued to shoot until the minimum safe distance was reached; hits on the Boeing's cockpit and engines were very clearly visible. At the last moment I decided to slip under the Boeing, but I miscalculated and rammed the bomber.
      My 109 completely lost the tail section. The plane immediately went into a very fast spin and absolutely did not react to any rudder movements. Finally I decided to use a parachute. For this purpose I dropped the flashlight and unfastened the seat belts, and was immediately thrown out of the plane. Turning over from time to time, I fell from 6 to 5 thousand meters, where I could already open my parachute. When the canopy came out, I was jerked on the lines with a strong overturning moment. It took 15 or 20 minutes before I landed, avoiding falling into the lake and meeting with trees and power lines, and at the top there was a very strong wind. In any case, this hurricane, coupled with my swinging swing on the lines, made the landing so hard that I lost consciousness. So I was also dragged by parachute across the field a couple of hundred meters ... "
  30. Doctorleg
    Doctorleg 24 September 2013 15: 45 New
    +2
    Quote: Tlauicol
    By the way, the top B 17 managed to sit down !!! 1,5 hours to the base flew.

    Strong machine!
  31. sven27
    sven27 24 September 2013 15: 51 New
    +2
    the author a huge plus for the work done. But such facts must be presented with caution, otherwise liberals and other shushar will quickly rewrite history books and it will turn out that the Western allies rammed, because they already write that in the Great Patriotic War amers and allies won, and 20 million Soviet citizens didn’t score.
  32. Sarmat1972
    Sarmat1972 24 September 2013 16: 45 New
    +2
    Quote: bunta
    Quote: xetai9977
    And everything is explained simply: with an acute desire to beat the enemy, most of the young Soviet pilots simply could not really fly and fight.


    Completely wrong conclusion. It turns out that the chest on the bunker and with a grenade under the tank is also from "inability" ?!

    No, this is from the incompetence of command. On the location of bunkers and machine-gun points, the command should !!!! know from intelligence and accordingly take measures to suppress them (artillery, mortars, etc.) Some of the military commanders said: people become heroes because of someone’s sloppiness
  33. saygon66
    saygon66 24 September 2013 17: 23 New
    +1
    - Yes, you need to be more serious about potential opponents!
  34. motorized rifle
    motorized rifle 24 September 2013 19: 24 New
    +1
    However, not all ramming attempts ended for the Japanese pilots as tragically. For example, 8 October 1943 r fighter pilot Satosi Anabuki on a lightweight Ki-43, armed with only two machine guns, managed to shoot down an American fighter and 2 B-3 four-engine bomber in one battle! And the third bomber spent the entire ammunition Anabuki destroyed ram attack. After this ram, the wounded Japanese managed to land his wrecked plane "on a forced one" on the coast of the Burmese Gulf. For his feat, Anabuki received an exotic for Europeans, but a reward quite familiar to the Japanese: the commander of the forces of the Burma district, General Kawabe, dedicated a poem of his own to the heroic pilot ...


    NON-VE-RYU !!! Kishka (Ki-43) really had 2 machine guns, in one version of 7,62mm caliber 500 rounds per barrel, in the second 1 12.7 250 rounds and 1 7.62 500 rounds. in the MOST "COOL" OPTION, AT LATER SERIES. 2 x 12.7 x 250 cartridges per barrel! Say this is enough for at least one heavy 4-engine B-24, and he allegedly shot down 2 of them by fire! Moreover, he flunked 2 American fighters! Fiction!
  35. Aaron Zawi
    Aaron Zawi 24 September 2013 22: 32 New
    +2
    Quote: Igarr
    Alexander, thanks ...
    Aircraft plate - shine!
    Especially the US and we .... the comparison is deadly.

    Self-education is a good thing.
    http://www.razlib.ru/transport_i_aviacija/istorija_samolyotov_1919_1945/p4.php
    Pay attention to the fact that among the Americans the main number of sorties was made by bombers and the main number of victims was their crews, and in the USSR fighters.
  36. Sunscorpion
    Sunscorpion 25 September 2013 00: 01 New
    +1
    ... But they went only in a hopeless situation; regularly using complex expensive equipment as a banal “cleaver” is a silly and costly affair. My opinion: the massive use of rams speaks not so much about the heroism and patriotism of a certain nation, but about the level of its military equipment and the preparedness of the flight personnel and command, which constantly put its pilots in a hopeless situation. In the aviation parts of countries where the command was able to skillfully lead units, creating an advantage in the forces in the right place, whose aircraft had high combat characteristics, and the pilots were well trained, the need to ram the enemy simply did not arise. But in the aviation parts of countries in which the command was not able to concentrate forces in the main direction, in which the pilots could not really fly, and the planes had mediocre or even low flight characteristics, ramming became almost the main form of battle. That is why at the beginning of the war the Germans who had the best aircraft, the best commanders and pilots did not actually use rams. When the enemy created better aircraft and outnumbered the Germans quantitatively, and the Luftwaffe lost the most experienced pilots in numerous battles and didn’t have time to properly train new recruits, the ramming method entered the arsenal of German aviation and reached the point of absurdity of “man-bombs” that were ready to fall on their heads civilians ... ...
    For all the seeming objectivity of the article, I cannot but notice that the final wording of the author is complete rubbish. To perform a battering ram, the highest skill, sober calculation and iron nerves are necessary. This was one of the forms of air combat, which became widespread in the USSR Air Force. Moreover, the author did not mention that during the Second World War there were pilots who carried out battering rams 2, 3, and some 4 times: 34 pilots used an air ram twice, Hero of the Soviet Union A. Khlobystov - three times, V. Kovzan - four times.
    “With an air ram, every third pilot died.”
    - 23% of pilots saved by parachute.
    - Only in 12% of cases after the ram, the pilots were able to safely land their plane at the airport, and the technical staff to repair the damaged car in a short time.
    - In 20% of cases, landing was compelled outside the airfield with the landing gear removed, when the aircraft either completely crashed, was not transportable due to a lack of proximity to the road, or was taken out in parts, which required a lot of labor.
    1. studentmati
      studentmati 25 September 2013 00: 11 New
      +2
      Quote: SunScorpion
      ... But they went only in a hopeless situation;


      Soviet pilots rammed not out of hopelessness, but precisely out of conviction based on True Patriotism and love for the Motherland! The level of military equipment and preparedness have absolutely nothing to do with it. You, by the way, contradict yourself, claiming that "To perform a ramming, you just need the highest skill." Of course, skill is needed, but skill without love and devotion to the Motherland means nothing.
      1. Alex 241
        Alex 241 25 September 2013 00: 16 New
        0
        Fidelity to the Oath and Duty to the end!
        1. studentmati
          studentmati 25 September 2013 00: 24 New
          0
          Quote: Alex 241
          Fidelity to the Oath and Duty to the end!


          The principle of invincibility of the Russian army!
          1. Alex 241
            Alex 241 25 September 2013 00: 26 New
            +1
            .............
      2. Day 11
        Day 11 25 September 2013 00: 33 New
        +1
        Sasha, I absolutely agree with you. Patriotism and love for the motherland is the highest manifestation of feelings for one’s country (no matter what system in your country) is from one side or the other! I read a bunch of memoirs (and diaries) of German pilots He didn’t notice the Nazis among them. Heinz Knoke didn’t like Bolshevism and was ready to fight him to the last. But he was never a bastard! There were such pilots ...
        1. studentmati
          studentmati 25 September 2013 00: 44 New
          +2
          Quote: Den 11
          Sasha, I absolutely agree with you. Patriotism and love for the motherland is the highest manifestation of feelings for one’s country (no matter what system in your country) is from one side or the other! I read a bunch of memoirs (and diaries) of German pilots He didn’t notice the Nazis among them. Heinz Knoke didn’t like Bolshevism and was ready to fight him to the last. But he was never a bastard! There were such pilots ...


          I agree with you, Denis. Those German memoirs that I managed to read are more likely to look at what was happening from a military and technical point of view in the first place, and not from a political or ideological one.
          1. Day 11
            Day 11 25 September 2013 00: 59 New
            +2
            True. He also noted that the Germans in their memoirs place a greater emphasis on the technical side of the issue, and ours put pressure on patriotic feelings — necessarily in any book are party organizers, Komsomol leaders and other political officers. Maybe at that difficult time it was necessary (who knows? ). But the German pilots sent these (theirs from the party) to ...! But they fought, you know how! Why so?
            1. cdrt
              cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 29 New
              0
              in ANY book mentioned party organizers, Komsomol and other political officers

              Everything is simpler - if this mention was not made - it was very difficult for memoirs to go through editing (censorship).
              From the experience of the family - in the early 1980s, my father wrote and published books, without an explicit description of the "leading and guiding role of the party", the books were very difficult to pass.

              At the same time, I admit that there were also political officers who really benefited the soldiers.
        2. uyrii67
          uyrii67 4 November 2013 11: 30 New
          +1
          It’s interesting, but the shootings of refugee columns because of the presence of the Bolsheviks in them, or maybe they dumped their food for them?
  37. Simple
    Simple 25 September 2013 00: 52 New
    +1
    Today (more precisely yesterday), while watching a video on the Internet, I came across the following phrase (recollection of a German Luftwaffe veteran): "Although we had an advantage on the eastern front at the beginning of the war, the fighting spirit of the Russians was always at its best ...."

    somewhere here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJDdVitZHfg

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBwEhRefGY8


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCSy2BvT53o
    1. Day 11
      Day 11 25 September 2013 01: 20 New
      +2
      Wow, I didn’t see the first two, I laid out the third. Very interesting (though my German is ...). Slightly slower. I understand the meaning. Thank you, Sasha
  38. Simple
    Simple 25 September 2013 01: 27 New
    +1
    To your health!

    Generally speaking modestly: without any pathos.
    As you rightly noted, without politics.
    1. cdrt
      cdrt 25 September 2013 17: 30 New
      +1
      As you rightly noted, without politics.

      I think the allied post-war denazification of the Germans beat off the desire to remember the politics to death wink

      By the way, if we now communicate with still living veterans, then there will also be no special policy.
  39. placidus
    placidus 25 September 2013 13: 36 New
    0
    "Lieutenant Dimitar Spisarevski fired all the ammunition of his Bf-109G-2 into one of the Liberators, and then, slipping over the dying car, crashed into the fuselage of the second Liberator, breaking it in half! Both planes crashed to the ground; Dimitar Spisarevski was killed. Spisarevsky's feat made him a national hero "
    KMK got a fiftieth caliber bullet in the opposite direction from the shooter of the first bomber, and the plane with the already dead pilot crashed into the next. And all the heroism.
  40. Jekich
    Jekich 16 October 2013 00: 08 New
    0
    An interesting article almost anywhere except this article about air rams, especially those committed by foreigners I have not heard.
  41. Masha from uralmash
    Masha from uralmash 22 February 2020 09: 38 New
    0
    Ralph Chelie, it seems, did not commit a battering ram, and generally died in captivity (executed).
    proof: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Cheli
    Can I source your information?