Military Review

Winter Infirmary. Nicholas II gave almost all the imperial palaces and residences to military hospitals

31
Winter Infirmary. Nicholas II gave almost all the imperial palaces and residences to military hospitalsAfter the outbreak of the First World War, from the first days of carrying numerous human victims to the world, all of Russia turned into a military infirmary. For him, their buildings and structures were transferred not only to organizations and various Russian societies, but also ordinary Russians - their private dwellings. The example was given by the supreme authorities of the country and noble families who placed in their palace houses medical facilities for wounded generals, officers and lower ranks of the Russian army who arrived from the front.


A lot is said by the fact that almost simultaneously their private housing was given to a military hospital by two Russian officers: the Winter Palace - the colonel, Emperor Nikolai Romanov, and the house in Gatchina - the lieutenant, the famous writer Alexander Kuprin, whose wife, Maria Kuprina-Iordanskaya, who had experience sister of mercy, took over the management of the hospital. And such actions did not surprise anyone, because they were for the peoples of Russia the natural work of mercy and care for the wounded soldiers, which proved to be especially extensive and widespread in the subsequent testing for our Fatherland - during the Great Patriotic War 1941 – 1945.

... This unusual for other countries, but not for Russia, the hospital was created by the decision of Nicholas II. Help and care for the wounded and maimed soldiers of the Russian army was one of the main concerns of the rulers of Russia and their families. Peter the Great issued a special Decree of 3 in May of 1720 on the allocation of injured and wounded soldiers into a special group of suspected persons from the state. And in the future, his descendants, who did not share in terms of importance their royal rank and belonging to the officer corps of the Russian army, faithfully and mercifully performed their duty to the defenders of the Fatherland, who were injured and injured on the battlefield.

For Emperor Nicholas II, this duty did not contradict the way the Emperor was raised by his mother - Empress Maria Fedorovna, wife of Emperor Alexander III. This Danish princess, like almost all the foreign wives of Russian tsars, was an ascetic in helping and caring for Russian soldiers. She, traditionally for Russia, was the chief of several regiments of the Russian army, including for 36 years the guards of the Cavalier Guard of Her Imperial Majesty the Empress Maria Fedorovna regiment. Therefore, directly participating in the lives of her military personnel, she became not only their patroness in army life, but, having assumed the post of head of the Russian Red Cross Society, she began to patronize all Russian soldiers injured in the battles for the Fatherland. Naturally, her children, who were from an early age, like their parents, chiefs of army regiments and fleet, constantly accompanied her mother in her visits to hospitals, hospitals and shelters of crippled warriors and considered it necessary for herself to take care of these military heroes.

The family of Emperor Nicholas II gave under military hospitals not only their main house on Palace Square, but also almost all the country palaces and residences throughout the Russian Empire.

The transfer of the Winter Palace, the main state, historical and artistic value of the building of the northern capital and the treasury of Russia, under the premise for suffering warriors was a landmark event for the peoples and estates of our Fatherland during the First World War.

Before the opening of this infirmary there was a thorough technical and organizational preparation, which ended only in 1915, when wounded soldiers from all fronts, where the Russian army fought, began to enter the luxurious halls of the Winter Palace. This imperial hospital accepted only seriously wounded soldiers who needed complex operations or special treatment. When they started to get better and walk, the soldiers were transferred to other medical institutions, and seriously wounded people again took their places.

The Hospital of the Winter Palace was given the official name of "The Infirmary of His Imperial Highness the Heir to the Tsarevich and the Grand Duke Alexei Nikolayevich in the Winter Palace." Initially, chambers and operating rooms wanted to be placed in the Hermitage, but they had to abandon this due to the lack of necessary technical conditions. Museum director Dmitry Tolstoy told the emperor that there was no electricity, running water and sewage, so they decided to use the Winter Palace building to house the hospital. Eight ceremonial halls with adjoining premises were allocated for it and considerable sums of money were spent on the creation of a modern for that time stationary military medical institution.

The infirmary was opened on October 10 1915, without unnecessary celebrations, as the Emperor considered it inappropriate during the hostilities. The hospital organizers took very seriously, not only to equip it with special medical equipment, but also to create the necessary facilities for patients, medical and service personnel. The walls were draped with special fabric, and the floors were covered with material that creates noise protection so as not to disturb the wounded. Special common canteens were created for patients and doctors with sisters of mercy. The builders carried out painting work in all the halls and improved the ventilation system, as well as installed boilers and boilers of the most modern design. The water supply and sewerage network was significantly expanded and repaired. One of the important construction tasks in creating dressing rooms, operating rooms for doctors and procedures was to preserve the unique decoration of the ceremonial halls of the Winter Palace. The steps of the Jordan Staircase were covered with boards, and all decorative items and works of art from the main halls were moved to other rooms. Everything was carefully fixed, photographed and packed in boxes. Special night lighting was created with purple electronic lamps.

On the first floor of the Winter Palace were located the outbuildings of the infirmary: a waiting room, a pharmacy, a kitchen, bathrooms, doctor’s offices, a household unit, office, the chief doctor’s office. On the second floor in Avanzal, the Eastern Gallery and the halls: Field Marshalsky, Gerbovom, Piketnom, Aleksandrovskiy and Nikolayevskoye housed wards for wounded. The famous Petrovsky Hall was given for postoperative patients.

In the Military Gallery of 1812 Heroes, an X-ray laboratory was installed and underwear was stored. In the Column and partially Field Marshals' Halls were dressings. Bathrooms and showers were located in the Winter Garden and the Jordan Entrance.

The entrance to the hospital was from the Palace Embankment, through the main entrance. The wounded arrived upstairs along the Jordanian stairs, delivered food and medicine.

In the infirmary, about 1000 wounded were to be treated. The hospital hospital staff consisted of 34 doctors (most surgeons), 50 nurses, 120 orderlies, and 26 people of household staff. The emperor appointed A.V. as chief doctor of the infirmary. Rutkovsky. An outstanding Russian surgeon, Professor N.N. Petrov, one of the founders of the national oncology, the future corresponding member of the USSR Academy of Sciences, academician of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Hero of Socialist Labor.

“The infirmary of His Imperial Highness, Heir, Tsesarevich and Grand Duke Alexei Nikolaevich in the Winter Palace” existed only for two years, but during this time made an invaluable contribution to the nationwide cause of salvation and healing of Russian soldiers. Despite the ceremonial visits that were natural to his status, as well as visits by representatives of the authorities and prominent foreign guests, the medical team of the infirmary and the attendants professionally performed their duty and saved thousands of lives of the sick and wounded.

Unfortunately, the events of October 1917 have not bypassed this medical facility. On the morning of October 25. 1917 in the northern capital of the Russian state of Petrograd several hundred armed men: soldiers, sailors and civilians broke into the Winter Palace and, disarming the Provisional Government, arrested his ministers. It was a short but most significant event in its consequences for Russia and the world of the October revolution or revolution ... Historians and various ideologists have written about this a lot and in different ways, depending on the political situation. However, the memories of the participants of this historical event are more interesting.

American writer John Reed, who was at that time in Petrograd, wrote from the words of a sailor - a participant in the capture of the Winter Palace: “We discovered around the 11 hours of the evening that there were no Junkeri at the entrances to the palace from the Neva. Then we burst through the door and began to climb up the stairs, one by one or in small groups. When we climbed to the top floor, the cadets detained us and took from us weapon. But our comrades all approached and approached until we were in the majority. Then we turned against the junkers and took away the weapons from them. ”

Here is what the outstanding figure of Russian art, Alexander Nikolayevich Benois, writes: “... At about five o'clock in the afternoon I was told by telephone from the Hermitage that they received a telephone call from the“ revolutionary headquarters ”that the cadet guard would be replaced by another soon. After a quick bite, I went inside to the Hermitage. On my way, the so-called “Gallery of Petersburg Views” was filled with female soldiers of the Women's Battalion. Getting down to the entrance, I called the senior officer on the Junker guard and asked him what he intended to do. To this he explained that he was now going to the head of the guard at the Winter Palace and, having received instructions from him, would report everything to me. Upon returning from the Palace, he assured me that they would not leave their cadet position, they would not give up the guard and would protect the institution entrusted to their protection to the last opportunity ... .. 9 around the evening there was a loud knock on the front door and 30 man of armed transfigurations came in from non-commissioned officer in charge. They demanded that the cadets give up their weapons and announced that they themselves would be replaced. There was a rather lively altercation, there were explanations that I could not hear behind the general din, but the result was that the old guard gave up and was disarmed. The senior junker came in front of me to apologize and prove that they had no other way out, since they could not defend the Hermitage against a decisively superior detachment. I had to admit that I considered the peaceful end of the collision to be the most responsible in this case the interests of our artistic repository - God knows what could have happened, how much irreparable harm would have been done if there had been an armed struggle inside the building ... ”

Arresting and sending the ministers of the Provisional Government to the Peter and Paul Fortress, the winners scattered around the halls and offices of this hitherto unknown royal dwelling and the great treasury of Russia unknown to them.

Many of them were led by simple curiosity - to see how the king and queen lived ... Others were occupied with royal values, but they all found out with bewilderment that they unexpectedly got into a huge military hospital. Almost all ceremonial halls were filled with hospital and medical equipment, and from the beds they looked at the exhausted faces of the wounded, just like them, of ordinary Russian people. Representatives of the new government passed through the Fieldmarshall Hall with a heavy smell of blood and pus, where wounds were bandaged ... carefully walked around the Column Hall, where despite military events around the palace, operations were going ... moving the hospital clothes in the 1812 Gallery of Heroes, which served as a clothes room, to see pictures on the walls and with curiosity looked at an unprecedented device located in the X-ray room. Especially struck all the huge Nicholas Hall, placed under the chamber for the newly received soldiers. It turned out that the Provisional Government and the protection of the Winter Palace and the Hermitage occupied a very small place in this realm of suffering and mercy. And it could be said that the new masters of the country seized not the stronghold of the ruling power, but a peaceful hospital with the same wounded sailors and soldiers as they did.

This is how the end of the Winter Palace infirmary's activities is described. Benoit: “... With this tour of the palace we could be convinced that, although it was stated that all the military units from the inner chambers of the palace had been removed, many soldiers with guns in their hands still roamed the palace and it is possible that they also plundered ... .. A particularly sad sight was the first one - that vaulted room on the lower floor that overlooks the Admiralty and that once served as a strict Sovereign at the same time as the study and the bedroom. Here was his writing desk, on which the mass of writing utensils remained, as well as all sorts of knick-knacks and portraits of loved ones; and the walls of this room were completely (and even in the embrasures of the windows) hung with paintings and miniatures, mostly of a souvenir order; Immediately there was a simple soldier's bed of the emperor. Now the walls were bare, the table was broken, the floor was littered with papers, and the whole bed was torn up. ... The same abomination of desolation was the cabinet of Alexander II, who once served as the cabinet of Alexander I (he was decorated for him by his grandmother, Catherine II, when he was the Grand Duke; the architecture of this room was restored after the 1837 fire). But in this alone the floor was now completely covered with letters, all sorts of papers and broken things. Pictures and drawings were not taken out of the frames, but their glasses were broken, and the frames were broken. ... .. Obviously, the soldiers were looking for gold here, imagining, in their naivety, that the king, precisely in his room, had to hide his fabulous treasures ... ”.

The second testimony came from the great Petersburger and Leningrad citizen Boris Borisovich Piotrovsky, Director of the State Hermitage Museum, who kept the diaries of the former nurse of this hospital Nina Galanina, too frank for the Soviet era, whose records were archived in the State Hermitage Museum. Here are some of her memories: “On the night of October 26, the most disturbing, ominous rumors crept in. Among others, the fact that as a result of the shelling of the Winter Palace from the Peter and Paul Fortress and Aurora the palace and many nearby buildings were allegedly destroyed. ... As soon as morning came ... I, asking for a half day from work, hurried to the city. First of all, I wanted to go to the hospital of the Winter Palace. Getting there was not so easy: from the Palace Bridge to the Jordan entrance there was a triple chain of Red Guards and sailors with rifles at the ready. They guarded the palace and did not let anyone to it ... Required documents. I showed my ID issued in my name back in February, with the seal of the hospital of the Winter Palace. It helped - I missed. Something else shouted after, but I didn’t make out and went on. The third chain is no longer delayed. I entered, as happened hundreds of times earlier, at the Jordanian entrance. There was no place for the usual doorman. At the entrance stood a sailor with the inscription "Dawn of Freedom" on his peakless cap. He allowed me to enter. The first thing that caught my eye and struck was a huge amount of weapons. The entire gallery from the lobby to the Main Staircase was littered with it and looked like an arsenal.

Armed sailors and Red Guards walked in all the rooms. In the hospital, where there was always such an exemplary order and silence: where it was known in what place which chair should stand, everything was turned upside down, everything was upside down.

And everywhere - armed men. The elder sister was under arrest: she was guarded by two sailors. I did not see anyone else from the medical staff ... ”.

October 28 The 1917 of the Winter Palace Infirmary, designed to help the wounded and sick soldiers of the Russian Army, was officially closed by a new Bolshevik power ...
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  1. Syrzhn
    Syrzhn 5 December 2013 07: 56
    +6
    Well, maybe the personal qualities of Nicholas II were high, only for the ruler, especially in the era of global change, this is not enough. The result of his reign - 2 lost wars, the collapse of the country, civil war, famine and mass terror. On ... such rulers.
    1. Baron Wrangell
      Baron Wrangell 5 December 2013 08: 53
      +1
      Quote: Syrzhn
      Well, maybe the personal qualities of Nicholas 2 were high, only for the ruler, especially in the era of global change, this is not enough. The result of his reign - 2 lost wars, the collapse of the country, civil war, famine and mass terror. On ... such rulers

      plus the revolution of 1905, and bloody Sunday, Lena mines, and much more!
      thy holy one!
      1. CreepyUknow
        CreepyUknow 5 December 2013 10: 21
        +1
        For the lost war of 1914, say thanks to the interim government and the Bolsheviks. And for the loss of 1905 - to the Jewish banker from America Schiff and our Western partners, who forced Japan to participate in the war as a puppet
        1. kirgudu
          kirgudu 5 December 2013 10: 37
          +1
          Read about the state of the troops at the end of the war. They are completely demoralized, only resellers and speculators participate in deliveries to the army, officials rely on this.

          Reminds perestroika ...
          1. CreepyUknow
            CreepyUknow 5 December 2013 11: 30
            +1
            And why are they demoralized? Thanks to active agitation, which opened the soldier's eyes to the "truth of war". As I said, thanks to Schiff and his Jewish Co. And about the supplies ... And under the Soviet Union, no one profited from this ?? Maybe this was not the case only under Stalin, and that is not a fact.
            1. kirgudu
              kirgudu 5 December 2013 22: 40
              0
              Well, yes, read it. First of all, they are demoralized because of a long war and trampling in one place, in the second - because of rotten supplies.

              In general, what does the union have to do with it? We take the specific time of the traitor of the people and the church - Nicholas 2.
      2. Yoshkin Kot
        Yoshkin Kot 5 December 2013 11: 51
        +3
        recall the executions of workers by the Bolsheviks? sailors in Kronstadt? Hunger in the Volga region?
        1. CreepyUknow
          CreepyUknow 5 December 2013 12: 07
          -1
          + how many millions of Russia Russia lost in civil, famines in Ukraine and the Volga region
        2. kirgudu
          kirgudu 5 December 2013 22: 44
          0
          The Bolsheviks did all this, Stalin himself:

          At the beginning of the XX century, Russia was hungry in Russia: 1901-1902, 1905-1908 and 1911 - 1912 years.
          In 1901 - 1902, 49 provinces starved: in 1901 - 6,6%, 1902 - 1%, 1903 - 0,6%, 1904 -― 1,6%.
          In 1905 - 1908. starved from 19 to 29 provinces: in 1905 - 7,7%, 1906 - 17,3% of the population
          In 1911 - 1912 over the 2 of the year, famine swept 60 provinces: in 1911 - 14,9% of the population.
          30 million people were on the brink of death.
          1. kirgudu
            kirgudu 5 December 2013 23: 12
            +2
            And what are we minus, isn't it? We do not believe statistics that Tsarist Russia suffered from hunger not less, but even more than Soviet? This is not an idea, but bare facts and figures. If you do not believe them, then it's time to the infirmary.
          2. lexe
            lexe 5 December 2013 23: 14
            0
            At the beginning of the XX century, Russia was hungry in Russia: 1901-1902, 1905-1908 and 1911 - 1912 years.
            In 1901 - 1902, 49 provinces starved: in 1901 - 6,6%, 1902 - 1%, 1903 - 0,6%, 1904 -― 1,6%.
            In 1905 - 1908. starved from 19 to 29 provinces: in 1905 - 7,7%, 1906 - 17,3% of the population
            In 1911 - 1912 over the 2 of the year, famine swept 60 provinces: in 1911 - 14,9% of the population.
            30 million people were on the brink of death.

            And how did this during the reign of Nicholas 2, the Russian Empire increased by 50 million people?
            The Anglo-Saxons are generally stupid-they tied Russia into WWI ... they didn't let all Russians die of hunger, they didn't show "soft power" so to speak.
            Yes ... besides, the word HUNGER in the Russian Empire had a different meaning than later. I remember recently the prices for buckwheat somehow soared ... everyone was on the "edge" - of course bad ... So similar situations were in the beginning century.
            1. kirgudu
              kirgudu 5 December 2013 23: 19
              0
              High mortality was offset by high birth rates.
              Population within the borders of the USSR:
              1913 139,3 million
              1926 147,0 million
              1939 170,6 million
              1. lexe
                lexe 5 December 2013 23: 27
                0
                High mortality was offset by high birth rates.
                Population within the borders of the USSR:
                1913 139,3 million
                1926 147,0 million
                1939 170,6 million

                Can you figure out how many people in the Russian Empire "crossed the line"? that is, they died of hunger.
                And the source.
                The Russian Empire fed the whole of Europe - and in every farmstead there were always reserves for a rainy day - remember collectivization. Even in those dashing years there was something to take from the peasants.
                My great-grandmother really died of hunger, but after the revolution, when cholera raged in the Volga region.
                1. kirgudu
                  kirgudu 5 December 2013 23: 46
                  +1
                  From a report to Alexander III in 1892: "The losses from crop failure alone amounted to two million Orthodox souls."
                  And here is already from the report to Nicholas II in 1901: “In the winter of 1900-1901 42 million people starved, while 2 million 813 thousand of them died. Orthodox shower"

                  From Stolypin's report in 1911: "32 million were starving, loss of 1 million 613 thousand people."

                  At the same time, grain exports were approximately at the level of 50%.

                  The Hunger Years: 1873, 1880, 1883, 1891, 1892, 1897, 1898, 1901, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1911 and 1913.

                  Here are grain exports: 1930 - 4,8 million tons, 1931 - 5,2 million tons, 1932 - 1,8 million tons. 1933 - 1,6 million tons.
                  But hunger in the USSR 1932 - 1933, dependence is traced.

                  Maksudov’s table of the ratio of the number of generations born in 1930-1934 and 1935-1939 according to the 1959 census for rural women of some regions of Ukraine and Russia.

                  Cherkasy 0,7
                  Krasnodar Territory 0,72
                  Kirovograd 0,73
                  Lugansk 0,73
                  Kharkiv 0,74
                  Zaporizhzhya 0,77
                  Poltava 0,8
                  Stavropol Territory 0,8
                  Kherson 0,8
                  Nikolaev 0,81
                  Crimean 0,83
                  Rostov 0,83
                  Saratov 0,84
                  Amur 0,85
                  Donetsk 0,86
                  Volgograd 0,88
                  Odessa 0,88
                  Zhytomyr 0,89
                  Orenburg 0,89
                  Sumy 0,89
                  Gorky 0,91
                  Chelyabinsk 0,92
                  Vinnytsia 0,94
                  Omsk 0,95
                  Kuibyshevskaya 0,96
                  Ryazan 0,96
                  Penza 0,97
                  Tatar Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic 0,97
                  Ulyanovskaya 1
                  Chernivtsi 1
                  Transcarpathian 1,01
                  Rivne 1,01
                  Chernihiv 1,01
                  Belgorodskaya 1,02
                  Ivano-Frankivsk 1,03
                  Lipetsk 1,04
                  Lviv 1,06
                  Kursk 1,07
                  Tarnopol 1,07
                  Oryol 1,08
                  Khmelnitsky 1,08
                  Volyn 1,11
                  Voronezh 1,11
                  Bryansk 1,14
                  1. lexe
                    lexe 6 December 2013 00: 11
                    0
                    Thank you. There will be free time, I will read in more detail your sources and opinions about these sources, as well as compare the figures before 1917 and after 1917 how many Orthodox souls died prematurely.
                    Only it is necessary to remind why then the "hysteria" with hunger were inflated ... - it was necessary to populate the East of the country. And after all, they gave out lifting ones during resettlement.
      3. Old scoop
        Old scoop 5 December 2013 12: 55
        0
        Yeah, sometimes inaction is worse than action.
    2. Yoshkin Kot
      Yoshkin Kot 5 December 2013 11: 49
      +3
      By the way, who knows why the frostbitten gang of foreigners stormed the largest hospital in the world? Winter?
      1. CreepyUknow
        CreepyUknow 5 December 2013 12: 09
        +2
        In order to eliminate the dual power that arose as a result of the October Revolution. Let's not forget that by that time the country was ruled by the so-called Provisional Government, and not Nicholas II, so the hospital was no longer there. It just shows quite well the attitude of the Provisional to the war and the people.
        1. Syrzhn
          Syrzhn 5 December 2013 13: 03
          +4
          And Nikolai - the Tsar, it turns out, was not responsible for anything, was not responsible for the decline in his popularity among his subjects, for the unsolved conspiracy around him, for having surrendered the country to a handful of bastards - to the interim government ?!
          1. CreepyUknow
            CreepyUknow 5 December 2013 14: 16
            +3
            Its popularity fell almost exclusively in higher circles, and it is not clear for what reason.
            He gave the country not to a temporary p-woo, but to his brother. Moreover, in an exceptional situation - he was betrayed by those on whom he was counting only - the generals. No need to blame him for this, the king was simply betrayed and "thrown"
          2. Serg 122
            Serg 122 5 December 2013 19: 02
            +1
            And Nikolai - the Tsar, it turns out, was not responsible for anything, was not responsible for the decline in his popularity among his subjects ...

            PR managers then were probably not enough ... Yes, and the head was busy with others, most likely
      2. lexe
        lexe 5 December 2013 13: 07
        -1
        к
        By the way, who knows why the frostbitten gang of foreigners stormed the largest hospital in the world? Winter?

        And really, why?
        Like the wine cellars were vast lol
        Yes ... how they knew how to rivet myths in the USSR ... Putilovsky plant resting bully
        The conveyor has been straight ideological since 1917. But the invention is grandiose ... - no one really patents ... even the Communist Party laughing
    3. 222222
      222222 5 December 2013 14: 15
      +2
      The Romanov dynasty went to sunset .... even nature was against continuing their race .. Alexandra Fedorovna had four girls in a row and only the fifth heir to the throne was born, but sick .. And then Grigory Rasputin appeared ..
      1. 222222
        222222 5 December 2013 18: 10
        +1
        HASPAD minus-I bring to your attention that payment to me goes for minuses with a coefficient of 2 ... a joke.
        seriously, your minus signification shows that, nevertheless, the idea and hope for a good and kind Tsar for Russia are still alive ... By the way, tell me, where do the nobles write ??? so as not to be late for the distribution ...
        1. Thunderbolt
          Thunderbolt 5 December 2013 18: 28
          0
          Quote: 222222
          where in the nobles write?
          On the battlefield
  2. 505506
    505506 5 December 2013 09: 33
    -1
    It seems that he did a good thing, but the complete rejection of this character in Russian history leaves him indifferent. Thanks to the doctors and all the medical staff!
  3. realist
    realist 5 December 2013 09: 40
    +5
    Well, are current rulers capable of doing so? oh I doubt ....
    1. 505506
      505506 5 December 2013 09: 54
      +4
      And the current ones are even worse. The collapse of the country with the goal of personal enrichment is like killing a mother.
      1. Yoshkin Kot
        Yoshkin Kot 5 December 2013 11: 52
        0
        Yeah, "worse" they don't put "kontrikov" against the wall, but in vain, there is a lot of Russian blood, bitten on the rebbe by Marx am
  4. Serg 122
    Serg 122 5 December 2013 12: 53
    +2
    Baron Wrangell
    Quote: Syrzhn

    Well, maybe the personal qualities of Nicholas 2 were high, only for the ruler, especially in the era of global change, this is not enough. The result of his reign - 2 lost wars, the collapse of the country, civil war, famine and mass terror. On ... such rulers
    plus the revolution of 1905, and bloody Sunday, Lena mines, and much more!
    thy holy one!

    To whom to whom and Baron Wrangel write this .... You guys at least have something to read, besides the history textbook of the USSR period. A saint is not a saint "2 lost wars, collapse of the country, civil war, famine and mass terror" he didn’t arrange, you confuse ...
  5. dmb
    dmb 5 December 2013 15: 37
    +2
    I read the article and almost burst into tears with emotion. The Tsar-Father, if anyone had forgotten, was an autocrat and the last word, whether or not to enter the war, even nominally, remained with him. He dragged Russia into it without sufficient preparation, without material reserves (the shell and cartridge famine of the initial period can only be denied by those who, apart from "propaganda", read nothing). After that, as a lot of people were killed, the priest provided his palace for the wounded. which once again confirms the lack of proper logistic support, the mediocrity and thieving of his entourage. By the way, he appointed all of them himself, you can't blame them on the "world backstage". I suppose that a number of "analysts" who were "bitten by the monarchy" will immediately shout about international treaties, which the tsar-father, because of his nobility, could not destroy. So the dignitaries appointed by them concluded them, so that their disadvantage for Russia and its people, this is again to him dear.
  6. people
    people 5 December 2013 16: 08
    0
    Nikolay2, his wife, Alexander, are the most worthy people, which are few in world history. The emperor’s family is a model of love, fidelity and patriotism, in which there was no snobbery and hypocrisy, but on the contrary, evenness and modesty. The Soviet government pretty much poured dirt on the emperor’s couple to justify their deeds and crimes. Whatever the king, but to win wars when traitors to Russia's interests are subversive for the money of the same enemies among the army, the intelligentsia and the people is impossible. Betrayal and confusion in the minds of many is the reason for the collapse of Russia, and many of the initiatives that Nikolai2 laid down would make our country prosperous and strong.
    1. 222222
      222222 5 December 2013 16: 33
      +2
      man RU Today, 16:08 New
      "Infirmary in Winter. Nicholas II gave almost all the imperial palaces and residences to military hospitals."
      The unique title of the article !!.
      And why in the country for wartime there weren’t enough hospitals, infirmaries, shells .. Apparently, Serdyukov tried ?????
    2. uhjpysq1
      uhjpysq1 6 December 2013 03: 18
      -2
      ) and he also loved ballet)))) or ballerinas
  7. Drosselmeyer
    Drosselmeyer 5 December 2013 16: 37
    +3
    Damned Bolsheviks set up hospitals, hospitals and schools where the wounded were placed in the Second World War, and all that had to be done was to remodel a completely unsuitable room for the hospital, for example, a mausoleum, and everyone would be touched now ...
    The little article is another crunch of French rolls.
  8. 222222
    222222 5 December 2013 17: 26
    -2
    "Lord, the king will rejoice with your strength."
    Drosselmeyer UA Today, 16:37 New
    The little article is another crunch of French rolls ...
    "If the stars fall from the sky, then someone needs it" ...
    Last, Last Sunday's transmission at Soloviev. Archpriest Dmitry Smirnov advocates for an elected (?) King .. the truth is still timid, but give time .. the sowed seed will sprout ...
    1. kirgudu
      kirgudu 5 December 2013 23: 03
      0
      Quite right. Recently, "patriots" have stubbornly begun to appear, praising the tsar and dreaming of rewriting history once again. At best, invite the Romanovs to the throne.


      Here is a recent communication between monarchist pseudo "patriotic philosophers" with Kurginyan. In the end, the historian blew all the myths to smithereens. (Here Kurginyan does not act as an agitator there, but as a representative of the patriotic-communist direction to find a common language with monarchist patriots)
  9. Marat
    Marat 5 December 2013 22: 19
    +1
    The sovereign would not be the best manifestation of humanism for his own people if the country did not enter this European massacre. In a war in which Russia’s defeat was desired not only by enemies, but also by allies.
    1. CreepyUknow
      CreepyUknow 6 December 2013 09: 13
      +1
      Marat, but there was no precedent in 1904? In order to ruin Russia, a war was needed. And if we had not stood up for the fraternal people, we would not have saved the country; six months later, we would be attacked, as before, Japan at the direction of the West.
      1. Marat
        Marat 7 December 2013 16: 01
        0
        Who exactly would attack?