Military Review

American pilots from ... Penza!

44
"We fly, hobbling in the mist,
We go on the last wing.

Buck pierced, tail burning
And the car flies
On parole and on one wing.
("Bombers", Leonid Utesov)


"Contracts must be respected!"


War is war and politics is politics! At the same time, it is not necessary to forget about the economy either. Therefore, it often happens that yesterday’s allies become today's enemies (the enemies promised more, so the allies bought it!), And vice versa. So it was, for example, with Italy in the First World War and with Japan ... in the Second. It would seem that, being an ally of fascist Germany, she would have to put all her strength into war with Soviet Russia, but ... even a victory over the latter would not have given her oil! And oil is the blood of war! Meanwhile, the American oil embargo would strangle the Japanese economy. Here are the Japanese and began a war with England and the United States. And with the USSR, Japan had signed a non-aggression pact, and it was more or less respected. That just gave birth to a certain incident. According to him, all the American crews of planes shot down over Japan, which turned out to be in the USSR after that, were to be interned! Moreover, there were quite a lot of such crews of the US Air Forces and the US Navy interned in the USSR during the war years. Their planes were damaged, they ran out of fuel, and they flew to their allies, that is, in the USSR.

It was then that it turned out that, as allies of the United States in the anti-Hitler coalition, we did not fight with Japan. And according to the norms of international law then existing, since there was no war between us, the Americans who had fallen to us during the hostilities against the Japanese side had to be kept in the camp “for displaced persons” before the end of the war! It is ridiculous, of course, but "contracts must be respected." Well, the first crew who happened to experience all the charms of political “de facto” and “de jure” became, surprisingly, the pilots of the squadron of the famous lieutenant colonel Jimmy Doolittle, 18 on April 1942 of the year who made a daring raid on the capital of Japan.

"The Empire Strikes Back!"

And it was so that the US Navy headquarters was extremely concerned about the need to respond with a blow to Japan after Pearl Harbor. It was supposed to be a great PR, for which, however, there was neither strength nor opportunity. The solution was found by Jimmy Dulittl: to bomb Japan with the help of ground-based B-25 "Mitchell" twin-engine bombers, which were supposed to take off from two aircraft carriers. It was prepared two options for the raid. The first one was optimal, it involved a strike from a distance of 500 miles. Immediately after this, the aircraft carriers had to depart, and the bombed aircraft caught up and sat down.

American pilots from ... Penza!

The aircraft carrier "Hornet" with aircraft B-25 on the deck.

The second option was a backup. In case the operation went "wrong", the planes should fly to China, get to the territory occupied by the troops of General Chiang Kai-shek, and get on the airfield in Huzhou province, 200 miles south-west of Shanghai.


These are the 12,7-mm machine-gun belts prepared for laying in the aircraft on the deck of the Hornet.

“Not so” began 18 on April 1942, when the American ships were at a distance of 750 miles from the coast of Japan, aerial reconnaissance from the aircraft carrier Enterprise had discovered the patrol vessel Nitto Maru. The ship was immediately sunk, but it was too late. The Japanese had already sent a signal to headquarters, so the response to the invasion by airplanes or ships could follow at any minute! However, the commanding fathers in charge of the operation decided to take the risk, and Doolittle gave the order to lift the Mitchells into the air. Sixteen bombers headed for Japan, and the aircraft carrier compound immediately turned east. The eighth in 8.35 took off the plane of Captain Edward York. The Americans managed at low altitudes to approach the Japanese coast and drop bombs on Tokyo, Kanazawa, Yokohama, Yokosuka, Kobe, Osaka and Nagoya. Not a single aircraft was shot down over Japan, that is, the raid was a complete success. The slap turned out to be awesome, which President Franklin Roosevelt immediately said, speaking on this issue on national radio. He then said that the planes took off from Shangri-La, a country born of the fantasy of the English writer James Hilton, who located it in the Himalayan mountains. Then, of course, nothing was said about what happened to the crews of these aircraft: they are alive or dead - all this was hidden by a “military secret”. Meanwhile, none of the 16 aircraft could not reach the airfield they needed due to the lack of fuel. Part of it fell into the sea, and their pilots escaped by parachute. Eight were captured by the Japanese, and they beheaded three of them, and another pilot died in the camp. But the 64 pilots did manage to get to the Chinese partisans and not soon, but still return to the United States. Among those who returned was Lieutenant Colonel Jim Dulittle, who immediately became a national hero.

But Captain Edward York, the crew commander No. XXUMX, turned out to be “the smartest.” Dropping bombs, and, calculating fuel consumption, he realized that he could not fly to China and headed northwest to Russia ... The crew members of York were: co-pilot - 8-th lieutenant Robert J. Emmens, navigator - 1- Lieutenant Nolan A. Herndon, flight engineer - staff sergeant Theodore X. Leben and gunner-radio operator - Corporal David V. Paul.


Crew №8, participated in the "Doolittle raid". The aircraft number is 40-2242. The goal is Tokyo. 95-I bomber squadron. In the first row, from left to right: the crew commander - the first pilot, captain Edward York; the co-pilot, 1 th lieutenant Robert Emmens. In the second row, from left to right: navigator-scorer, Lieutenant Nolan Herndon; flight engineer, staff sergeant Theodore Leben; gunner - Corporal David Paul.

Orders must be carried out!

After nine hours of flight, the Americans crossed the coastline and began to search for a landing site. Archival documents and, in particular, memorandum of the Chief of Staff of the Pacific fleet Rear Admiral V. Bogdenko, Air Force Chief of the Navy of the USSR, Lieutenant General S. Zhavoronkov, noted that the B-25 was spotted by the air surveillance, warning and communications post (WMO) No. 7516 of the 19th Separate Air Defense Regiment of the Pacific Fleet at Cape Sysoev. But those who were on duty showed carelessness and ... took the American bomber for our Yak-4, whose flight they simply did not notify. Therefore, the alarm was not announced, and the American plane both flew and flew. Then he was again noticed, again identified as the Yak-4, and "where necessary" was not reported. Then, nevertheless, a message arrived, but the anti-aircraft gunners of the 140th battery, although the American plane flew in their fire zone for two minutes, did not pay attention to the order of their operational duty officer and continued to do their own business (then all officials will be punished for negligence).


B-25 in the air.

And York continued to fly heading north, trying to quickly network. It was then that two I-15, engaged in the training of group fights, came to him. Seeing an unknown plane, they immediately went to intercept, but did not open fire. And the Americans understood it so that they were met and immediately landed on Unashi airfield, leaving behind the 9 hours of exceptionally difficult flight. It was difficult to explain to the pilots who sat down and the owners - none of them knew English, and their guests did not speak Russian. But York showed on the map that they had flown in from Alaska. Well, and then the Allies began to feed and water, the authorities came along with a translator, and in the meantime, the message about the landing American plane arrived in Moscow. An urgent order came from there - to deliver the pilots to Khabarovsk, to the headquarters of the Far Eastern Front. Already on board the aircraft they were told that ... they are interned! Surprised Americans found it hard to understand why this Soviet command did not allow them to fly to China, because the plane was working properly.


“Battle Coloring” B-25.

Forced tour of Soviet Russia

And then their real “wanderings” around Russia, or, rather, “forced tour”, began. First, they were transported from Khabarovsk to the city of Kuibyshev (Samara). But there was a Japanese diplomatic mission and they were transported away from sin to the next ... Penza. And not just in Penza, but the village near Penza Akhuna, where they began to live and live under the supervision of Soviet officers. They were also served by a translator and as many as seven women who cleaned the house and prepared their meals. In general, they lived very well.

Today, the Akhuny is a recreation area recognized by the Penzens. There are several sanatoriums located there, there is a beautiful pine forest, a small river flows through the village, in a word, although there are very many here (there is a school, a technical school, a library and an agricultural academy!), They mostly come here to have a rest. Getting to the city, however, is not so easy, as one road leads there and the forest around it is marshy.


American pilots crew number XXUMX in the Chinese village.

Well, at that time it was just a big village, from where it was before the city - oh, how many. So that you yourself will not run away from there (where should you run?), And no one there will find you! The Penza historian Pavel Arzamastsev tried to find out where exactly what house the Americans lived in, but he did not succeed. But the fact that they lived there is undoubtedly and strangely, while walking along the forest paths there, among the fences of pioneer camps, old shacks and new-fashioned cottages, to know that English was once heard here, and American pilots could walk who bombed Japan!

But our authorities did not like something in Akhuny and the Americans were sent to the city of Okhansk near Perm. They lived there for seven months, and American diplomats came to them there, and they delivered letters from their homeland, in a word, “life got better”. Navigator Bob Roberbs almost got married to their Russian mistress there. But it was very cold there, and the pilots were asked where it was warmer.

7 January 1943, they wrote a letter in two languages ​​at once - to the Chief of the General Staff of the Red Army, Colonel-General Alexander Vasilevsky, with the expectation that Stalin would be reported to him. At the same time, Yorke's wife turned to the US president and asked for help to “return her husband.” And ... work has begun!

South, South!

And when the Americans really were about to flee, they were told about the transfer to Tashkent, and then, on Stalin’s personal instructions, they began to prepare an operation to prepare for the “escape” of pilots from the USSR. And everything had to be done so that the Americans themselves would be sure that they conceived this escape and fled themselves, that the Russians did not help them!

For this purpose, even a false border strip, imitating the Soviet-Iranian border, was equipped near Ashgabat. So that everything would be like “really,” because in reality there was no “border” there. Then a smuggler was sent to them, who offered to transfer them to the border for money and even told them how to find a British consulate in Mashhad. Well, and then at night they were put into a truck and with all the precautions taken to the border, where they, looking around and sneaking, climbed under barbed wire and ... found themselves in Iran! But it was still the Soviet occupation zone, so the British also carried them secretly, circling the Soviet checkpoints! On the Pakistani border they were met ... a wooden fence (!), Which they broke down and it was then that they became truly free!

On the same day 20 May they were put on an American plane and sent to Karachi. And then in an absolute secrecy, the pilots of the B-25 were taken through the Middle East, North Africa and South Atlantic to Miami to Florida. Here they were given a rest, after which 24 May was sent to Washington, where he was personally presented to the US President. So ended the 14-month odyssey of the American pilots who bombed Japan, but by chance turned up in the USSR!
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  1. tundra
    tundra 29 March 2016 06: 31
    +6
    For this purpose, even a false border strip, imitating the Soviet-Iranian border, was equipped near Ashgabat. So that everything would be “for real,” since in fact there was no “border” there. /////////
    NKVD burns !!!! laughing
    The crew probably thought how cool they were to the Chekists.
    And how probably disappointed to find out everything.
    Although, the main thing at home and everyone is happy, everyone laughs,
    everything is formally observed. fellow
    1. Andrey Zh
      Andrey Zh 17 December 2016 09: 52
      0
      Yes, the border is not far from Ashgabat there! ...
  2. Serg koma
    Serg koma 29 March 2016 06: 42
    +9
    Thank you for the article. Another page of the history of the war. I never (actually specifically studied) knew about the hospitable welcome of American pilots in the Far East and diplomatic casuistry between the USSR and Japan.
    The non-aggression pact, and it is somehow respected. It just gave rise to a certain incident. According to it, all the American crews of planes shot down over Japan that ended up in the USSR after that had to intern! Moreover, such crews of the US Air Force and US Navy, interned in the USSR over the years of the war, quite a lot. Their planes were damaged, their fuel ran out, and they flew to their allies, that is, to the USSR.

    I would like the author to develop this topic, if possible, of course. For example, it would be interesting to learn about other "interned" Americans, as well as about Japan's attitude to the Poltava airfield in 1944. Are there any published impressions of the forced trip to the USSR?
  3. veteran66
    veteran66 29 March 2016 07: 00
    +1
    Yes, "it's some kind of ... shame." On the site through one we shout, they say badly America helped us in the war, but what did they themselves do to help them in the war with Japan?
    1. Kazakh
      Kazakh 29 March 2016 09: 18
      +3
      Quote: veteran66
      Yes, "it's some kind of ... shame." On the site through one we shout, they say badly America helped us in the war, but what did they themselves do to help them in the war with Japan?

      Yes, we reduced the war to them by at least one year in 45. You still repent "forgive us Americans"
      1. veteran66
        veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 11
        -2
        I am not going to repent before anyone, but the "amerekans", as you call them, helped us to reduce the war too. And yet, what front did you fight on? We plowed ... b ... db
    2. Captain45
      Captain45 29 March 2016 09: 29
      0
      Quote: veteran66
      Yes, "it's some kind of ... shame." On the site through one we shout, they say badly America helped us in the war, but what did they themselves do to help them in the war with Japan?

      How did they do it? After the victorious end of the war with Nazi Germany, the USSR, faithful to the commitments it had undertaken to the allies in the anti-Hitler coalition, tore up the peace treaty with militarist Japan and declared war on it. Agreements must be observed that the USSR did the whole war, despite the provocations Japan also has to abide by its obligations (they were made at the Yalta conference in 1945), so everything was done correctly. And you, a veteran, should be interested in history, then you won't talk about "shame".
      1. veteran66
        veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 19
        +1
        So I didn’t understand something, do I have to comply with the agreements or not? Judging by your thoughts before the age of 45, we were not allies with the USA and Great Britain, and then we became? And how long must we observe treaties with the allies of our enemies? I think that as soon as the war began. For example, Germany, Italy and other Axis countries declared war on the United States almost immediately as soon as they entered the war with Japan. And you need to take an interest in history and not only from the agitation of the Central Committee of the CPSU.
    3. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 29 March 2016 10: 41
      +7
      Quote: veteran66
      Yes, "it's some kind of ... shame." On the site through one we shout, they say badly America helped us in the war, but what did they themselves do to help them in the war with Japan?

      Heh heh heh ... You still remember that Japanese companies in the war produced oil in the Soviet North Sakhalin. Under the 1925 concession agreement, the Japanese obtained the right to organize concessions for the extraction of oil and coal in Sakhalin for a period of 45 years. And until 1944, the agreement was strictly observed, while Sakhalin provided the Empire with half of its own oil production. smile

      As for helping the Allies ... it was expressed in the fact that our forces in the Far East fettered the formations of the Kwantung Army, which the Japanese would gladly use in China. The most interesting thing is that the Japanese were doing the same, pinning down our units in the Far East, which would be useful to us at the front. By the way, this is how they answered all the demands of the Reich to start a war - "we distract a quarter of the Russian army".
      With a quarter, they certainly bent. But, nevertheless, our group on the Far East was quite significant:
      On July 01 of 1942 of the year in the Far East, the Red Army had: 29 sd, 3 cd, 2 td, 10 aviation divisions, 20 sbr, 20 tbr, 4 air brigades and 15 UR. In total - 49,5 accounting divisions, 1 440 012 people. l / s, 11759 guns and mortars, 2589 tanks and self-propelled guns, 3178 aircraft.
      1. Cap.Morgan
        Cap.Morgan 29 March 2016 21: 18
        +1
        Paul Sakhalin was Japanese. After 1905
        Therefore, the Japanese mined something there. And not because they let them go there.
        The border there was transparent. Japanese merchants went to Russian villages selling various trifles.
        1. Alexey RA
          Alexey RA 30 March 2016 10: 21
          0
          Quote: Cap.Morgan
          Paul Sakhalin was Japanese. After 1905
          Therefore, the Japanese mined something there. And not because they let them go there.

          Tell me, did you carefully read my message?
          Quote: Alexey RA
          Japanese companies extracted oil in the war in Soviet North Sakhalin

          The Japanese in the war produced oil precisely in soviet territory. According to a concession agreement signed in 1925. They also mined coal and fished.
      2. veteran66
        veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 28
        -1
        Quote: Alexey RA
        Under the 1925 concession agreement, the Japanese obtained the right to organize concessions for the extraction of oil and coal in Sakhalin for a period of 45 years. And until 1944, the contract was strictly observed,

        and do you think it was right? While Japanese submarines drowned the vessels of the USA and even the USSR with grain, disrupting the supply of millions of tons of bread to us (and at that time people were starving), while our border guards and Red Army soldiers were killed and captured. Well yes, hehe hehe ..
        Quote: Alexey RA
        that our forces in the Far East fettered the units of the Kwantung Army, which the Japanese would gladly use in the same China.

        I hasten to inform you that we have not fettered anything, rather, on the contrary. And the Kwantung Army was located in China and was used there, so almost no help from the USSR to the Chinese partisans during this war was rendered. The Kwantung army was for the Yaps the same as the Atlantic Wall for the Germans - a source of manpower. By the 45th year of the much-praised 1,5 million army there was only a miserable semblance, consisting of reservists of the 2nd stage and local Aboriginal people with the equipment of the early 30s.
        1. Alexey RA
          Alexey RA 30 March 2016 10: 51
          0
          Quote: veteran66
          and do you think it was right?

          I just think that it would be nice for the patriots condemning the Allies to pull the logs out of their own eyes. And I still did not write anything about the period 01.09.1939-22.06.1941 ...
          Quote: veteran66
          I hasten to notify you that we have not fettered anything, rather, on the contrary. And the Kwantung Army was located in China and was used there, so almost no help from the USSR to the Chinese partisans during this war was rendered.

          Do not confuse the expeditionary army in China and the Kwantung army. Active military operations in China led the expeditionary army. The Kwantung army actively participated in battles sometime before 1938, after which it occasionally allocated reinforcements to the expeditionary forces (which, upon completion of operations, were selected back).

          Do you think the Kwantuntse divisions in 1941-1942 would be useful to the Japanese? Especially considering that for the entire campaign against the Allies they managed to scrape together only 11 divisions initially?
          Quote: veteran66
          The Kwantung army was for the Yaps the same as the Atlantic Wall for the Germans - a source of manpower. By the 45th year of the much-praised 1,5 million army there was only a miserable semblance, consisting of reservists of the 2nd stage and local Aborigines with equipment from the beginning of the 30s.

          They began to drag Kva from 1944. Nevertheless, by the beginning of the Manchurian operation, about a third of its forces still remained the same.
          1. veteran66
            veteran66 30 March 2016 20: 41
            0
            Quote: Alexey RA
            I just think that it would be nice for the patriots condemning the Allies to pull the logs out of their own eyes.

            You will laugh, but I think so too
            Quote: Alexey RA
            Especially considering that for the entire campaign against the Allies they managed to scrape together only 11 divisions initially

            yes then they needed more more ships and aviation
  4. bionik
    bionik 29 March 2016 07: 26
    +3
    Lt. Col. James Doolittle, attaches Japanese medals to the 225 kg bomb to "return to the Japanese with interest" for the attack on Pearl Harbor.
  5. bionik
    bionik 29 March 2016 07: 29
    0
    A group photo of pilots selected for a bomber raid on Japan on the deck of the USS Hornet (CV-8). On the left is Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle, commander of the historic “Raid Doolittle”, talking to aircraft captain Marc A. Mitsher.
    1. Vik66
      Vik66 29 March 2016 10: 28
      +2
      Bad omen before taking a photo! winked
  6. parusnik
    parusnik 29 March 2016 07: 51
    +1
    took an American bomber for our Yak-4.... Originally had the name BB-22, later it was renamed the Yak-4. It was produced in 1939-1940 in Leningrad. 90 pieces were produced ... They were retired in 1942 ..
  7. Captain45
    Captain45 29 March 2016 09: 46
    +1
    An interesting, informative article. I used to read something about this, but here in more detail, + to the author. By the way, here is an article about the American Air Force base in Poltava in 143-44 year: http: //www.sovsekretno.ru/articles/id/4147/
  8. Cartalon
    Cartalon 29 March 2016 10: 16
    +4
    You can shoot comedy
    1. kalibr
      29 March 2016 12: 35
      +4
      And the comedy would be just wonderful: "The Incredible Adventures of Americans in Russia" !!!
  9. Sergej1972
    Sergej1972 29 March 2016 10: 38
    +3
    Article plus! There is only one flea - "I met them on the Pakistani border .." Then Pakistan did not exist yet. There was British India.
    1. kalibr
      29 March 2016 12: 36
      +2
      Yes, I somehow missed what happened after 1948 year ...
      1. veteran66
        veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 54
        0
        Quote: kalibr
        There is only one flea

        not one, no one planned to land on an aircraft carrier upon return; they were supposed to land on Chinese territory. And the song
        "We fly, hobbling in the mist,
        We go on the last wing.
        Buck pierced, tail burning
        And the car flies
        On parole and on one wing .. "is a song by English pilots, translated into Russian.
  10. exSUman
    exSUman 29 March 2016 10: 51
    -2
    Quote: veteran66
    Yes, "it's some kind of ... shame." On the site through one we shout, they say badly America helped us in the war, but what did they themselves do to help them in the war with Japan?

    It's strange you are thinking ... they first did everything to confront us with Japan and Germany, and then pondered for a long time how to open a "second front" ... while bombs and shells fell on their territory during the entire war as much as on ours for half a day of war ... have profited a lot from our blood!
    1. veteran66
      veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 33
      0
      Quote: exSUman
      at first they did everything to push us against Japan and Germany,

      Sorry, but this is nonsense. The British faced us with Germany (this is a normal policy, we also longed for a war in the West, we even signed an agreement with the Nazis), and the Americans themselves faced the Japs, despite all their requests and ultimatums not to help China and not cut off oil supplies. Learn the materiel.
  11. iouris
    iouris 29 March 2016 12: 27
    +1
    Strange, in its inefficiency and even seeming meaninglessness, air operation. It shows what an important role PR plays in the domestic and foreign policy of the United States, and now Ukraine.
    1. kalibr
      29 March 2016 12: 34
      +1
      The degree of patriotism has increased significantly! There you have it!
      1. iouris
        iouris 29 March 2016 17: 18
        +2
        The United States won the war not because of outbreaks of patriotism, but because of its economy, which amounted to 40-50% of world GDP, and investment. And the necessary investment was received immediately after Pearl Harbor, in which the obedient Japanese struck.
    2. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 29 March 2016 13: 11
      +4
      Quote: iouris
      Strange, in its inefficiency and even seeming meaninglessness, air operation. It shows what an important role PR plays in the domestic and foreign policy of the United States, and now Ukraine.

      Hmm ... don't throw stones sitting in a glass house.
      Because even we did PR raids in that war: August 7-8 and August 10-11, 1941.

      By the way, the blow of Doolittle, despite the meagerness of the forces involved, turned out to be an unexpected success: B-25B 40-2247 (crew commander - Lt. Edgar McElroy) managed to directly damage the Taigei floating base, which was converted into AB Ryuho, while it was directly hit by a bomb. good
      1. iouris
        iouris 29 March 2016 17: 22
        0
        This does not explain anything, given the damage inflicted on the Japanese with the costs and combat losses.
        Landing at your airfield was not foreseen at all.
        As for us, in August 1941 the bombing of Berlin really made psychological and political sense. According to all forecasts, the British and Americans (USA) by this point, Hitler should already have been in Moscow.
        1. Alexey RA
          Alexey RA 29 March 2016 17: 50
          +1
          Quote: iouris
          This does not explain anything, given the damage inflicted on the Japanese with the costs and combat losses.
          Landing at your airfield was not foreseen at all.

          Have you read the article at all? The operation plan provided for two options for the return of aircraft.
          But alas it was smooth on paper... American intelligence did not open the system of long-range patrols on the approaches to the Metropolis. As a result, the American AUG was discovered long before the planned take-off area. And I had to raise the B-25 into the air without a landing guarantee.

          By the way, about the losses and the inability to return to your aerodrome ... do not want to remember the blow to Berlin on August 10-11, when technically raw and overloaded cars were sent on the raid?
          10 TB-7 and 16 Er-2 were supposed to take off. In fact:
          On the take-off of Er-2 Molodchesky demolished the landing gear on the edge of the airfield.
          On TB-7 of Major Egorov immediately after taking off from the ground two right M-40F diesel engines failed, and the plane crashed. After that, Zhigarev P.F. stopped the departure of the remaining aircraft. As a result 7 TB-7 and 3 Ep-2 went to Berlin.
          On the plane of Lieutenant V. D. Vidnogo over German territory the left external engine caught fire. The crew managed to eliminate the fire, but the aircraft continued to fly with loss of altitude. Not reaching 370 km to Berlin, the crew dropped bombs and lay back on course. After the failure of another M-40F, the aircraft made an emergency landing at the airfield in Obukhov.
          On TB-7, captain A.N. Tyagunin already one of the engines failed on the way back. In addition, over the Baltic coast the plane was fired by its anti-aircraft gunners. When landing, the car crashed.
          On TB-7 of Major Ugryumov M.M. several times at high altitudes engines failed. The crew was bombed in Berlin, consumed all the fuel and made an emergency landing in Torzhok.

          Quote: iouris
          As for us, in August 1941 the bombing of Berlin really made psychological and political sense. According to all forecasts, the British and Americans (USA) by this point, Hitler should already have been in Moscow.

          That is, the military meaning of the operation was much less political and moral. Just like in Doolittle's raid. smile
          1. visitork67
            visitork67 29 March 2016 19: 58
            0
            Read the article. It is not the only one and is not the ultimate truth. Take-off from an aircraft carrier before the operation was practiced. Landing was not even closely considered. It was technically impossible to execute on these aircraft and the existing runways of aircraft carriers. PR in its purest form. And the commander of this crew, in my purely subjective opinion, chose the most correct solution. For any of them it was no worse than the rest of the raiders. I don’t think that those who came to the Japanese (see article) or to the Chinese felt better.
            1. Alexey RA
              Alexey RA 30 March 2016 10: 58
              0
              Quote: visitork67
              It was technically impossible to execute on these aircraft and the existing runways of aircraft carriers.

              Believe it or not ... but in 1944 the Yankees made a B-25 capable of taking off and landing on AB - with a "slow but deadly" landing hook. And we even performed two landing-takeoff cycles:
              B-25H-5-NA SN 43-4700 BuNo 35277 was modified for carrier landing and catapult launching trials at sea. The aircraft was structurally modified at the Kansas City modification center and the gear was installed at the Naval Air Material Center in Philadelphia. The tailhook was modified from a Douglas SBD. On November 15, 1944, Lieutenant Commander Bottomley made the first carrier landing in a B-25 bomber. The aircraft was inspected, taxied to the catapult position and launched. The B-25 again landed, was inspected, and launched again for the flight back to Norfolk.
    3. veteran66
      veteran66 29 March 2016 21: 34
      0
      Quote: iouris
      Strange, in its inefficiency and even seeming meaninglessness, air operation.

      So to argue, how do you rate our raids on Berlin and Koenigsberg in the 41st year? Also madness?
  12. Aleksander
    Aleksander 29 March 2016 12: 46
    +1
    As US allies in the anti-Hitler coalition, we did not fight with Japan. And according to the then norms of international law, since there was no war between us, the Americans who came to us during the hostilities against the Japanese side had to be kept in the camp for displaced people until the end of the war!

    Strange: in 1944-45, the Americans quietly shuttle shuttle flights to the USSR (Poltava) and no one interned them. Long before the war with Japan.
    1. Lanista
      Lanista 29 March 2016 13: 15
      +2
      This is different. These "shuttles" did not fight against Japan.
    2. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 29 March 2016 13: 16
      +1
      Quote: Aleksander
      Strange: in 1944-45, the Americans quietly shuttle shuttle flights to the USSR (Poltava) and no one interned them. Long before the war with Japan.

      Because both the USSR and the USA fought with the Reich.
      Here, a crew landed on our territory, bombing in a formally neutral (in relation to the USSR) country. In such cases, the pilots were interned - see the same Switzerland.
  13. V.ic
    V.ic 29 March 2016 13: 02
    0
    But captain Edward York - the crew commander number 8, was "the smartest." Having dropped the bombs, and having calculated the fuel consumption, he realized that he couldn’t reach China and headed northwest to Russia ... Author Vyacheslav Shpakovsky

    Then this route was used by B-29 crews and the USSR received at its disposal several serviceable / almost serviceable aircraft, on the basis of which the Tu-4 was developed.
  14. Warrior2015
    Warrior2015 29 March 2016 16: 26
    +1
    Well, dear Vyacheslav, it turned out that in fact you are not very far from aviation! don't be shy, great article again! wink

    Quote: Captain45
    Agreements must be observed that the USSR did the entire war, despite the provocations of Japan and obligations must also be respected (

    Well, do not talk about provocations - neutrality was beneficial to both sides, and the USSR and Japan massively removed troops for action at the front - we are in Europe, and the Japanese are everywhere from China to New Guinea. And about oil production has already been noted - almost Japanese concerns worked throughout the war and nothing like that, they closed their eyes.
    1. kalibr
      29 March 2016 20: 55
      0
      The history of aviation and aviation technology are two different things. Soon there should be material on aviation too, but on the Pravda newspaper. What was written about her during the Second World War.
  15. polkovnik manuch
    polkovnik manuch 29 March 2016 18: 23
    0
    Thanks to the "flown" American bombers, we managed to "create" our own long-range bomber. So there are some pluses in this, and the American pilots were subsequently awarded medals "For Courage" to make up for the "misunderstanding" - I read somewhere earlier.
    1. Cap.Morgan
      Cap.Morgan 29 March 2016 21: 28
      +1
      Quote: polkovnik manuch
      Thanks to the "flown" American bombers, we managed to "create" our own long-range bomber. So there are some pluses in this, and the American pilots were subsequently awarded medals "For Courage" to make up for the "misunderstanding" - I read somewhere earlier.

      Tupolev promised to make the plane better than the B-29.
      Stalin said that it was better not to, and ordered a copy of the American car.
      What they did, right up to the erroneously scroll holes. This work brought our instrument making to a new round.
      The article is very good.
      1. bionik
        bionik 29 March 2016 21: 57
        +1
        Quote: Cap.Morgan

        Tupolev promised to make the plane better than the B-29. Stalin said that it was better not and ordered to copy the American car.
        What they did, right up to the erroneously scroll holes.

        And they even copied a camera that American pilots forgot.