Military Review

"Purely Japanese killing!"

32
At one time, the great Russian historian Klyuchevsky said that “we all came out of the rye field”, that is, he stressed the dependence of the culture of the nation on natural conditions. Accordingly, the Japanese came out of rice, the Americans - from corn, and the French - from the vineyard! Accordingly, the equipment depends on this (the Negroes with their bananas, which equipment is needed?), And technology, and methods of warfare.


"Purely Japanese killing!"

American Tanks "Sherman" burning in the jungle.

So in the years of the Second World War, this was manifested very clearly. So, the Americans and the British in their tanks tried to provide their tankmen with convenience and comfort. For example, our tankers who fought on the British Matilda tanks were amazed that the armor of the tank was covered with spongy rubber from the inside. It was simply impossible to hit his head, that's why the British went in the same berets. We had a different approach: “What comfort? War! ”And so the tankers wore a helmet, but how else. Moreover, if it were otherwise, then the very same British and American tankers would have considered their tanks unequivocally bad, and ours simply “would not understand humor,” since they were initially accustomed to “amenities on the street.” But for Western cars this level of comfort was quite expected, and was perceived as something natural.

It is not surprising, therefore, that the Japanese tanks were just as primitive, although they were plastered with asbestos inside. Because of the heat. That is, it was a purely pragmatic campaign, but no more. Plus, a very low level of technology development. That is why, when the Japanese had to face the Anglo-American tanks face to face, they had to show a lot of ingenuity in order to cause them at least some damage in their constrained circumstances. Some of their decisions were original, others were just fun, but it was. Recently, the Japanese magazine “Armor Modeling” wrote about how the Japanese fought American tanks and, by God, it’s worth reading!


Cumulative hemp-tailed grenade "Type 3".

On traditional means of struggle, which turned out to be, however, ineffective it was already discussed - in the material “In the desert and in the jungle: Anglo-American tanks in battles and ... in the debate (part two).” Well, that's what the Japanese themselves write about what Japanese infantry used to attack American and Australian tanks.

So, to fight the tanks they had a rifle grenade caliber 40 mm, fired with a wall-mounted grenade launcher and with armor penetration 50 mm. Following the model of the German Faustpron, a RPG was created (45 mm barrel caliber, 80 mm grenade caliber) with a firing range of 30 m, capable of penetrating 100 mm armor with its grenade. Again, following the model of the German “Panzershrek”, he made a “legless” grenade launcher, caliber 70-mm and hit the 200 m. He had less penetration resistance - 80 mm. It would seem great weapon, is not it? But the fact is that all these samples appeared at the very end of the war and they simply did not have enough.


Tank "Comet" with an additional reservation of the boards.

That is why other means of struggle were used much more often ... First of all, mines! Standard Japanese anti-tank mines, too, were, like everyone. Push action. Weight 1,4 kg and 3 kg, which had a charge of explosives, respectively 900 g and 2 kg. There was a mine in a wooden case - a cubic form. Weight 3 kg, charge 2 kg. But as you can see, their power was insufficient. Therefore, the Japanese between the two boards-croaks inserted four such mines, tied it all up with ropes and buried them on the way from American tanks. That was something already! An extended charge with a weight of 4,7 kg and with a charge of 3 kg was applied on the roads, but it turned out to be ineffective. Do you know why? Because it was necessary to use it like this: tie a hand grenade to it, run out of the bushes in front of the tank and throw “it” right under the tracks!


Tank "Cairo", hit a mine.

There were also two land mines: in a wooden case and a canvas. 4-5 and 7-10 kg of explosives. They were undermined with the help of an electric igniter with all the ensuing consequences. Therefore, it was recommended to take two such land mines, fasten on the chest and on the back and ... rush with them under the enemy tank! The warranty for the bottom of the machine (10-20 kg of explosives!) Was absolute!

In the Soviet war films, our soldiers constantly throw grenades into German tanks. Not always the ones that should have been, but this does not change the essence of the matter - it was so. The British - they even created a special “sticky bomb” No. XXUMX (ST), which had to be removed from a special container and, holding the handle, put into action and thrown into a German tank. Grenade stuck to the body and after 74 seconds. exploded. Naturally, grabbing her hands was impossible!


Sherman with additional bookings from the tracks.

The Japanese also had grenades, and the simplest ones that they could think of. With corrugated body and with a smooth. Weighing 300-450 g and explosive charge 62-57 g. A fuse was pulled out of the fuse, they were hit on the rifle butt and threw a grenade at the target. Such grenades could not harm the tank in principle. A more powerful grenade had a weight of 600 g, but even it was not very effective. Incendiary bottles with a grater ignition were also used - wherever without them, but they also did not play a special role. It hurts in the jungle damp and often it rains.

True, the Japanese invented the original cumulative anti-tank grenade. With metal case and ... burlap case. Why waste metal on it? After all, the main thing - a cumulative funnel, lined with copper! The grenade weighed 853 g and carried a charge of 690 explosives in it. It pierced Armor with a thickness of 70 mm and this, perhaps, was the most effective Japanese anti-tank weapon.


Tank "Devi Jones."

Finally, there was also a magnetic mine weighing 1,2 kg. With her, you had to get close to the tank, put it on board, "pull the rope" and run back into the undergrowth. Here is a war, but what to do?

However, this is no better than the recommendations to the German soldiers: run up to the Soviet tank from behind and throw a canister of gasoline and a grenade attached to it to its overmotor part! Or run up, put an anti-tank mine on the caterpillar. Then, they say, it is sure that it will touch the fuse shield with a fuse and explode! And you could sit in a hole and pull a board with five anti-tank mines tied to it across the movement of Soviet tanks. Not one, so another will drive!

Well, the most original of what came up with the Japanese. Since in the jungle (and along the roads in them) the tanks were going slowly, it was recommended to get on the tank (!) And close the viewing devices of the driver and machine-gunner with a tarpaulin, and when they open the hatches - shoot at close range! And, finally, the most amazing. It was necessary to get on the tank with a pickaxe and ... yes, that's right - with its help, break viewing devices on it!

In addition, there was another way to destroy enemy vehicles. Sitting again in the bushes along the road along which the tanks were going, with the help of a long bamboo pole, put a magnetic cumulative mine on the hatches of the tank — either tower or driver. Then again, "pull the rope" and run! Armor hatch was thinner and could not stand the explosion. So it was guaranteed to kill one crew member and contusion all the rest! In addition, the same mines with a pole were placed on the hull between the tracks - the most vulnerable spot!

The Americans, hitting the jungles of the islands of the Pacific and Burma and faced with all this "horror", hastily began to look for opposition to such exotic means of warfare.

We started with the fact that the sides of the tanks (and the frontal armor plate) were sewn with boards against magnetic mines. They began to wind a spare track on the tower that had rubber plates between the teeth. The supermotor part of the tank began to be reserved by cardboard and wooden boxes from under food rations and ammunition. And since it interfered with the normal cooling of the engine, they were not placed directly on the ventilation grill, but on wooden slats, which left room for air to pass through.


All in the thorns - hatches, periscopes, fan ...

Well, so that with the help of a fishing rod it was impossible to put a mine on the hatches, they began to weld on them trimming rebar, sticking vertically upwards and in addition wrapped with wire. Now, even if a mine was put on all “this”, it was at a distance from the hatch, and besides, it was impossible to put it directly. The explosion did not occur at the optimal distance from the armor, besides, the cumulative jet struck the armor tangentially. The “witch bite” remained on it, but it was no longer possible to penetrate the armor!

The Japanese began to respond to these "tricks". They invented, again, a cumulative grenade not to be hung on a “fishing rod”, but mounted on a long bamboo pole, like a spear's tip. And in addition to supply it with three sharp thorns. Again, sitting in the thickets on the road, it was necessary to forcefully hit mine in the side of the tank. In this case, the thorns pierced the tree, the bamboo rod fuse broke, the capsule punctured and ... after five seconds, an explosion followed. It was easy to do this, because the Americans, in order not to overload the tanks with excess weight, sheathed them with balsa boards. And the balsa is light, but soft and it didn't cost anything to stick a studded mine into it.

The Americans reacted instantly! The balsa was replaced with an iron tree and now the poor Japanese didn’t beat them on the board, but they couldn’t attach the mine, and it still happened, and it exploded. So, fantasy and "improvised means" in that war did not help the Japanese!
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  1. svp67
    svp67 29 October 2015 06: 28 New
    +9
    The usual story of the "spear and shield" struggle ...
    1. marlin1203
      marlin1203 29 October 2015 20: 47 New
      +1
      And what about the anti-tank rifle we only had? And by the end of the war, the Germans had panzerfaust, and the British and the Americans had bazookas. It could have been written.
      1. your1970
        your1970 30 October 2015 10: 57 New
        +1
        and this is written before the photo of the Comet tank
      2. 4thParasinok
        4thParasinok 31 October 2015 15: 37 New
        +2
        Quote: marlin1203
        And what about the anti-tank rifle?

        not only, there were a lot of people, Czechs, Poles ... those same Japanese had 20mm quite effective self-charges, but only heavy ones that were very difficult to manufacture.
        Ours were simply the best.
  2. inkass_98
    inkass_98 29 October 2015 07: 17 New
    10
    Well, the most original of what the Japanese came up with. Since the tanks walked slowly in the jungle (and along the roads in them), it was recommended to climb onto the tank (!) And cover the driver and machine gunner’s sight gauges with tarpaulin, and when they open the hatches, shoot at point blank range!

    This was not invented by the Japanese, this tactic of fighting tanks was still in World War I, and then it did not go anywhere, it remained in practice (remember the same "Maxim Perepelitsa"). And almost all anti-tank defense manuals were recommended to fight the viewing slots by breaking them. Not with a pickaxe, of course, but shooting at periscopes.
  3. Russian Uzbek
    Russian Uzbek 29 October 2015 07: 50 New
    20
    whatever yapes come up with in the end they still get kamikaze
  4. parusnik
    parusnik 29 October 2015 07: 50 New
    +7
    So, the fantasy and “improvised means” in that war did not help the Japanese!
    An interesting game - curling!
    Sport for real samurai.
    But I’m eating buckwheat with chopsticks,
    I’ll tell you - even more interesting ...
  5. tchoni
    tchoni 29 October 2015 08: 17 New
    25
    This is called a “cunning invention fool”. And our task is not to repeat the mistakes of the samurai, falling into cheers patriotism and putting the Yankees to blame and weakness for the presence of a warm closet in the barracks and vanilla ice cream in the field canteen
  6. Hubun
    Hubun 29 October 2015 09: 09 New
    0
    on which tricks only did not go, but now friends and comrades
    1. 2s1122
      2s1122 29 October 2015 11: 19 New
      +6
      Tambowski wolf im comrade wassat
  7. andrew42
    andrew42 29 October 2015 09: 37 New
    +9
    No matter how ingenious and savvy the "savage" is, he will always lose to the "engineer". That's the whole story. This principle has been proven millions of times - since the use of "bone" armor and combat use of a horse.
  8. Basil50
    Basil50 29 October 2015 10: 29 New
    0
    It turns out that not only the Germans came up with shooting around the corner
  9. kvs207
    kvs207 29 October 2015 10: 29 New
    +1
    Interestingly, did the Germans use anti-personnel mines in a wooden case because they "came out of the woods"? How is it that the Americans ride in tanks in hard helmets? Is it uncomfortable in their tanks? Japanese shipbuilding was practically second in the world and they produced very good planes. Strange article.
    1. Forest
      Forest 29 October 2015 11: 15 New
      +2
      The anti-tank and anti-personnel are quite different - the main thing is to tear off or damage the anti-personnel, the tank needs to break through the bottom, and then up to 30 mm. The M1938 American tank helmet was supposed to protect against shell fragments and armor after falling into the tank, and when and when the tankers rode out of the hatch. On land, the Japanese froze in the development of technology simply, something more or less normal began to appear only in the 44, and so, consider that on Khalkhin Gol, in Manchuria, in Burma and in Okinawa, the same thing happened.
      1. Alexey RA
        Alexey RA 29 October 2015 13: 21 New
        +7
        Quote: Forest
        On land, the Japanese froze in the development of technology simply, something more or less normal began to appear only by the 44th, and so, consider that on Khalkhin Gol, in Manchuria, in Burma and Okinawa, the same thing happened.

        They did not freeze. They were simply constantly late with the rearmament of the army, rolling out new models exactly when the enemy was rearming for the next generation. For example, in 1945, the Kwantung Army was ready to meet with the Red Army-39 ... but the Red Army-45 arrived. smile

        The reason is simple - you cannot be strong everywhere. Even the United States with its economy and industry did not succeed. The Japanese created a good fleet (though they could not compete with the Yankees in the pace of construction of ships), but the army was not strong enough. In addition, the rivalry between the army and the fleet spoiled them - when the fleet designed and built air defense tanks and interceptors, and the army - aircraft carriers and submarines.
        1. Forest
          Forest 30 October 2015 01: 37 New
          +1
          Given the gigantic leap into the development of the same tanks of the European theater of war (at least from the Pz III c to the latest Panthers with night vision devices) - progress froze. And the Navy did not keep pace with the United States with their Iowas with automated 127-mm guns. Airplanes yes, they were good, but they were few and excellent pilots were knocked out.
          1. Alexey RA
            Alexey RA 30 October 2015 11: 35 New
            +5
            Quote: Forest
            Given the gigantic leap into the development of the same tanks of the European theater of war (at least from the Pz III c to the latest Panthers with night vision devices) - progress froze.

            So this is on the ETVD - there the evolution of the tanks of the opposing sides was spurred by 5 years of fighting on land, when everyone tried to make the tank either better than the enemy, or not inferior to the enemy. Non-viable concepts were eliminated quickly - and only the most adapted and optimal machines for the given country, theater and army survived. Plus - a voluntary or involuntary exchange of information between countries, which helped designers not to reinvent the wheel and not get involved in castles in the air.

            And what was Japan equal to before 1943? On the Chinese and Soviet T-26 and BT? On American M2 and M3L? British Vickers? On Dutch CTLS-4, not to be commemorated by nightfall? So the Japanese cooked in their own juice, inventing tanks that were superior to those they had already met. And, pushing their strength, they gave out "Chi-Ha" and "Chi-He".

            And in 1943 the "Shermans" came to them. I had to make "Chi-Nu" ... but it was too late.
            Quote: Forest
            Yes, and the Navy did not keep pace with the United States with their Iowas with automated 127-mm guns.

            Have time. The directors of air defense and MPOZO at Yap were not bad. They just did not have time to produce high-tech at the same pace as the Yankees drove him.
            Here is the result - USN has one director for one 40-mm installation, while the Japanese have one director for 1-2.

            With what the Japanese flew by - it was with radio fuses and heavy MZA. 25mm against American "decks" is not serious.
            1. Forest
              Forest 31 October 2015 23: 14 New
              +1
              What did not have time - and called flying, as with the last of their aircraft, which were excellent. What is only Shiden-Kai worth.
    2. 4thParasinok
      4thParasinok 31 October 2015 15: 46 New
      -2
      Quote: kvs207
      Strange article

      she is not strange but provocative. purposefully silenced the problems of the Japanese - a lack of resources and ridiculing their ingenuity. Yes, and the Germans ***** purposefully, but their infantry in the 41st was good at fighting tanks. In June-July, at least a third of our tanks were destroyed by grenades.
  10. _KM_
    _KM_ 29 October 2015 10: 54 New
    +2
    The planes and ships of the Japanese were not bad, but UG tanks. But with very good diesel engines.
  11. Polkovodetz
    Polkovodetz 29 October 2015 10: 54 New
    0
    Thanks to the author, a very interesting article. The magnetic mine was especially surprised. About the German magnetic mine is widely known, but that the samurai were the same very surprised.
    Although the author writes about Japanese grenades and mines with some irony, but pay attention to the last photo, then all the same, these funds had an effect.
  12. forwarder
    forwarder 29 October 2015 11: 39 New
    +6
    Accordingly, the Japanese came out of rice, the Americans - from corn, and the French - from the vineyard!

    The Americans, like all Anglo-Saxons, came out of barley. Then they were diluted with others. But the base is "barley".
    For example, our tankers who fought in the English tanks "Matilda" was amazed that the inside of the tank was pasted over with sponge rubber. It was simply impossible to hit the head, that's why the British rode in berets. Our approach was different: “What comfort? War!" And so the tankers wore a helmet, but how could it be otherwise. Moreover, if it were otherwise, then the same British and American tankers would consider their tanks unambiguously bad, and ours simply "would not understand the humor," since they were initially accustomed to "convenience on the street."

    About how I listened to my grandmother on a bench. In fact, this protected the crew from being defeated by secondary fragments of armor.
    It is not surprising, therefore, that Japanese tanks were just as primitive, although they were glued inside with asbestos. Because of the heat. That is, it was a purely pragmatic campaign, but no more.

    Another tale. I recommend the author to describe in more detail the technique of protecting a person from tropical heat using asbestos sheets.
    1. kalibr
      29 October 2015 12: 15 New
      +3
      Do you think that the Japanese pasted over beauty machines with asbestos for the sake of? And what would you recommend to the Japanese who write about it? Or do you know better than them and you read their magazine? And have you read Chibisov's "Tanks at the Cool Log"?
      1. Alexey RA
        Alexey RA 29 October 2015 13: 26 New
        +4
        Quote: kalibr
        Do you think that asbestos the Japanese pasted cars for the sake of beauty?

        Maybe it's just a loot that protects the crew and equipment from secondary fragments of armor?
        Tell me, what kind of insulation does the engine need? The engine compartment is completely trimmed with the same sheets.
        The fact is that the main enemy of the tank at that time, like the infantry, is a machine gun. To combat armored vehicles, armor-piercing bullets existed, and although the armor of light tanks was designed specifically to protect against such weapons, when firing at close range with machine-gun fire, tiny pieces of armor that could injure the crew or damage equipment were fragmented from the inside of the armor. . So they were caught by asbestos sheets.
        (c) Tankdriver
  13. DMB_95
    DMB_95 29 October 2015 11: 44 New
    0
    In my opinion, the Soviet anti-tank rifles PTRD-41 or PTRS-41 would easily have pierced Sherman. At least on board. And from a distance - from shelter.
  14. Hort
    Hort 29 October 2015 12: 50 New
    +2
    Well, in general, something like this:
    1. cth; fyn
      cth; fyn 29 October 2015 13: 39 New
      +2
      Spirited Away, mmmmm!
  15. Alexey RA
    Alexey RA 29 October 2015 12: 59 New
    +9
    Well, the most original of what came up with the Japanese. Since in the jungle (and along the roads in them) the tanks were going slowly, it was recommended to get on the tank (!) And close the viewing devices of the driver and machine-gunner with a tarpaulin, and when they open the hatches - shoot at close range! And, finally, the most amazing. It was necessary to get on the tank with a pickaxe and ... yes, that's right - with its help, break viewing devices on it!

    Do not underestimate the gloomy British genius. For it was he who gave birth to the way to fight tanks with the help of trimming the rail, blankets and gasoline:


    In general, those who want to laugh at the "stupid Japanese", it would be nice to first read the documents of their own army. For instance, "Instructions for the fight against enemy tanks":
    7. Having used up grenades and bottles with a combustible mixture, fighter fighters harvest mud-clay, which is thrown over the tank’s viewing slots.

    (c) Lieutenant General N. Vatutin, Chief of Staff of the North-Western Front, 5.7.41
    1. Good me
      Good me 29 October 2015 21: 33 New
      0
      Quote: Alexey RA
      Do not underestimate the gloomy British genius. For it was he who gave birth to the way to fight tanks with the help of trimming the rail, blankets and gasoline:


      I remember that even from the publications of the Soviet press, about the events in Yerevan, nationalist extremists, with the help of a piece of a water pipe, managed to "strip" the BMD ...
  16. iouris
    iouris 29 October 2015 18: 29 New
    0
    Thanks to the author. Unexpected information, but very instructive. In war, when planning actions, one must foresee what the enemy will answer in the proposed circumstances.
  17. novobranets
    novobranets 29 October 2015 18: 46 New
    +2
    For example, our tankers who fought in the English tanks "Matilda" was amazed that the inside of the tank was pasted over with sponge rubber. It was simply impossible to hit the head, that's why the British rode in berets.
    When armor-piercing blanks hit, even if they weren’t penetrated, often the crews died or received multiple injuries from fragments flying off from the inside of the armor. To combat this, some Soviet tanks were glued with felt lining on the inside, and this was done not for comfort (although there was no superfluous insulation), but to detain these small pieces of armor. Maybe the author beguiled something, and the rubber was also not for comfort?
  18. Olezhek
    Olezhek 29 October 2015 21: 21 New
    +2
    Spike hatches, yes! lol
  19. dzeredzavkomimu
    dzeredzavkomimu 30 October 2015 00: 12 New
    +3
    not funny, you want to live
  20. Sasha75
    Sasha75 1 November 2015 10: 18 New
    0
    The Japanese really had no resources, read the story of the Chinese how Japanese soldiers collected all the brass, copper, all the scrap metal, torn off the brass heck. Do not forget that they bought all the resources abroad and the war began with the United States over oil, if anyone does not remember. They initially lost in the war, they had one plan, it’s incomprehensible for us to win purely Japanese, at the initial stage, and everyone will be afraid to fight them, and they will sign the world on their terms, well, purely Japanese psychology, but they had no such thoughts about the answer a brilliant plan and that is true.
  21. _KM_
    _KM_ 2 November 2015 12: 16 New
    0
    About asbestos. In the sun, metal is heated and it is impossible to touch the tank. Asbestos glued from the inside prevents contact with hot metal. In addition, asbestos is non-combustible material, unlike rubber on British tanks. So the choice of the Japanese is justified.