Military Review

Alexey Maresyev. The story of a real man

51
Exactly 100 years ago, 20 in May 1916, the famous Soviet pilot Alexei Petrovich Maresyev was born in Kamyshin, whose feat formed the basis of the book “A Tale of a Real Man”, which was included in the course of Soviet school literature. In the Soviet Union there was probably no one who would not hear about this fighter pilot. The feat accomplished by him during the Great Patriotic War and today lives in the memory of people. Thanks to the book of Boris Polevoy, Maresyev entered people's minds as the standard of the “real person.” Under this high rank he will forever be inscribed in history our country.


Alexei Maresyev will remain in the public mind thanks to inhuman endurance and the will to live. The feat perfect for them was worthy of both a separate book and a film made on it later. After an 18-day return to his crawling through the forest, frostbite and amputation of both legs, this man did not break down and did not give up. He not only stood on the prosthesis, but also returned to Aviation: in itself, it was akin to a miracle. But Maresyev not only returned to heaven, he returned to the fighter unit, continuing to fight for the freedom and independence of his homeland.

Alexey Petrovich Maresyev was born 20 May 1916 of the year in the city of Kamyshin, Saratov Governorate. Alexei and his two brothers, Peter and Nicholas, raised his mother. The father of the future pilot, past the battles of the First World War, died from the effects of numerous wounds when Alexei was only three years old. In childhood, Maresyev did not have a special health, the boy was often sick and suffered a severe form of malaria, the consequence of which was rheumatism. Alexei was tormented by terrible pains in the joints, and the neighbors of his family whispered among themselves that he would not last long. However, from his father, whom Aleksey practically did not know and did not remember, he inherited an enormous willpower and stubborn character.

Alexey Maresyev. The story of a real man


After graduating from 8 classes of high school in Kamyshin, Alexei Maresyev received a specialty metal turner at a local school at a sawmill. Here he began his career. Twice at this time he applied to the flight school, but both times they were returned back, referring to his health. In 1934, the Kamyshin District Komsomol Committee sent the future hero to the construction of the city of Komsomolsk-on-Amur. It was in the Far East that, without a break from work, Alexey began to study at the flying club, after all having realized his craving for heaven, which had arisen in it as a child.

In 1937, he was drafted into the army. He initially served in the 12 airborne squadron located on Sakhalin Island, but was then transferred to the 30 th Chita military pilot school, which in 1938 was transferred to Bataysk. Bataysk Aviation School named after AK Serov Maresyev graduated in 1940 year, receiving the rank of junior lieutenant. After graduating from college, he was left there as an instructor. It is in Bataysk that Maresjev will meet the beginning of the Great Patriotic War.

After the start of the war, the pilot was sent to the South-Western Front, where he fought as part of the 296 th Fighter Aviation Regiment. He made his first sortie 23 on August 1941 of the year in the Krivoy Rog area. The first months of the war were a very difficult time for the entire Red Army and Soviet aviation. The Germans surpassed the Soviet pilots in accumulated experience, in the level of ownership of the equipment on which they flew for a long time, as airplanes. Maresyev was saved by the fact that he was already an experienced pilot. And although he didn’t chalk up his victories in 1941, he survived. Later, the famous Soviet ace Alexander Ivanovich Pokryshkin said that those who did not fight in 1941-1942 did not know the real war.

He shot down his first German aircraft, the Ju-52 transporter, at the start of the 1942 of the year. In March, 1942, Alexei Maresyev was sent to the North-Western Front, by which time he had already shot down the 4 German aircraft. It was here that an air battle occurred that would forever change his life.



In the spring of 1942 between the Seliger and Ilmen lakes, Soviet troops near the inconspicuous small town of Demyansk surrounded an approximately 100-thousandth group of German troops that did not think to surrender, providing organized and very strong resistance. 4 April 1942 of the year in the area of ​​this so-called "Demyansky boiler" during the flight to cover the bombers in a battle with German fighters the Yak-1 Maresyev plane was shot down. He tried to make an emergency landing in the forest, spotting a suitable lake there. However, his plane caught the landing gear over the tops of the pines and turned over. The plane fell into deep snow, and the pilot himself was seriously injured, but he remained to live.

For the whole 18 day, the pilot who had injured his feet, first on crippled legs, and then crawled to the front line crawling. Having eaten on the way onboard rations, he ate what could be found in the forest: tree bark, berries, cones. The situation seemed hopeless: having found himself alone in the midst of the endless and dense forest, the pilot with injured legs simply did not know where he should go, or rather crawl. How he remained in the end alive, no one knows. Alexey Petrovich never liked to remember this story and tried not to talk about it. According to him, at that moment he was motivated by an indomitable desire to live.

In the end, he still got to his. Near the village of Plav, Kislovsky Village Council of the Valdai District, he was noticed by his father and son, local residents. As the pilot didn’t respond to the questions by that time, the father and the son came back to the village from fear, thinking that they were German. Only later, the children from the same village, Sasha Vikhrov and Seryozha Malin, were barely able to find a living pilot, who determined that they were a Soviet pilot, and with the help of Sasha’s father drove the wounded pilot to their home. The villagers took care of Maresyev more than a week, but that needed qualified medical assistance. In early May, an airplane landed near the village, and Maresyev was transported to a hospital in Moscow.



On this story Alexei Petrovich could come to an end. By the time of delivery to Moscow, the pilot was already in critical condition, he had gangrene. At the same time, there were quite a few wounded in the hospital, so the fighter pilot brought in as practically hopeless was laid on a gurney in the corridor. Here, while making a detour, Professor Terebinsky accidentally turned his attention to him, who eventually saved his life. True, it had to be paid for by amputation of both legs in the lower leg area. There was simply no other way out; by that time, Maresyev had begun to develop gangrene incompatible with life.

Amputation of both legs, it would seem, put a fat point on the career of a pilot. However, Maresiev was not going to give up. He did not accept the idea that he would have to part with the sky, making a decision for himself to return to aviation and fly again at any cost. Having accepted this, he began almost immediately to train: walk, run, jump and, of course, dance. True, he had to learn to dance again not with the nurses in the hospital, who were afraid that he would crush their feet with his insensitive prostheses, but with his neighbors in the hospital ward who, especially during training, wore work boots.

In total for 6 months of intense training, Alexey Maresyev learned to walk on prostheses so that only a rare person could notice something unusual in his gait. He continued to train in the sanatorium, where he was sent in September 1942. Already at the beginning of 1943, the commission recorded in the personal file of the senior lieutenant: "Valid in all types of aviation." After passing a medical commission, he was sent to Ibresa flight school (Chuvashia). In February of the same year, the pilot made his first flight after being seriously wounded. Anton Fedoseyevich Beletsky, the head of the flight school, who himself flew with a prosthesis instead of his right leg, helped him in this.

Just because after an emergency landing and the death of his plane, the 18 pilot was selected from Valdai forests, his act could be called a feat. However, it was much more striking that after amputation of both legs, Maresyev not only did not break, but also achieved incredible results: having overcome a lot of administrative and medical barriers, he returned to the line.



Maresyev reached the front again in June of the 1943 of the year, hitting the 63 of the Guards Fighter Aviation Regiment. Initially, the regiment Maresiev was not allowed to fly on combat missions. The regiment commander simply did not let the pilot go into battle, as the situation in the sky over the field of the future Kursk battle was extremely tense. Alex was very worried about this situation. As a result, the commander of one of the squadrons of the regiment, A. M. Chislov, sympathized with him. He took Maresyev on a pair of combat missions. As a result, several successful sorties together with Chislov helped to correct the situation, and the credibility of the pilot in the regiment increased.

20 July 1943 of the year during an air battle with the superior forces of the Germans Maresyev saved two Soviet pilots by shooting down two German Fw.190 fighters at once who were covering the Ju.87 dive bombers. Thanks to this, the military glory of Alexei Maresyev spread throughout the 15-th Air Army and across the front. In the 63 th Fighter Aviation Regiment, correspondents from all over the country became frequent, among whom was Boris Polevoy, the author of the future book The Tale of a Real Man.

It is surprising in this story that when he returned to the combat unit after amputation of both legs, Maresyev shot down 7 combat aircraft, bringing his list of air victories to 11 enemy vehicles. Then he was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union. In 1944, Alexei agreed to the proposal to become an inspector-pilot and move from the fighter regiment to the management of higher education institutions of the Air Force. The pilot himself honestly admitted that the loads on the flights only grew, and it became harder and harder to transfer them. At the same time, Maresyev never refused to take off combat missions, but he did not complain when he was offered a new job. As a result, in June 1944, the guard Major Alexei Maresyev accepted the offer to become an inspector.

In total, during World War II, Maresyev made 86 combat missions, shooting down 11 German planes: 4 before being wounded and 7 after. He was in military service until the 1946 year, until he retired for health reasons. In this case, the former fighter pilot tried to keep himself in very good physical shape. The man who lost his legs in the war was fond of skating, skiing, swimming and cycling. As a result, he even managed to set a record in the sanatorium near Kuybyshev, having swum the Volga here (2200 meters) in 55 minutes. His last sorties on an airplane (school U-2) Maresyev made at the beginning of the 1950-s, working as an instructor of the Air Force special school in Moscow.



Alexey Petrovich Maresyev became the very man about whom you can talk all life - a feat. Especially since after the war, he still brought very great benefits to the country's air force, engaging in the process of training future pilots. In addition, since 1956, when the Soviet (and later Russian) committee of war veterans and military service was formed, retired colonel Maresyev headed it. He was in this public (but in his own way also a battle post) until the last days of his life.

Alexey Petrovich, in spite of everything, lived a long enough life. Somehow he managed to overcome the aftermath of a severe childhood and a wound received during the war. May 18 The 2001 of the year at the Theater of the Russian Army was to host a gala evening dedicated to the 85 anniversary of Alexei Maresyev. He was just about to come to this event, when a heart attack struck him, he was taken to the intensive care unit of a Moscow clinic, but the doctors could not save his life. As a result, the gala evening in his honor began with a moment of silence.

It often happens that a person who becomes a prototype of a book character in his life does not reach the image created by the writer. However, Maresyev is a living example of the opposite. He has proved with his whole life that the book “The Story of a Real Man” is not a colorful myth, but a real story that tells about the great courage and unsurpassed strength of the spirit of this person.

In honor of the centenary of the birth of the Hero of the Soviet Union and the famous pilot Alexei Petrovich Maresyev, a center for patriotic education will be opened in his small homeland in the city of Kamyshin, and a parade will be held with the participation of the Russian Knights and Swifts air groups, reports TASS. The name of Alexei Maresyev will be assigned to the plane EMERCOM of Russia and one of the new streets of Volgograd. In addition, commemorative events dedicated to the anniversary date will be held in Moscow, Tver and Nizhny Novgorod regions, as well as in other regions of Russia. In turn, the Russian military-historical society will continue the search for the Yak-1 fighter, which the pilot was shot down during an air battle near the Demyansky Boiler in 1942 year.

Based on materials from open sources
Author:
51 comment
Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must sign in.
  1. EvgNik
    EvgNik 20 May 2016 06: 28
    +23
    The Story of a Real Man was my sons' handbook.
    1. Vladimirets
      Vladimirets 20 May 2016 06: 38
      +15
      Quote: EvgNik
      "The Story of a Real Man"

      They used to study at school. recourse
      1. Volga Cossack
        Volga Cossack 20 May 2016 10: 34
        +11
        alas removed ......... the question is why?
        1. Sling cutter
          Sling cutter 20 May 2016 12: 10
          +7
          Quote: Volga Cossack
          alas removed ......... the question is why?

          "-But you are a Soviet man
          insisted Commissioner.

          “Soviet man,” Alexei repeated mechanically, still not taking his eyes off the note; then his pale face lit up with some kind of inner blush, and he looked around everyone with amazed joyful eyes. "

          http://russkay-literatura.ru/polevoj-b/48-b-polevoj-p
      2. Reserve officer
        Reserve officer 20 May 2016 10: 52
        +9
        Our pioneer detachment was named after Alexei Maresyev. It was a very high honor.
  2. Red_Hamer
    Red_Hamer 20 May 2016 06: 34
    +15
    Here he is a real hero! We do not need to invent our heroes! Bright memory!
    1. svp67
      svp67 20 May 2016 08: 16
      +8
      Quote: Red_Hamer
      Here he is a real hero! We do not need to invent our heroes!

      Correctly!!! We need to remember them, because Marasyev was not alone ...
      1. Amurets
        Amurets 20 May 2016 08: 50
        +6
        Yes, they must be remembered! Not only A. Maresyev, but all those who have accomplished the impossible and returned to aviation. Http://allaces.ru/ginnes/inv.php
        1. alstr
          alstr 20 May 2016 13: 20
          +2
          At one time, I read that about 50 people in the SA, except Maresyev, fought with various injuries from lack of limbs to fractures. Unfortunately, few of them received the title of GHS, although by the very fact - they deserve this title.
          Of course, the story played a great role in the fate of Maresyev.
          1. Verdun
            Verdun 20 May 2016 15: 16
            +7
            Of course, the story played a great role in the fate of Maresyev.
            The title of Hero Maresyev received in 1943 not for the fact that he fought without legs, but for the number of downed enemy aircraft. At that time, the star was given for 10 downed. And this man made his fate himself. And he never sought public glory.
  3. Uncle Murzik
    Uncle Murzik 20 May 2016 06: 41
    +12
    yes there were People, real heroes! bow to them to the ground!
  4. Reptiloid
    Reptiloid 20 May 2016 06: 50
    +12
    Maresyev ---- an example of the fact that a person can overcome all obstacles! Soviet man!
    I read the book at the age of 10, I was very worried. One of the most beloved books.
    1. svp67
      svp67 20 May 2016 08: 22
      +3
      Quote: Reptiloid
      Maresyev ---- an example of the fact that a person can overcome all obstacles! Soviet man!

      I agree that these are really people from a different "test", but alas, in other armies, not only the Red Army fought legless and otherwise injured pilots, including in the Luftwaffe
    2. Prometey
      Prometey 20 May 2016 21: 14
      -5
      Quote: Reptiloid
      Maresyev ---- an example of the fact that a person can overcome all obstacles! Soviet man!

      Still, it would be more correct to call him a Russian person.
      1. Reptiloid
        Reptiloid 21 May 2016 00: 45
        0
        It can be seen from your phrase that you either forgot the book and the film, or want to correct the words of the book. But this is wrong. Because this phrase is there. Perhaps I should have formalized it in "...." Well, there is something else the pilot is naturally mentioned.
  5. Knizhnik
    Knizhnik 20 May 2016 07: 26
    +5
    Handbook of childhood. I wonder what are the favorite books of today's boys?
    1. Alex
      Alex 20 May 2016 22: 57
      +3
      Quote: Knizhnik
      Handbook of childhood. I wonder what are the favorite books of today's boys?

      Harry Potter ... There are unique people in my class (10, by the way) who know him as a keepsake. But they did not hear about Maresyev, Kolobanov, Pavlichenko.
  6. qwert111
    qwert111 20 May 2016 08: 00
    +5
    Repeatedly watched a movie and read a book about Maresyev and each time you discover something new. In schools now, all this needs to be shown and told to children!
  7. dsm100
    dsm100 20 May 2016 08: 19
    +8
    This is the Man, the Man with a capital letter. The school curriculum is no longer studying this work, but it's a pity. Although most of our children (schoolchildren) would not be imbued with the courage and heroism of this person. Many students do not even know the start and end dates of the Second World War. Most teenagers have only a mind on their mind: a tablet, computer, xbox, anything but books.
    1. Kenneth
      Kenneth 20 May 2016 08: 27
      +1
      I completely agree with the first part, and as for the second, paper books are yesterday.
      1. Amurets
        Amurets 20 May 2016 11: 32
        +4
        Quote: Kenneth
        I completely agree with the first part, and as for the second, paper books are yesterday.

        There are many online libraries where you can download good books. And if you have a reader in FB format, you can always configure the program as it suits you. My laptop is set up so that I have an open book in front of my eyes. This is especially convenient when you're sick.
        1. bastard
          bastard 21 May 2016 08: 12
          0
          Quote: Amurets
          . My laptop is set up so that before my eyes an open book. This is especially convenient when you are sick.

          I wish you good health, dear man. And never get sick!
      2. bastard
        bastard 20 May 2016 18: 31
        +1
        Quote: Kenneth
        . . . then paper books are yesterday.

        In electronic versions there is an opportunity to make the "necessary" edits, in paper editions this opportunity is only available when the book is republished.
        Once I bought Ershov in the "Little Humpbacked Horse" store, came home and started reading I was very surprised, because about 20% of the text was missing (I know by heart), at the end of the book there was a note "with abbreviations". What for? After all, there is every bast in a line.
        Pushkin's tale "About the priest and Balda" was republished at the insistence of the churchmen under the title "The Tale of the Merchant and His Worker Balda". They were completely morose. The trial version was released 2 or 3 years ago with a circulation of 5000 copies.
        But the electronic version is easier to fix.
        No matter how democrat-rekhvormators got to the "Tale of a Real Man" and vulgarized the feat of will and spirit. For some reason, they do it best.
        1. Alex
          Alex 20 May 2016 23: 01
          +3
          Yes, it’s not about which option - paper or electronic - is better. IMHO, everyone has both advantages and disadvantages. The problem is that the current generation does not read in principle, they are able to absorb only a video series, and even that is not too stressful. A couple of people per hundred - as a pleasant exception, which only emphasizes the general grayness.
  8. Kenneth
    Kenneth 20 May 2016 08: 25
    +7
    Sir Douglas Robert Stuart Bader (Douglas Robert Steuart Bader; February 21, 1910 - September 5, 1982) - Colonel of the Royal Air Force of Great Britain (FAC), as World War II. Lost both legs in a plane crash, but continued to fly and participated in the fighting. He won 20 personal victories, 4 in the group, 6 personal unconfirmed, one group unconfirmed and damaged 11 enemy aircraft.
    1. Spitfire
      Spitfire 20 May 2016 09: 27
      0
      Quote: Kenneth
      Sir Douglas Robert Stuart Bader (Douglas Robert Steuart Bader; February 21, 1910 - September 5, 1982) - Colonel of the Royal Air Force of Great Britain (FAC), as World War II. Lost both legs in a plane crash, but continued to fly and participated in the fighting. He won 20 personal victories, 4 in the group, 6 personal unconfirmed, one group unconfirmed and damaged 11 enemy aircraft.


      Paul Brickhill "The Legless Ace". Very easy to read, I recommend it.
      1. Kenneth
        Kenneth 20 May 2016 10: 55
        -6
        Read. Particularly struck by a completely chivalrous relationship with the enemy. Unlike what was happening between the USSR and Germany.
      2. 1rl141
        1rl141 20 May 2016 12: 53
        +6
        Quote: Spitfire
        Quote: Kenneth
        Sir Douglas Robert Stuart Bader (Douglas Robert Steuart Bader; February 21, 1910 - September 5, 1982) - Colonel of the Royal Air Force of Great Britain (FAC), as World War II. Lost both legs in a plane crash, but continued to fly and participated in the fighting. He won 20 personal victories, 4 in the group, 6 personal unconfirmed, one group unconfirmed and damaged 11 enemy aircraft.


        Paul Brickhill "The Legless Ace". Very easy to read, I recommend it.


        And this Sir Douglas crawled 18 days through the forest? Or was his heroism that he flew without legs? So he was not the only one. Recommend reading to English readers about Maresyev. I wonder what they will tell you?
        1. Amurets
          Amurets 20 May 2016 16: 16
          +3
          Quote: 1rl141
          And this Sir Douglas crawled 18 days through the forest? Or was his heroism that he flew without legs? So he was not the only one. Recommend reading to English readers about Maresyev. I wonder what they will tell you?

          I just want to add Zakhar Sorokin. I won’t add anything else. On the day of the anniversary of A. Maresyev it’s not ethical, just give a link.
          http://publ.lib.ru/ARCHIVES/S/SOROKIN_Zahar_Artemovich/_Sorokin_Z.A..html#001
        2. Kenneth
          Kenneth 20 May 2016 17: 23
          -4
          We appreciate Maresyev for the heroism of the pilot who returned to duty after serious injuries. The way in which he survived relates to his desire to live, and of course surprisingly. But by the way, the story of filming with DiCaprio is quite real and American
          Which sailed a month and a half on a rubber boat in the Pacific Ocean is also real
          1. Alexey RA
            Alexey RA 20 May 2016 18: 45
            -1
            Quote: Kenneth
            But by the way, the story of filming with DiCaprio is quite real and American
            Which sailed a month and a half on a rubber boat in the Pacific Ocean is also real

            I remember the story of the Stephen Hopkins transport crew: after their ship was killed in a battle with the Stir (causing fatal damage), 19 civilian and naval sailors who survived went on a boat with a minimum supply of food and water to the shores of Brazil ... 2200 miles in 31 days. Of the 19 people, 15 survived.
    2. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 20 May 2016 16: 26
      +1
      Quote: Kenneth
      Sir Douglas Robert Stuart Bader (Douglas Robert Steuart Bader; February 21, 1910 - September 5, 1982) - Colonel of the Royal Air Force of Great Britain (FAC), as World War II. Lost both legs in a plane crash, but continued to fly and participated in the fighting.

      To be precise, he lost both legs in an accident in 1931. Then he restored the form and submitted documents for restoration in flight. Bader was refused - and fired in the reserve. Then he decided to go on the other side, and in 1937 returned to the RAF to a ground position. And already from it, in 1939, he moved to the cockpit of a fighter. smile
  9. dsm100
    dsm100 20 May 2016 08: 36
    +6
    People who are ready to sacrifice themselves for the sake of their homeland have been and will always be, a lot of examples can be given. Alexander Prokhorenko heroically died in Syria. Bright memory to him.
  10. Arktidianets
    Arktidianets 20 May 2016 09: 12
    +5
    As a child, I read a story about a real man ten times, Maresyev for me, and then and now, a model of the Real Man.
  11. alexej123
    alexej123 20 May 2016 09: 42
    +11
    This is what many schoolchildren who studied in the USSR know. 18.05.2016/9/9, at the TK "Zvezda", host A. Marshall, I saw the program for Maresyev. I did not know such facts. It turns out that in many ways, thanks to Maresyev, we now have a holiday on MAY XNUMX, we have a monument to the Unknown Soldier in the Alexander Garden, we are proud of our ancestors. After all, a person PASSED this memory with his character. Under Khrushchev, MAY XNUMX went to NO. Maresyev and his associates walked through high offices and argued that there should be a national holiday and a military parade. The holiday was returned to the people. May the Russian Land be in peace to him.
  12. Vladimir
    Vladimir 20 May 2016 10: 03
    +6
    As a child, he also liked to read books about the war, at that time there were no tablets and other gizmos, but I always give preference to a paper book, as it is more natural. Bright memory to the real heroes.
  13. Volga Cossack
    Volga Cossack 20 May 2016 10: 32
    +5
    Great person! Great Tale! And from the school program - removed ..... I think it is wrong!
  14. Vodrak
    Vodrak 20 May 2016 11: 30
    +4
    And in the nineties on May 9, the administration gave him socks .... what kind of people are we ...
  15. RuslanNN
    RuslanNN 20 May 2016 11: 41
    +6
    The story of a real person is one of his favorite books from childhood. Now he gave the eldest son to read - read one, then with the youngest. When they learned that this is a real story about a real person, they were shocked. Children should read more of these books instead of computer toys.
  16. sibiryk
    sibiryk 20 May 2016 11: 48
    +5
    The book "The Story of a REAL MAN" read in childhood, made an indelible impression, predetermined the future fate and choice of profession, became a military man.
  17. Verdun
    Verdun 20 May 2016 12: 10
    +2
    Previously, he loved to visit Marfino near Moscow, where the Air Force sanatorium is located, the same in which the hero of the book "The Story of a Real Man" learned to dance "the lady". Maresyev was a truly amazing person. A good pilot, an ace in the parameters of any Air Force. An example for anyone who does not want to put up with difficulties. Here is just a small comment to the author. The article contains a photo of the Yak-9 aircraft. Before being wounded, Maresyev flew on the I-16, and after that, as part of the 63rd GUIAP, on the La-5.
  18. Gamdlislyam
    Gamdlislyam 20 May 2016 12: 19
    +3
    Article plus.
    But, here in the photo (in the article) Yak-9.
    Yak-1 in the winter 41 - 42, for the most part they flew on skis, had no radio stations.

  19. pavelty
    pavelty 20 May 2016 12: 25
    +5
    Yes, nails would have to be made of these people ... I saw him, when he was still alive, at an orthopedic plant in Moscow, such an unremarkable guy, but with a hero star, if you hadn’t told who it is, you would not have understood
  20. rus-5819
    rus-5819 20 May 2016 13: 54
    +5
    Quote: Volga Cossack
    alas removed ......... the question is why?


    Doesn't fit into the "modern" Bologna education system, reformers are shitty!
    1. Verdun
      Verdun 20 May 2016 14: 50
      +5
      Does not fit into the "modern" Bologna education system
      I'm afraid this is different. After all, as Boris Polevoy wrote, the hero of the book was a "Soviet man".
  21. tolancop
    tolancop 20 May 2016 14: 01
    +10
    Quote: alstr
    At one time, I read that about 50 people in the SA, except Maresyev, fought with various injuries from lack of limbs to fractures. Unfortunately, few of them received the title of GHS, although by the very fact - they deserve this title.
    Of course, the story played a great role in the fate of Maresyev.

    From my point of view, Maresyev performed not one feat, but two. And somehow it is customary to recall the second - return to duty after amputation of the legs. And not just in operation, but for flight work. Feat? Without any doubt!!! But his first feat somehow appeared in the shadow of the second. In winter, with mutilated legs, without food and without a great chance of success for 18 days, getting to your own without giving up - IMHO The feat (that is, with a capital letter) is no less than a subsequent return to duty. In addition to Maresyev, pilots without limbs were in the war, but there were no more like Maresyev, IMHO. And he deserved the title of GSS in full.
  22. The point
    The point 20 May 2016 15: 12
    +5
    In Komsomolsk-on-Amur, there is a monument to the Hero.
    And on Victory Day, a flight was made to solder about Maresyev. [Media = http: //www.dvnovosti.ru/komsomolsk/2016/05/09/50223/]
    [media = http: //www.dvnovosti.ru/khab/2016/05/20/50708/]
  23. yuriy55
    yuriy55 20 May 2016 16: 54
    +6
    Throughout his life, he proved that the book The Tale of a Real Man is not a colorful myth, but a real story that tells about the great courage and unrivaled strength of spirit of this man.


    You can’t say better! good
  24. V.ic
    V.ic 20 May 2016 18: 03
    +1
    Not an icon, but a MAN!
  25. Prometey
    Prometey 20 May 2016 21: 12
    +1
    Great person. After reading the book in childhood, I had no other heroes.
  26. Rubon
    Rubon 21 May 2016 03: 58
    +1
    My class teacher knew Maresyev personally, brought photos, talked about him. I remembered this from childhood. Russian character!
    1. alexej123
      alexej123 21 May 2016 20: 59
      +1
      Yes, in the school curriculum there was also a story for the tanker "Russian character" in my opinion. When, after being wounded, the burned man returned home, and his parents did not recognize him. Mother only felt with her heart that it was her son. Great times, Great People.