Military Review

Capture of the Selenga steamer

32
Capture of the Selenga steamer



In October 1939, the Soviet ship Selenga left Vladivostok and headed for the Philippines. The transition passed without any complications, and on October 25 the ship was anchored in Manila’s internal roadstead. Having barely finished the parish, we started loading. From both sides they moored along the lighter, from which tungsten and molybdenum ore and 1600 t coffee began to flow into the holds of the Selenga. After that, on November 5, the ship sailed to Vladivostok.

While the Soviet ship was stationed in Manila, local newspapers vied with each other that the Selenga accepted valuable strategic cargo, which would probably be sent from Vladivostok to Germany by the Trans-Siberian Railway, but it is unlikely that British warships on the roads will allow it. These articles were provocative in nature, but the crew was not particularly worried.

The next day, sailing, on the approach to the island of Formosa (Taiwan), the vessel caught up with the British cruiser Liverpool. A “Immediately stop!” Signal was fluttering on his mast. This was a gross violation of the freedom of navigation on the high seas. Therefore, the captain of the "Selenga" Alexey Pavlovich Yaskevich did not begin to fulfill the order and ordered to follow the previous course. On the cruiser, they uncovered the guns and went towards rapprochement. A motorboat was launched from the cruiser. A few minutes later he was already there, and the naval sailors who had gathered in him did not have the special difficulty of “boarding” the Soviet low-breasted ship. He headed the landing, as it soon became clear, the senior assistant commander of the ship. The British quickly scattered on the ship.



However, the radio operator "Selenga" has already managed to transfer to Vladivostok, that the ship was detained by an English cruiser and that the military team is coming aboard. Nothing more could not be reported, the British broke into the radio room. At the same time they appeared on the bridge.

The English officer announced that, according to their information, the cargo of tungsten and molybdenum on board the Selenga was intended for Germany, with which England was in a state of war. Therefore, he was instructed to detain the vessel and take him to Hong Kong to inspect cargo and shipping documents. Yaskevich protested, stressing that the Soviet Union was not at war with anyone, and the British seized the ship of a neutral power. However, the English officer demanded to follow to Hong Kong to verify information regarding the cargo. It was clear that the decision was made much earlier, and any arguments are simply not taken into account. "We will not play hide-and-seek, captain," the officer finally said in response to a categorical refusal to go to Hong Kong, "if you do not obey, I have an order to force the entire crew to the cruiser, and we will take the vessel in tow."

A.P. Yaskevich understood that to leave the vessel without a crew is impossible in any case - any new provocation is possible. Therefore, submitting to force, he led the Selenga to Hong Kong under the escort of a cruiser. On board the ship, the British left three officers and forty armed sailors. 12 on November the ship was anchored in the military port of Hong Kong, and the sailors from the cruiser were replaced by naval police.

Soon the commission arrived, headed by the head of the naval base, who announced that before finding out whether the cargo was “Selenga”, it was arrested, but the crew has the right to go ashore. After that the holds were opened, the cargo was photographed and copies were taken of the shipping documents. Having completed this work and sealed the radio room, the commission departed.

The next day, the captain of the ship went ashore, sought out a representative of Exportles in the city and through him sent telegrams about the detention of the ship to the head of the Far Eastern Shipping Company and the ambassador of the Soviet Union in England. For the team stretched days of anxious waiting.

Protracted flight, tropical climate, nervous tension did their job. By the end of the month, three crew members were sick. They were able to be sent to Vladivostok on a Norwegian vessel en route with a load of tea. With them, Yaskevich delivered a detailed report on the incident to the address of the head of the shipping company. In addition, he asked to solve a number of problems related to the payment of money to the crew, the costs of products, materials, bunker and other practical issues that inevitably arise in unforeseen circumstances. The answer was required to give on the radio in the agreed time, without confirming receipt.



By this time, managed to convince the British that the crew can no longer without a radio. It really was like this: people didn’t have enough news from the Motherland, simple Russian speech, music. But now the receiver was especially needed to accept the shipping company's response. With the consent of the watchmen, the radio was moved from the radio room to the mess room. Near him the crew set the duty. About a month after the patients were sent, the radio operator was able to listen to the shipping company’s answers.

Meanwhile, life went on as usual. The crew maintained the vessel in the proper form, carried out repair work. The monotonous series of days is occasionally interrupted by "entertainment." Once a Chinese arrived on the ship, introduced by a representative of a Hong Kong shipowner. Having handed over a business card, he said that he had instructions to talk with the captain about the sale of the vessel and cargo. According to the information that his firm allegedly has, the British are not going to release the Selenga. The price and terms of sale can be negotiated later, in a relaxed atmosphere in one of the restaurants in the mainland of Hong Kong. Yaskevich suspected that the meeting was inspired by the British authorities. Unless could this type get on the vessel without their permission? To avoid trouble, the captain decided to consult with our representative in Hong Kong, and appointed the meeting to the Chinese after three days. As expected, the “buyer” did not appear at the appointed time. And through our representative, it was established that the company was not listed on any list of Hong Kong firms.

There was another case. Once a Russian émigré appeared on the ship, identifying himself as Popov. He arrived on a junk in the form of a junior officer of the English maritime police. The officers on duty on the ship missed him unhindered. Mercilessly cursing England and the British, this Popov, in great secrecy, said that the ship would soon be released and asked to hide him on the ship to return to the Soviet Union. It was the simplest attempt of provocation, calculated to accuse the Soviet sailors in violation of local laws. The capital gave the command to throw Popov into the junk that stood at the ramp. Police officers on duty on the ship silently watched this scene and did not even intervene.

12 January 1940, two months after the arrest of the vessel, the commander of the naval base arrived at it. He told the captain that, according to the instructions from London, the Selenga is being released, and you can prepare to leave for Vladivostok.



On January 14 the ship was completely ready to go. The last formality remained — to receive from the port authorities a special flag signal for the passage of the port gate and the side fence. Yaskevich was informed that the signal would be given directly by the chief of the naval base, who would arrive on the ship especially for this.

He really arrived in the afternoon, but not alone: ​​he had a French naval officer with him. The Englishman confirmed once again that his authorities were releasing the ship. But the allies of England, the French, have some questions. So he left.

History repeated. The Frenchman was the senior assistant to the commander of the auxiliary cruiser Aramis. More recently, it was a large passenger vessel of the company Messager Maritime, re-equipped with the beginning of the war, and became part of the French Asiatic squadron. Now the cruiser was on the roads near our ship.

Having put forward all the same absurd claims regarding the cargo, the officer announced that the French authorities were detaining the Selenga and offering to accompany the cruiser to Saigon. After Yaskevich refused to execute the instructions of the French officer to board the Selenga, two motor boats with Aramis, packed with armed sailors, rushed. Having unceremoniously disembarked the ship, they first occupied the bridge, then the engine room and all the rooms of the ship. The captain of the Soviet ship was again asked to sail to Saigon. In case of refusal, the entire crew will be transferred to the cruiser and placed under arrest, and the Selenga steamer in tow will be delivered to Saigon.

Strongly refusing to fulfill this requirement, appealing illegal actions, A.P. Yaskevich demanded to remove all the French from the ship. In response, armed French sailors, at the command of an officer, began to force, or rather, demolish, on the hands of resisting crew members and commanders, cruisers standing at the side of the boat. But the captain had already foreseen this, so he managed in advance to convey instructions to the senior mechanic so that in the event of which the French could not lead the Selenga on their own.



On the "Selenga" were alone the French. On the cruiser, the whole team was driven into one cabin, and the command personnel was placed in cabins. All premises have sentries. So, before receiving instructions from France, the crew had to be in the position of internment. First - on board the Aramis, and then on the coast - under the supervision of the French colonial authorities. The situation was complicated by the fact that the USSR did not know anything about the next events at the Selenga, so quickly events developed.

When the convoy brought the crew of the vessel to the upper deck for a walk the next morning, the Soviet sailors saw the Selenga, walking alongside the cruiser. The ship was moving barely. This meant that the senior mechanic had time to disable the water heating system to power the boilers. The next day, the cruiser was already towing the ship.

After four days of sailing, the Aramis, with the help of tugboats, led the Selenga to the port of Saigon and set it to the pier in the military port. The crew, with motorboats, drove twenty miles up the Saigon River and placed them in some quarantine huts. There, the Russian sailors were with compatriots - the crew of the ship "Mayakovsky" of the Black Sea Shipping Company, led by captain G. Miroshnichenko. On the way from the USA to Vladivostok with a cargo of various equipment, this vessel was detained in the South China Sea by the French cruiser “La Mota Picke” and brought to Saigon. The reason for the detention was chosen the same.

Yaskevich and Miroshnichenko discussed the situation and wrote a protest to the governor of French Indochina, sending him through a French officer guarded by Russian sailors. Two days passed, but there was no answer.

Then the captains decided on extreme measures. After consulting with the crews, they declared a hunger strike. At first, the camp guards did not take this statement seriously. But when the sailors did not come for breakfast, lunch or dinner for two days, the guards began to worry. The camp commander, the French captain, begged to stop the hunger strike, but the Soviet crews stood their ground: the hunger strike would continue until the governor arrived.

And it worked. The next morning, though not the governor himself, arrived at the camp, but his representative with the rank of rear admiral. It turned out that the governor received our protest and had already reported it to Paris. From the visit of a high-ranking official, our sailors tried to extract the maximum benefit. He stated all the claims. The Soviet crews were not prisoners of war, but only temporarily interned citizens of a neutral country. The camp, where they were placed, did not meet the most basic requirements. In addition, the sailors' clothing did not match the local climate.

Admiral had to agree. He not only ordered the sailors to be transferred to a more suitable place, but also ordered the delivery of tropical outfit to both crews and the ration provided for French sailors.



The admiral kept his word. Just the next day, Soviet crews were transported by car to a former rubber plantation, a hundred miles south of Saigon. Although the conditions here could be considered satisfactory, the plantation was, nevertheless, fenced and guarded by French and Vietnamese soldiers under the supervision of French officers. Exit for the territory of the Soviet sailors was banned. Was issued to the crews and tropical clothing.

Despite the improvement in conditions, Yaskevich and Miroshnichenko were particularly worried about one question: until now, the fate of the Soviet courts was not known either in the Soviet representation or in their homeland, since they failed to convey the message during the seizure. It was decided to try to secretly contact the consuls of neutral countries in Saigon.

Writing a letter on behalf of the two captains to the Norwegian and Chinese consuls in Saigon, indicating the location of the Soviet crews, they appealed to these diplomats to inform the Soviet government about the detention of ships and the internment of crews. One Chinese from the attendants took the letter to its destination, of course, bypassing the camp administration. The Chinese man kept his word, and the letter, as it turned out later, reached its intended purpose.

About a week after that, the two consuls arrived in the camp, accompanied by French officers. What a surprise the French were when, in their presence, the consuls told us that the letter had been received and already transferred to Moscow. Thus, the main goal was achieved. The captains of the Soviet courts once again confirmed that the only request, claim and wish was for the crews to be released as soon as possible, returned to the ships and given, finally, the opportunity to return to their homeland.

It is clear that the foreign consul is not given the right to interfere in the actions of local authorities, but both of them firmly promised that they would be interested in the fate of the Soviet crews and ships and, as soon as something becomes known, they will surely inform the captains.

So it took more than four months before the long-awaited news came: an instruction was received from Paris concerning Soviet sailors. However, the French decided to leave the goods in Saigon until the end of the war. Protests Yaskevich and Miroshnichenko did not have success. However, it took at least one and a half months before the sailors returned to their vessels. "Selenga" was in the port already without cargo. The hull, superstructure, decks, mechanisms were covered with rust. Equipment, furniture, practical items are broken or stolen. To bring the ship to a seaworthy state, it took at least a month of intensive work of the entire crew. Part of the repair and restoration work on the orders of the governor was carried out by the forces and means of the Maritime Admiralty.



Finally, in May 1940, the Selenga was ready to sail. But it was not to return home in ballast, especially since a long transition was coming to Vladivostok. With the permission of the shipping company, the ship went to Hong Kong and from there with a load of nuts, butter and beans followed in his native Vladivostok, where 30 June arrived. So ended this flight, stretching almost half a year.

Sources:
Paperno A. Aleksey Pavlovich Yaskevich - the first captain of the first liberty, captain No. XXUMX of the war years // Lend-Lease. Pacific Ocean. M .: Terra, 1. C. 1998-243.
Yaskevich A. Interrupted voyage // Sea Fleet. 1985. No.8. C.74-76.
Shirokorad A. The fleet that destroyed Khrushchev. M .: VZOI, 2004. C. 59-60.
Shirokorad A. A short century of a brilliant empire. M .: Veche, 2012. C. 188.
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  1. Basil50
    Basil50 27 October 2015 06: 29 New
    11
    Well, the French, like the British, have always been great lovers of robbery, and always only with noble intentions. Why not rob if there is no responsibility. In that story there was no guilty cargo, so, a nice bonus in your pocket. The main thing was showing off, that's about the failure * of squeezing * the ship, probably sad.
    1. Owl
      Owl 27 October 2015 08: 40 New
      +8
      They (England, France) have always been enemies of Russia (USSR), only sometimes they were "forced allies", everything that has been said also applies to other European countries. Now, in the period of aggravation of the conflict against Russia, all these actions are simply repeated, they are afraid of being captured, but in other points of possible rivalry, the actions are only intensifying. As there were enemies, enemies, they remain, they only fear and respect strength.
      1. veteran66
        veteran66 27 October 2015 19: 32 New
        -7
        Quote: Eagle Owl
        They (England, France) have always been enemies of Russia (USSR),

        Well, of course, now you can blame the French and English for all mortal sins. But they themselves went bankrupt over the supply by some US firms of equipment and raw materials to Germany until the 40th year, with the alleged connivance of the US government. And then they forgot that our ships were transporting raw materials and equipment from the same USA to Germany, which fought against England and France. Comrades, all the more necessary, to be more honest, the cargo was not squeezed out, but left in port until the end of the war.
        1. victor
          victor 27 October 2015 20: 27 New
          +4
          Excuse me, but will you discard the data, reference about the return of the goods and stolen things and equipment? Or should only comrades be more honest?
        2. Alf
          Alf 27 October 2015 22: 54 New
          +4
          Quote: veteran66
          Well, of course, now you can blame the French and English for all mortal sins. But they themselves went bankrupt over the supply by some US firms of equipment and raw materials to Germany until the 40th year, with the alleged connivance of the US government. And then they forgot that our ships were transporting raw materials and equipment from the same USA to Germany, which fought against England and France. Comrades, all the more necessary, to be more honest, the cargo was not squeezed out, but left in port until the end of the war.

          And where does it say that the cargo of the Selenga was intended for Germany?
      2. Mikado
        Mikado 28 October 2015 16: 47 New
        +1
        Quote: Eagle Owl
        They (England, France) have always been enemies of Russia (USSR), only sometimes they were "forced allies", everything that has been said also applies to other European countries. Now, in the period of aggravation of the conflict against Russia, all these actions are simply repeated, they are afraid of being captured, but in other points of possible rivalry, the actions are only intensifying. As there were enemies, enemies, they remain, they only fear and respect strength.

        If I am not mistaken, in 1940, at a time when Hitler had already defeated Poland long ago, and was ready to "squeeze" Denmark and Norway, England and France, sitting behind the "Maginot Line" and being confident in their own safety, were developing a plan for landing in the Caucasus. Ostensibly to cut off Hitler from our oil. They also provided military assistance to the Finns during the Finnish War. In principle, they were ready to support any enemy of the USSR on occasion. Only the defeat of France prevented, in fact, the implementation of their plans of aggression against us. And then, in 1941, even the "ungrateful" Finns became their opponents. Moral: don't dig another hole. And if Stalin's so-called. "liberal intellectuals" reproach that he was building a powerful state and an army, it is worth thinking - what else could he do, surrounded by such "partners"? Yours faithfully, hi
    2. chunga-changa
      chunga-changa 27 October 2015 09: 56 New
      +1
      Rob someone who allows it. Try to detain and rob the ship under the English flag, be very surprised.
      1. Alexey RA
        Alexey RA 27 October 2015 11: 22 New
        +1
        Quote: chunga-changa
        Rob someone who allows it. Try to detain and rob the ship under the English flag, be very surprised.

        Not always - the fate of their ships with outright smuggling, detained off the coast of a belligerent state, limes usually turn a blind eye - "gentlemen do not come across so stupidly".
        But if the detention was outside the zone of hostilities ... during the time of the RYV there was a demonstrative "case of the steamer" Malacca ".
      2. Mikado
        Mikado 28 October 2015 16: 58 New
        0
        Quote: chunga-changa
        Rob someone who allows it. Try to detain and rob the ship under the English flag, be very surprised.

        Our naval forces in the Far East were too small at that time. The core consisted of several pre-revolutionary destroyers, the rest of the forces were torpedo boats and submarines. The task was to defend the coast. At that time, Britain had half the world in the colonies, and the joke was true "over the British Empire the sun never sets." There were 50 cruisers alone.
        Everyone knew very well that the war had begun, and that it would still draw many countries into itself. Everyone was preparing for it. We were preparing on land, they were on the sea. The doctrines were different due to different geographical locations. Unfortunately, at sea we could not compete with them then. Especially in the Far East. The task was - not to succumb to provocation.
    3. Basil50
      Basil50 27 October 2015 13: 52 New
      +4
      The French and the British at this time planned to bomb the oil fields in the Soviet Union in the North Caucasus. The bombing was thwarted by the Germans, who were offended that Hitler was not given the Nobel Peace Prize.
  2. kind
    kind 27 October 2015 07: 59 New
    +8
    Ordinary piracy. Arrogant Saxons and paddling pools, those still fagots.
    1. kaa_andrey
      kaa_andrey 27 October 2015 09: 39 New
      +4
      This is the essence of European values: robbery, theft and cynical attitude towards others.
  3. Doomph
    Doomph 27 October 2015 08: 08 New
    0
    This once again confirms the need to create AUG.
    1. Wheel
      Wheel 27 October 2015 22: 22 New
      0
      Quote: Doomph
      This once again confirms the need to create AUG.

      Give each transport its AUG! laughing wassat
  4. parusnik
    parusnik 27 October 2015 08: 10 New
    +2
    In 1939, England and France waged a "strange" war with Germany ... But provocations against the USSR are always the case ..
    1. Amurets
      Amurets 27 October 2015 13: 50 New
      +1
      Ours also took revenge not badly later, having led a number of ships and vessels of Germany along the Northern Sea Route in 1940, including the raider Komet, as well as providing a basing point for ships and submarines in Zapadnaya Litsa Bay in Andreyev Bay for the Kriegsmarine. Details in Wikipedia: article basis nord, in Kovalev's books about the Germans in the Arctic "Swastika over Taimyr" and Koryakin's "War in the Arctic 1941-1945". There are books about the raiders of the 3rd Reich.
  5. miv110
    miv110 27 October 2015 08: 31 New
    +8
    The role of our diplomats and intelligence is completely incomprehensible from the whole story. Where? What? When? Two ships are missing - in whose hands are they, what is the fate of the crew? It seems to have given the news - so what? Why was no Soviet diplomatic envoy present at the departure of the ship from Hong Kong, and if they could not be there, then enlist the support of other diplomatic missions. It turns out if it were not for the personal courage and perseverance of the crews, then the outcome would not have been so optimistic. The story is almost one-on-one as with the seizure of the tanker "Poltava" by the Chiang Kai-shekists, based on which the film "Emergency" was filmed in 1958, only enemies and friends changed places. The French consul acted as the savior.
  6. Fotoceva62
    Fotoceva62 27 October 2015 09: 42 New
    +3
    The very fact of being detained and searched at sea during the war is not illegal. Towing or forwarding to the port is also not beyond the bounds, but the subsequent actions of the Angles and Gauls are a violation, since they interned the neutral vessel and its crew. Moreover, the crew were kept as prisoners of war without allowing the shift service to serve the vessel and save cargo, which is a gross violation (read the act of piracy). At that time, the USSR did not have a fleet in the understanding of "oceanic", and indeed where did it come from, only 18 years passed after the end of the civilian and intervention period.
    As Pyotr Alekseevich the Russian Emperor said: ... Sovereign, that he has only one arm with the army, and the one that has the army and fleet with two hands! ... Europeans, and especially the British, have traditionally robbed ships and peoples. Remember the times of Catherine the Great .The whole story is a chronicle of robbery and betrayal (business is only business, nothing personal ...). Bandits ... sir!
    Regarding AUG, I’m not at all sure of the prevailing military and economic-political conditions, as well as of possible theater of operations.
  7. _KM_
    _KM_ 27 October 2015 10: 53 New
    +1
    Unfortunately, the "allies" achieved their goal - they overcame a strategically important cargo.
    1. veteran66
      veteran66 27 October 2015 19: 37 New
      -3
      Quote: _KM_
      Unfortunately, the "allies" achieved their goal

      they didn’t squeeze, but detained, do not forget to whom this load was intended. Are there still those who will deny Stalin’s help to Hitler?
  8. SIT
    SIT 27 October 2015 11: 05 New
    0
    As part of the Pacific Fleet in 1939, according to a report by N.G. Kuznetsov had 86 submarines. At the transition to Saigon, the French could have arranged a strong show, after which they would have washed their latrine for a long time.
    1. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 27 October 2015 11: 43 New
      +7
      Quote: SIT
      As part of the Pacific Fleet in 1939, according to a report by N.G. Kuznetsov had 86 submarines.

      Of which 90% could operate only at bases ("M") or in the near zone ("Щ").
      In 1939, there were no cruising submarines at the Pacific Fleet. Combat ready (according to the documents) Submarines capable of operating far from bases (submarine mine blocks "L" with a range of 7500-10000 miles and an autonomy of 1 month) - there were no more than a dozen.
      1. jjj
        jjj 27 October 2015 15: 16 New
        +1
        The saddest thing is that the crews of our submarines before the war were poorly trained. Only the death of many comrades was able to teach something
        1. Alexey RA
          Alexey RA 27 October 2015 16: 39 New
          +2
          Quote: jjj
          The saddest thing is that the crews of our submarines before the war were poorly trained. Only the death of many comrades was able to teach something

          There were problems with the Pacific Fleet and with the equipment. EMNIP, in order to transfer 6 submarines from Pacific Fleet to SF in 1942, batteries were collected from the entire fleet. Known malfunctions were eliminated during the first repair in the USA. But, as it turned out later, not everything was discovered. Here's what happened on the S-56 in the Caribbean:
          Another major nuisance: it turned out - on the left diesel engine to increase speed above 350 rpm. fails. This was noticed yesterday, but today it has finally been confirmed. The reason is the wear of the gears of the diesel diesel pump, due to which it does not give a sufficient amount of diesel fuel and there is a jam in the servo motor regulator.
          (...)
          At 14.55, the oil pipe of the right diesel engine between the four-seater box and the filter burst. He stopped the right diesel, told the flagship. The flagship gave the move "both small." He ordered a change of pipe. At 15.35, the pipe was replaced, again, 16 knots. The weather is still quiet, visibility is good. We tried unsuccessfully to adjust the left diesel engine to smokeless and increase the speed. It was not possible to achieve smokelessness, the speed was hardly brought up to 350. I received a semaphore from the flagship - at 19 o'clock we will differentiate. At 19.00, it plunged, by 19.15 it had differentiated itself, the boat turned out to be easier to calculate only 300 liters. At 19.15 he surfaced, began to be purged, and this combination took exactly 20 minutes. It turns out that it is no longer possible to purge with the left diesel engine, somewhere it does not hold the blowdown pipeline at low pressure. Unable to create pressure.
          (...)
          I spoke with the mechanic - the repair in Halifax will require the following: gas valves - old to grind, new ones to order, inspect the circulators, order new gears for the oil pump. Oil pipe repair of the right machine, low pressure inspection of the pipeline and a whole series of small things. I am a supporter of all this, because I must bring a military unit to the Northern Fleet, not a cripple.

          (c) Diary of the commander of submarine S-56 captain-lieutenant G. Shchedrin
        2. Amurets
          Amurets 27 October 2015 17: 17 New
          +1
          Read Kolyshkin in The Depths of the Polar Seas. In the beginning of his book, he directly writes that, fearing the death of boats and crews, the Main Naval Headquarters gave instructions to the commanders of ships, units and formations not to dive to great depths and most of the tasks of the boats were worked out on the surface. poor crew training only the leadership of the RKKF.
          1. Alexey RA
            Alexey RA 27 October 2015 19: 09 New
            +1
            Quote: Amurets
            Read Kolyshkin in "The Depths of the Polar Seas." In the beginning of his book, he directly writes that, fearing the death of boats and crews, the Main Naval Staff gave instructions to the commanders of ships, units and formations not to dive to great depths and most of the submarines' tasks worked out on the surface

            Right. It should only be recalled - after which this instruction was given.
            On November 13, 1940, the D-1 "Dekabrist" submarine sank in the Motovsky Bay of the Barents Sea during combat training missions.
  9. _KM_
    _KM_ 27 October 2015 11: 47 New
    +3
    Quote: SIT
    As part of the Pacific Fleet in 1939, according to a report by N.G. Kuznetsov had 86 submarines. At the transition to Saigon, the French could have arranged a strong show, after which they would have washed their latrine for a long time.


    Could. Too far from the bases. And France is a potential ally in the war with Germany. In general, it seems that the British decided to profit at our expense from tungsten and molybdenum ore. During the war, she was worth its weight in gold. More precisely, many times more expensive. Therefore, each ton was counted. And then the Soviet ship ...
  10. EVIL KOLORAD
    EVIL KOLORAD 27 October 2015 14: 32 New
    +4
    Respect for the published material ... this is our piece of history, which should not be forgotten ...
  11. ilyaches
    ilyaches 27 October 2015 16: 33 New
    +2
    Thanks for the interesting article.
  12. Glagol1
    Glagol1 27 October 2015 19: 08 New
    +1
    Our sailors were doing great. But make a big difference
    It was unlikely that the USSR should have been extremely
    Neat, everything around except China was valid
    or potential enemies.
    1. Megatron
      Megatron 28 October 2015 01: 30 New
      +2
      Yes, the Chinese, who remained unknown, helped out a lot.
      1. Alf
        Alf 28 October 2015 21: 42 New
        0
        Quote: Megatron
        Yes, the Chinese, who remained unknown, helped out a lot.

        I wonder what was the name of the Chinese-Wang Yu Shin or Li Si Tzin? laughing
  13. ded_banzai
    ded_banzai 7 March 2020 19: 27 New
    0
    The Selenga cargo "surfaced" during the visit of the Japanese Foreign Minister to Moscow. Then we raised the question of returning the cargo to the USSR. The Japanese agreed. But self-pickup. Even then, their losses in transport tonnage were constantly growing. Our team weighed all the pros and cons and decided not to risk it in the zone of active hostilities.