Military Review

Where the ships go

27
Modern ships are able to walk for decades on the seas and oceans, before their repair becomes economically unprofitable. When their lifespan comes to an end, around 90% of huge ships end up off the coast of India, Pakistan, Indonesia, or Bangladesh, where cheap labor resides.



Old ships are built along the coastline, and then they are pulled apart with hammers and blowtorches until at least something can be sold or recycled.

1. A portrait of an Indian hard worker who breaks old ships apart. Mumbai, India, December 27 2012. (Photo AP Photo | Rafiq Maqbool):



2. Gaddani, Pakistan, July 10 2012. Work is underway to remove the skin of the ship. In the upper left of the vessel are visible people who help assess the scale.
This place is located in 40 kilometers from Karachi and is one of the largest sites for the analysis of old ships. About 10 000 workers send ships here on their last journey. On average, it takes about three months for the 50 worker to disassemble the old medium-sized ship with a displacement of 40 000 tons per piece. This is hard and dangerous work. Workers get about 300 dollars a month, half of which goes to food and rent, and they work 6 days a week. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):



3. All the work here is manual. Here the workers cut a piece of metal from the ship with a torch. Pakistan 25 November 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



4. And this is a satellite view of the ship graveyard in Chittagong, Bangladesh. (Photo © Google, Inc.):



5. Going to the rescue. Gaddani, Pakistan, November 24 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



6. Cutting the hull of the ship. Gaddani, Pakistan, July 11 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):



7. But almost dismantled the ship. Ship recycling in Chittagong pollutes the coastal zone with a length of 20 km. (Photo by Reuters | Andrew Biraj):



8. People of all ages, Mumbai 21 December 2006, are engaged in ship debriefing. (Photo by Reuters | Anuruddha Lokuhapuarachchi):



9. Workers are pulling the cable to separate the part from the ship, 25 November 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



10. Trolley used to launch parts of the ship to the shore, Gaddani, Pakistan, November 25 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



11. Inside the hull of the vessel were barrels of oil, Gaddani, Pakistan, 11 July 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):



12. Hunky from Jakarta, Indonesia. Gets about 5 dollars per day. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti | Getty Images):



13. Pakistan, July 10 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | GettyImages):



14. Coast of the dead ships in Alang, which is in 50-km from Bhavnagar, India. View from the satellite. (Photo © Google, Inc.):



15. Portrait on the background of an old ship in Chittagong, Bangladesh, 19 August 2009. (Photo by Reuters | Andrew Biraj):



16. This, by the way, is the first Indian aircraft carrier Wickrant, Mumbai, India, November 22, 2014. The Vikrant was originally built at Royal navy Great Britain under the name HMS "Hercules" (R49). The ship was laid down at the shipyards of the English company Vickers-Armstrong during World War II in 1943. (Photo AP Photo | Rajanish Kakade):



17. Smoke break Chittagong, Bangladesh, 16 July 2013. (Photo by Reuters | Andrew Biraj):



18. Ships high. Workers made a makeshift cable car to climb up the ship, 24 Nov. 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



19. Gaddani, Pakistan, July 9 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):



20. Ship Review in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 20 July 2008. (Photo by Spencer Platt | Getty Images):



21. Shower after work shift, Gaddani, Pakistan, 10 July 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | GettyImages):



22. Workers on the old ship in Chittagong, Bangladesh, 19 August 2009. (Photo by Reuters | Andrew Biraj):



23. Ship dismantling in Gaddani, Pakistan, 10 July 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | GettyImages):



24. Workers climb the ship in a chain, Gaddani, Pakistan, November 24 2011. (Photo by Reuters | Akhtar Soomro):



25. Workers roll oil barrels from ship to shore, Chittagong, Bangladesh, 24 July 2008. (Photo by Spencer Platt | Getty Images):



26. Some months - and from the ship there is one skeleton. Chittagong, Bangladesh, April 19 2009. (Photo by Munir Uz Zaman | AFP | Getty Images):



27. Woman collects rusty pieces of metal on the beach in the rain. For 100 kg of collected rust, it will earn about 2 $. It was in Jakarta, Indonesia, April 16 2010 of the year. (Photo by Reuters | Enny Nuraheni):



28. Pull-pull. Gaddani, Pakistan, July 11 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):



29. A Pakistani worker descends anchor chain from a ship, Gaddani, 10 July 2012. (Photo by Roberto Schmidt | AFP | Getty Images):

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  1. Bongo
    Bongo 1 December 2014 07: 39
    +12
    It would be nice to invite these hard-working ants to us, to clean the coast.
    Google Earth snapshot: Labor Bay on Russky Island.
    1. givargi
      givargi 1 December 2014 08: 21
      +5
      I now looked at Google, half of the bay is cleared! There is a construction ..
      1. Bongo
        Bongo 1 December 2014 08: 26
        +5
        Quote: givargi
        I now looked at Google, half of the bay is cleared! There is a construction ..

        Really cleaned, before it was even worse. But mostly those closer to the shore. In any case, the pace is very low ... 2006 photo of the year.
  2. Professor
    Professor 1 December 2014 07: 39
    +5
    It is interesting what mortality rate with such organization of labor if, on average, one person dies during the construction of one medium-deadweight ship?
    1. ICT
      ICT 1 December 2014 07: 44
      +9
      Quote: Professor
      what mortality


      big (I watched something like a movie about them), and injuries to injuries even more
    2. Nayhas
      Nayhas 1 December 2014 08: 12
      +10
      Quote: Professor
      It is interesting what mortality rate with such organization of labor if, on average, one person dies during the construction of one medium-deadweight ship?

      Very high. Who crashes to death, who burns down from ignition of the remnants of fuels and lubricants, who is poisoned by any chemistry which is full of any ship ... terrible work ... okay, died, but mostly crippled, which is equivalent to a slow death from starvation ...
      1. Professor
        Professor 1 December 2014 08: 35
        0
        The number of people with disabilities in India caught my eye when I first visited. By the way, I read that these ships come with asbestos and no one except India is ready to take them apart.
        1. Nayhas
          Nayhas 1 December 2014 11: 15
          +3
          Quote: Professor
          By the way, I read that these ships come with asbestos and no one except India is ready to take them apart.

          Come on, in Bangladesh people spit on people even more than in India. What is asbestos-masbest ... who cares ...
          1. Professor
            Professor 1 December 2014 11: 16
            +1
            Quote: Nayhas
            Come on, in Bangladesh people spit on people even more than in India. What is asbestos-masbest ... who cares ...

            I don’t know, I was not in Bangladesh. Was in India and the asbestos scandal was real. request
            1. Denis
              Denis 1 December 2014 20: 30
              +3
              Quote: Professor
              the asbestos scandal was real

              It seems that those scandals are for everyone except the Indians. This is far from the first. Let us recall how much it rattled
              The Bhopal disaster is the largest man-made disaster in modern history in terms of the number of casualties that occurred as a result of an accident at a chemical plant owned by the American company Union Carbide and located in the Indian city of Bhopal (capital of Madhya Pradesh) on the early morning of December 3 of 1984, which caused death at least at least 18 thousand people, of which 3 thousand died directly on the day of the accident, and 15 thousand - in subsequent years.

              The cause of the disaster has not yet been officially established. Among the versions, a gross violation of safety regulations and deliberate sabotage of the work of the enterprise prevail. The TV show “Seconds to Disaster” concluded that despite the fundamental possibility of sabotage, the first link in the catastrophe chain was an economic error in estimating the demand for the company's products, which led to economic pressure on the company's owners to manage a loss-making plant in order to reduce costs, resulting in in turn, it’s already for the immediate reason - savings on security measures on it. As shown in the aforementioned film, all protective systems turned out to be inoperative or ineffective, the devices did not reflect the actual state of the tank, the safety inspector was fired, and the most effective protective means, the gas afterburning pipe, was dismantled and not restored within a few weeks. According to this film, the company did not provide any significant evidence in favor of the theory of sabotage, that is, it fabricated it to save the corporate reputation.
              Bhopal (marked in red)

              Some newspapers in 1984 reported that the owners of a plant owned by an American company intentionally did not name the composition of the chemical substance in the first hours, so as not to divulge the commercial secret of the enterprise. This increased the number of victims, as doctors could not find an effective treatment.
              Little scandals help
              Bhopal
    3. valokordin
      valokordin 2 December 2014 20: 08
      0
      Quote: Professor
      It is interesting what mortality rate with such organization of labor if, on average, one person dies during the construction of one medium-deadweight ship?

      This is the face of Capitalism and democracy "I don't want to die"
      1. Professor
        Professor 2 December 2014 20: 37
        0
        Quote: valokordin
        This is the face of Capitalism and democracy "I don't want to die"

        On average, one person per ship died in the country of developed socialism. For bourgeois, this figure is much lower.
  3. A1L9E4K9S
    A1L9E4K9S 1 December 2014 07: 57
    +4
    And how many of these ships rust in different bays in our country, but no one wants to engage in cutting, oh, and it's hard work to drag a hippopotamus out of a swamp.
  4. blizart
    blizart 1 December 2014 08: 06
    +3
    He who knows how to be content will be satisfied. I mean that people's faces are not dull, like those of people of creative professions who receive orders of magnitude more for their "hellish" work.
  5. Nayhas
    Nayhas 1 December 2014 08: 20
    +7
    A terrible death for a warship.

    Better in the form of a new coral reef at the bottom, than being strewn with cutters into small pieces ... so at least the memory will remain ...


    Maybe I'm wrong from an economic point of view, but the ship should die at sea ...
    1. Professor
      Professor 1 December 2014 08: 36
      +4
      Quote: Nayhas
      Maybe I'm wrong from an economic point of view, but the ship should die at sea ...

      IMHO he should not die at all. Museums need to be made of them.
      1. Panikovsky
        Panikovsky 1 December 2014 10: 05
        +6
        Quote: Professor
        IMHO he should not die at all. Museums need to be made of them.

        until the horseradish of museums divorced, there will not be enough visitors, unless to write out from India and Pakistan. laughing
    2. kolyhalovs
      kolyhalovs 1 December 2014 08: 38
      +5
      Maybe I'm wrong from an economic point of view, but the ship should die at sea ...


      Maybe I'm wrong from a romantic point of view, but I think that living safely to a natural demise is good for ships.

      I'm apparently not a viking enough - to die in battle and all that ...
      1. Nayhas
        Nayhas 1 December 2014 11: 03
        +3
        Quote: kolyhalovs

        I'm apparently not a viking enough - to die in battle and all that ...

        Oh no, I mean rest on the bottom of the ocean ...
        1. kolyhalovs
          kolyhalovs 1 December 2014 11: 50
          +1
          AND! You meant to bury a ship at sea, with honors and with a flag like a sailor. It is beautiful, I agree.
    3. Panikovsky
      Panikovsky 1 December 2014 10: 08
      +7
      Quote: Nayhas
      Maybe I'm wrong from an economic point of view, but the ship should die at sea ..

      and the plane, logically, in the sky?
      1. Nayhas
        Nayhas 1 December 2014 11: 04
        +2
        Quote: Panikovsky
        and the plane, logically, in the sky?

        I won’t say for airplanes ... I just love the sea more ... let the pilots answer this question.
        1. Mhpv
          Mhpv 1 December 2014 11: 10
          +2
          I look at the sky, I see the sea! hi
        2. Panikovsky
          Panikovsky 1 December 2014 11: 35
          +1
          Quote: Nayhas
          I won’t say for airplanes ... I just love the sea more ... let the pilots answer this question.

          do not be offended, Eugene, I joked, if unsuccessful, I'm sorry.
          1. Nayhas
            Nayhas 1 December 2014 17: 21
            +1
            Quote: Panikovsky
            do not be offended, Eugene, I joked, if unsuccessful, I'm sorry.

            Come on, the question was logical. But the sky for me is "terra incognita", only as a passenger ... I think the pilots should have their own associations with the fate of their cars. But I suppose their hearts also bleed when looking at a photo of an aircraft cutting ...
        3. Yon_Silent
          Yon_Silent 1 December 2014 19: 42
          +3
          Heh) As a submariner grandfather said in response to a parent's desire to go to an aviation school: "There are much more aircraft in the sea than there are submarines in the sky." lol
      2. Vasek
        Vasek 1 December 2014 23: 04
        0
        Quote: Panikovsky
        and the plane, logically, in the sky?

        good Bravo, Panikovsky! laughing
        And I thought you were a miserable and insignificant person ... drinks
    4. D-Master
      D-Master 1 December 2014 16: 36
      +2
      Well, why is it wrong. Butchering a ship is a very dreary and complicated matter. But preparing a ship or ship for the role of a reef is not an easy task. It is cleaned of everything that can serve as a polluting agent for water, wiring, naturally the engine and highways. Only the skeleton remains - clean and safe.
      1. Nayhas
        Nayhas 1 December 2014 17: 23
        0
        Quote: D-Master
        Butchering a ship is a very dreary and complicated matter.

        Definitely, therefore, not every ship is destined to rest at the bottom.
      2. Papakiko
        Papakiko 1 December 2014 22: 16
        0
        Quote: D-Master
        Only the skeleton remains - clean and safe.

        I am ready to listen to you with my entire biography .. wink
        Quote: D-Master
        He is cleansed of everything
        like a baby booty .. yeah.
        An exclusively certified company from (BICS) prepares ships for the "last voyage". wink
    5. Papakiko
      Papakiko 1 December 2014 16: 50
      0
      Quote: Nayhas
      Maybe I'm wrong from an economic point of view, but the ship should die at sea.

      In you, romanticism revels!
      The ship should be disposed of and put into processing, thereby giving new life to other ships (this, by the way, prevails in all of us - leave offspring) etc. td And nature-mother herself creates reefs.
      There is nothing to litter the planet.
      1. Nayhas
        Nayhas 1 December 2014 17: 26
        +1
        Quote: Papakiko
        The ship should be disposed of and put into processing, thereby giving new life to other ships (this, by the way, prevails in all of us, leave offspring) and so on. td And nature-mother herself creates reefs.
        There is nothing to litter the planet.

        This is reality ... there is no getting anywhere ...
        Quote: Papakiko
        In you, romanticism revels!

        I am a sailor in the first profession, with the sea I have love at first sight ... but what about the sea without romanticism?
  6. Vadim237
    Vadim237 1 December 2014 08: 47
    +2
    This is truly hellish labor.
  7. Denis 60 rus
    Denis 60 rus 1 December 2014 09: 05
    +1
    if our people were given free rein, faster than any Hindus would be cut into metal. in the countryside you won’t already find a piece of iron — everything was scrapped, naturally from the variety of work and well-fed life.
  8. Mhpv
    Mhpv 1 December 2014 09: 57
    +12
    Last beep:
  9. apro
    apro 1 December 2014 12: 21
    +3
    He himself worked with a gas cutter on metal, the work of hellish scum and the frying of money a penny and without doping is not like it. Yes, and now in our town, gas cutters for 500 rubles a day are humped in principle 2 times more expensive than there.
  10. abdrah
    abdrah 1 December 2014 13: 01
    +4
    Here's a similar post about Chittagong, Bangladesh.
    http://masterok.livejournal.com/1821711.html
    I look at the photos of these people and the landscapes of their locality and quietly rejoice that I was born in the European part of the USSR ...
  11. 16112014nk
    16112014nk 1 December 2014 15: 04
    -7
    A couple more terms of government - and we will have the same thing. bully
  12. Noncombatant
    Noncombatant 1 December 2014 15: 34
    +5
    Very interesting photo story. When viewing, there was a desire to send all the managerial managers of Russia to these works.
    "$ 300 a month, half of it goes to rent, buy food ..". This is where all this trash would have understood the "relativity of life."
    1. abdrah
      abdrah 2 December 2014 01: 53
      0
      "... half is spent on renting housing, buying food .."
      If so then it’s not all bad, how much does it cost to rent an apartment in Moscow and meals for one person per month? Maybe they have the same dolly has 100% coverage, because how else can you rent a house for 150 $? in Moscow it’s a minimum of 50.000 rubles, so the guys have a total of 100.000, you can live!
  13. Lone wolf
    Lone wolf 1 December 2014 16: 16
    +1
    The last voyage of the Valiant ship is a painting by the English painter William Turner, written in 1839. The canvas depicts the last voyage of the participant of the Battle of Trafalgar, the warship of the English fleet "Brave". A steam tug pulls an old ship into the docks, where it will subsequently be dismantled. First exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1839.

    Ships - they are like people ..
    1. Nayhas
      Nayhas 1 December 2014 17: 36
      +1
      Quote: Lone Wolf
      Ships - they are like people ..

      ...
      I drink foam, the wave doesn't reach my mouth
      And from the decks to the bottom, the sides were exposed
      And my sides are dirty - Thai, not Thai
      So admire my sores and wounds!

      Here is a hole at the rib, this is a trace from the core,
      Here are the scars from the ram, and even
      Hook scars are visible
      Some pirate spine me
      Interrupted in boarding.

      Kiel, like an old, jagged guitar fretboard,
      This belly ripped me a coral reef,
      Choking, rotting, it happens:
      And the salted rot.

      The winds drink my blood and scurry through the cracks
      Right from the tank to yut, the winds will finish me.
      I stand under them from morning to morning,
      Nails into my soul clog the wind!

      And a crazy stranger throws everyone upside down
      These winds are intruders.
      Would drown them in my holds of wine
      Or aground to tear me angry!

      I believed it like a driven animal
      But not evil winds I need now
      My masts are like flabby arms
      Sails, like breasts of an old woman.
      .
      V.S. Vysotsky.
  14. Teberii
    Teberii 1 December 2014 18: 36
    +2
    Someone in this world must do such dirty work.
  15. Denis
    Denis 1 December 2014 20: 43
    +2
    Quote: A1L9E4K9S
    And how many of these ships rust in different bays in our country, but no one wants to engage in cutting,

    They are engaged, though not ships, but simply metal, but still somehow not so.There is little joy from this
    Here are the squares of the Kirov Plant on the Volkhonskoye Highway, the outskirts of St. Petersburg. They do everything from fountain pens to condoms, but this is not a product that will overshadow the Kirovites. Consequences of the disaster, desolation ...
    Here rent, at least rent
    Plot on the territory of the Kirov plant on the Volkhonskoye highway
    Object Land plot of 6,9 ha.
    Location and description Leningrad Oblast, Lomonosov District, territory of Kirovsky Zavod OJSC on Volkhonskoye Shosse.

    A land plot with railway tracks entering the plot, with storage buildings located on the plot with a total area of ​​2500 sq.m and existing communications.
    Land status Category - industrial land.
    The property of a legal entity.
    Communications Electricity - 100 kW; additional capacities may be purchased.
    Possible use Production, warehouse.
    There, the migrant workers cut the metal, load
    and taken to the seaport
    There are loaded onto foreign ships
    How Bangladesh is some, but a pity