Military Review

Ju-188. Part II Avenger enters battle

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In the first part of our material on Ju-188, we looked at the long journey of creating this rather interesting and little-known aircraft that received the name “Racher” - “The Avenger” in the Luftwaffe (because one of its goals was to “retaliate”) for the bombing of the German cities by the allies). In continuation of the topic, we will consider the features of its combat use (although, of course, the member countries of the anti-Hitler coalition would be better if the machine of this class did not go beyond the limits of the drawing boards of German designers).


So, with confidence we can talk about the fatal for the Nazi regime, the underestimation of this aircraft, because if the German leadership decided to accelerate the introduction of the Ju-188 series and its release would begin not in the spring 1943 of the year, but in the spring of 1942, and if by the summer of the 1943, the Luftwaffe could have several thousand machines of this type, then at least the Axis forces Berlin-Rome "could reflect the landing of the Allies in Sicily, and perhaps even change the course of the Kursk battle.


Ju-188 during the night attack of the sea convoy against the background of the English destroyer.


Ju-188 was not remembered by Soviet soldiers in the same way as, for example, the Jo-87 or the frame (although numerically Ju-188 was produced even slightly more than Fw-189). FirstThis happened because airplanes of this type were massively used only in the last year of World War II, when the Luftwaffe no longer had air supremacy and these vehicles could no longer “hang” over the front line, carrying out reconnaissance or bombardment strikes as it was in 1941-1943. As you know, from the middle of 1943 until the end of the war, the only way of operating the German strike and reconnaissance aircraft (due to the sharply increased quality level of the Soviet Air Force) was to reach the given area as quickly as possible, to quickly drop bombs or make aerial photography, and return back to maximum speed. SecondThe Ju-188 was primarily required in the Mediterranean and Western European theaters, where the Western Allies air forces had a very large numerical and significant qualitative superiority (in particular, due to the use of automatic anti-aircraft fire control systems for air defense systems), and therefore only a small number of aircraft of this type were sent by the Germans to the Eastern Front.

It is also worth saying that on the Soviet-German front, the Air Forces of the Red Army had only numerical, but not technological superiority over the Luftwaffe forces, and, in addition, the Soviet air forces were even numerically smaller than the air forces of the Western Alliance, and operated mainly only in the front zone, without the risk of carrying out long raids deep into enemy territory after the bloody lessons of 1941. Thus, according to Nazi leaders, aviation The Soviet Union posed a relatively smaller threat than Anglo-American aviation.

At the same time, starting from 1942, the Western Allies launched a systematic strategic aerial offensive, launching missions against 1943 already against industrial centers directly of Germany itself, and as a result, 1944 achieved complete domination of Europe in the sky. All this forced the Germans to use technically less sophisticated or outdated aircraft models on the Eastern Front to a large extent than on the Western Front, which is why the high-speed Ju-188 was created and used primarily as a vehicle for opposing the Western alliance.

Ju-188. Part II Avenger enters battle

Ju-188 in their characteristic snake camouflage. Torpedoes are clearly visible at the base of the wings - in the variant of the marine base torpedo bomber this machine could take in overload not one, but two “fish” at once. In the nose of the fuselage visible antenna radar, used in marine navigation and to search for enemy ships.

The very first combat sorties of these vehicles were carried out as high-altitude sea reconnaissance and mine planters in the North Sea; acting on areas where, in the event of destruction in battle, a new type of aircraft would not have become an enemy trophy. And I must say that for combat reasons, during the first few months of 1943, not a single Ju-188 was lost during such missions, which was one of the proofs of the outstanding flight qualities of this model (although a certain number of cars were badly damaged and then written off however, they were not considered as combat losses). As for the bombers, their first combat mission carried out 18 \ 19 August 1943 on the night of August, successfully producing (by an experimental squadron together with other Luftwaffe units using other types of aircraft) the bombing of the city of Lincoln in the UK. Other raids followed, and although the damage inflicted on British industry was relatively small, these bombings showed that it was too early for the Luftwaffe to "write off".

Deserves special attention scheme used by the Nazis in the commissioning of the bomber. To retrain pilots to a new type of aircraft by the German command in the spring of 1943, a “special squadron 188” was created, through which the first pilots recruited from squadrons planned to be transferred to Ju-188, and who had instructor experience, passed work. Then, after some time of training, they were distributed back to the units, where they had already formed their “training squadrons” (mainly based on the “staff staff”) and transferred the experience to other pilots of the “group” or arriving newcomers, in parallel with new type of aircraft. A little later, several dozen vehicles of this type were transferred to flight schools for training pilot pilots to fly bomber, which they planned to make one of the main ones in the Luftwaffe.


Ju-188 A-3 - FuG 200 search radar antennas are clearly visible, although they lowered the speed characteristics, but allowed to navigate and search for targets at night or in poor visibility conditions. The British sailors complained very much that it seemed that when the weather or time of day allowed them to quietly follow their own course, fearing only mines and submarines, several of these dirty cars suddenly appeared because of low clouds or at night and released their torpedoes.

The first unit, completely re-armed with the Ju-188 bomber modification in the Nazi Air Force, became the headquarters detachment and then the II group of the 6 bomber squadron, followed by the IV and I groups of the same squadron, and then other units. For a number of reasons, primarily due to limited release, only three squadrons of the KG 1943, KG 1944 and KG 2 were armed with aircraft of this model from the end of 6 to the end of 26, and then not completely, but only some of their units. In addition, KG 66 had one squadron (4 Staffel) flying on Ju-188, as well as KG 200 also had a separate squadron operating on this type of aircraft.

The peak of using the Ju-188 as a night bomber fell on the first half of 1944 of the year, and in this role it proved to be relatively successful. However, after the landing of the Western alliance in Normandy, as a result of an incorrectly adopted operational decision of the Luftwaffe leadership, the extermination of the Ju-188 bomber formations literally took place. The fact is that, relying on high speed even with a bomb load and, as it was believed, sufficient defensive armament of these machines, the Nazi leadership ordered all the available forces to carry out massive Allied bombing attacks in the Normandy landing zone and ordered to carry out combat missions not only at night, but during the day. However, the Anglo-American air force over the English Channel in the summer of 1944 had an indisputable advantage over the Luftwaffe, as a result of which the German pilots found themselves in a situation in which the bomber units of the Red Army Air Force in the summer of 1941 had appeared: by direct order "from above" squadron Ju-188 and other attack aircraft rushed to attack the disembarkation zone with the highest concentration of air defenses, with the absolute domination of the forces of the Western alliance in the air, and were almost completely destroyed. Thus, instead of repeating the success of the French 1940 campaign, the Luftwaffe forces suffered a major defeat and seriously lost their combat capability.

As a result, some units of the German Air Force, who suffered huge losses in the fighting for several weeks and even days, refused to continue combat missions under the threat of armed insurrection, demanding a withdrawal to the rear of the re-formation, and in general the Luftwaffe leadership was forced to admit the fallacy of their actions and perform the demands of their pilots by transferring the remnants of the once strong Kampfgeshwaderes to the rear bases.

It is interesting to compare this situation with other countries of the war. It was probably an unthinkable situation for the Soviet air forces — pilots who refused to perform combat missions in wartime due to high unit losses would most likely be immediately shot by order of a quickly assembled troika ship (consisting of a unit commander, commissioner and a senior officer of the squadron), or, at a minimum, would have been penalized (for example, in the “air penal battalion” - with the same air gun on IL-2). At the same time, in the Anglo-Saxon Air Force, after achieving a loss level in 6-10% in the subdivision and even more so in 15-20% of the air crew, combat sorties were necessarily stopped, and part of it was retired to rest and replenish (thereby, unlike, unfortunately, from the Soviet Air Force, its combat effectiveness and the backbone of experienced veteran pilots remained).


Yu-188 in the version of the reconnaissance bomber goes to the target area for reconnaissance - the best time was considered a night flight, designed so that with the first rays of dawn to be over enemy territory, quickly reconnaissance and return at maximum speed there was less chance of falling victim to their anti-aircraft gunners or night fighters).

One way or another, it was precisely in the summer of 1944 that the remnants of the experienced pilots of the German bomber squadrons fell out of the sky over northern France, after which these once formidable units stopped creating a truly serious threat to the allies. They could not restore their former combat capability in the Luftwaffe - the shortage of trained pilots and the shortage of aviation fuel began to show, with the result that the last bombing raid against English cities using Ju-188 was fixed on 19 of September 1944.

The most Ju-188 effectively proved themselves as high-speed scouts. (recall that about half of the aircraft of this type produced were precisely reconnaissance variants). During the second half of 1943, these vehicles were put into service by four long-range reconnaissance units, and by the end of 1944, the Ju-188 (along with aircraft of other models) were already part of ten such units and were used in all theaters from Italy to Norway and from Belarus to France.

In particular, the long-range maritime reconnaissance detachment 1. (F) / 124, based in Norway, acted with the 26 units of the bomber squadron against the Allied ships following in the maritime convoys to Murmansk and Arkhangelsk. For the first time, Ju-188 from distant high-altitude reconnaissance detachments appeared on the Soviet-German front in September of the 1943 year, and since then their number has steadily increased. It should also be noted that in most Soviet front-line units for almost a year they did not know about the appearance of a new universal strike aircraft with the enemy (although the British shot down the first Ju-188 on the night from 8 to 9 in October 1943 of the year, and after some time, after studying the trophy, reported in the USSR about a new type of German bomber), because air defense units and pilots of the Soviet fighter aircraft, apparently, took him for the well-known Ju-88 (by the way, really having a basis for this).

It should be noted especially the unique work of Soviet foreign intelligence, which, according to a number of researchers, at the very beginning of 1943 of the year (that is, when the Germans had just finished the final design improvements and barely started building the first small-scale copies of Ju-188) reported in the Kremlin about the appearance of a new type of bomber among the Germans and, perhaps, even provided partial copies of the design documentation. However, according to the testimony of Western authors, the Soviet side either did not attach any importance to the data received, or “modestly decided to keep silent” about the information received, but in one way or another, none of the information received came to London (perhaps this was due to the fact that in the opinion of the Soviet network of agents, the new bomber by the Germans was intended primarily for actions against England, and not against the USSR).

And until autumn 1943, i.e. until the British themselves got a copy of the downed Ju-188 as a trophy, the foggy Albion secret service remained in blissful ignorance for a new type of scout, target designer, torpedo bomber and night bomber. German car. When the British handed over to the USSR the first results of a survey of a captured aircraft, and then the Ju-188 began to be used in increasing numbers on the Soviet-German front (including becoming Soviet trophies), official instructions were developed in the Soviet Union an indication of the vulnerabilities of the new German aircraft, which were sent to the fighter units.


Ju-188, shot down over England during a bomber mission night fighter.


Despite a number of technical advantages, the Ju-188 on the Western Front did not show any particularly outstanding results as a bomber (especially during operations during the day), and the compounds reequipped on machines of this type also suffered almost the same losses as those used by Ju-88 and Do-217. Attempts by the Luftwaffe to use Ju-188 in daytime bomber missions against allies advancing in Italy, and later disembarking in France, were unsuccessful, and since the summer of 1944, all Ju-188 bomber units were used against the forces of the Western alliance exclusively at night.

At the same time, on the Soviet-German front, it was Ju-188 that quite successfully manifested itself throughout the year - from the 1943 fall to the 1944 fall, being used not only as a scout, but also as a bomber. In fact, due to its high speed and good altitude, as well as weak tactical interaction between various branches of the Soviet troops, and, one can say, due to the lack of developed night fighter aircraft from the Red Army air force, these aircraft became almost the only large-scale German bombers who were able to successfully complete not only night missions, but also day missions, and even in 1944-45.

According to the testimony of the Luftwaffe pilots flying the Ju-188, the most dangerous among the day fighters of the Western Front were considered American "Mustangs" and English "Spitfires", partly "Temposts" and "Lightnings", and among the day fighters of the Eastern Front - Yak-3 and to a lesser extent La-7, with high speed and good altitude. Among the Allied night fighters in the West German pilots were especially wary of high-speed, well-armed and equipped with the English Mosquito radar. At the same time the Germans noted that on the Eastern Front, Soviet night fighters could barely fear even in 1944, because it was only possible by chance that the Ju-188 pilot could become their victim (due to the extremely weak training of Soviet pilots of night fighter aviation, poor use of radar in the air force and the air defense forces of the Red Army, and also (according to the Germans) due to the absence of specialized night fighter models in the USSR ).

Knowing this, one can only marvel at the courage and long-suffering of the Soviet soldiers who fought in the ground forces, which even in 1944 had to withstand the attacks of German bombers. It would seem - “well, everything, the 1941-42 nightmare passed. The difficult and bloody 1943 ended, everything, we will drive the German to the west!”. However, the German designers developed, and the German industry began to produce another new type of bomber, which was so difficult for the Soviet aviation to shoot down that they could attack our troops with impunity in the conditions of the seemingly operational and tactical superiority of the Red Army air force. I don’t even want to talk about speed Ju-188 in reconnaissance variants: it seemed that Soviet troops had just got rid of the hated “frames” (Fw-189) that were so annoying in 1941-43, and “here you are” Germans appear qualitatively different magnificent scout with excellent quality camera equipment, which is not something that shoot down, but just to catch up even with the latest Soviet "hawks" was extremely difficult.

However, despite the good characteristics of Ju-188, since the fall of 1944, the bomber and later torpedo-carrying compounds were forced to curtail their activities. This happened due to the need for the Luftwaffe to concentrate all resources for Germany’s air defense, including due to the growing fuel shortage, and the adoption of the RLM program to stop the production of any aircraft other than fighters. In response to this, the German designers of the concern Junkers AG attempted to create a special modification of the Ju-188 R in the “heavy night hunter” variant, equipped with a radar and four 20 mm MG-151 guns or two XKNUMX mm MK30 guns located in the nose the aircraft. However, in the process of testing, it turned out that installing such strong weapons critically upsets the balance of the structure, making takeoff and landing extremely dangerous for poorly trained pilots, and the onboard weapons planned for installation had to be reduced. As a result, only a small part of this type of aircraft was used as heavy night fighters, having only a pair of 103 mm guns in the nose, which was, of course, extremely insufficient for fighting allied four-engined bombers, and it is logical that Ju-20 didn’t show itself.


The photo captured an extremely unpleasant moment for the Anglo-Saxon sailors: "The Avenger" on the combat course, already dropped a torpedo.

At the same time, as already noted, the reconnaissance Ju-188 modifications were very actively used by the Luftwaffe, and not only in the 1944 year, but even until the very end of the war, and this version of the high-speed high-altitude reconnaissance was almost the only saved not only in the autumn of 1944, but even in the spring of 1945 of the year.

It can also be noted that in the last months of the war part of the formations, equipped with both torpedo-bombing and reconnaissance modifications Ju-188, used as extreme supplies and even as a means of emergency evacuation of VIPs from a number of “boilers”. Almost all equipment and often armament were removed from airplanes intended for such missions in order to ensure maximum speed, while special bomb containers and sometimes on the external sling accommodated cargo containers dropped over the “boiler” territories. If there was a technical opportunity for landing and there was a task to take someone from the valuable "encirclement", then only the first pilot participated in the departure from the entire crew. Next was the landing on the territory occupied by German troops; For example, important Nazi party functionaries or valuable technical specialists were loaded into the cockpit, which were exported using Soviet terminology to the “mainland”. In particular, such missions were carried out in the "Ruhr cauldron" in the west, and in the east to Courland and East Prussia. At the same time, during such sorties, due to the good speed data, the Ju-188 suffered relatively small losses relative to other, less speed German aircraft of other types.

Due to the fact that the Ju-188 was adopted by Germany rather late, and began to be produced in large quantities when the Reich began to lose all its satellites, the Ju-188 was supplied only to Real Fuerza Aerea Hungaru (Royal Air Forces of Hungary) . In total, this country — the most faithful Hitler’s ally — received, according to various sources, from 12 to 20 or even to 42 Ju-188 of various modifications that were actively used in battles against the advancing Soviet forces, and later against Romania that had fallen to the side of the anti-Hitler coalition of Romania. In addition, according to some data, several copies of Ju-188 were transferred and used in the Air Force of the Italian fascist "Republic of Saló" (not to be confused with Svidomo "Republic of Sala"! laughing ) and the Croatian Air Force.


Soviet fighter shot down U-188 in summer camouflage of the Eastern Front.


As a conclusion, we can say that, despite the fact that this plane was hardly remembered by the Soviet soldiers who fought on the fronts of World War II, and that even today it is known only to a small circle of aviation enthusiasts, the Ju-188 proved to be a good universal bomber, as a very formidable all-weather torpedo bomber and as an extremely difficult to shoot down high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft.

Yes, it was not some kind of masterpiece of the German aircraft industry, but, thanks to the deep processing of its predecessor Ju-88, this machine became a reliable “workhorse”, while “running very fast”, i.e. developing a very high speed for a 40-bomber bomber comparable in some modifications to the speed of many fighters of the anti-Hitler coalition countries.

If it were not for the number of organizational mistakes of the Hitlerite leadership, the Nazis could have a fleet of extremely difficult for interception strike aircraft in their hands, which would allow them to continue the aerial terror campaign in 1943-45, and perhaps even change the course of the war, but by Fortunately for all of us, this did not happen.


Sources and literature used:
Militärarchiv Freiburg. Ju-188. Produktionsprogramme.
Caldwell D .; Muller R. "The Luftwaffe Over Germany". L., "Greenhill Books". 2007.
Dressel J., Griehl M., "Bombers of the Luftwaffe." L., "DAG Public.", 1994.
Wagner W., "Hugo Junkers Pionier der Luftfahrt - seine Flugzeuge". "Die deutsche Luftfahrt", Band 24, "Bernard & Graefe Verlag", Bonn, 1996.
"Warplanes of the Third Reich" by William Green. "Doubleday & Co.", NY., 1970.
Vajda F A., Dancey PG, German Aircraft Industry and Production 1933-1945. "Society of Automotive Engineers Inc.", 1998.
"Combat aircraft of the Luftwaffe" / Ents.aviation under the editorship of D. Donald. Pers. With English M., "AST Publishing House", 2002.
Haruk A. “All Luftwaffe Airplanes” M., Yauza, Eksmo, 2013.
Schwabedissen V. “Stalin falcons: Analysis of the actions of Soviet aviation in 1941-1945.” Mn., "Harvest", 2001.

Used Internet resources:
http://www.airaces.ru/plane/yunkers-ju-188.html
http://www.airwar.ru/enc/bww2/ju188a.html
http://aviacija.dljavseh.ru/Samolety/Junkers_Ju_188.html
http://armedman.ru/samoletyi/bombardirovshhik-yunkers-ju-188.html
http://www.nazireich.net/lyuftvaffe/samolety/616-ju188.html
http://www.airpages.ru/mn/ju88_03.shtml
http://pro-samolet.ru/samolety-germany-ww2/bombardir-schturmoviki/137-ju-188?start=1
http://www.planers32.ru/mc_883.html
http://avia-museum.narod.ru/germany/ju-188.html
http://weapons-of-war.ucoz.ru/publ/junkers_ju188/30-1-0-427
http://aviawarworld.ru/index/junkers_ju_188/0-182
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  1. Yarik
    Yarik 7 June 2016 06: 20
    +4
    Soviet fighter shot down U-188 in summer camouflage of the Eastern Front.

    Four-screw was not the same? winkOh, four-bladed.
    1. V.ic
      V.ic 7 June 2016 06: 45
      +1
      Quote: Yarik
      Four-screw was not the same? Oh, four-bladed.

      This artist has a blinking frequency of half the speed of the screw. what A screw, of course, a two-blade ... lol
      1. fleks
        fleks 7 June 2016 07: 10
        +4
        Three lobed. On 2 was two lobed, but generally on the pistons this thing is called a propeller
        1. AUL
          AUL 7 June 2016 07: 40
          +1
          "From the propeller!"
        2. Bayonet
          Bayonet 7 June 2016 20: 53
          0
          Quote: fleks
          but in general on the pistons this thing is called a propeller

          Yeah, the propeller, here on these! wink
      2. Spitfire
        Spitfire 7 June 2016 08: 12
        +7
        Quote: V.ic
        Quote: Yarik
        Four-screw was not the same? Oh, four-bladed.

        This artist has a blinking frequency of half the speed of the screw. what A screw, of course, a two-blade ... lol


        Spitfire it. 12. And he has a four-blade screw. But the engine hood is from 16. The only question is whether they were delivered to us.
        1. Spitfire
          Spitfire 7 June 2016 08: 14
          +2
          in RAF coloring page
          1. Spitfire
            Spitfire 7 June 2016 08: 19
            0
            Here is the 16th, another flashlight.
        2. Lankaster
          Lankaster 7 June 2016 11: 08
          +3
          Quote: Spitfire
          Quote: V.ic
          Quote: Yarik
          Four-screw was not the same? Oh, four-bladed.

          This artist has a blinking frequency of half the speed of the screw. what A screw, of course, a two-blade ... lol


          Spitfire it. 12. And he has a four-blade screw. But the engine hood is from 16. The only question is whether they were delivered to us.

          In the picture Spitfire IX. He had a four-blade screw and in the Red Army Air Force this modification was.
          1. Spitfire
            Spitfire 7 June 2016 12: 19
            +2
            Exactly 9. I looked at the pictures, on all the wingtips of the 9-ki uncircumcised, but there were modifications with trimmed tips. Thank.
            1. Spitfire
              Spitfire 7 June 2016 12: 23
              +1
              Coloring our 9s
        3. Warrior2015
          7 June 2016 19: 25
          +1
          Quote: Spitfire
          Spitfire it. 12. And he has a four-blade screw. But the engine hood is from 16. The only question is whether they were delivered to us.

          Rather, all the same MkIX. In general, many different Spitfires were supplied - and they went primarily in the air defense unit. This explains the picture because it was these machines that could shoot down high-altitude reconnaissance Ju-188.
      3. yehat
        yehat 7 June 2016 11: 08
        0
        or eight-blade ... or 16-blade ... fellow
      4. Bayonet
        Bayonet 7 June 2016 20: 50
        0
        Quote: V.ic
        A screw, of course, a two-blade ...

        Subtle humor lol And the screw is still four-blade!
    2. goose
      goose 7 June 2016 13: 02
      0
      Quote: Yarik
      Soviet fighter shot down U-188 in summer camouflage of the Eastern Front.

      What is this Soviet fighter of unknown design? This is a typical arrogance, which was sent mainly in the part of air defense.
    3. hohol95
      hohol95 7 June 2016 13: 28
      +2
      Did not recognize Spitfaire? It happens!
    4. Bayonet
      Bayonet 7 June 2016 20: 45
      0
      Quote: Yarik
      Four-screw was not the same? Oh, four-bladed.

      Were! The picture shows Spitfire LF.IXE. So laugh in vain. hi
    5. Muxomor
      Muxomor 24 June 2016 20: 01
      +2
      "Soviet" fighter Spitfire Mk.VB arr 1942 shoots down Junkers-188 arr 1944 on the Eastern Front?
      Isn't cranberries dofig in this article about modifying the Luftwaffe U-88 workhorse?
      Yu-188 was NEVER an outstanding aircraft; they were shot down no less often and no more often than Yu-88.
      In general, the article of which Germanophile
  2. AlNikolaich
    AlNikolaich 7 June 2016 07: 46
    0
    Ha! And what kind of Soviet fighter is this? Who knows? Outwardly resembles a Yak, but so that with such wingtips ...
    1. Arktidianets
      Arktidianets 7 June 2016 08: 10
      0
      It looks like Spitfire, only the wingtips on Spitfire are rounded, and in the figure straight, maybe one of the many modifications.
      1. Kostya Andreev
        Kostya Andreev 7 June 2016 09: 44
        +2
        The wingtips on sleep are rounded and elliptical. On the tip, cut off the tips to increase the speed of the cre
    2. yehat
      yehat 7 June 2016 11: 11
      0
      perhaps in the article is a picture of the cannon spitfire MK VI, which was supplied by Lend-Lease
      http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww2/spit6.html
  3. Dimon19661
    Dimon19661 7 June 2016 09: 43
    +5
    It is also worth saying that the Soviet-German front of the Red Army had only numerical, but not technological superiority over the Luftwaffe forces, and, in addition, the Soviet Air Force was even numerically relatively smaller than the Western Alliance air force, and acted mostly only in the front-line zone, not risking after the bloody 1941 lessons of the year to make long-range raids deep into enemy territory. Thus, according to the Nazi leaders, Soviet aviation was a relatively lesser threat than Anglo-American aviation.


    I did not read further ....
    1. Dimon19661
      Dimon19661 7 June 2016 11: 15
      +7
      Having lost from 70 to 75% of their planes on the Eastern Front, the Germans did not see any special threats from the actions of Soviet aviation ???
      1. yehat
        yehat 7 June 2016 13: 09
        +4
        and here it’s not worth scumbling. The Germans regularly sought in key operations until the end of 43 years of effective work of their aircraft on the eastern front. I'm not talking about a fetish with a personal account of aces and internal shoals like a charter that goes against the requirements of tactics or the high mortality rate of newcomers of the Air Force.
        Therefore, the Germans had a reason to look down on our Air Force.
        This changed in 44, after a major reorganization of the work of aviation - then the opinion changed dramatically, because aviation began to do its work not only bravely, but also efficiently.
      2. Warrior2015
        7 June 2016 19: 28
        0
        Quote: Dimon19661
        Having lost from 70 to 75% of their planes on the Eastern Front, the Germans did not see any special threats from the actions of Soviet aviation ???

        First, let me ask you a question, where does the data come from?
        Secondly, the Air Force of the Red Army did not engage in strategic bombing and did not conduct an air attack, solving exclusively tactical tasks in the front line - hence the assessment as less dangerous.
    2. yehat
      yehat 7 June 2016 11: 15
      +3
      why didn’t you?
      or was there no beating of the regiments DB-3, TB-3 and SB, flying without cover in the 41st?
      as for the size of the Allied aviation, it is not clear what time is meant
      in 44 they were numerically very strong, in the 43rd Air Force of the USSR they were perhaps a more powerful number.
      however, by the year 44, our aviation had seriously grown both organizationally and technologically.
    3. stalkerwalker
      stalkerwalker 7 June 2016 11: 30
      +6
      Quote: Dimon19661
      I did not read further ....

      Well, suppose you read it ...
      The main task of the Red Army Air Force was considered to attack the enemy’s positions to a depth of 20-30 km deep into enemy territory. Those. aviation constantly helped ground forces break open the defense. Hence the fact that in the ranks of the Air Force of the Red Army there were no aces who shot down 100 or more German planes. Yes, there was free hunting in a dedicated section of the front, and in some cases under the guise of an entire squadron. But there was no clearly expressed task of shooting down and shooting down any planes in order to increase personal accounts. Soviet pilots rarely made more than 3-4 sorties per day, when 6 sorties a day was normal for Lufwaffen pilots.
      As for the technological superiority, on the ground the panzerwaffen represented by the Pz-V and Pz-VI in various modifications were more technologically advanced than the T-34-85 and IS-2. On what, in fact, and "burned", completely abandoning the "workhorse Pz-IV".
      So, fairy tales about technology in wartime, the lot of losers. As proof - a failed attempt to realize the advantage of the Me-262 in the form of an air defense fighter-interceptor.
      1. yehat
        yehat 7 June 2016 13: 19
        +3
        Quote: stalkerwalker
        Hence the fact that in the ranks of the Air Force of the Red Army there were no aces who shot down 100 or more German planes.

        except for the listed tactical and statutory restrictions
        1. our air force had a different statistic job, unconfirmed shots were not credited.
        2. Veterans not infrequently recorded group shots on beginners. And there was no particular fetish over quantity.
        3. The Germans for a long time had an advantage in coordination in the air, in communication and in the speed of fighters, as well as in J-88, ju-188. All this allowed us to escape from danger. Since the age of 41, the Germans did not always accept the battle, and in danger they often evaded it.
        4. Another factor was the poor training of the Air Force pilots. How many cases were there when the MiG-3 over Moscow could not be shot down by a bomber due to the fact that the entire BC was shot.
        1. DimerVladimer
          DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 15: 15
          +2
          Quote: yehat
          1. our air force had a different statistic job, unconfirmed shots were not credited.


          And it’s absolutely true, since if you count all the declared downed ones, then they will turn out three times as much as was released by industry at all.
          And this did not happen because they intentionally overestimated.

          Comparison of losses is on the Internet - for example, near Murmansk, at a local theater where it was possible to compare declared and real shot down.
          It happened that in an air battle there were several planes fired at one — each claimed to be shot down, it happened that several planes from different regiments took part in the air battle — and each one also claimed to be shot down.
          And not every one shot down - turned out to be shot down - the Germans usually got out of the battle - by diving and it was not always possible to track the plane before it crashed.

          It is better to read post-war studies and double-check:

          http://rufor.org/showthread.php?t=951
          ".... So, after the battles at Khalkin Gol, the USSR said that 588 Japanese aircraft were shot down and another 58 were destroyed on the ground, the Japanese announced the destruction of 1162 aircraft in the air and 98 on the ground. But, in reality, the Soviet Union the loss of 207 aircraft in battle and 42 more are not combat losses, the Japanese reported the loss of 88 aircraft in battle and 74 were written off due to combat damage. That is, the Soviet data on enemy losses were 4 times overstated, the Japanese by 6 times. coefficient 1 to 4, approximately preserved in the Air Force of the Red Army and the Great Patriotic War.
          German "Messerschmitts", when leaving the attack, due to the peculiarities of the engine, always smoked, they were also recorded as "downed" ... "

          Another example, already the Western Front, March 6, 1944 raid on Berlin: the Americans (fighter pilots. Gunners bombers) said that they destroyed 179 enemy aircraft (83% reflecting the attack of German aircraft), the Germans lost 66 fighters. German pilots said they shot down 128 bombers and fighters, another 12 aircraft were allegedly shot down, in reality, the Americans lost 69 bombers and 11 fighters.

          The battle near Kharkov on 13 on May 1942 of the year the Germans announced that they shot down 65 planes, our losses on that day were 20 planes. On May 14, Germans report on 47 aircraft, of which German Graf shot down - 6, Adolf Dickfeld - 9 aircraft. Our real losses are 14 aircraft.

          There are many studies on post-war statistics. Everywhere the number of shots exceeds real losses.
          1. Warrior2015
            7 June 2016 19: 41
            0
            Quote: DimerVladimer
            The battle near Kharkov on 13 on May 1942 of the year the Germans announced that they shot down 65 planes, our losses on that day were 20 planes. On May 14, Germans report on 47 aircraft, of which German Graf shot down - 6, Adolf Dickfeld - 9 aircraft. Our real losses are 14 aircraft.

            No doubt the number of claimed victories in the air was constantly overestimated by all parties for many reasons. But specifically this example — only pairs of units were taken into account here, while planes of other aviation regiments could be located on this section of the front. In general, everything is complicated in these statistics.
            1. stalkerwalker
              stalkerwalker 7 June 2016 19: 46
              +4
              Quote: Warrior2015
              No doubt the number of claimed victories in the air was constantly overestimated by all parties for many reasons.

              A. Isaev, both in co-authorship and himself, has a lot of materials on a similar topic (10 myths about the Second World War), where he examines in great detail the topic of WHO and HOW HAS “HAPPENED” a lot of enemy aircraft.
            2. dv_generalov
              dv_generalov 11 June 2016 22: 50
              +1
              They may have. We have a film camera, plus the testimony of two pilots. The rest is combat work, and believe me, it was. Otherwise, besides Pokryshkin and Kozhedub, I think there would have been more Asss with more than fifty victories. Yes, and Pokryshkin with Kozhedub had a large number of unconfirmed victories. The question is how statistics were kept. We have one thing, the Germans have another. The Germans have enough reports - the pilot’s report on the completed task (therefore, the figures are gigantic. And who will check?). I think history has put an end to this issue in the time period.
              1. Warrior2015
                14 June 2016 23: 21
                0
                Quote: dv_generalov
                We have one thing, the Germans have another. The Germans have enough reports - the pilot’s report on the completed task (therefore, the figures are gigantic. And who will check?).

                You are very mistaken. The aforesaid is purely your personal opinion, showing unfamiliarity with the combat work of the Reich Air Force.
      2. Warrior2015
        7 June 2016 19: 31
        +2
        Quote: stalkerwalker
        So, fairy tales about technology in wartime, the lot of losers.

        You very clearly saw one of the main thoughts held in the material presented - Ju-188 was a good, very technically advanced aircraft, but it was introduced into the series for a very long time in war conditions, it was difficult to produce and no technical innovations can replace much simple and reliable weapons.
      3. PHANTOM-AS
        PHANTOM-AS 8 June 2016 14: 02
        +1
        Quote: stalkerwalker
        Hence the fact that in the ranks of the Air Force of the Red Army there were no aces who shot down 100 or more German planes. Yes, there was free hunting in a dedicated section of the front, and in some cases under the guise of an entire squadron. But there was no clearly expressed task of shooting down and shooting down any planes in order to increase personal accounts.

        The fact is that the main task of the Red Army fighter aircraft was to cover its own attack and bomber aircraft, as well as to cover ground troops.
        From the many memories of our fighters, one conclusion follows that there were, of course, rewards for the downed "Hans", but the punishments for the losses, covered by attack aircraft and bombers, were very tough.
        In 1979, the book "Akhtung! Kamozin in the Sky!" Was published about PM Kamozin, who fought in the fourth and fifth air armies. the pilot shot down 29 enemy planes personally and 13 in the group and was awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union twice: in May 1943 and in July 1944.
      4. dv_generalov
        dv_generalov 11 June 2016 22: 41
        +1
        You have a good comment. When the Germans drove the equipment (tanks) to the repair factories for restoration, our repair plants put 80% of the damaged equipment into operation in the fields near the front line.
    4. DimerVladimer
      DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 14: 55
      +2
      Quote: Dimon19661
      It is also worth saying that the Soviet-German front of the Red Army had only numerical, but not technological superiority over the Luftwaffe forces, and, in addition, the Soviet Air Force was even numerically relatively smaller than the Western Alliance air force, and acted mostly only in the front-line zone, not risking after the bloody 1941 lessons of the year to make long-range raids deep into enemy territory. Thus, according to the Nazi leaders, Soviet aviation was a relatively lesser threat than Anglo-American aviation.


      I did not read further ....


      And it should ...
      With the illiterate, there’s no reason to talk.
      1. Muxomor
        Muxomor 24 June 2016 20: 20
        +1
        Why read the elevations of the brain of a person who does not even know what he writes about?
        1-Throughout the war, including in 1941 deep into the defense worked ADD, even on Li-2 ADD hung bombs sent to bomb at night the railway station
        2- "The level of skill and technological lag" of the Red Army Air Force from the Luftwaffe is complete nonsense - 191 fighter regiment near Leningrad in 3 months on the I-16 shot down 96 awesome German aircraft, losing only 23 of its rusfaner I-16
        The 3 Losses of Backlash on the Eastern Front EVEN in 1941-42 (710 cars per month) were MORE than the Backlash lost during the Battle of Britain (688 cars per month) so here the author of the Germanophile exposes himself as an ignoramus Pete Ushnik
  4. oblako
    oblako 7 June 2016 10: 30
    +4
    The picture is of course utopian ... fiction. On it Spitfire painted under the Soviet fighter. Well, Hurricane or AeroCobra, which were supplied by the allies of the anti-Hitler coalition in the USSR. And Spitfire wasn’t even delivered ... And on account of the fighting qualities of Yu 188, I read other stories, less enthusiastic, so the limited series of these machines is a conscious choice. Yes, speed, yes locators, and everything else is not very fun ... Well, a tendentious attitude towards the Yak-3 and La-7 in person ...))) The key to victory was to follow the military industry principle of cost - effectiveness. La-5fn, la-7, yak-1,7,9,3 were more technologically advanced, cheaper and no less effective than enemy aircraft. As proved in battle, and not on the couch.
    1. Per se.
      Per se. 7 June 2016 11: 05
      +3
      Quote: oblako
      And Spitfire wasn’t even delivered ...
      Here you are very mistaken, delivered. There was an article on this.
      The British government at the end of 1942 finally agreed to massively supply Spitfire fighters to the Soviet Union. Already in January of next year, the first Spitfire modifications of the Mk V were delivered through Iran. In total, about 150 fighter data was transferred over the year (plus 50 fuselage as a source of spare parts was supplied to this).
      The first regiment to receive Spitfires was the 57th Guards Fighter Aviation Regiment, formed in 1938 in Baku as the 36th Fighter Aviation Regiment.
      Since February 1944 in the USSR began to arrive "Spitfire" Mk IX. According to Western sources, a total of 989 LF IXE and HF IXE, as well as 190 LF IHS were supplied. The aircraft were distributed between the air defense regiments, of which only the 26 and 27 th guards fighter regiments from the Leningrad district of air defense managed to make war.
      In the photo, preparation of fighters for distillation in the USSR.
    2. yehat
      yehat 7 June 2016 13: 00
      +2
      Well, about the effectiveness of the Yak question is very ambiguous.
      at the beginning of the war there was little duralumin and they were made with a weakened glider.
      again, the claims were to defense, weapons, workmanship, altitude and a number of other features. Yes, Yakovlev’s planes had quite a few pluses, and there were not a few minuses.
      Therefore, I would not speak out about the effectiveness of these machines as a dogma.
      Perhaps Yak was the best that is possible in those conditions, or maybe not.
      Do not forget about those expectations from new engines that did not materialize.
      Do not forget about how many promising projects and cars were crushed to give Yak-u road. The only thing I perceive as unconditional success is the Lagg-3 mimicry in La-5, and then in La5FN and LA-7.
      1. DimerVladimer
        DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 14: 16
        +3
        The pilot who flew on the Yak (mainly escort of attack aircraft and partially loop-2)
        considered the best Yak-1 - maneuverable and thrust-armed slightly inferior to the Bf-109F in the vertical
        The Yak-7 was heavier and worse in maneuverability - it was much inferior to the Messer in the vertical, it was equally horizontal
        The Yak-9 was also much inferior in the verticals, were heavier than the Yak-1 and worse maneuverability.
        All types of serial Yak 1/7/9 did not reach the calculated speed and did not give out more than 540-560 km - they accelerated very slowly, which was much inferior to the Bf-109F / G / K

        Memoirs of the pilot of the Yak Kozhemyako Ivan Ivanovich - as they say, do not add to diminish - a living participant in the war

        "... the combat speeds of the Yak-7B and the Messer were practically the same - from 200 to 540–550 km / h, but the Messer could keep the high combat speed longer, the yak lost speed faster ...

        "... What engine was on your Yak-76: M - 105PA or M-105PF?
        - At first, simple, then, at the end of 1943, the cars went with forced. Most of our [88] Yak-7B engines were simple - 1100 hp. at the 1st stage of the supercharger. I fought on the Kursk in a simple engine, and on the Dnieper. There were few cars in the regiment with a forced engine. Although the Yak-7B, even with the M-105PF, it still did not reach the Yak-1. Heavy.

        Was the Yak-7B difficult to fly?
        No. On takeoff, the “moment of rotation” was very easily compensated by the rudder. Landing is easy. Flying is very simple, the "yak" flew by itself.
        All types of Yakovlev fighters were easy to control, not only the Yak-7B. Piloted "yaks" very easily. Steering effort was needed small. "Yaks" - aircraft for aerobatics ...

        If we compare the sum of the characteristics of speed and maneuverability, then how Yak-7B and Me-109G are comparable?
        - “Messer” was better. I will not say that it is overwhelming, but better. The Yak-7B was heavy. In the duel “one hundred and ninth" and the Yak-7B, much depended on the pilot and much on the type of combat mission that these fighters perform. What to hide, but in solving most of the combat missions that are set for fighters, the Messer will still have an advantage. But as a fighter for direct escort of low-altitude strike aircraft, such as the Il-2, the Yak-7B will be preferable.

        Armament Yak-7B suited you? Did machine gun and cannon weapons work reliably?
        - Armament - excellent! 20 mm ShVAK gun (fired through the hollow shaft of the gearbox) and two synchronized (under the hood) UBS - 12,7 mm Berezin machine gun. The armament is powerful.
        Both weapons and synchronizers worked reliably. Sometimes, of course, failures occurred, but this was either due to lack of knowledge of the equipment, or due to poor service or oversight. It was an interesting case.
        Once near Zaporozhye I flew as a wingman with Senior Lieutenant Medvedev ... "

        http://militera.lib.ru/memo/russian/drabkin_ay5/04.html
        1. yehat
          yehat 7 June 2016 14: 26
          +1
          The Yak-1 turned out to be lightweight and yet without important metal elements (not the fault of the designer, but there was something)
          Yes, because of the weight culture, I walked vertically well, but at what cost?
          The wings could not withstand the load and fold, especially when diving
          not uncommon after active aerobatics with loads, the plane went to repair
          the ammunition was modest.
          and do not forget that only the Yak-7 had a powerful volley weight, comparable to the Bf-109f2.
          Yak-1, Yak-9, Yak-3 had only 2 barrels.
          With the advent of Bf-109g2, g6, the Yak was by no means equal to them.
          and only then, when the Messers began to overweight, Yak got a real advantage in maneuverability. In the example you cited, there is cunning - the pilot is asked about the armament of the most armed version, missing the fact that the rest of the Yak were weakly armed - this was enough to drive away the fighters, but actively to shoot down - no.
          1. Warrior2015
            7 June 2016 19: 45
            +1
            Quote: yehat
            missing the fact that the rest of the Yak were weakly armed - this was enough to drive away fighter jets, but actively to shoot down - no.

            Absolutely true - when the Germans began to install 109 cannons and 3 machine guns on the Me-2, they began to chop up bomber and assault formations without question (and then the "Fokkers" appeared).

            First, they brought in 1-2 links of lightly armed "Messers" - Soviet fighters were usually easily connected in battle, threw an escorted formation - and even one link of heavily armed German aircraft fell on it - and "write gone" ...
          2. DimerVladimer
            DimerVladimer 8 June 2016 13: 34
            +1
            Quote: yehat
            In the example you cited, there is cunning - the pilot is asked about the armament of the most armed version, missing the fact that the rest of the Yak were weakly armed - this was enough to drive away the fighters, but actively to shoot down - no.


            These are quotes from a participant in the war - he flew in the Yaks and his opinion can only be challenged by the same participant - let's respect the opinion of veterans.
          3. DimerVladimer
            DimerVladimer 8 June 2016 13: 40
            +2
            Quote: yehat
            The wings could not withstand the load and fold, especially when diving
            not uncommon after active aerobatics with loads, the plane went to repair
            the ammunition was modest.


            I don’t recall the complaints about the folding wings.
            I read about I-16 in Spain - there was such a lot of I-16 in 1935, wings fell off en masse - up to 30% of losses - violation of production technology.
            About modest ammunition - I agree.
            We can also mention a small supply of fuel (except for the Yak-9D), but for the solution of the tasks facing the Yaks - escorting attack aircraft and Pe-2 - their combat radius was enough.

            In general, I have the impression that the Yaks are hard workers of the war.
  5. yehat
    yehat 7 June 2016 11: 05
    +1
    Compared TTX ju-188A and 2 fighters Yak-9 and La-5FN
    the first was slightly superior in speed, and given the poor speed at the field airfields with painting cars and they noticeably lost speed, then in fact the first modifications of the Yak-9 could not hunt ju-188a at all. Another matter of La5-FN is that it came out simultaneously with the junkers and surpassed it in speed by 70-90 km / h at all altitudes, however, this is not a big advantage and even in this case the interception would be difficult if the fighter had no advantage in height.
    1. DimerVladimer
      DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 14: 30
      +2
      The pilots considered the speed already 20-30 km / h to be an advantage.
      And 70 km / h is already an overwhelming advantage ... but!
      The question is how long you can withstand the "combat" speed

      The engines were heavily boosted and more than 3-5 minutes on the afterburner is a common practice, so really - interception will depend on the height-distance ...
  6. Papandopulo
    Papandopulo 7 June 2016 11: 24
    +1
    They did not remember Soviet soldiers because the Ju-87 was replaced by the FW-190
    Daytime bombing of Germany began after the Soviet Air Force halved the backlash over the Kuban.
    At night the cities were bombed, the Yak-3 took it in the daytime MiG-3 at night.
  7. yehat
    yehat 7 June 2016 11: 29
    +3
    and you do not confuse anything? Yak-3 over the Kuban, well, well request
    Mig-3 by the year 43 remained mainly as the air defense forces of large cities
    if they were at the front, then very few.
    the simultaneous diving of the Yak-3 and Mig-3 on the same sector of the front is rather nonsense.
    1. Papandopulo
      Papandopulo 7 June 2016 12: 19
      -1
      So you just confused everything.
      1. yehat
        yehat 7 June 2016 12: 51
        0

        In September 1943, an improved version was prepared - the Yak-1M
        .....
        The first production aircraft were sent to the 91st fighter aviation regiment of the 2nd Air Army, which in June 1944 took part in the offensive Lviv operation


        fights over the Kuban - summer 1943
        Now tell me, HOW did the Yak-3 manage to participate in these battles ????
        further, the source is not the best, but rarely talks about these things. We look on the wiki: /https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%92%D0%BE%D0%B7%D0%B4%D1%83 % D1% 88% D0% BD% D1% 8B%
        D0%B5_%D1%81%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B6%D0%B5%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%8F_%D0%BD%D0%B0_%D0%9A%D1%83
        %D0%B1%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8_(1943)
        the composition of the air regiments and do not find Mig-3, Yak-3. Generally not on the lists.

        so who messed up?
        1. Papandopulo
          Papandopulo 8 June 2016 05: 20
          -1
          It is written that the Yak-3 took it in the afternoon, and not over the Kuban.
    2. The comment was deleted.
  8. DimerVladimer
    DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 13: 45
    +1
    "at least the forces of the" Axis Berlin-Rome "could repel the landing of the allies in Sicily, and perhaps even change the course of the Battle of Kursk"
    You do not even have a close idea of ​​the air situation during the landing of allies in Sicily!
    According to the recollections of German fighter pilots (who fought in Italy at that time and were transferred to Sicily), lightings possessed an overwhelming advantage and in a couple of days, there were hardly 3-4 suitable aircraft for flight from fighter squadrons (although there were about 300 new aircraft on the mainland aircraft, which for some reason did not transfer to the regiments, to replace those that were knocked out in battles).
    But bombers generally had no option to break through the barriers of lightings.
    1. Warrior2015
      7 June 2016 19: 49
      0
      Quote: DimerVladimer
      You do not even have a close idea of ​​the air situation during the landing of allies in Sicily!

      Well, how can I say, in general I can imagine, and that's why I wrote. Please note that one of the main directions of the combat use of the Ju-188 was its use as a torpedo bomber, moreover, in bad weather conditions or at night - if the Anglo-Saxons had a little less air supremacy, and the Ju-188 would have been much greater, it would be through the destruction of the landing ships by torpedo bombers could be "covered".
      1. DimerVladimer
        DimerVladimer 8 June 2016 14: 08
        +1
        Quote: Warrior2015
        Well, how can I say, in general I can imagine, and that's why I wrote. Please note that one of the main directions of the combat use of the Ju-188 was its use as a torpedo bomber, moreover, in bad weather conditions or at night - if the Anglo-Saxons had a little less air supremacy, and the Ju-188 would have been much greater, it would be through the destruction of the landing ships by torpedo bombers could be "covered".


        And yet this is a bold, in my opinion, very exaggerated interpretation of the air situation.
        I do not think that the Yu-188 with a combat load in the form of a torpedo was able to reach a speed of 75% of the maximum speed. And at this speed, its advantage is doubtful.
        1. Warrior2015
          9 June 2016 02: 07
          0
          Quote: DimerVladimer
          Yu-188 with a combat load in the form of a torpedo was able to develop a speed of 75% of the maximum.

          Here it is necessary to watch the operation of engines in various modes, taking into account the different combat weight. This is too deep for the article. The big trump card for the Anglo-Saxon Air Force was that in the summer in the Mediterranean there is excellent weather and little cloudy, i.e. torpedo bombers in the clouds or at low visibility could not sneak up on the forces of the landing fleet (and those who tried to attack in the afternoon - they quickly knocked out).
  9. DimerVladimer
    DimerVladimer 7 June 2016 14: 36
    +1
    "... thus, according to the Nazi leaders, the aircraft of the Soviet Union posed a comparatively less threat than the Anglo-American aircraft"
    Here you can’t argue with the author - in many sources it is found that graduates of German flight schools were sent first to the Eastern Front - to gain experience, then transferred to Western destinations.
    1. stalkerwalker
      stalkerwalker 7 June 2016 15: 26
      +2
      Quote: DimerVladimer
      in many sources it is found that graduates of German flight schools were sent first to the Eastern Front - to gain experience, then transferred to Western destinations.

      The tactics of aerial combat on the Western and Eastern fronts differed markedly - in the West, German aviation emphasized air defense as a means of repelling the mass use by the Allies of bombers flying at high altitude under the guise of fighters. It was in this context that the Me-262 was used as an interceptor. And the Fuhrer of the German nation initially prepared for him the fate of a fighter-bomber. And he was generally right.
      On the Eastern Front, the bulk of the air battles took place directly above the battlefield.
    2. Warrior2015
      7 June 2016 19: 55
      +1
      Quote: DimerVladimer
      graduates of German flight schools, first sent to the Eastern Front - to gain experience, then transferred to Western destinations.

      Well, as if not always, especially if at the end of 44-45, but in general, yes.

      And so - in the West - the conditions were more comfortable, better provision, radar coverage, take-off strips. But they had to fight with very highly trained pilots who had huge numerical superiority.

      In the East, the situation is different in all respects: living conditions and airfield are very poor, the runways are unpaved, but the Soviet Air Force didn’t have such a monstrous numerical superiority as the Anglo-Saxon ones, and most pilots were essentially untrained novices (there was little chance to run into the guards squadron) .

      Therefore, German pilots in many ways "loved" the Eastern Front, it was easier for fighters to "collect" victories, and it was easier for bombers to survive and make more sorties (in the West, since 42, the Lutfwaffe stopped flying on daytime bombings).
      1. DimerVladimer
        DimerVladimer 8 June 2016 14: 52
        +1
        Quote: Warrior2015
        In the East, the situation is different in all respects: living conditions and airfield are very poor, the runways are unpaved, but the Soviet Air Force didn’t have such a monstrous numerical superiority as the Anglo-Saxon ones, and most pilots were essentially untrained novices (there was little chance to run into the guards squadron) .


        It should be noted that the Soviet Air Force had a numerical superiority since 1943. But the tactics of using the Soviet Air Force left much to be desired. The desire to "be strong everywhere" led to the dispersion of forces, ineffective "troop cover" - leading to ineffective loitering over the front line (as demanded by ground troops), burning fuel and resource of fighter aircraft engines. And the short flight time did not allow Soviet fighters to effectively provide air cover for the troops - about 20-30 minutes - after which they again went to refuel.
  10. Santor
    Santor 7 June 2016 19: 10
    0
    Quote: yehat
    the simultaneous diving of the Yak-3 and Mig-3 on the same sector of the front is rather nonsense.


    Yak-3 was not observed there, but MIG-3 was. By the way, on this link you can read about how the calculations were carried out by both sides of the shot down.

    http://www.airpages.ru/dc/bf_k1.shtml
  11. Filxnumx
    Filxnumx 8 June 2016 07: 22
    +4
    The article is good, but I would like to make a small stylistic remark. As a military translator, it hurts me to hear the constant mention of the term group instead of the Russian translation analogue group. If you really like the German gruppen so use then a geshwader instead of a squadron. Good luck
    1. Warrior2015
      9 June 2016 02: 10
      0
      Quote: Fil743
      it hurts the hearing the constant mention of the term groupen instead of the Russian translation analogue group. If you really like the German gruppen so use then a geshwader instead of a squadron.

      Thanks for the comment, but let me disagree (not relying on copyright). The fact is that the "group" in the Luftwaffe does not correspond to the Russian term "group" at all.
      And "geshwader" - yes, I agree, it is worth using (again, because the Russian term "squadron", being more and more "naval," does not correspond to German terminology).
  12. Achtaba1970
    Achtaba1970 8 June 2016 18: 30
    0
    Quote: Fil743
    The article is good, but I would like to make a small stylistic remark. As a military translator, it hurts me to hear the constant mention of the term group instead of the Russian translation analogue group. If you really like the German gruppen so use then a geshwader instead of a squadron. Good luck

    And in addition, all the same in German staffel, not staffel
  13. Robert Nevsky
    Robert Nevsky 1 November 2016 19: 14
    +1
    Posted by germanophile! am
    1. Signore Tomato
      Signore Tomato 2 November 2016 07: 06
      0
      Quote: Robert Nevsky
      Posted by germanophile! am


      Well done!
      He masturbates in Germany and Small Britain with the acquisitions.
  14. antivirus
    antivirus 29 November 2016 18: 50
    0
    (True, a certain number of vehicles were badly damaged and then decommissioned, but they were not taken into account as combat losses).
    So count-art losses!
    ! million "military" Germans were missing and have not yet been found.
    And in technology it means: tanks and aircraft are also the most reliable and with microscopic losses.