“They put a hand to an empty head”: the nuances of a military greeting in the US Army


The military salute in the American army is called “Salute” and is fundamentally different from how it is displayed in many armies in the post-Soviet space. In Russia, it is worth noting that they cannot indifferently look at how in the USA the hand is applied to the "empty head" - that is, to the head on which there is no headgear.


A former Ukrainian soldier on his YouTube channel Rud & Co tells about the nuances of a military greeting in the American army.

How does the American army give a military salute?

For example, from the "quiet" position in the headdress - the right hand is pushed to the side by an angle of 90 degrees with the body, then bends at the elbow, after which the palm is brought to the head so that it touches the edge of the headdress with the index finger. At the same time, many American troops, giving a military greeting, turn their hand slightly towards the eyes. After that, the hand lowers directly in front of you - again to the attention position.

A former Ukrainian soldier, expressing his point of view, says that giving a military greeting without a headgear is correct.

Rudenko:

I believe that it should be so. The military salute in the USA is given to specific epaulets, and it is not so important who at the moment wears them.

Reasoning Rudenko:
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  1. eagle owl 24 December 2019 07: 17 New
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    Based on the fact that the gesture initially means raising the visor, the Ukrainian military is coming
    1. tracer 24 December 2019 07: 29 New
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      Think, after all, it is the dream of any share-elf to serve in the army of the "master." Whatever they do, everything will be "right." And better than everyone. Although, of course, this is partially true for a shareholder. After what Nenki’s army has become, it's certainly fantastic.
      1. Shurik70 24 December 2019 07: 42 New
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        Well, in Russia, too, there are many nuances that are strange to foreigners, who can be saluted, and at what nuances.
        For the sake of PR, a general can salute the church patriarch.
        The traffic police officer, introducing himself, also salutes.
        BUT THE CAP HAS TO BE MANDATORY !!!
        I think it’s not worth the hassle to climb into a strange monastery with your charter.
        The main thing is not to allow anyone else to teach us charters. If necessary, we can take someone else’s (a gift from friends or a trophy from the enemy). But forcibly pushed in - kick back.
        1. Aldmit_2 24 December 2019 09: 32 New
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          You can relate to Ukrainian non-brothers as you like, but in this video, the person simply explained the difference between the American greeting and greeting in the post-Soviet countries. He did not insult or humiliate anyone. And what serves in the US Army is his right. How many former Russians are there?
          I’ll even say more. I listened. There is a certain logic in the American rules.
        2. Inspector 24 December 2019 09: 45 New
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          Before the coup, Russian officers said, “I have honor.” Trotsky introduced a salute - and no one canceled it ... horror. It is not surprising that in 1991 and 1993 the Trotskyists took revenge. Officers, start with the return of honor. Yours.
          1. Shurik70 24 December 2019 12: 56 New
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            Quote: Inspector
            Before the coup, Russian officers said, “I have honor.” Trotsky introduced a salute - and no one canceled it ... horror. It is not surprising that in 1991 and 1993 the Trotskyists took revenge. Officers, start with the return of honor. Yours.

            I didn’t read the royal charter.
            But from historical books it seems that “I have Honor” - instead of “Goodbye” and “Farewell” - is a confirmation sign of the end of a conversation, pronounced by a junior in rank during a conversation by the military, or by a civil servant when talking with any civilian. And by no means as a greeting.
            1. jonny64 24 December 2019 17: 19 New
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              The expression "I have the honor" is usually perceived as a certain praise of one’s own merits and emphasizing one’s own significance, which is fundamentally wrong. Not only is this phrase used incorrectly these days, it is also misunderstood, because it has a radically opposite meaning to what is being invested in it. Many do not know about this and try to use such a phrase anywhere, completely not understanding how important it was for their ancestors.
              The phrase was borrowed from the English “I have the honor of ...”, which meant that there was serious respect for his interlocutor and opponent. The modern interpretation of the phrase implies the presence of this very honor in the speaker of such a phrase. In fact, this is an absolutely wrong opinion - they have no honor in terms of possessing it, but in terms of receiving attention from the interlocutor or the opponent. The army expression “salute” can be explained in a similar way - of course, no one gives it to anyone, but they respect and reverence it in a similar way.
              The expression became popular in Russia in the XNUMXthth centuries. It was used by army officers not only in official, but also in everyday communication. By the way, in the modern army of Russia, this phrase is also often used, but not at all with the meaning that was originally invested in it. She was very loved and often used by the famous General Swan, who also did not quite understand her meanings. The widespread use of this expression has completely discredited its meaning - now proper meaning is not being put into these two words.
              “Honor I have” implies precisely a respectful attitude to the interlocutor, and not emphasizing the presence of honor in oneself. Thus, the person wanted to express some gratitude, which does not correspond to the modern use of such a phrase, which, by the way, can now sound completely inappropriate. In principle, the use of such an expression today is the usual reduction of the general concept of honor and dignity, which, by the way, has already lost its importance in comparison with the times when the phrase was used among officers.
              By the way, in the modern army of the Russian Federation, this expression is usually used as a military privet. More precisely, parting is even directly prescribed by the current combined-arms Charter, in particular, by the chapter on military politeness.
              Initially, the phrase was used only in conjunction with verbs, for example, bowing, staying, congratulating, seeing, appearing and others. The famous "I have the honor!" paired with a click of heels and abrupt withdrawal is nothing more than a widely spread legend about a serious offense of one person against another. That is why such a phrase is not customary to use at the end of a sentence without verbs, although in modern times this rule does not interest anyone.
              1. ccsr 25 December 2019 12: 16 New
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                Quote: jonny64
                Many do not know about this and try to use such a phrase anywhere, completely not understanding how important it was for their ancestors.

                You stated everything absolutely correctly - that is how the words “I have the honor” were interpreted, and this is not connected with the personal qualities of the speaker of these words, but as a tribute to the interlocutor.
        3. Barmaleyka 24 December 2019 09: 47 New
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          Quote: Shurik70
          The traffic police officer, introducing himself, also salutes.

          in fact there are not any violations of tradition
        4. major147 24 December 2019 13: 57 New
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          Quote: Shurik70
          salutes too.

          I would call it a "military salute." soldier
    2. sidoroff 24 December 2019 08: 30 New
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      according to another legend, Francis Drake's “put into circulation” gesture greeted his queen. and a royal headdress
      the person is supposed to shoot.
    3. Valery Valery 24 December 2019 08: 53 New
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      Yes, let even the hand buttocks apply! In the latest trends in their tolerance, this may be more correct. Do we care ...
    4. svp67 24 December 2019 09: 15 New
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      Quote: Uhu
      Based on the fact that the gesture initially means raising the visor, the Ukrainian military is coming

      It’s considered so with us ... It’s a visor or a mask, from here to go with an “open face”
      Americans have a different mythology, it comes from the English pirate Morgan. Who met with a similar gesture Queen Victoria in his ship. In answer to the question, what did it mean? He replied that I was hiding from the light emanating from Royal Majesty. Since then it has become a tradition ...
      It’s worth recalling that the hats on his head WAS NOT
      1. Berg berg 24 December 2019 13: 32 New
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        If he was hiding from the queen's radiance, he would have held his palm by his eyebrows, covering his eyes. And if he seemed to be listening to his hat, then he just doesn’t see a schiz that he doesn’t! )))
        1. svp67 25 December 2019 10: 35 New
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          Quote: Berg Berg
          If he was hiding from the queen's radiance, he would have held his palm by his eyebrows, covering his eyes.

          Read the article carefully
          At the same time, many American servicemen, giving a military greeting, turn their hand slightly in the direction of the eyes ...
    5. maidan.izrailovich 24 December 2019 11: 55 New
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      Based on the fact that the gesture initially means raising the visor, the Ukrainian military is coming

      Do not be so strict .... in the pots there is no visor. lol
    6. ccsr 24 December 2019 18: 27 New
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      Quote: Uhu
      Based on the fact that the gesture initially means raising the visor, the Ukrainian military is coming

      There is a version that this gesture appeared in the era of the appearance of hats, when the greeter took to the fields, and took off his headdress to a superior in charge.
      1. Berg berg 25 December 2019 12: 34 New
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        And so it worked out to automatism, that even at the genetic level this movement was impressed - although there is no hat!)))
        1. ccsr 25 December 2019 13: 07 New
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          Quote: Berg Berg
          And so it worked to automatism, that even at the genetic level this movement was impressed - although there is no hat

          Instead, a cap or beret should be. But without a headgear, this gesture looks ridiculous for us, and our military traditions have deeper roots than in the American army.
    7. Bar2 28 December 2019 09: 21 New
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      this is a salute


      or here



      The very word
      -Salut-Solo -Sun
      and eastern greeting
      -Sala-Maleykum is a prayer to the Sun or Praise to the Sun, so that
      SALAAM ALEIKUM.
  2. nikvic46 24 December 2019 07: 43 New
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    Each army has its own traditions. Even in the parades, you can see that everyone walks in different ways. We have taken a lot from abroad now. These are shoes, hats, and numerous order straps.
    1. tracer 24 December 2019 08: 00 New
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      In Russia, the ceremonial step is Prussian. The army of the Prussians disappeared in history but their step was passed on to Russian. Neither give nor take. The beautiful and proud step of brave and strong people.
    2. ccsr 24 December 2019 18: 33 New
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      Quote: nikvic46
      These are shoes, hats, and numerous order straps.

      By the way, in the American army there is a good example when an asterisk (or several) is attached to one order block, if they re-award the same medal or order (or several times) - at least as I understand it. This significantly reduces the number of pads, and even when there are so many of them that reach the navel, it just looks ridiculous, and in some way resembles North Korean generals.
      1. your1970 25 December 2019 07: 19 New
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        Quote: ccsr
        This greatly reduces the number of pads,

        Do we have many twice Heroes or Red Star awarded?
        And anniversary medals are all one by one .....
        There will be no significant decrease
        1. ccsr 25 December 2019 12: 12 New
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          Quote: your1970
          Do we have many twice Heroes or Red Star awarded?

          Among veterans a lot.
          1. your1970 25 December 2019 12: 39 New
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            Quote: ccsr
            Quote: your1970
            Do we have many twice Heroes or Red Star awarded?

            Among veterans a lot.

            And a lot of you living Do you know veteran order-bearers? They are not there, they died ... naturally after the Second World War they were many ...

            and modern twice Heroes or twice order-bearers of the same order throughout the country 100 people will not be typed

            The question was about simplifying the wearing of awards and reducing the number of pads on the slats for the current military
            1. ccsr 25 December 2019 13: 12 New
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              Quote: your1970
              There are none, they died ... naturally after the Second World War they were many ...

              An officer who was awarded two Orders of the Red Star for Afghanistan served with me. In addition, I met such people several times in the nineties, among those I had to deal with - for example, K. Tariverdiev in the GSVG.
              1. your1970 25 December 2019 15: 31 New
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                AND? The point is to enter some kind of asterisks / stripes on the slats for the sake of 200-300 people?
                Moreover, for example, your example, in any case, wore both asterisks ....
                1. ccsr 25 December 2019 18: 53 New
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                  Quote: your1970
                  The meaning of introducing some kind of asterisks /

                  I did not say what to introduce - I said that there is a good example when they reduce the number of pads in a simple way, and it would not interfere with our armed forces, since in Soviet times they did not think of that.
                  Quote: your1970
                  stripes on slats for the sake of 200-300 people?

                  Judging by the fact that our hostilities are not ending, I do not exclude that these figures will not be final, especially since they can be awarded the Order of Courage several times.
  3. asv363 24 December 2019 07: 46 New
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    They don’t apply a hand to an empty head! So that Rudenko would not think about this.
    1. Semurg 24 December 2019 07: 53 New
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      Quote: asv363
      They don’t apply a hand to an empty head! So that Rudenko would not think about this.

      Not to an empty head, but to a head without a headgear. These are two big differences. hi and do not apply but salute or salute.
      1. asv363 24 December 2019 08: 20 New
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        Of course, it was possible to paint everything formally. And yes, you are right, salute. But the saying sounds exactly as I wrote.
        1. Berg berg 24 December 2019 13: 38 New
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          They salute, but they have the honor! Then this is a question with a gesture of Honor you have - turn your eyes, show your face!
        2. Nikolaevich I 24 December 2019 14: 29 New
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          Decree of the President of the Russian Federation of 10.11.2007 N 1495 (as amended by 21.02.2019) "On the approval of the military regulations of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation" (together with the "Charter of the internal service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation", "The Disciplinary ...
          War greeting

          46. ​​A military salutation is the embodiment of comradely unity of servicemen, a testament of mutual respect and a manifestation of politeness and good breeding.
          When meeting (overtaking), all military personnel are obliged to greet each other, observing the rules established by the Combat Charter of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. The subordinates (junior in military rank) greet the first bosses (senior in military rank), and in an equal position, the first to greet the one who considers himself to be more polite and well-mannered.
          47. Military personnel are required to comply with military greeting, paying tribute to:
          Tomb of the Unknown Soldier;
          mass graves of soldiers who fell in the battles for freedom and independence of the Fatherland;
          The state flag of the Russian Federation, the Battle flag of the military unit, as well as the Naval flag at each arrival on the ship and departure from the ship;
          funeral processions, accompanied by military units.
          48. Military units and units while in the ranks welcome at the command of:
          The President of the Russian Federation, the Chairman of the Government of the Russian Federation and the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation;
          Marshals of the Russian Federation, army generals, fleet admirals, colonel generals, admirals and all direct chiefs, persons appointed to supervise the inspection (verification) of the military unit (unit), as well as persons who arrived to present the military unit with the Battle Banner and (or ) state award.
          (as amended by the Presidential Decree of 14.01.2013 N 20)
          And where is "parting with honor" here? what
          1. asv363 24 December 2019 15: 10 New
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            Quote: Nikolaevich I
            And where is "parting with honor" here?

            It used to be different, Vladimir Nikolaevich:

            In the Charter of the internal service of the Armed Forces of the USSR of 1960 and the Charter of the internal service of the Armed Forces of the USSR of 1975, which was in force until the collapse of the USSR and (in the Russian Federation) until January 1, 1993, a military salute is called a salute.
            1. Nikolaevich I 24 December 2019 15: 37 New
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              Quote: asv363
              Until January 1, 1993, a military salute is called a salute.

              I never liked the expression: "salute"! It always provoked an internal protest from me ... for by the time of military service, I already knew the words: " "Soul to God ... Life to the Fatherland ... Heart to the ladies ... Honor to no one!" soldier And rightly so, that they canceled ... there is no need to compare the military personnel to the "institutes" ... ,, of bygone times ,,! wink
              PS By the way, I recently watched an old Soviet film ... an episode of the film dating back to the end of the 30s ... The red commander stops the gaping cadet: "Why not welcome senior in rank? "
              1. asv363 24 December 2019 16: 00 New
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                If you think about it, then you are certainly right. For me, it was more of a mundane, formal action. And, by the way, the frequency of such formalism in "hot spots" drops sharply, as an example - two Chechen wars.
        3. ccsr 24 December 2019 18: 38 New
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          Quote: asv363
          Of course, it was possible to paint everything formally. And yes, you are right, salute. But the saying sounds exactly as I wrote.

          Interestingly, an example of an informal salutation of officers existed in the tsar’s life guard — it was customary between the guards to simply approach and shake hands with even an unfamiliar officer, instead of giving honor. Trubetskoy wrote about this in his notes.
      2. AlexVas44 24 December 2019 08: 44 New
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        Quote: Semurg
        Not to an empty head, but to a head without a headdress ... and they don’t apply but salute or salute.

        Force, dear Semurg, to engage in verbiage. laughing An empty head is a figurative expression that has existed for a long time and is understandable in this context. And nevertheless they put a hand (to the skull, to the head, to the headdress - as you wish) this military greeting, in common parlance - salute. All these are slang, but accepted expressions, not only in a military environment.
        1. Semurg 24 December 2019 12: 36 New
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          Quote: AlexVas44
          Quote: Semurg
          Not to an empty head, but to a head without a headdress ... and they don’t apply but salute or salute.

          Force, dear Semurg, to engage in verbiage. laughing .

          So komenty is the transfusion from empty to empty in the mass. For myself, I find useful and new in 5-10% of comments, the rest is water, that is verbiage hi
          1. AlexVas44 24 December 2019 13: 50 New
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            Quote: Semurg
            ... the rest is water, that is verbiage

            Well it is. drinks
      3. Aldmit_2 24 December 2019 09: 34 New
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        To give honor is not enough for everyone. They do not give honor, but carry out a military greeting
    2. mister-red 24 December 2019 22: 28 New
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      Mikhail Yuzhny, when he won the match, saluted, covering his head with a racket. https://trenery-po-tennisu.ru/images/stati/man-rus/13yugn.jpg
      Abroad, this gesture is not particularly understood. But he did very right, well done.
      But the defenders of this Ukrainian I want to focus on the fact that he said "... that to give a military greeting, without a headdress, that's right." If he added - for the American army, then there would be no questions. And so he just lackeys, because in his native country it’s not only not done that way, but also looks idiotic. Once in the army, as a youth, the chief of staff saluted without a beret, so he looked at me with such a look that he would even fail through the ground. I never did that again.
    3. SamVI68 25 December 2019 11: 09 New
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      don’t put it on your empty head. and my head is not empty. I have that brain. So sho in a hat I or not does not matter.
  4. Nikolaevich I 24 December 2019 07: 49 New
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    Well, I don’t know ... I don’t know ... Somehow I justified, though in a jocular form, a "booby" ... they say he put his hand to a not empty head; he has hair on his head, a brain in his head ...
  5. Dmitry Potapov 24 December 2019 08: 05 New
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    In general, the absence of a headgear in our army corresponds to an incomplete uniform, except for rooms where greeting is given with a stand "at attention". I am for our option! And even if they salute without panties, the less clothes the more comical.
  6. Shuttle 24 December 2019 08: 11 New
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    Well, there has never been a knightly tradition in Americanism. They do not understand the depth of the essence of this gesture. More precisely, they put in a completely different, alien idea. Therefore, they don’t know what exactly is giving military honor. They send each other with this gesture t.s. Hello, and do not express military respect, recognition.
    Yes, we took a lot from the Prussians and Europeans in general. Because in those days it was the best traditions of the army. But the U.S. Army has never been like that.
  7. kosovvskiy 24 December 2019 08: 23 New
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    The military greeting of the Anglo-Saxons has a different internal content.

    In most countries, it went from custom to take off or raise one's hat as a sign of greeting. When military hats became so complicated that they could not be quickly removed in all cases, the gesture was reduced to putting a hand or two fingers on the headgear. Accordingly, without it, the gesture is completely meaningless.

    According to legend, the Anglo-Saxons showed a gesture after Francis Drake, when he met Elizabeth I, covered his eyes with his hand, as if protecting them from the radiance emanating from the queen. In this context, the gesture makes sense without a hat.
    1. The leader of the Redskins 26 December 2019 09: 11 New
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      They told me that in school too. Without any pirates.
  8. Gardamir 24 December 2019 09: 13 New
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    If the article described the traditions of different countries, then it would certainly be interesting. But the article is built on the principle that this is kakly ha ha, and this is amerikosy ha ha ha.
  9. sss
    sss 24 December 2019 09: 15 New
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    For a man who serves a foreign country, even nightingales sing more pleasantly in a new place (although they say that nightingales do not live in America). As for the greeting, the hand is not applied in two cases: 1. when there is no headgear, 2. when the serviceman is armed. (The fact of having weapons is in itself an element of military respect. That was how we were taught.) As I recall, the German army was the same.
    The best soldiers (at least in Europe, and therefore in the New World, starting at least from the Middle Ages) were German and Russian - Soviet. Despite all the Napoleonic and colonial wars. Well, there were also the French ... I do not recall the wars where the Anglo-Saxons fought worthy against superior or equal opponents. (if there are similar examples, I will remember with pleasure). So let them salute as they wish, if only they would not force us to this.
    1. Keyser soze 24 December 2019 11: 57 New
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      I don’t remember wars where Anglo-Saxons would fight worthily


      Anglo-Saxons .... UTB are the same Germans and Vikings. The same Old German was spoken in England, in Novgorod or in Kiev ... hi
      And still the ethnic basis, the majority in Schaty are Germans.
      1. mister-red 24 December 2019 22: 30 New
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        Change of country of residence is not always beneficial
    2. Semurg 24 December 2019 12: 19 New
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      Quote: sss

      The best soldiers (at least in Europe, and therefore in the New World, starting at least from the Middle Ages) were German and Russian - Soviet. Despite all the Napoleonic and colonial wars. Well, there were also the French ... I do not recall the wars where the Anglo-Saxons fought worthy against superior or equal opponents. (if there are similar examples, I will remember with pleasure). So let them salute as they wish, if only they would not force us to this.

      Well, the French in the centennial war they beat three or four times, being in the minority and far from their bases. From the vaunted knightly cavalry of France flew down and feathers.
      1. Ponchik78 24 December 2019 18: 57 New
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        About a third of the territory of modern France at that time was English possessions. There was no mention of any distance from the bases. Plus, Burgundy was an ally of the British and the French essentially fought on two fronts.
    3. your1970 25 December 2019 07: 27 New
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      Quote: sss
      2. When a serviceman with arms. (The fact of having weapons is in itself element of military respect. So we were taught.)

      And we were taught that weapons should not be let out of the hands, therefore, honor is not given in arms
    4. Dmitry Bolotsky 25 December 2019 09: 34 New
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      I allowed myself to disclose your comment.
      To salute is a military greeting. Honor - honor - respect. Raising a hand up imitates raising a visor - with an open visor, as a rule, they don’t go on the attack. The civilians have nothing to do with the removal of the headdress - civilians greet them in this way.
      Removing the headgear from the military means giving honor to the dead. Civilians adopted this gesture from the military.
      Also, honor is given to weapons, firearms, blades. The standard bearer salutes with the banner.
      In the absence of a headgear or in the ranks, honor is bestowed by turning the head in the direction of the person welcomed at a stand. In the ranks, when moving, the right-flanks look forward, keeping the ranks straight, the rest turn their heads towards the teammate - "At attention, alignment is right."
      Civilians are greeted with a nod of their heads, both with or without a headgear removed.
      Thus, raising the right hand does not give honor:
      1. In the absence of a hat.
      2. If the right hand is busy.
      3. In the ranks.
      4. When honoring the dead.
      5. Civil (except in certain cases).
      hi hi
  10. Barmaleyka 24 December 2019 09: 35 New
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    the greeting has specific historical roots, everything else from the evil one
  11. Inspector 24 December 2019 09: 49 New
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    Yes, that’s the difference - the Soviet still salute, and the Americans salute! That is why the Warsaw Pact did not exist !!! When you return the honor, as it was before the coup. Come to your senses ...
    1. mister-red 24 December 2019 22: 31 New
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      Unconditionally 1st place in idiocy among all comments.
      1. Inspector 24 December 2019 22: 43 New
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        and those who do not understand the meaning of what is written. If honor were the norm, not pathology, then it would be given not only from 1917 to 1993.
        Until 1917, the officers said, “I have the honor,” and in 1993 renamed this ritual the “Greetings of War” by itiots? No, comrade, these are those who, from 1917 to 1993, considered honoring officers as the norm. And now they deny the obvious.
        1. mister-red 25 December 2019 23: 44 New
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          I have the honor - such a phrase was spoken not as a greeting, but as a farewell. Nothing else. It was necessary to read books in childhood.
  12. Flatter 24 December 2019 10: 37 New
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    A cap, a cap, and a cap are the final element of a military uniform. Gest demonstrates its readiness to execute an order, both at an accidental meeting and in the service. And the Americans are ready without a uniform.
  13. Cowbra 25 December 2019 13: 28 New
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    fundamentally different

    The military salute in the USA is given to specific epaulets, and it is not so important who at the moment wears them.

    And now the difference.

    And HERE IN THIS, we are with you - we will never understand each other.
    You didn’t fight
  14. Kibl 25 December 2019 14: 33 New
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    Well, why the hell should I publish this crap from the next Goal of the Ukrainian spill on VO expanses? Or there are no other topics. As the saying goes, "stop clogging the air"!
  15. Po-tzan 27 December 2019 22: 45 New
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    In Russia, it is worth noting that they cannot indifferently look at how in the USA the hand is applied to the "empty head" - that is, to the head on which there is no headgear.


    Why?