Military Review

BAE completed 2000-mile GCV hybrid mobility test ahead of time

4
BAE completed 2000-mile GCV hybrid mobility test ahead of time

First Ground Combat Vehicle (GED) with hybrid electric drive (HED) from BAE Systems successfully passed the 2000 miles test on the fully integrated mobile platform Hotbuck, which was an important milestone for the GCV program, led by the US Army.


Hotbuck is a stationary modern test bench that simulates real-life conditions and terrain and makes it possible to actually conduct a test run of the hybrid system. In accordance with BAE Systems' own tight schedule, the tests were completed four months earlier than the officially scheduled deadline.

"These tests are significant progress in the overall implementation of the GCV program. On real equipment, which allows us to demonstrate that the BAE Systems team can complete the schedule ahead of schedule both now and in the next phase of the program, saving the client time and money," said Mark Signorelli (Mark Signorelli), Vice President and General Manager for Armored Combat Systems at BAE Systems. "Our main goal was to test our hybrid electric technologies for a long time in a realistic environment, and the successful completion of the tests is a testament to the quality and maturity of the technology."

The development and testing of real equipment was not a requirement of the Technology Development (TD) program, but BAE Systems decided to take the initiative to demonstrate the fuel efficiency and other characteristics of the hybrid system for a promising army infantry fighting vehicle.

Hotbuck installed the hybrid electric drive (HED) components that will be used in the BAE Systems offer for GCV, including traction drive systems, thermal systems, motors, generators, controllers and software. Held at the BAE Systems plant in Santa Clara, California, the 2000-mile pre-test accurately reproduces the conditions that exist at two well-known military range ranges. The test results further confirmed the performance, efficiency and maturity of the HED technologies used in the GCV design of BAE Systems.

The HED system in GCV, which BAE System proposed will contribute to: - creating high torque at any speed, resulting in more flexibility, greater acceleration and greater maneuverability than machines with comparable mechanical systems - reduction in fuel consumption to 20 percent compared to what a GCV would have with a conventional power plant, which leads to a reduction in total costs and the required number of fuel convoy - the presence of sufficient electrical power on board, taking into account the increase in consumption with the introduction of new technologies in the next 30 - 40 years - a decrease in 40 percent of the total number of parts used than in comparable mechanical systems, which reduces maintenance requirements and reduces the life cycle cost of the machine

BAE Systems was awarded the contract for the TD stage of the GCV program in August 2011. The TD phase is scheduled to be completed by June 2014.
Originator:
http://www.army-guide.com/
4 comments
Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must to register.

I have an account? Sign in

  1. svp67
    svp67 2 September 2013 12: 09 New
    0
    I understand that the entire run was "imitated." That's interesting, but how much does it still correspond to a real run-in in real terrain? In general, an interesting direction of development, maybe our engineers need to develop something similar - I think a rather promising direction ...
    1. Russ69
      Russ69 2 September 2013 12: 28 New
      +1
      Quote: svp67
      I understand that the entire run was "imitated." That's interesting, but how much does it still correspond to a real run-in in real terrain? In general, an interesting direction of development, maybe our engineers need to develop something similar - I think a rather promising direction ...

      So we have on the basis of the BTR-90, something like that dashed off more in real terrain, rather than on the stand. smile
      1. svp67
        svp67 2 September 2013 12: 58 New
        +3
        Quote: Russ69
        So we have on the basis of the BTR-90, something like that dashed off more on the real terrain, rather than on the stand
        Here you understand what a positive moment in this "figovon" ... The whole process is under control, you can immediately not only take a reading from the instruments, but also process it, the human factor is immediately excluded, since in this case the driver is not needed ... That there is, as the initial stage of testing a new car, I think it’s not even bad ... Here, ride, bring to working condition, cured of childhood diseases, and in the future you can give it to the hands of testers. So to say - an "aerodynamic" pipe for land vehicles ... I think that thanks to this, the test can be woken up in time.
    2. Nayhas
      Nayhas 2 September 2013 13: 42 New
      0
      Quote: svp67
      I understand that the entire run was "imitated."

      Called bench tests ...
      1. svp67
        svp67 2 September 2013 15: 46 New
        0
        Quote: Nayhas
        Called bench tests ...
        Fact. Did you want to work on this?
  2. Veles25
    Veles25 2 September 2013 13: 15 New
    0
    ..................