How the younger brothers S. Bandera died in Auschwitz


The thesis is widespread in Ukraine that the Hitlerites, who were not embarrassed in their methods, forced S. Bandera, thrown into the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, to cancel the “Act of proclamation of the Ukrainian state”, but the head of the OUN did not submit to the monsters even after the death of two of his brothers, who experienced all the horrors of the concentration camp life and the "brutally tortured" in Auschwitz. The materials at our disposal allow us to consider the circumstances of the death of the brothers in detail.


In 1916, the city of Auschwitz (former Polish Auschwitz), owned by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, built the "Saxon Camp" ("Sachsengänger"), intended for temporary residence of the Saxons - seasonal agricultural workers from rural areas of East and West Prussia, as well as Poznan, who came for a well-paid job for harvesting sugar beets. Twenty-two brick dormitories (8 two- and 14 one-story) and 90 wooden barracks were erected on the camp, intended to accommodate approximately 12000 people.

After the occupation of Poland by Germany, by April 1940, the inspection initiated by the SS (Schutzstaffeln, abbr. SS) completed the abandoned camp long ago, which recognized the latter as suitable for creating on its base a “transit and quarantine camp” for Polish opponents of the occupation regime, which were supposed deported to Germany for subsequent use as bonded laborers. However, since sand and gravel pits were located nearby, and also taking into account the convenient transport and geographical location of Auschwitz, the SS decided to develop their own “business” there. Over time, the nomenclature of the work performed by the prisoners became very extensive: from repairing Wehrmacht weapons systems, producing explosives and extracting sand and gravel from nearby quarries, to growing flowers and raising fish, poultry and cattle.

After the announcement of the “Act of the Proclamation of the Ukrainian State” in Lviv on June 30, 1941, Oleksandr Bandera arrived there, where he was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Krakow prison. In the same year, Vasyl Bandera was arrested in Stanislav (now Ivano-Frankivsk).

How the younger brothers S. Bandera died in Auschwitz

Olexander Bandera


Vasyl Bandera

On July 20, 1942, the security police (Sicherheitspolizei, abbr. SiPo) sent twenty-four members of the Ounwitz concentration camp in Auschwitz I from Krakow, including Vasyl Bandera, who was assigned camp number 49721.

After quarantine in block No. 11, they were initially placed in a dormitory (hereinafter referred to as block) No. 13, but then, due to the aggravated relations between them and the rest of the prisoners, all Ukrainian nationalists were gathered in two rooms of block No. 17. Four days later, another one joined them S. Bandera’s brother, Oleksandr (camp number 51427), consisting of a group of sixty people (mostly Polish political prisoners), also transported from Krakow. Oleksandr, like his younger brother, also got a job in the construction team "Neubau". The hard work for which he was determined by the foreman (Vorarbeiter) Franciszek Podkulski (camp number 5919), led to physical exhaustion, apparently not in the good health of O. Bandera, and he was soon placed in hospital unit (Revier) No. 20, where sick OUN members on the ground floor, in ward No. 4, a separate room was allocated. Here, on August 10, 1942, during a routine examination, 75 seriously ill prisoners were selected, including O. Bandera, who were killed on the same day by order of the camp doctor with an intracardiac injection of phenol.

Vasyl Bandera, having got to Auschwitz, was confused by Polish prisoners with his older brother Stepan, by whose order June 15, 1934, OUN fighter Grigory Matseyko (underground nickname Gaunt, in 1941-42 the leadership of the OUN and German special services planned to use him to assassinate the president Roosevelt) mortally wounded Poland's Interior Minister Bronisław Peratsky (Bronisław Wilhelm Pieracki). Later, during the years of World War II, the head of the OUN S. Bandera organized ethnic cleansing and pogroms, during which hundreds of thousands of Poles and Jews, including family members of some prisoners of Auschwitz, were killed. For the first time, the elder (Kazetpolizei, abbr. Kapo) of block No. 16 Edward Radomsky pointed out to V. Bandera other Poles.

A plot was drawn up for the purpose of revenge, it is interesting that the group of prisoners-conspirators included both ethnic Poles and Jews of Polish descent. The leader in the group was Neubau foreman Franciszek Podkulski, in this he was assisted by the Neubau capo Kazimierz Kolodynski, Boleslav Jusinski, chimney sweeps Tadeusz, Edward and some others. Franciszek and Kazimierz drew up a plan for the execution of the sentence, and on August 5, 1942, Podkulski pushed V. Bandera, who worked as an auxiliary worker in the plasterers brigade, along with a wheelbarrow from the first tier of the scaffolding. Vasyl, who was injured in the fall, was sent to a camp hospital. According to the camp hospital book, on August 5, 1942 he was placed in hospital block No. 20, from where he was then transferred to hospital block No. 28, where he died on September 5 of the same year. According to the memoirs of the former orderly of the hospital unit Jerzy Tabo (camp number 27273), Vasyl died of diarrhea. Apparently, from other patients he contracted an infectious intestinal disease like dysentery, one of the symptoms of which is severe diarrhea, which leads to dehydration and death.

As political prisoners (Polizeihäftling), the OUN members in the concentration camp were under the jurisdiction of the Gestapo of Katowice, awaiting trial at Auschwitz. Some of them were later released from Auschwitz, for example, on December 18-19, 1944, in connection with the organization by the Germans of the so-called. Ukrainian National Army (Ukrainische Nationalarmee), were released Yaroslav Rak, Mykola Klimyshyn, Stepan Lenkavsky and Leo Rebet.

The Ounovites belonged to the category of privileged prisoners (Ehrenhaftlinge), which they were much proud of. They occupied a special (compared to other prisoners) position in the camp. They were not shot, they were not hanged in front of the ranks, and they were not taken hostage. They had their own, separate rooms for living in the block, there was even a separate room in the hospital. Prominent Ukrainian nationalists not only regularly received food packages from the Red Cross, but thanks to the guardianship of the political department of the camp (Politische Abteilung, actually the Gestapo camp) they occupied “prominent” positions “under the roof”, that is, in the room, which gave the prisoner great chance to survive. These were, for example, places like a clothing store for prisoners (Bekleidungskammer), a storehouse for things confiscated from newly arrived prisoners (Effektenkammer), a camp hospital (Krankenbau), a vegetable warehouse, a bakery, a slaughterhouse and kitchens (serving both prisoners and SS men). Ukrainian nationalists were accommodated in one of the two-story landscaped brick blocks (No. 17), built of red brick in the summer of 1941. The building had two residential floors, a basement and an attic.


Block number 17


Nara in the dormitory of the block


Block washroom


Toilet in the block

The rooms in which the prisoners were housed were corner rooms with a total area of ​​70,5 and 108 square meters with electric lighting, and, judging by the photographs, water heating, and, depending on the area, five or seven windows. In addition, each room had one or two stoves - the number of the latter depended on the area of ​​the room. Unlike such brick blocks, the most common one-story brick and wooden barracks in the concentration camp had either one furnace for the entire hut, or there was no furnace (like windows) at all.


Auschwitz wooden hut


Naras in the usual Auschwitz hut


Inside the toilet

The prisoners held there were brought in by a system in a special toilet hut, where there were three long ramps, two of which, densely studded with holes, were used for basic needs, and the third as a washbasin. At the same time, two-story brick blocks were equipped with two heated toilets with toilets and urinals, as well as a separate room for washing.

A special attitude towards the members of the OUN was also shown after the death of V. Bandera, when the camp administration launched a thorough investigation in order to search for those responsible. One of the Banderaites saw how Vasily was pushed, and reported this to the political department. The direct executors of the sentence were summoned to the Gestapo camp for interrogation, and Boleslav Juzinski, both chimney sweeps and other prisoners, after several days in the punishment cell, were sent to the concentration camp Sachsenhausen (KZ Sachsenhausen). During interrogations, Podkulsky and Kolodynsky, covering their comrades, took all the blame.

As a result of the investigation carried out by the Gestapo camp regarding the death of Bandera’s brother, both of them were first put in the punishment cell of Unit 11, and subsequently, on January 25, 1943, they were shot at the “wall of executions”. In addition to them, another eleven of those who participated in the elimination of Bandera were shot there. So the camp administration of Auschwitz avenged the Poles for the death of his brother S. Bandera.

* OUN-UPA is prohibited in the Russian Federation.
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  1. AU Ivanov. 27 February 2020 18: 47 New
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    And I thought it was a sinful thing that the Bandera brothers, drunk, fell off the guard tower of Auschwitz. In the line of duty.
  2. aranzon1913 27 February 2020 18: 48 New
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    Did not know. Upon reading, absolutely not surprised. What should have happened. Intestinal infection, epic ...
  3. Pavel Fedorov 27 February 2020 19: 14 New
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    Zhidobesy went home
  4. knn54 27 February 2020 19: 32 New
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    They banged someone from the Nazi elite, either in Lviv or in Rivne. They threw some papers. The Gestapo pecked and arrested a number of OUN figures. Brothers also fell, especially in their posts showed excessive independence.
    And in the Nazis concentration camp, the slip came out - they all sat together, which the Poles took advantage of.
    The Germans released the remaining figures in 1944. The brothers were simply out of luck.
    By the way, after the war, the NKGB conducted an investigation. The conclusion is similar to the material in this article.
    1. tihonmarine 27 February 2020 21: 31 New
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      Quote: knn54
      The Gestapo pecked and arrested a number of OUN figures.

      And maybe as a warning to others, so as not to “flirt” strongly with the independence, but to comply with the orders of the owners.
    2. Avior 27 February 2020 21: 53 New
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      what you described is a case already in 1944, this is an action of Nikolai Kuznetsov, while the chief of the government of the district, Galicia Otto Bauer, and the head of the office of the government of the governor general, Heinrich Schneider, were liquidated, nearby Kuznetsov threw a fake order to eliminate them from the OUN
      but the events in the article are long before 1941
      hi
      1. The leader of the Redskins 28 February 2020 09: 06 New
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        A rare and informative article. Very informative and not very subjective. For me personally, the facts in the article are not known. Thanks to the author.
  5. Avior 27 February 2020 20: 48 New
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    In the photo, the barracks and the toilet at the barracks are a post-war reconstruction.
    there are photos from the archives of the war, at least some looked different

    maybe, of course, this is some kind of model-demonstrative, although I don’t understand why, maybe there were others

    and two-story buildings were not a few, as I understand it, at first they built two-story buildings, then cheap one-story buildings.

    It seems that more about the Poles can be said about the special situation and overseers, all the time in the article I stumble
    the headman (Kazetpolizei, abbr. kapo) of block No. 16 Edward Radomsky .... foreman of the "Neubau" Franciszek Podkulski, in this he was helped by the capo "Neubau" Kazimierz Kolodynski, Boleslav Jusinski.

    The nurse is also a Pole, and the chimney sweeps, as I understand it, are also a good place in the camp, but I don’t see about Ukrainians overseers in the article.
    In general, it follows from the article that relations with the Germans in Bandera were complex and contradictory.
    I would like to read a serious article on this topic, with links and other things.
    1. Xnumx vis 27 February 2020 21: 49 New
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      Put a plus. because I agree I need good detailed information, an article ... And touching photos of the hut with feather-beds and flowers in the end. camp cause disgust ....
      1. Avior 28 February 2020 01: 00 New
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        yeah, the concentration camp is not very similar
        I think it’s not feather-beds, but some kind of mattresses covered with blankets, but flowers, and also blankets - this is a clear window dressing for filming.
        Maybe the Germans were shooting for the Red Cross, they were allowed in there, I don’t know.
        But on the other hand, these two-story buildings in the article, they are also not very similar to a concentration camp, but they have been preserved in the same form as when the camp existed. There are other photos of Auschwitz that are not very similar to a concentration camp. And the fact that the flowers are window dressing is understandable, but the hut itself was unlikely to be built just for filming. I suspect that there were different conditions there, depending on the time when they were building, and the attitude towards prisoners during the war changed, and the Nazis at some stage maintained the appearance of normal conditions, allowing Red Cross representatives to enter there.
        Auschwitz did consist of several parts, what we see is a working part, the extermination camp was separated.
        Auschwitz I

        After this region of Poland was occupied by German troops in 1939, the city of Auschwitz was renamed Auschwitz. The first concentration camp in Auschwitz was Auschwitz 1 [12], which later served as the administrative center of the entire complex. It was founded on May 20, 1940 on the basis of brick one-story and two-story buildings of the former Polish and previously Austrian barracks. Initially, members of the Auschwitz Jewish community were forcibly involved in the construction of the Auschwitz I concentration camp. The former vegetable storehouse was rebuilt into crematorium I with a morgue.
        During the construction of all one-story buildings, second floors were added. Several new two-story buildings were built. In total, there were 24 two-story buildings (blocks) in Auschwitz I camp. Block No. 11 (“Death Block”) was a prison camp, where meetings of the so-called “Extraordinary Court” took place two or three times a month, by the decision of which death sentences were imposed on Gestapo arrested members of the Resistance movement and arrested prisoners of the camp . From October 6, 1941 to February 28, 1942, Soviet prisoners of war were placed in blocks No. 1, 2, 3, 12, 13, 14, 22, 23, which were then transferred to Auschwitz II / Birkenau camp ....

        https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9E%D1%81%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%86%D0%B8%D0%BC#Структура
        hi
      2. The leader of the Redskins 28 February 2020 09: 09 New
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        These are staged photos for the International Red Cross, if I'm not mistaken. I once read an article specifically about such photos and about comparing with these "species".
    2. Comrade 28 February 2020 02: 14 New
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      Quote: Avior
      In the photo, the barracks and the toilet at the barracks are a post-war reconstruction.

      I understand you correctly, you want to say that block number 17, in which Bandera lived, was a remake?
      If so, then I object as follows. The hut and its contents are real, on the Internet in English I managed to find an article dedicated to this particular hut. Attached are photographs and two drawings. One of the drawings is original, German. There I found out more about the hut.
      Quote: Avior
      It seems that more about the Poles can be said about the special situation and overseers, all the time in the article I stumble

      Head of the block and construction superintendent not were overseers.
      Quote: Avior
      In general, it follows from the article that relations with the Germans in Bandera were complex and contradictory.

      And so the Germans gave prominent Bandera workers work in the kitchen and vegetable warehouse, rather than being driven out into the fields, working in the rain and in the mud?
      1. Doctor 28 February 2020 10: 36 New
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        If so, then I object as follows. Barack and its contents are real,

        Do not work, they will not believe. At present, not all hospitals have toilet bowls.
        1. Comrade 29 February 2020 02: 30 New
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          Quote: Arzt
          We do not have toilet bowls in all hospitals now.

          I know. And the Germans in the forty-first set them for prisoners of a concentration camp. Not for everyone, of course, but fact is a fact.

      2. Avior 28 February 2020 11: 23 New
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        They misunderstood, the two-story buildings are the same as they were.
        But the barracks in the photo in your article were recreated during the organization of the museum.
        But two-story buildings were not built for what special conditions, And there were a lot of them, at that time it was ordinary camp premises
        I provided a link from Wiki about this
        1. Comrade 29 February 2020 02: 21 New
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          Quote: Avior
          the barracks in the photo in your article are recreated when organizing the museum

          I do not argue, the wooden hut in the photo is really a remake. But what does it change, how do these replicas differ from those that the Germans built? One oven for the entire hut, toilet and washbasins are not.

          Quote: Avior
          two-story buildings were not built for any special conditions, and there were a lot of them, at that time it was ordinary camp premises

          You are mistaken, two-story brick huts were built only in Auschwitz I. There were thirty-one huts in total, however, eleven of them were used not for living, but for other purposes - from a brothel (puff) and a death block to hospitals for both SS men and and for prisoners.

          In modern terms, twenty two-story barracks with all the amenities where the Germans settled Bandera, were VIP barracks.
          1. Avior 29 February 2020 08: 30 New
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            Sorry, the speech that the conditions in which Bro Bandera and other nationalists were placed did not differ much, the main part of the camp at that time looked like that
            After, when they began to expand the camp, conditions began to deteriorate
            1. Comrade 1 March 2020 04: 12 New
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              Quote: Avior
              Sorry, the speech that the conditions in which Bro Bandera and other nationalists were placed did not differ much, the main part of the camp at that time looked like that

              Sergey, you are mistaken.
              1) Himmler ordered a fundamental expansion of Auschwitz in early March 1941 Mr.
              2) The expansion of the camp began in October 1941 The construction of the first stage of the Auschwitz II (Vernichtungslager Birkenau) was started.
              3) Brothers S. Bandera were transferred to Auschwitz at the end July 1942 Mr.
              4) The first sectors were completed with the construction of:
              BIa Sector June 1942 Mr.
              BIb Sector August 1942 Mr.
              5) By the time the Bandera brothers left quarantine, the Germans were ready to receive prisoners in two sectors of the Auschwitz II concentration camp.
              6) There, in these "new buildings", Bandera was not sent, they were placed in VIP barracks, with water supply, sewage, washbasins, toilets, wooden floors, as well as with water and stove heating.
              7) In one-story barracks just built, instead of the initial 550 prisoners, according to the “adjusted” norms, 744 prisoners were placed.
              8) In these same barracks there were neither toilets, nor washbasins, nor water heating. the floors were earthen.
              There was only one stove, although the standard single-story hut was 390 square meters.
              For comparison. In the premises where Bandera sat, on an area of ​​108 square meters there were two furnaces.
              Again.
              When Bandera was brought to Auschwitz, there were already two sectors with one-story huts, an image with a fragment of which is attached. This is not a remake, but a real hut, it was taken to the USA in an unassembled form at the exhibition.
        2. igordok 29 February 2020 08: 01 New
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          Three-story huts and a two-story dining room, Dulaga-100 (Porkhov). Number of storeys does not mean anything. Hell is hell.

          1. Comrade 1 March 2020 17: 40 New
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            Quote: igordok
            Three-story huts and a two-story dining room, Dulaga-100 (Porkhov).

            A colleague, these are Soviet buildings, not barracks.
            Quote: igordok
            Hell is hell.

            Again.
            The Bandera brothers lived and worked in much better conditions than other prisoners in Auschwitz.
            With a well-maintained life and work in the room, Bandera residents owe an unheard of low mortality rate compared to other categories of prisoners.
            For example, from the first batch of Soviet prisoners of war numbering 10 people, less than a thousand were left alive after six months.
            And out of about 300 Bandera-inhabitants of VIP barracks, about 30 died. The lion's share of these 30 falls on the winter-spring of the forty-fifth, and there were reasons for the increase in mortality among prisoners.
    3. gsev 14 March 2020 20: 31 New
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      Quote: Avior
      In general, it follows from the article that relations with the Germans in Bandera were complex and contradictory.

      Just before Stalingrad, the Germans considered their defeat incredible and saw ordinary slaves in the Ukrainians. Then they said that the Germans eat Jews for breakfast, Russians for lunch, Ukrainians for dinner.
  6. SPB63 28 February 2020 16: 08 New
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    Brick houses are original. These are really old barracks (Austrian, then Polish) - as local guides in Auschwitz say. I don’t know where the information came from in the article on farm houses. And it would be strange to build brick two-story houses "with all conveniences" for seasonal workers.
    This is the original part of the camp, the so-called Auschwitz-1. Many people could not fit in here, so later Auschwitz-2 arose, aka Birkenau (named after the village). It is approximately 3 km from the barracks. There the Germans already built a huge number of wooden barracks, which, of course, were not preserved. Those that are now are restored for the museum (there are much fewer than there were during the war).
    1. Comrade 29 February 2020 02: 28 New
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      Quote: SPB63
      These are really old barracks (Austrian, then Polish) - as local guides in Auschwitz say.

      If you are not too lazy and delve into the study of the topic of these barracks, then the babble of the guides will cause a smile.
      Quote: SPB63
      I don’t know where the information came from in the article on farm houses

      Go to the German page on the concentration camp, there in the history of the camp it is said superficially that the camp was built for seasonal workers. There is also a link in the text, after which you will find out all the details, since in the article under discussion everything is stated quite concisely.
  7. Comrade 29 February 2020 02: 40 New
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    If we talk about the conditions of prisoners in concentration camps, it makes sense to say a few words about the conditions under which Stepan Bandera was sitting in a concentration camp. As you know, the Germans put him in the Zellenbau block. Here is a photograph of the decoration of one of the cells of this block, which was located on the territory of the Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

    It was in such conditions that the Germans kept S. Bandera. As for me, it’s good looking at the unfortunate ones from the wooden barracks, where people often lay so crowded that they could not afford to lie on their backs.
    By the way, Stepan had the right to visit the camp brothel three times a week. Apparently not to be bored.
    The time allotted for the visit was standard for everyone - fifteen minutes.
    1. Avior 29 February 2020 08: 44 New
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      The conditions of detention of this Bandera were also not some kind of indulgence for him.
      A solitary confinement in a prison is certainly better than a death camp, but this is not a sanatorium, and it was quite common to shoot from this prison.

      The most “sensitive” camp area. It held the most dangerous and important prisoners of the Reich - above all, well-known politicians of high rank, statesmen, as well as personal enemies of Adolf Hitler. Among them is OUN-B conductor Stepan Bandera [1].

      “Zellenbau” was distinguished by better conditions of detention in comparison with other conditions of the concentration camp. .... Each detainee was in solitary confinement, the window of which was closed with a wooden shield.

      One of the “horrors” of the prisoners was the unit’s commandant, SS Hauptsharfuhrer Kurt Ekkarius (Ikarius), who for any, in his opinion, violation of the regime could cruelly torture or kill the prisoner ....


      https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Целленбау

      About the brothel, you cleverly managed to combine “could visit” and “visited”, which is far from the same thing, and since it was available to prisoners in prison and not in the camp, I never heard or read it.
      The brothel was also in Auschwitz, but this does not make it a sanatorium
      smile
      1. Comrade 1 March 2020 05: 39 New
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        Quote: Avior
        The conditions of detention of this Bandera were also not some kind of indulgence for him.

        We looked at the photo, now we read in what conditions S. Bandera was kept in a concentration camp.
        S. Bandera did not wear a prison uniform, walked in a civilian suit.
        He ate in the dining room serving the SS men.
        For forced labor, unlike his brothers Oleksandr and Vasyl, Stepan was not persecuted.
        During the day, the cell was open, prisoners of the Zellenbau block were free to visit each other.
        Bandera had the right to see his wife.
        There was no need to go to roll call (stand appel). As the Polish writer writes in her autobiographical book, “I Survived Auschwitz,” you could stand the appel for four and six hours. Imagine: November, a strong wind blows and it rains. You stand on the parade ground for more than one hour, get wet to the skin, are tired. Finally, you can go to a cold hut, but change into dry clothes and keep warm. People lay in wet clothes on bare boards, and in the morning they got up and went to work.
        S. Bandera, like the other inhabitants of Zellenbau, was relieved of this procedure.
        For what ? And for the beautiful eyes.
        So yes, indeed, the head of the OUN in the concentration camp had absolutely no concessions from the Germans, he lived on common rights, everything was with Stepan, like with other prisoners of the concentration camp.

        Quote: Avior
        and shot from this prison quite ordinary.


        Can you name which of the Zellenbau shot?
        In the meantime, here. In addition to Bandera, the following Ukrainian nationalists sat there:
        Yaroslav Stetsko
        Taras Bulba-Borovets
        Oleg Olzhich
        Andrey Melnyk
        The question is the same, which of them was shot?

        Quote: Avior
        Solitary confinement in prison is certainly better than a death camp, but this is not a sanatorium


        Bandera will go to the sanatorium later.
        1. Avior 2 March 2020 02: 19 New
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          Can you name which of the Zellenbau shot?

          For example, Yakov Dzhugashvili, Stefan Rovecki
          The question is the same, which of them was shot?

          For example, Oleg Olzhich
          So yes, indeed, the head of the OUN in the concentration camp had absolutely no concessions from the Germans, he lived on common rights, everything was with Stepan, like with other prisoners of the concentration camp.

          Yes, on the same as other prisoners of Zelenbau.

          Or do you think there were only Bandera people?
          There are a lot of famous people sitting. There was a torture chamber, since it was also a special Gestapo prison, but if necessary, they could be transferred to another camp for execution.
          Like Ernst Thalmann in Buchenwald, for example. I sat there before with Bandera, on the same conditions. And he had meetings with his wife and daughter, and they released him from the cell, and then they shot him.
          No need to pretend that somewhere in the German camps was a sanatorium.
          Yes, the conditions were different, even inside the camp, as in Auschwitz.
          But it was still a German concentration camp, and not a safe sanatorium.
          hi
          1. Comrade 2 March 2020 04: 08 New
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            Quote: Avior
            For example, Yakov Dzhugashvili

            Colleague, you are again mistaken, Yakov Dzhugashvili not was shot.
            According to an autopsy report published in Der Spiegel (2013 No. 7), a bullet fired by SS watchmaker Rottenführer C. Hafrich hit Yakov’s head four centimeters from his right ear and crushed his skull. However, the death of the prisoner came earlier - from electric shock of high voltage, passed through the barbed wire, which Jacob grasped. In other words, a bullet hit the head of a corpse.
            Olzhich also not was shothe died during interrogation.

            But Stefan Rovecki, yes, he was killed, here you are right.
            Quote: Avior
            No need to pretend that somewhere in the German camps was a sanatorium.

            And where do I "portray" it?
            The facts are that Bandera were privileged prisoners who lived and worked in conditions that hundreds of thousands of other German concentration camp prisoners could only dream of. It was these conditions that provided Bandera with both a relatively comfortable life and an unheard of low percentage of deaths during imprisonment in Auschwitz.
            And you can’t accept this in any way, therefore you are trying to convince readers of our discussion that the Germans placed Bandera on equal terms with all other prisoners.
            1. Avior 2 March 2020 19: 13 New
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              Olzhich was tortured to death, there was a torture chamber for these purposes, I don’t see much difference in how they killed.
              Apparently not in a sanatorium.
              Yes, Bandera was on a par with other prisoners who were sitting next to him, and they could be killed in one way or another. This is a fact that you have not refuted in any way, but what you write is unfounded allegations, an attempt to pull an owl on a globe, to adjust reality to your ideas.
              Both in Auschwitz and in Sachsenhausen, including Zellenbau, Bandera was in the same conditions as other prisoners.
              And if conditions were different in Zellenbau from other camps, then not only for Bandera, but also for Telman or Ravel.
              hi
              1. Comrade 3 March 2020 04: 49 New
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                Quote: Avior
                Olzhich was tortured to death

                How do you know this, do you have any documents?
                He could have been killed during interrogation through negligence. I am writing "by negligence", because if they wanted to take their life, they would simply put it on the wall.
                Last year, a similar case occurred in one of the regional centers of Ukraine. Two policemen approached a passerby and invited him to become understood. A passerby refused, and one of the policemen stabbed him in the head with his fist. The guy fell on the curb, and did not get up anymore - he died in intensive care.
                The police officer, of course, had nothing for it.
                Quote: Avior
                Both in Auschwitz and in Sachsenhausen, including Zellenbau, Bandera was in the same conditions as other prisoners.

                Colleague, here is not "Maidan", but a forum. If you are stating something, then please provide evidence.

                In the meantime, here is information for you to think about.
                1) Total through Auschwitz I almost passed 350 (three hundred and fifty) Ukrainian nationalists, of whom survived 325 (three hundred twenty five) people.
                2) Polish writer Kristina Zhivulskaya wrote an autobiographical book, "I Survived Auschwitz." As part of the transport from Warsaw, in which she was brought to Auschwitz IIthere were 190 (one hundred and ninety) people survived one it. And that’s only because she managed to escape during the “Death March” in the winter of 1945.

                If you have even a drop of common sense, think about the above statistics.

                And for others I’m not too lazy to write again, only good living conditions and “thieves” work caused the Bandera to lose less than ten percent of the total number of people spent in the concentration camp for three years.
                I already told you about the first batch of Soviet prisoners of war, less than a thousand of ten thousand survived in six months.
                By the way, I did not see information that the Germans released Soviet prisoners of war, but Bandera was released from Auschwitz, and Bandera himself too.
                Is this not evidence of a special attitude of the Germans towards Ukrainian nationalists?
                Along the way, are you aware that Heavenly Hundred is also a myth? There are people on the list who were actually dead long before, according to official propaganda, they were "killed on the Maidan."
                1. Avior 3 March 2020 09: 08 New
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                  No need to sprinkle irrelevant information.
                  The conditions in the concentration camps, even in the same, and even more so different, could differ markedly, there were many factors.
                  And death in a concentration camp or in the dungeons of the Gestapo could be for a variety of reasons, not necessarily from the fact that they decided to kill a particular person.
                  It appears in your reasoning that you still need to figure it out first, maybe it was just an accident or a violation of the safety procedures for conducting interrogations, and then it was up to you to decide whether the person was a victim of the Nazis.
                  In my opinion, you pre-assigned yourself that the Bandera people were in German camps in some special sanatorium conditions, and do not pay attention to the fact that even the ones you cited from a well-known article (I'm not sure if you know the primary source of information, since in the article you he wasn’t brought) facts (namely facts, not general considerations in which camp and among which groups of the population survived more) about the death of the Bandera brothers confirm that they were on a common basis.
                  As in Sachsenhausen, too.
                  There were very different conditions and situations.
                  Have you heard about the release of Soviet prisoners of war?
                  They released quite a lot, not all and not always, released certain categories, but nonetheless the phenomenon is not unique.
                  It’s just that our people didn’t really like to write about it, but even in Soviet times, one could meet memories of Soviet women who pulled prisoners out of camps, claiming that it was their husband
                  https://reibert.info/threads/sluchai-osvobozhdenija-voennoplennyx-rkka-iz-plena-samimi-nemcami.371554/
                  I see no reason to argue further, the conversation goes on in a circle
                  hi
                  1. gsev 14 March 2020 20: 42 New
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                    Quote: Avior
                    they took prisoners out of the camps, claiming that it was their husband

                    In the summer of 1941, this was possible. The Germans believed that they had broken the Russians and they were now their obedient slaves. And they can be exploited without spending money on security. After the start of the partisan war, the battle of Smolensk and the defeats at Leningrad, Moscow was no longer like that. For example, in 1941, Muslims were often shot as Jews. In 1942, they began to seek to recruit them in the SS.
                2. Avior 3 March 2020 09: 17 New
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                  http://army.armor.kiev.ua/hist/sovet-plennye.shtml
                  Supplement to the journal No. 39058/41
                  from 8.IX.41g.
                  Orders for the treatment of Soviet prisoners of war in all POW camps

                  I. General issues of treatment of Soviet prisoners of war .... Persons of the following nationalities should be released to their homeland; Germans (Volksdeutsche), Ukrainians, Belarusians, Latvians, Estonians, Lithuanians, Romanians, Finns. Special orders will follow up on the dissolution of these prisoners of war.

                  Everything was very different, such questions require serious study.