Military Review

Japanese Komatsu Type 96 armored personnel carrier

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Japanese Type 96 armored personnel carrier armed with an M12,7 HB 2-mm machine gun

For many years, Japanese self-defense forces have been armed with mainly tracked vehicles, in addition to the Komatsu Type 87 6x6 reconnaissance vehicle and the Type 82 6x6 operating control vehicle, which have a high level of uniformity. The production of both of these options is complete. As in the case of the rest of the Japanese armored vehicles, Japan did not sell their cars abroad.

The main contractor for the Type 96 armored personnel carrier is Komatsu Defense Systems Division, which also developed and manufactured the Type 87 6x6 reconnaissance and patrol vehicle, which is still in operation.

The first production Type 96 BTRs were manufactured in the 1995 year, roughly 55 machines were made by the end of the 1999 year, and since then production continued with an annual volume from 31 machines in the 2003 year to 14 machines in the 2004 year. According to estimates, from the beginning of deliveries to the 2009, about 270 Type 96 machines were supplied, but in 2010, 17 machines were manufactured and 2011 11 machines in the year. In total, 322 machines have been manufactured in all years.

The BN Type 96 all-welded hull is made of armored steel, the engine-transmission compartment is located in front of the left. The exhaust pipe of the exhaust system is located on the left side of the hull roof.

The driver is located in front of the right, he has a hatch with a solid cover that opens back and three day periscopes for the front view. The central periscope can be replaced by an illumination periscope for driving at night.




The commander / gunner sits behind the driver, he has a raised turret with daytime periscopes for all-round visibility, the hatch cover opens back. In front of the turret installed 12,7-mm machine gun M2 HB, from which it is possible to aim and shoot from inside the turrets. Later, some machines were equipped with a locally produced 40-mm automatic grenade launcher.

The troop compartment is located in the rear part of the vehicle, eight paratroopers land and disembark through the aft ramp with a power drive. On the roof of the troop compartment, there are five hatches that open outwards, two on the right and three on the left. On each side of the troop compartment there are at least two fire embrasures and corresponding viewing instruments.

On the roof of the troop compartment closer to the stern on each side are installed four forward-facing smoke grenade launchers.

Standard equipment of the machine includes power steering on the front four wheels, a centralized wheel inflation system that allows the driver to adjust pressure depending on the type of terrain to be overcome, a system of protection against weapons of mass destruction and a laser warning system installed in the front left. A similar system is installed on other Japanese armored vehicles, for example tanks Type 90.

Option RCB intelligence
Japan also developed a radiation, chemical and biological reconnaissance vehicle based on the Type 96 8x8 chassis. It is equipped with a set of sensors and sensors, as well as a meteorological station, a self-disinfecting system and an integrated air purification unit.

Specifications of Type 96 armored personnel carrier
Crew: 2 + 8
Length Overall: 6,84 M
Width, overall: 2,48 m
Height, overall: 1,85 m
Combat weight: 14500 kg
Configuration: wheel, 8x8
Engine: Mitsubishi 6D40, diesel, water cooling, 6 cylinders, hp 360
Maximum speed: 100 km / h
Power reserve: 500 km
Armament: 12,7-mm machine gun M2 HB; or
40-mm automatic grenade launcher;
8 smoke grenade launchers
Stabilization of weapons: no
Ammunition: 1000 x 12,7 mm; 650 x 40 mm; 8 smoke grenades
Night vision equipment: yes
The system of protection against weapons of mass destruction: there is





Materials used:
www.komatsu.com
www.army-technology.com
www.weaponsystems.net
www.wikipedia.org
Author:
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  1. gla172
    gla172 27 January 2016 07: 06
    +1
    It’s interesting, what kind of armor was used? And it’s kind of sleek, or just used to our 80th ...
    1. gjv
      gjv 27 January 2016 11: 17
      +1
      Quote: gla172
      I wonder what kind of armor was used?

      Details, too, did not come across. Some experts write that the body is all-welded, while others claim that the body is modular. It is not clear where exactly the loopholes are in the stern, although the Japanese claim that there are two loopholes. They only write about booking that it is average for an APC. Japan BTR does not export, but there is advertising.
      1. APASUS
        APASUS 27 January 2016 16: 49
        +2
        If I understood correctly, the soldiers were put in front of the targets in the hope that the Japanese technology would not fail and none of the "soldiers in the tower" would get a ricochet? Well, the samurai give!
        On the BRT, only the issue with mine protection arises, I have doubts, and as a drinker as a drinker!
    2. The comment was deleted.
    3. RDX
      RDX 30 January 2016 13: 03
      0
      conventional, armored vehicles, with obsolete performance characteristics
  2. Dragon-y
    Dragon-y 27 January 2016 07: 22
    +1
    It seems to me, or is it similar to "Boomerang", like a "cousin"? :)
    1. Mera joota
      Mera joota 27 January 2016 08: 34
      +1
      Quote: Dragon-y
      It seems to me, or is it similar to "Boomerang", like a "cousin"? :)

      No, Japanese is worse. No protection, windows! (rectangular!) on the sides, the seats are attached to the bottom ... The engine is probably not bad, this can not be taken from the Japanese, the rest is crap.
      1. Falcon
        Falcon 27 January 2016 09: 31
        +1
        Quote: Mera Joota
        No, Japanese is worse. No protection, windows! (rectangular!) on the sides, the seats are attached to the bottom ... The engine is probably not bad, this can not be taken from the Japanese, the rest is crap.


        Yes, hatches on top are generally plywood. Shops like on-board KAMAZ. With a mass of 14 tons, only Kalash protection is similar.
        Only ride on the armor, inside the grave.
        Probably worth it, but like two T-90 laughing
    2. gjv
      gjv 27 January 2016 11: 26
      +1
      Quote: Dragon-y
      It seems to me, or is it similar to "Boomerang", like a "cousin"? :)

      The armored personnel carriers are all alike than the brothers. Here enti eetponets not quite, but only slightly similar to the "Boomerang" tank bombaduzili.
    3. The comment was deleted.
    4. avdkrd
      avdkrd 27 January 2016 12: 51
      +1
      Quote: Dragon-y
      It seems to me, or is it similar to "Boomerang", like a "cousin"? :)

      Relationship is confirmed only by the presence of 8 wheels. A completely different approach to both booking and mobility. The Japanese do not have mine protection as a class (landing seats on a hard on). Visually welded hull, no modular armor. The mass of the Type 96 is comparable to the BTR-80 (14500kg versus 13600), and therefore the armor is hardly better, especially considering the dimensions that are almost the same as in the eighty. The phrase "12,7 mm M2 HB machine gun, from which it is possible to aim and shoot from the inside of the turret" most likely means the absence of a remote control of the weapon module, you can simply turn the machine gun from the inside manually and aim at observation devices. The presence of the Boomerang's remote control module with a 30mm cannon and an ATGM takes it to another league.
  3. inkass_98
    inkass_98 27 January 2016 07: 42
    +4
    Does he have any mine protection? The bottom is flat, the landing is sitting on the lockers. The ground clearance is high, but with the explosion of a mine under the wheel the crew will not find it enough. And such an interesting pepelats is confused only by a cap that is glazed and not covered with armor plates over the driver in the upper photo, but, as I understand it, it is removable (triplexes can be seen behind the glass).
    1. gjv
      gjv 27 January 2016 10: 51
      +1
      Quote: inkass_98
      the only thing that confuses is the cap that is glazed and not covered with armor plates over the driver in the upper photo, but, as I understand it, it is removable (triplexes are visible behind the glass).

      The Japanese took part in the Tempest in Iraq. An overhead cab was then added for better driver visibility when driving in dusty desert. The Japanese claim that the glasses are bulletproof, but the indication of the bullet resistance class did not come across.
      1. castle
        castle 27 January 2016 13: 40
        0
        Pope Assad also took part in the "Tempest" on the side of the Americans.
    2. The comment was deleted.
    3. castle
      castle 27 January 2016 14: 05
      +2
      Let's figure it out!
      This Japanese armored personnel carrier - specifically the Komatsu Type 96 - has been in service with the Japan Self-Defense Forces since 1996 (count 20 years), but if you compare it with the Boomerang, which has not yet been adopted and who knows when and if, appears, but is already considered "the best in the world", then Japanese is already working.
      What did the Russian armored personnel carriers look like "20 years ago" and what were their bottoms?
      KAMAZ 63968 "Typhoon" does not have a glass cabin?
      1. Falcon
        Falcon 27 January 2016 14: 15
        +2
        Quote: hrad
        Let's figure it out!
        This Japanese armored personnel carrier - specifically the Komatsu Type 96 - has been in service with the Japan Self-Defense Forces since 1996 (count 20 years), but if you compare it with the Boomerang, which has not yet been adopted and who knows when and if, appears, but is already considered "the best in the world", then Japanese is already working.
        What did the Russian armored personnel carriers look like "20 years ago" and what were their bottoms?
        KAMAZ 63968 "Typhoon" does not have a glass cabin?


        It's not about Boomerang.

        By its characteristics, the Japanese are no better than the BTR-80 80's of release, and even can’t swim.

        Its only plus is the Japanese engine and transmission. This cannot be taken away from them
        1. Amurets
          Amurets 27 January 2016 17: 57
          +3
          Quote: Falcon

          Its only plus is the Japanese engine and transmission. This cannot be taken away from them

          Cyril! Hello. The sad thing is that the engine and transmission were tested and refined on forestry and construction equipment in our harsh conditions. In the 70s there were training centers in Khabarovsk and Vyazemsk, and in Khabarovsk there was a sales office with a service department and warranty representatives .And the Japanese did not secretly bring equipment for the Self-Defense Forces of Japan, although at that time they rigidly complied with the constitutional provision prohibiting the sale of military equipment abroad and the use of Self-Defense Forces outside of Japan.
          1. Falcon
            Falcon 27 January 2016 19: 53
            +2
            Hail Nicholas!

            Quote: Amurets
            .In 70's there were training centers in Khabarovsk and Vyazemsk, and in Khabarovsk there was a sales office with a service department and warranty representatives.


            I have not heard this - very curious for 70's!

            But more recently, HINO trucks were tested in Khabarovsk. About two years ago. There, my friend took part. I didn’t find a photo of normal resolution - but the cars on delivery looked something like this



            He told me that they scraped all day with a crowbar. laughing
            By the way, HINO supplies trucks to the Japanese army now.

            Quote: Amurets
            at that time, they strictly complied with the constitutional provision prohibiting the sale of military equipment abroad and the use of the Self-Defense Forces outside of Japan.


            This is what bothers me the most. Now they have tweaked the constitution. Nevertheless, this is the third economy of the world, and it is right at our borders.
            1. Amurets
              Amurets 28 January 2016 00: 30
              +2
              Quote: Falcon

              I have not heard this - very curious for 70's!

              I don’t remember the exact date, but at the end a contract was signed for the supply of timber to Japan. Under this contract, the Japanese began to supply their logging equipment to the Far East. In the Dallesprom system there were two educational plants: In Khabarovsk and Vyazemsk, where they trained specialists for maintenance and repair I don’t know how the drivers and machinists had high requirements for locksmiths and mechanics. Then they faced the age and educational qualification. In those days, only Khabarovsk was practically open. I don’t know how the supply of mining equipment began. foresters was the association "Dallesimportekhnika" which dealt with all these issues. The association included all ARZ and TRZ Dallesprom. Well, somewhere like this. It takes a long time to describe all the details, but the Japanese tried to get all the units that failed, and not just the warranty ones. By the way, on new models of equipment, they also had frequent breakdowns of the units. They changed them quickly, apparently there was a stock. I will not do it, but there were also design mistakes and the impression is that the Japanese knew about them. The last time I went to BAM was in 1993. There were already new relationships and new contracts. I don’t know what happened then because I left for another organization. The warranty service and repair service collapsed. HINO division of TOYOTA at that time supplied a very small share of equipment, in mainly dump trucks. The main suppliers were Komatsu-Nissan, Mitsubishi-Fuso and Isuzu. In the segment of tractor equipment "Komatsu" and "Kato".
              1. Amurets
                Amurets 28 January 2016 01: 02
                +1
                Quote: Amurets
                The main suppliers were Komatsu-Nissan, Mitsubishi-Fuso and Isuzu. In the tractor segment Komatsu and Kato.

                The Japanese mainly made the production of logging and processing equipment for countries with warm climates (Southeast Asia, Africa and the Australian regions (Tasmania, New Zealand). The Japanese knew these regions and operating conditions. They also knew about our climate, but the experience of the Kwantung army during the years of the occupation of Manchuria, he demanded a new approach to this topic. Here the Japanese took advantage of the forest treaty. By the way, the Japanese examined all our operating materials, and then applied new filters or issued recommendations for replacement materials. By the way, we never wondered what the addition of chlorinated water to antifreeze could lead to. The effect was amazing. The cast-iron diesel unit rotted in a week. And the Japanese warned about this, but the notice did not reach us.
              2. Falcon
                Falcon 29 January 2016 09: 10
                0
                Quote: Amurets
                . All the details to describe for a long time, but the Japanese tried to get all the failed units, and not just warranty.


                Yes, a curious experience - I have not heard this.

                We needed to take an example in due time. All chances were to create competitive engines and civilian equipment.

                Quote: Amurets
                .HINO TOYOTA division at that time supplied a very small share of equipment, mainly dump trucks.


                Now they are being trained. Here's an example of an army HINO (cross between UAZ and Hamer):



                this also seems to be HINO:



                And the engines are everywhere standard civilian.
      2. avdkrd
        avdkrd 28 January 2016 00: 49
        0
        Quote: hrad
        What did the Russian armored personnel carriers look like "20 years ago" and what were their bottoms?
        KAMAZ 63968 "Typhoon" does not have a glass cabin?

        Type 96 is not correctly compared with the Boomerang, just the japs ​​have nothing else to compare with the Boomerang.
        Japanese is in the same category with the BTR-80 in weight and size, but without the ability to swim. Personally, I would prefer 80ku, and because of its buoyancy and because of more rational booking angles (especially from the sides). The advantage of the Japanese is a more powerful engine, otherwise if not worse then not better for sure. By the way, in the 90s in Russia there was Rostock, which was definitely a cut above, although it did not go into the series. The BTR-82 is the same machine in the more serious Type 96. Infantry under cover of a 30 mm gun is definitely calmer and the Russian theater is more favored by floating vehicles.
  4. tchoni
    tchoni 27 January 2016 08: 36
    +3
    It seems to me that on the whole and in general it is an analogue of our eighty, but sharpened more for transportation, with a weakened support function (which, in my opinion, is more correct)
  5. carabiner sks
    carabiner sks 27 January 2016 11: 00
    +3
    And he does not know how to swim, like our armored personnel carriers. Although for island Japan it is not out of place.
  6. crambol
    crambol 27 January 2016 11: 04
    0
    Type 96




    ... 96 ... 69 ... A familiar combination, where did I see him?


    1. castle
      castle 27 January 2016 13: 46
      -1
      It seems that you are constantly hanging on servers with forbidden combinations, it starts with the letter "p", in the sense of the basic instinct, and there is also the combination of "88"
      1. crambol
        crambol 27 January 2016 17: 36
        +1
        And how interesting do you know this?
  7. Volga Cossack
    Volga Cossack 28 January 2016 06: 48
    0
    the only thing that pleased the feed ramp ........ as well as the armored personnel carrier as the armored personnel carrier ......... well, they smiled at the window)))))