Military Review

History of tank helmet

32
One of the most recognizable elements of a tanker's military uniform is tank helmet, gradually turned into a headset. Such hats always perform the same functions: protecting the tanker from injuries and providing communications, but historically, tank helmets have had quite strong structural and visual differences. Moreover, the prototypes of the first tank helmets in different countries were completely different hats.


The first tanks appeared on the battlefields only during the First World War. It is worth noting that these iron monsters were not distinguished by their special manufacturability, and it’s not even necessary to speak about the comfort of the work of their crew members. The service of the first tankers was, to put it mildly, uncomfortable. The tightness, exhaust fumes, the heat from the engine, the smell of fuel, strong shaking when driving - this is just a small list of what the first tankmen had to face. In case of contact with the tank, the crew could easily lose sight due to small fragments and hot metal splashes. And the usual domestic injury, hitting his head in an awkward movement, could be obtained in a tank standing in place. Since the formidable fighting vehicles appeared on the battlefield at the height of the war, there was simply no special uniform for tankers. Initially, they were supplied with what was at hand. In England, for tankers, the already existing infantry helmet Mk.I was specially upgraded, because of its form, it is known in the common people as a "bowl".

This helmet was made of an alloy of steel and manganese; for this reason, the first English helmets practically did not magnetise, and they were only one size. The thickness of the steel used was 0,9 mm, the weight of the helmet Mk.I - 950 grams. This helmet was fitted with a balaclava, which was made of waxed fabric, under which a rope net was attached, intended to regulate the size of the balaclava. The cap comforter itself was fastened with the help of one riveting, which was located in the central part of the dome of the helmet. An antiseptic cotton lining was attached to the dome from the inside, which was designed to absorb sweat. Initially, helmets were painted in khaki color, occasionally camouflaged on him in field conditions, later on helmets of soldiers of auxiliary units began to be painted in dark blue or black. With 1916, sand was added to the paint during dyeing in order to eliminate unnecessary shine.

Mk.I Cruise 2


In June 1916, the Military Department Eye Protection Committee, specially created under the Department of Supply, created a new version of the Cruise 1 (Cruise I) helmet, which was named after the head of this committee, Captain Richard Cruise. A special feature of this helmet was a thick chain mail mask with small cells. This mask was attached to the helmet on a special wire shackle. To fix it, it was attached with a chain either to the chin strap, which the soldier in this case should have thrown under the back of the head, or to the back of the fields of the helmet itself. Initially, this helmet was designed for the needs of the trench warfare; signallers and gunners were supposed to arm themselves with it, but the helmet was also useful for the first tank crews. In 1917, an improved helmet version was released, called the Cruz-2. In it the chain mail mask was supplemented with a special lever-jamb. A small-looking detail performed two functions at once: in the combat position, this nose pane prevented the tanker's skin from contacting the metal, and during a gas attack or if inside the tank it became just impossible to breathe due to smoke and powder burning, the crew of the combat vehicle put on gas masks and This lever-nose fixed a chain mail mask on the outer part of the helmet.

In France, they also began to develop a tank helmet on the basis of a conventional infantry model, taking the infantry helmet of the Auguste Louis Adrian system 1915 of the year as a basis. It is worth noting that Adrin’s helmet became one of the most famous symbols of the entire First World War. It was widely used not only in the French army, but also in dozens of other countries that included it in the equipment of their soldiers, among these countries was Russia. This helmet was made from steel sheet 0,7 mm thick, and its weight was usually 700-800 grams, varying depending on the size, of which there were three, in contrast to the only size of the English helmet Mk.I.

History of tank helmet
Adrian's tank helmet, model 1917 of the year


The decision to develop a helmet directly for tankers was made by Adrian in September 1917. Working on a new version of his helmet, he replaced the front visor, securing in its place a thick shock roller, which was made of dark leather. Also, an emblem of assault artillery appeared on the helmet (from October 1917, a knightly helmet of the Arme type, which was put on crossed cannon barrels). The chin strap, thick shock absorber and petal sub-sole were made of brown leather. These helmets were painted in a dark blue color - "the color of the horizon."

Complete with Adrian’s tank helmet of the 1917 model, from which it wasn’t taken, there were drivers or aviation glasses. However, in order to protect the face, some tankers clung to the helmet a special leather or steel mask with goggles, blinds and a chain mail “beard,” French tankers from the First World War borrowed these masks from foot soldiers. In the infantry, they were often used by observers in the trenches. The masks were designed to protect tankers from small bullet fragments, chips from the inside of the armor and lead spray. This was necessary, since the German infantry from the beginning of the use of steel monsters on the battlefield began to concentrate machine-gun fire on the open viewing slots of the tanks. For this reason, injuries to the face and eyes accounted for a significant percentage of injuries to members of tank crews. At the same time, both English and French tankers during the First World War often went into battle in gas masks, regardless of whether the enemy conducted a gas attack or not.



In our country, finding a person who would not know what a tanker's helmet looks like is practically unrealistic today, if we are not talking about small children. It is difficult to say why it was such a silhouette and form that was chosen for the tank helmet in the Soviet Union. It is only known that the familiar tank helmet appeared as early as 1934, while it underwent a number of upgrades before World War II. The Soviet tankmen met the war in a helmet of the 1938 model of the year. The aviation equipment of the aviation type helmet was started to be equipped only at the end of 1942 of the year, after which it was renamed the headset, and the common version of the tank helmet received the nickname “talking hat”.

According to the technical conditions of 1938, several variants of helmets for Soviet tank crews were envisaged - leather, covered with kersey, kersey and fur. The skin helmet of the tanker was sewn from a black shevret, a dark blue bike was used as a lining. From the forehead to the back of the head on the helmet there were three rollers that served as shock absorbers, in the front part there was a headrest. From the sides of the helmet there was either one roller, which was sewn in the center, or three, located in a fan. An essential element of the Soviet tank helmet were valves that were designed to protect the tanker's ears. All rollers or ribs were filled with horsehair; in later models of helmets, technical fibers were used for this purpose. Already during World War II, radio equipment began to be placed in the enlarged sinuses and special pockets on the helmet flaps (oval cups of laryngophones and telephones, as well as connecting cords). The Soviet headset, as in fact, practically the entire Soviet military machine was distinguished by a certain conservatism, for this reason for almost 80 years of its existence the tank helmet did not undergo any particular changes.

Red Army Tank Helmet, model 1936 of the year




In the USA, they only thought about creating their own tank helmet in 1938. According to the technical specifications, it should be light and at the same time durable, have good ventilation, easy to remove and put on. Also, he had to be necessarily adapted to accommodate radio headphones. The winner of the competition for the creation of a tank helmet was the company Rawlings Manufacturing Corporation, which presented its development to 1940, which received the designation M1938. In this case, the basis of the tank helmet was taken protective headdress, which was used by athletes who play American football.

The first American tank helmet was made of compressed chemical fiber; for ventilation there were 10 holes on it. Lining the leather valves to protect the ears and the so-called "rear wing", which was attached to the helmet and was designed to protect the back of the tanker's head, were made of the same material. In the side wings of the M1938 helmet were equipped with holes for the installation of headphones. Inside the helmet was a balaclava, which was a 4 leather petal, connected at the top with a cord. This helmet did not protect the tanker from bullets and fragments, but was notable for its lightness of construction, weighed only about 500 grams. When exiting a tank, a tanker could easily put on a standard American M1 steel helmet over a tank helmet.

M1938 tank helmet


The first batches of these helmets hit the US Army by the end of 1941, and showed their best results. For this reason, the US government has decided to mass release them. By the end of the war over the release of these “half-sports freaks”, the helmet was not the most attractive outwardly, at least 4 of large corporations worked. The helmet was very popular among tankers and was even exported to Australia, the UK, China and Israel. American tankers used this helmet until the beginning of the Vietnam War.

American tankers, the film "Rage"


The German tank crews during the First World War differed little from their English or French colleagues. For head protection, they used a leather shock-absorbing helmet with protective rollers, which resembled those already worn by aviators, or simplified versions, which in their form resembled the helmets of British infantry. In order to protect their face, they used metal and leather masks with slits for the eyes, which were usually covered with canned glasses. Also a mail beard could be attached to this mask, which was supposed to protect the neck area of ​​the tankman from splinters. In such a vestment, the German tanker was a rather awesome sight.

Curiously, during the Second World War, German tankers did not use helmets. In this case, a protective headdress, created before the war, they had, in fact, representing an ordinary beret. The German tank helmet consisted of two parts: a large soft beret and a balaclava, which directly fitted the head. The beret was worn over the padded balaclava on the oilcloth lining and closely fitted to the balaclava. The cap comforter was covered with black wool.

German tankers on the background of the tank "Tiger"


Already during the campaign in Poland, only the caps covered the head of the German tankers. The reason for the refusal of the Germans from helmets is still the subject of fierce disputes between experts and amateurs. According to one of the versions, the pre-war German tank helmets simply did not fit in with the radio equipment that the German tank units relied on very seriously from the very beginning of World War II. According to another version, the German tanks were quite spacious and comfortable, so head protection was not required. Anyway, for the entire period of the war in Pancervafe, no special headgear was worn, which tankers would wear in a tank. There is evidence that the development of a tank helmet was carried out in Germany in 1940, but the matter did not go further than the experimental samples.

Curious and curious is the fact that in some Soviet films, which were devoted to the events of World War II, German tankers are depicted in tank helmets, while in each film they are different. One of the most striking examples was the four-part film “Blockade”. Because of ignorance or misunderstanding, how can you manage a formidable fighting vehicle without protecting your head, the whole film was used by German tankers to wear helmets similar to the Italian ones, which were used by allies of the Nazis during the war: Italians, Romanians, Hungarians. These helmets from the film themselves, apparently, were fiberglass helmets for motorcycling, painted black.

German tanker in the film “Blockade” or when military consultants sleep


If we talk about Italian tank helmets, then by the beginning of the 1930-s, tankers of this country were wearing aviation helmets. However, in 1935, the army received a new helmet, designated M1935. The dome of this helmet was made of fibers and leather-covered on top. The fields of the helmet were laid with a special roller, which was filled with technical cotton, the roller was supposed to serve to quench the force of impact. Unlike many other tank helmets of those years, the Italian helmet lacked wings on the sides and rear. Instead, there was a rectangular piece of leather that was sewn to a helmet like a raincoat. Italian tankers usually covered their eyes with aviation glasses.

The Italian tank helmet was distinguished by its simplicity of design and technological solutions, but it proved to be quite good. Moreover, the M1935 tank helmet became one of the few that later migrated from the tank and other types of troops. For example, in the Italian army it was considered normal practice when amphibious units were equipped with tank helmets. Later, police officers began to wear it as a headdress. This tank helmet continued to serve the Italian military almost unchanged until the 1960-s. During this time, he managed to serve as a prototype for the creation of tank helmets in several European countries. For example, in Hungary, this helmet was modified by replacing the side air vents with mounts for communications.

Italian tankers during the Second World War


Italian tankers during the Second World War


The Japanese tank helmet of the 1938 model of the year was unusual, but perhaps it looked better than many Japanese tanks, which are difficult to call awkward as otherwise. This tank helmet was a cork hemispherical frame, which was covered with cotton cotton cloth from above. The fabric cover of the helmet formed six triangular patches that were sewn together. In the upper part of the dome, where the flaps of fabric met, there was a single vent hole. This tank helmet, like the American one, was reminiscent of sports, representing a militarized likeness of a “jockey helmet”. A textile pentagonal star was placed in the front lower part of the helmet on a sewn cloth pentagonal cockade.

On the tanker's head, the helmet was held using a leather chinstrap and two valves, to which radio communications could be mounted. Despite the simplicity of its appearance, the insides of the Japanese helmet were very interesting and were quite effective, evenly distributing the impact energy. Eight sectors of the petals of the skin, four on each side, in the center were connected to each other with the help of lacing. The depth of the head position in the helmet could be adjusted using a cord that passed through the holes in the sectors. Like other WWII tank helmets, he could not protect his owner from bullets or shrapnel, while the Japanese helmet also had no structural protection for the ears and neck.

Japanese tank helmet


Japanese tankers near their tanks



Information sources:
http://warspot.ru/2527-dlya-teh-kto-v-tanke
http://tanki.kruzzz.com/ekipirovka-francuzskix-tankistov
http://www.helmets.ru/cat_uk.htm
http://www.ugv.su/obmundirovanije/tankisty.php
http://karopka.ru/forum/forum173/topic426
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  1. qwert
    qwert 1 March 2016 06: 56 New
    19
    It is a pity in the article there is no photo of the Soviet LEATHER helmet of the thirties.
    He can be seen and seen well in the 1935 film Hot Days. By the way, I recommend this film to tank lovers. It contains many frames from the T-26 modifications of 1931 and 1935, as well as the BT-2. Everything is close-up and in crowd scenes. Tankers mostly in hard leather helmets
    1. bandabas
      bandabas 1 March 2016 15: 22 New
      0
      Yes, yes the scenes are soooooo massive. And the faces of the tankers are joyful and inspired. Honestly, I accidentally watched a couple of days on TV back. But you can find the same on the network. There is on the same wiki. smile
    2. moskowit
      moskowit 1 March 2016 18: 36 New
      +1
      Another very interesting emblems introduced in the 1922 year.
    3. Litsvin
      Litsvin 1 March 2016 21: 38 New
      +3
      Leather helmets remembered - this is "+". I don’t remember exactly, but it seems that in this film old-style leather helmets were used, which were "transferred" to the tank troops from the aviation, perhaps slightly modified. In turn, these samples of helmets fell into the Soviet aviation from the uniforms of the countries of the former Entente.

      But there is another film - "In war, as in war." There our tanker-colonel is shown wearing a "non-statutory" ribbed leather helmet of the classic Soviet cut. Looks nice. So, perhaps such helmets were really produced by our industry and supplied to the troops - I don't know for sure. But my grandfather, a tanker, told me that when they took American Lend-Lease diesel Sherman tanks, a lot of interesting things went to the tank ("spare parts", canisters do not count) - handbags for personal belongings of tankers, various soap wing accessories (from soap to unseen "Gillette" razors in our country), dressing bags, flasks, pots, forks, spoons, penknives (!!!), etc. Those. the American tank was originally completed "inside and out" - as ready-made housing for tankers. But most importantly, there were sturdy, sturdy short leather cloaks. Not everyone ran to this "good" - commanders of various levels were the first to "buy". The rest, if they did not have time to steal the clothes, went to the crews. So, my grandfather also got such a raincoat somehow. Our craftsmen immediately cut off the floors in such raincoats and made a "jacket" out of the raincoat - a very convenient and practical thing, strong, waterproof, easy to clean from oil contamination. But the rest of the leather went to the "restyling" of our Soviet ribbed tank helmets. Craftsmen simply sheathed them with this American leather, it was worth tinkering, but the result was. Somewhere relatives even have a photo of my grandfather in such "leather" clothes "a la Lend-Lease" near the new "Sherman" with an unpainted white American star in a circle.

      In general, of course, our Soviet ribbed black tank helmet is one of our Russian symbols of Victory. It is recognizable by everyone. By the way, in the warships of our Navy in the 70-80s, these tank helmets were also used.
  2. The comment was deleted.
  3. Volga Cossack
    Volga Cossack 1 March 2016 07: 21 New
    +2
    wow - native Talking Hat !!!!))))) thanks for the article!
    1. Evgen_Vasilich
      Evgen_Vasilich 1 March 2016 08: 40 New
      14
      which is typical, they say: "when you find a corner with your head, he, a female dog, has to be right between the edges of the helmet!")))
  4. Stas57
    Stas57 1 March 2016 07: 38 New
    +6
    but during the eastern company they, the berets, practically did not wear
    1. Stas57
      Stas57 1 March 2016 07: 43 New
      +4

      One of the most striking examples was the four-part film "Blockade."

      Well, Soviet cinema is generally hell for a uniformologist.

      Here is a typical photo from the Eastern Front.
    2. Aleksandr72
      Aleksandr72 1 March 2016 08: 00 New
      13
      This tanker’s beret from the Germans was officially called schutzmutze - juttsmütze, literally translated as a protective cap.
      The black protective beret (shootsmütze) was used by Wehrmacht tankers from the beginning of the 30s until the campaign to the East. Subsequently, the crew cap of tanks and self-propelled guns was almost everywhere ousted by a pilot, and he lasted the longest time among the crews of armored vehicles and as a front headdress. The beret was appropriately shaped by its soft upper part, under which was a felt comforter with a black cloth lining and 6 felt pillows covered with oilcloth.
      The cap comforter had 6 rubberized air vents and a leather goggle. The same, but the gray beret was at the beginning of the war in assault self-propelled artillery. I must say that according to the memoirs of German tankers this takes was not popular with them.
      Personally, I was always amazed at how German panzerzoldaten dispensed in their armor without protective hats - on the head there were only a cap and headphones and no other protection of the head from blows against armor that were inevitable inside the tank (especially in battle).
      And this is a modern Russian tanker in a helmet with a protective cover from the "cowboy" set:
      1. Stas57
        Stas57 1 March 2016 11: 38 New
        12
        but the berets went well to crosses
    3. Litsvin
      Litsvin 1 March 2016 21: 46 New
      0
      Funny guys from Panzerfaffen. If it were not for the "Adlers" on the beret and "skulls" on the tunics, I would definitely think - the French state people! laughing
    4. killganoff
      killganoff 1 March 2016 22: 31 New
      -3
      Are you the photo of your grandfather posted?
  5. bionik
    bionik 1 March 2016 08: 32 New
    10
    There is evidence that the development of a tank helmet was carried out in Germany in 1940, but the matter did not go further than experimental models.German experimental tank helmet.
    1. alpamys
      alpamys 1 March 2016 10: 45 New
      +1
      Quote: bionik
      There is evidence that the development of a tank helmet was carried out in Germany in 1940, but the matter did not go further than experimental models.German experimental tank helmet.

      hell of a hat laughing
  6. pts-m
    pts-m 1 March 2016 08: 41 New
    0
    Interesting article. Cognitive. And then how it turns out ... you put on uniforms, and you only know the name of this thing.
  7. bionik
    bionik 1 March 2016 08: 46 New
    +8
    At first, the only headdress to wear with a black uniform was a black beret.
    But this headgear was not popular among tankers. Most tankers preferred to wear ordinary field-colored field caps with a pink corner as a headdress (troops. Tanker color). Even during the Polish company, black caps appeared, which were made by tankers privately and in cut were similar to standard Wehrmacht caps. By order of 27 on March 1940, wearing a beret was canceled and the black cap was officially introduced as the only headdress for the black uniform. such a cap was similar in design to the combined arms, but it was made of black fabric, the imperial eagle and the three-colored cockade were embroidered on black linings, on the pilot's cap, a colored corner of the military color was worn over the three-colored cockade.
  8. Dimon-chik-79
    Dimon-chik-79 1 March 2016 10: 33 New
    +7
    Very interesting article! Thanks!
    1. alpamys
      alpamys 1 March 2016 10: 47 New
      +1
      Quote: Dimon-chik-79
      Very interesting article! Thanks!

      what kind of chicken, from the mid 30s or a parody?
      1. saygon66
        saygon66 1 March 2016 18: 51 New
        +1
        - This is the motorcycle helmet of the National Socialist Driver's Corps (I can not vouch for the accuracy of the translation). It existed from 1931 to 1945gg.
      2. The comment was deleted.
    2. flSergius
      flSergius 1 March 2016 11: 03 New
      +1
      Dimon-chik-79, in your photo a helmet of the 1930s, and an article about tank.
      1. WUA 518
        WUA 518 1 March 2016 21: 03 New
        +2
        Quote: flSergius
        1930s helmet, and an article about tank helmets.

        Is not a fact. Here is the helmet of the National Socialist Transport Corps 1934
        1. The comment was deleted.
        2. saygon66
          saygon66 1 March 2016 21: 09 New
          +4
          - Like, here ...
          -And there are a couple more options ...
          1. WUA 518
            WUA 518 1 March 2016 21: 19 New
            +3
            Quote: saygon66
            Like, here ...

            Exactly Konstantin. For these members of the corps was a dagger.
            1. saygon66
              saygon66 1 March 2016 21: 35 New
              +1
              - Dagger SA, over there and the emblem is embedded ... You think it has to do with NSKK! Damn offtop went ... smile
              1. WUA 518
                WUA 518 1 March 2016 22: 04 New
                +4
                Quote: saygon66
                SA dagger, over and emblem embedded ...
                Until May 1936, the National Socialist Motorized Corps did not have any of its official weapons. Even after separation from the attack aircraft, all its members were given a standard SA dagger, and the uniform of the organizations also coincided. To correct the situation, the commander of the motor corps Adolf Hanlein issued an order dated May 19, 1936, which introduced a new type of uniform: a brown top, which coincides with the uniforms of attack aircraft, and a black bottom, like that of SS fighters. In the same order, it was prescribed to change the scabbard to similar, but black, so scabbards repainted from old ones are often found. The new dagger was distributed in exactly the same way as the old one: through official representations of various firms and companies producing cold steel.

                The dagger blade is straight, double-edged, tetrahedral, without valleys; the inscription "Alles für Deutschland" ("Everything for Germany") is etched on the obverse of the blade in Gothic script.

                Using
                The standard NSKK dagger model of 1933 was worn by all members of the motor case. After the introduction of the dagger of the 1936 model, the dagger of the old model remained in service, provided that its scabbard had to be painted black. The dagger was in service until the dissolution of the NSKK in 1945.
                1. saygon66
                  saygon66 1 March 2016 22: 08 New
                  +1
                  - The stigma of RZM - an office that issued paraphernalia and awards?
                2. The comment was deleted.
            2. The comment was deleted.
  9. Fitter65
    Fitter65 1 March 2016 11: 08 New
    0
    I liked the article. It’s just that I pressed something, it’s not like I wanted to plus for it, but it turned out to be a turn
  10. Grigorievich
    Grigorievich 1 March 2016 11: 24 New
    +1
    Quote: bionik
    At first, the only headdress to wear with a black uniform was a black beret.
    But this headgear was not popular among tankers. Most tankers preferred to wear ordinary field-colored field caps with a pink corner as a headdress (troops. Tanker color). Even during the Polish company, black caps appeared, which were made by tankers privately and in cut were similar to standard Wehrmacht caps. By order of 27 on March 1940, wearing a beret was canceled and the black cap was officially introduced as the only headdress for the black uniform. such a cap was similar in design to the combined arms, but it was made of black fabric, the imperial eagle and the three-colored cockade were embroidered on black linings, on the pilot's cap, a colored corner of the military color was worn over the three-colored cockade.

    Since the 43, did the German army switch from caps to caps, but did the tankmen transfer, or remained in the canvases?
    1. bionik
      bionik 1 March 2016 11: 32 New
      +3
      Quote: Grigorievich

      Since the 43, did the German army switch from caps to caps, but did the tankmen transfer, or remained in the canvases?

      In 1943, a field cap was introduced in the whole Wehrmacht as a single headdress, and this order did not bypass the tankmen.
      The tank cap of the tankers did not differ from the combined arms, but was made of black fabric, the eagle and cockade were embroidered on a black trapezoidal valve, and a silver flagellum was sewn along the seam of the officer’s cap. Although the caps were very popular among tankers, the cap, which they continued to wear until the last day of the war, could not be forced out.
      1. saygon66
        saygon66 1 March 2016 12: 49 New
        +5
        - The visor in the tank interfered! The long was- 9cm! The pilot turned out to be a convenient thing altogether ... both sailors and submariners wore it ... Ours, by the way, also ...
      2. The comment was deleted.
    2. Stas57
      Stas57 1 March 2016 11: 37 New
      +2
      Quote: Grigorievich
      Since the 43, did the German army switch from caps to caps, but did the tankmen transfer, or remained in the canvases?
  11. otto meer
    otto meer 1 March 2016 16: 19 New
    +4
    Quote: bionik
    Although the caps were very popular among tankers, the cap, which they continued to wear until the last day of the war, could not be forced out.
    I don't remember who, I think Carius, who Otto, read that the cap was considered a special chic among tankers. The officers were also highly respected and wore instead of the "soft cap". And they did not switch to caps because, like cool, old-fashioned, like a seasoned manshaft!
    By the way, one uncle, an experienced tanker, called the speaking hat Tankoslem and in no other way, said that it was only so right! And who speaks differently linden tankers and fuel oils did not smell! soldier
    1. Litsvin
      Litsvin 1 March 2016 21: 55 New
      +1
      Yes, that's exactly what they call "ribbed" - "T A N K O SH L EM".
      By the way, German crews of captured captured Soviet tanks often fought in our tank helmets. There are many similar photographs, where German tankers in their tank uniforms "scurry" around the captured T-34s, and our tank helmets were wearing them.
  12. pacific
    pacific 1 March 2016 23: 43 New
    +4
    Quote: Litsvin
    By the way, in the warships of our Navy in the 70-80 years, these tank helmets were also used.

    True, used. First of all, at the open combat posts of the MZA (small-caliber anti-aircraft artillery). Why come up with something when there is a ready-made device that will provide communication and ears from the roar and wind will cover.
    I didn’t see it myself, but they said that they were also used on small artillery ships (MAKs). Well, on these boats tank towers stood as the main armament.