Military Review

A little-known 7,62-Mm an experienced army pistol F. Tokarev arr. 1939

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A little-known 7,62-Mm an experienced army pistol F. Tokarev arr. 1939



The TT pistol (Tula, Tokarev) of the 1930 model, under the 7,62-mm Mauser cartridge, served for several decades in the Red Army and other power structures of the Soviet Union armament system. Structurally, the TT was an exact copy of the Browning pistol of the 1903 model, but with a rigid locking of the barrel bore borrowed from the Colt pistol of the 1911 model of the year.
During World War II, the TT pistol was the main personal weapons officers and generals of the Red Army. After the war, the TT, which became a symbol of the army that defeated fascism, gained considerable popularity abroad. Various of its foreign versions are known, including those for the 9-mm Parabellum cartridge. In certain structures, the TT pistol was popular until the beginning of the 21 century.
Along with all this, little is known of the fact that literally several years after the TT was put into service, the question was raised about replacing it with another pistol.
17 May 1938, a competition was announced for the design and manufacture of a new model of a self-loading pistol for the 7,62-mm Mauser cartridge.
Competitive tests of pistols by various authors were held until March 1941, and only the outbreak of the Great Patriotic War prevented the planned adoption of a new pistol.
Among the participants of the competition was F. Tokarev, who presented a pistol with a protruding barrel, like the German “Parabellum” or the Japanese “Nambu”. Such a configuration of the pistol seemed to the military customer suitable for arming tankers. The pistols of the competitors P. Voevodina and I. Rakov had the same shape.


Below is a description of a self-loading pistol designed and manufactured for the competition personally by F. Tokarev in 1938-1939. Unfortunately, the Tokarevian designs of this period are overlooked by the domestic weapon historians.
According to the type of automatics, the gun refers to a weapon with a short barrel stroke and rigid shutter locking. The bolt is locked with a swinging latch of a simple form, located in the receiver. Regarding the frame of the pistol, the receiver box is spring-loaded with a separate short spring. Shutter pistol of rectangular cross-section, with a return spring located around the kick-peak. The trigger mechanism of a pistol of the hammer type, with an open trigger without a pickup. The spring is located in the frame of the pistol and interacts with the trigger in the same way as the Mauser K-96.
Shop gun on 15 cartridges, with their two-row arrangement and two-row output. On the left side of the frame of the pistol, in the front part of it, there is a checkbox flag. After turning it (like the “Parabellum” and “Walter P-38” pistols), the receiver with the bolt is separated from the frame forward. The recoil spring remains on the frame stand, and the bolt and firing pin with the firing pin spring fall out of the removed receiver. In the middle of the frame is the shutter stop lever, and behind the back of the store is a safety lever.
Pistol sight sector, with cutting tick marks to 1000 m.
Structurally, the gun is original and not similar to other pistols of those times. Externally, the receiver with the barrel and bolt have some features of the "Mauser K-96", but in general the gun is much simpler and more technological than the "Mauser".

Main characteristics

Caliber, mm 7,62
Gun Length, mm 238
Height of the gun, mm 130
Width of the receiver, mm 29
The width of the cheeks handle, mm 32,5
Barrel length (with chamber), mm 140
Mass of a pistol with a magazine without cartridges, kg 0,980
Mass of the gate assembly, kg 0,190
The mass of the node receiver with a barrel, kg 0,320
Magazine capacity, cartridges 15
Author:
Originator:
http://otvaga2004.ru/kaleydoskop/kaleydoskop-inf/pistolet-tokareva-obr-1939g/
39 comments
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  1. brom
    brom 3 July 2016 06: 56
    +6
    Externally - a cross between Lahti and Nambu.
    1. mark1
      mark1 3 July 2016 07: 11
      +12
      Rather re-organized Mauser
    2. self-propelled
      self-propelled 3 July 2016 07: 34
      +12
      Quote: brom
      Externally - a cross between Lahti and Nambu.

      clickable photo
      1. Aqela
        Aqela 3 July 2016 22: 03
        +2
        The photo clearly shows that there was a trend in gun design. It is quite obvious that "ears grow" from the development of Brhard-Luger. The bolt action is very similar to the Mauser C96, but there Bregman (1903-1910) had something similar ... Even the trigger is there.
    3. Razvedka_Boem
      Razvedka_Boem 3 July 2016 11: 13
      0
      Lahti - more elegant, so to speak.
      1. Aqela
        Aqela 3 July 2016 22: 06
        +3
        Lahti is outwardly similar, but is a trigger trigger, not a trigger. Those. in the scheme - significant differences
      2. Aqela
        Aqela 3 July 2016 22: 07
        +2
        The trigger mechanism is shock, not trigger. Those. there are serious differences in the design, although the overall design is similar.
  2. Vladimirets
    Vladimirets 3 July 2016 07: 39
    +8
    Of course, it’s hard to call a gun a handsome man. But with this arrangement, the balance is probably not bad.
    1. sub307
      sub307 3 July 2016 11: 56
      +3
      And the store’s capacity is almost 2 times more ....
    2. The comment was deleted.
  3. Mountain shooter
    Mountain shooter 3 July 2016 08: 05
    +4
    That's right, the Mauser is re-arranged. Why weren't they adopted? Are there any problems with reliability? It's a pity, because in terms of combat characteristics it would be no worse than a Mauser.
  4. Bayonet
    Bayonet 3 July 2016 08: 05
    +23
    I liked Voevodin’s pistol more.
    . The main advantage of the Voevodin pistol compared to other samples was the large capacity of the magazine (18 rounds), which significantly increased its practical rate of fire, along with which the Voevodin pistol compares favorably with other samples and the accuracy of shooting. He also showed the best results in the reliability of the automation and the reliability of operation in any operating conditions, without giving during the tests a single breakdown of parts, and the least number of delays. The Vojvodina pistol was somewhat heavier and larger than the TT, but it compares favorably with all other characteristics, especially the rate of fire and reliability of action. Comparison of Voevodin’s pistol with the most advanced foreign models showed that in terms of accuracy of the battle it was not inferior to such foreign pistols as “Parabellum”, Weblay-Scott, Mauser- “Astra”, and in terms of practical rate of fire and initial velocity the bullets were unparalleled.
    1. anatoliy73
      anatoliy73 3 July 2016 11: 55
      +4
      If the sclerosis does not change me - the Voevodinsky pistol was the leader of the competition, I don’t remember the current - how did the warriors justify their rejection of this product. (or was it a Cancer product? ...)
  5. Torins
    Torins 3 July 2016 10: 24
    +3
    Quote: Mountain Shooter
    That's right, the Mauser is re-arranged. Why weren't they adopted? Are there any problems with reliability? It's a pity, because in terms of combat characteristics it would be no worse than a Mauser.

    In the article it was written why they did not accept, the war began. What are you reading? laughing
    1. Amurets
      Amurets 3 July 2016 11: 37
      +5
      Quote: Torins

      In the article it was written why they did not accept, the war began. What are you reading?

      Actually at Bolotin's. in the book "Soviet small arms," ​​it is written that it did not pass the tests. << Repeated tests of the pistols of Rakov, Korovin, Voevodin and Tokarev were carried out in May 1939. Based on the results obtained, the pistol of Rakov was presented to the first prize and recommended for mass production. The commission proposed to give the second prize to Korovin. The pistols of Rakov and Korovin were presented to K.E. Voroshilov, who, after personally testing them, canceled the decision of the commission and gave instructions on further improvement of the samples. >> Voevodin's pistol finally won. And then, like you. The Great Patriotic War began.
    2. Mountain shooter
      Mountain shooter 3 July 2016 19: 21
      +2
      The war did not begin in 40. Apparently, there were problems with manufacturability. And in terms of power, the TT was very "cool", not worse than the "Mauser".
      So the Voevodinsky pistol, and Tokarevsky, decided not to adopt it, they don’t look for good from good.
      1. Aqela
        Aqela 3 July 2016 22: 12
        +1
        As I remember, Mauser punched 12 inch boards, and TT - 8 boards. Those. power comparable. From here, one can see the "ears" of the statement that "TT breaks through the wall of a wooden house" - after all, 20 cm of wood is not a joke!
        1. inkass_98
          inkass_98 4 July 2016 06: 53
          0
          God bless the memory, when comparing the breakthrough of a wooden obstacle from the WWII TT pistols in the leaders ("Mauser" was not considered, a non-standard pistol). Walter P-38 followed, all the others were outsiders. Again, the "Mauser" has a longer barrel, a higher bullet velocity, better penetration, it is not for nothing that the S-96 was positioned as a light carbine.
      2. Amurets
        Amurets 4 July 2016 01: 33
        +2
        Quote: Mountain Shooter
        The war did not begin in 40. Apparently, there were problems with manufacturability. And in terms of power, the TT was very "cool", not worse than the "Mauser".
        So the Voevodinsky pistol, and Tokarevsky, decided not to adopt it, they don’t look for good from good.

        The production of any product sample requires time for technological development of the sample and preparation of production. Just look at the list of new weapons that were adopted in 1938-1940 and you will understand how the plants were loaded. I mean only small arms plants.
  6. Verdun
    Verdun 3 July 2016 11: 38
    +1
    and only the beginning of World War II prevented the planned adoption of a new pistol.
    It is a pity that such a gun did not go into production. It seems like a good option.
  7. Lekov L
    Lekov L 3 July 2016 13: 07
    +13
    Thanks for the interesting article, but "Soldier of Fortune" he is not an engineer and has not even seen TT pistols, Browning 1903 and Colt 1911 otherwise why not Colt 1900 - it is also similar ...
    Structurally, the TT was an exact copy of the Browning pistol of the 1903 model, but with a rigid locking of the barrel bore borrowed from the Colt pistol of the 1911 model of the year.

    Structurally and externally similar - these are two big differences
    All the pistols after Browning, Mauser and Luger are similar in appearance.
    For "a pistol is a weapon for one hand" and all focused on this weapon definition - it is optimized for this.
    Well, okay, even this beginning of the article almost did not spoil the mood from it.
    Thank you repeat
    And yet the post-war development of pistols went along the path of development of the design with a bolt covering the barrel. So maybe it all came together correctly ...
    Although, Voevodin is good winked
    Sincerely ...
    1. inkass_98
      inkass_98 4 July 2016 06: 58
      +3
      The whole circus is that this weapon at the competition was for tankers to shoot at the enemy from the tank tower through the holes in the armor. There was still such a plug on the chain, to close the hole, remember the BT-5 / 7, T-26 tower (which is the same). And the TT in this case was not very suitable, there the pH was in favor. This is the design for the gun and was required. With the departure of the anachronism in the form of embrasures in the armor of the tank, the need for a similar form of the gun barrel disappeared.
      1. Lekov L
        Lekov L 4 July 2016 15: 52
        +1
        The whole circus is that this weapon for the tank competition was going to shoot at the enemy from the tank tower through the holes in the armor.

        Yes, yes!
        That is why the stem is thinner.
        Indeed, after the BTshek there were no "holes" in the tower. Why, at that time, they also often tried to insert a "machine gun back" into the turret in a ball mount. Apparently the concept of "sweep away the enemy who jumped on armor with a tarpaulin or worse" had a place in the minds of designers.
        Respectfully..
  8. User_internet
    User_internet 3 July 2016 14: 11
    +5
    I read that the development of pistols with an "open barrel" began at the request of the tankers, allegedly it is very inconvenient and impossible to shoot from a TT while in armored vehicles.
    1. Maki Avellevich
      Maki Avellevich 4 July 2016 06: 28
      0
      User_internet
      I read that the development of pistols with an "open barrel" began at the request of the tankers, allegedly it is very inconvenient and impossible to shoot from a TT while in armored vehicles.


      Why is it impossible? what exactly prevented?
  9. Altona
    Altona 3 July 2016 14: 29
    +3
    Aesthetically, the Luger-Parabellum design is brutally beautiful in its own way. A good article, I did not even know about such a branch of weapons in the USSR either, because the "small arms encyclopedias of weapons", widely published in the late 1990s, operate only mainly with Western models.
    1. kytx
      kytx 3 July 2016 20: 39
      +6
      "luger-parabellum" is wrong :).
      correctly - "Borchard-Luger". So Borchard's construction was finished by Luger, and Parabellum is a trademark.
    2. Aqela
      Aqela 3 July 2016 22: 18
      +2
      As people who have shot a lot both from the "parabellum" and from the TT explained to me, Borchard-Luger is exceptionally good for intuitive shooting for short ones - the hand lies comfortably, when aiming, as if pointing with a finger. TT is also good for accurate aimed shooting. The stump is clear that it is better to shoot from weapons that you shoot a lot, i.e. familiar and reliable ... The same parabellum was not at all famous for reliability.
  10. AlNikolaich
    AlNikolaich 3 July 2016 21: 49
    +1
    On the pages of the Youth Technology, at the end of the 80, there was a story about this competition, and that the Voevodin pistol was put into service! And supposedly, some party has entered service with the highest command staff. Only a major series prevented the war. Nowhere else did such data slip ... And with regards to Korovin, his 6,35 caliber pistol was officially armed with the TK brand. Structurally, it was actually browning under the Soviet reinforced cartridge ...
  11. Denimax
    Denimax 3 July 2016 22: 00
    +2
    In such a scheme, Parabellum was the most beautiful person.) A military pistol of such a scheme may well fit, there is a clear advantage in the absence of a heavy shutter cover, and this is weight saving. The military uses the pistol only as a second-class weapon and it is not the main one, and the picatini straps with quirks are unlikely to be useful to them.
  12. magician
    magician 3 July 2016 22: 12
    -1
    Since ancient times, in Russia, weapons were not as elegant as European ones, but please tell me who spent more time on the arms market? Our hobby: manufacturability and reliability, ergonomics is secondary, alas. Mosin rifle, Tokarev pistol, Koshkin tank, Ilyushin, Lavochkin, Polikarpov, Tupolev planes, Mil and Kamov helicopters, etc. Where are the competitors?
    1. Denimax
      Denimax 3 July 2016 22: 50
      +3
      If deigned to ask such a chaotic question, which by definition there can be no exact answer. Then you lost sight of Grabin, Starinov, etc.)
    2. gross kaput
      gross kaput 4 July 2016 14: 12
      +6
      Quote: wizard
      but please tell me who spent more time on the arms market?

      You may not believe it, but this "someone" is called John Moses Browning laughing
      Colt 1911, Browning HP, Browning .50 M2 HB, Colt Woodsman, M1894 Winchester are still manufactured and sold, and the .50 M2 HB is the most massive heavy machine gun in the world, although 95 years have passed since its inception laughing .
  13. Above_name
    Above_name 4 July 2016 01: 48
    +1
    .. Sector pistol sight, with cutting divisions up to 1000 m ...
  14. User_internet
    User_internet 4 July 2016 07: 23
    0
    Quote: Maki Avellevich
    User_internet
    I read that the development of pistols with an "open barrel" began at the request of the tankers, allegedly it is very inconvenient and impossible to shoot from a TT while in armored vehicles.


    Why is it impossible? what exactly prevented?

    probably loopholes narrow.
  15. gladcu2
    gladcu2 4 July 2016 22: 46
    -1
    Something I can not determine the short course of the trunk.

    Typically, those pistols that have a short barrel stroke have a shutter covering the barrel.

    A two-row magazine with two-row ammunition output is good. Recharging is easier. True, if the magazine mount allows a slight backlash, there may be problems with sending a cartridge.
  16. Phosgene
    Phosgene 9 July 2016 22: 16
    0
    But this is not Voevodin’s pistol, under the TT cartridge ?!
  17. RF Armed Forces 12345678
    RF Armed Forces 12345678 19 July 2016 11: 13
    0
    All the pistols of the 38th year competition show a kind of "Mauser-like"
  18. martin-159
    martin-159 25 September 2016 11: 42
    0
    In the end, they came to the conclusion that the tankers would cost Nagan.
  19. beeper
    beeper 11 November 2016 23: 20
    +1
    The receiver is very similar to the Mauser K-96, re-arranged to feed cartridges from the handle ... but why the famous designer in this pistol of his abandoned the Mauser blockiness of the trigger, which he successfully applied (together with the Browning cartridge feed guides) in TT- 33?
    "Much simpler and more technologically advanced" Mauser "" - this is probably due to the fact that the Mauser receiver was extremely time consuming and low-tech, as it was made completely with the barrel, from a single piece of steel, and F.V. Tokarev came up with the idea of ​​making the barrel and receiver separately ...? winked
    PS According to the recollections of familiar front-line soldiers who fought infantrymen and tankers, their TTs were not at all reliable (the magazine latch flashed, the return spring failed (misaligned and unloaded cartridge) and misfired the trigger, but the safety cocking of the trigger did not at all protect against an accidental shot when the gun fell, these the shortcomings were also indicated in the pre-war conclusions on the results of exploitation in the troops, but, alas, they were not eliminated - all hopes were pinned on the early adoption of a new pistol, Vojvodinsky ...), safety and ease of use.