Military Review

Battleship Petropavlovsk

26
01. The battleship Petropavlovsk is launched from the docks of the Baltic Shipyard. 9 September 1911



02. The moment of launching the ship “Petropavlovsk”



03. Descent of the ship “Petropavlovsk” on the water from the open dock



04. The descent of the body of the battleship "Petropavlovsk" at the factory



05. Battleship "Petropavlovsk", launched before the docks of the Baltic plant



06. Battleship "Petropavlovsk", launched



07. Linear ship "Petropavlovsk" on the Neva River near the Baltic Shipyard on the day of launching



08. Linear ship "Petropavlovsk" launched by the Baltic Shipyard



09. Sailors of the battleship "Petropavlovsk" view the portrait of Emperor Nicholas II



10. The guard of honor of the sailors on the deck of the battleship Petropavlovsk in anticipation of the arrival of Emperor Nicholas II



11. Emperor Nicholas II on the boat "Peterhof" is sent to inspect the battleship "Petropavlovsk"



12. Emperor II accepts the ship commander’s report on the construction of the battleship



13. Emperor Nicholas II welcomes an honor guard on the battleship "Petropavlovsk"



14. Emperor Nicholas II greets officers on deck of a battleship



15. Emperor Nicholas II bypasses the staff of the new battleship "Petropavlovsk", built by the Baltic plant



16. Emperor Nicholas II greets the officers of the battleship



17. Emperor Nicholas II among the officers of the battleship Petropavlovsk. Third from the right is the naval minister IK Grigorovich



18. Emperor Nicholas II among the officers of the battleship Petropavlovsk. Third from the right is the naval minister IK Grigorovich



19. Emperor Nicholas II with a group of officers of the Maritime Ministry on the deck of the battleship



20. Emperor Nicholas II says goodbye to the battleship officers



21. Emperor Nicholas II says goodbye to the battleship officers



22. Emperor Nicholas II welcomes the guard of honor before descending on the boat Peterhof after visiting the battleship



23. Emperor Nicholas II and his entourage down the ramp from the battleship "Petropavlovsk" to the boat "Peterhof"



24. The boat "Peterhof" with Emperor Nicholas II and his entourage departs from the battleship "Petropavlovsk"



25. A group of engineers and factory workers who participated in the construction of the battleship Petropavlovsk on its upper deck during a visit to the battleship by Emperor Nicholas II.



26. Battleship Petropavlovsk.

Originator:
http://humus.livejournal.com/4016590.html
26 comments
Ad

Subscribe to our Telegram channel, regularly additional information about the special operation in Ukraine, a large amount of information, videos, something that does not fall on the site: https://t.me/topwar_official

Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must sign in.
  1. Ayujak
    Ayujak 3 September 2014 09: 33
    +5
    Thank! Nice photos.
    For some reason I immediately remembered the film "Admiral". Lost history.
  2. A1L9E4K9S
    A1L9E4K9S 3 September 2014 10: 05
    +9
    You look at these old photographs and think if these people could have imagined then that after three years a terrible war would begin, and after six years in Russia everything would turn upside down and Russian people would kill each other.
  3. axiles100682
    axiles100682 3 September 2014 11: 11
    +4
    Thanks for the photo report, it’s very interesting. You can’t forget the history, you need to remember and study. Take all the best that was in the Russian Empire, the USSR and build a new modern Russia.
  4. Imperialkolorad
    Imperialkolorad 3 September 2014 13: 40
    +1
    And they will tell us that the Russian Empire was an extremely backward country. After all, few could build dreadnoughts.
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 3 September 2014 15: 05
      +4
      Quote: ImperialKolorad
      And they will tell us that the Russian Empire was an extremely backward country.
      Yes, indeed, everything was good and just wonderful. The fact that in the 20 century, 80% of the country was elementarily illiterate and only 1% of the population had access to higher education in general, is not scary. It’s possible for a simple stellar man to slurp cabbage soup, gentlemen know everything for him ...
      1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
        Andrei from Chelyabinsk 3 September 2014 15: 31
        +3
        Quote: Azzzwer
        The fact that in the 20 century, 80% of the country was elementarily illiterate and only 1% of the population had access to higher education in general, is not scary.

        Mixed up nothing? In 1913, among the recruits (in the army, esessno) there were only 27% of illiterates. This is from the first edition of TSB (1929-30gg), if that.
        And about 1% who allegedly had access to higher education ... Take an interest in how many engineers and doctors the Russian Empire graduated from in comparison with such advanced countries as England and Germany. I guarantee you will be very surprised ...
        1. Azzzwer
          Azzzwer 3 September 2014 15: 51
          +2
          Quote: Andrey from Chelyabinsk
          Quote: Azzzwer
          The fact that in the 20 century, 80% of the country was elementarily illiterate and only 1% of the population had access to higher education in general, is not scary.
          Mixed up nothing? In 1913, among the recruits (in the army, esessno) there were only 27% of illiterates. This is from the first edition of TSB (1929-30gg), if that.
          And about 1% who allegedly had access to higher education ... Take an interest in how many engineers and doctors the Russian Empire graduated from in comparison with such advanced countries as England and Germany. I guarantee you will be very surprised ...
          No dear, I have not confused anything! And on that I ask you, give me a reference, how many of those 73% of recruits were from peasants and workers, as well as a reference about how many representatives of these social groups entered the universities of the Republic of Ingushetia in 1913. And it’s somehow strange that you get it, until 1917 there was universal literacy in the country, and after 17 you have to fight illiteracy ... Just don’t say that the Bolsheviks destroyed all literate villains in the dungeons of the check ...
          1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
            Andrei from Chelyabinsk 3 September 2014 16: 59
            +2
            Quote: Azzzwer
            And by that I ask you, give me a reference, how many of those 73% of recruits came from peasants and workers

            Those. You want to say that 73% of the total number of draftees (that is, literate) were children of Russian aristocrats and 1% of people with higher education? :))
            Those. workers and peasants gave the Russian army only 27% of recruits ?!
            Quote: Azzzwer
            And it’s somehow strange that you get it, before 1917 there was universal literacy in the country, and after '17 we have to fight against illiteracy ...

            Everything is working fine for me. And it turns out abnormally with you, because you are comparing completely incomparable things.
            If among the recruits of the 1913 of the year (too lazy to remember how many years they called, then there will be 18) illiterate only 27%, this means that the rest of the age of 7-10 years still learned to read and write. In other words, it turns out that in 1905 before 73% of boys of draft age received literacy skills.
            But in the 1885 year (according to the same TSB) there were only 26% of literate conscripts, respectively 1877 and up to 26% of draft-age boys received literacy skills.
            In other words, it turns out that in 18 years the level of literacy training in tsarist Russia nearly tripled, covering three quarters of a representative sample (and this is about the state of education at 1905 year!) But it’s obvious that if in 1917 year those who joined the army in 1913 g (they then turned 22 years) by 73% were literate, then older ages (for example, the one who was called up to 1885 g and who in 1917 g turned 50 years old) were literate by force on 26%.
            Therefore, the figure in "AAAAAAAAA, in tsarist Russia 80% of the population was illiterate !!!" firstly, it is incorrect, because nevertheless there were much more literate people, and secondly - he does not speak about ANYTHING. The Soviets taught literacy to everyone up to the age of 50 and even more.
            In order to understand how poor / good / kotorotrophic was the literacy rate in Tsarist Russia, one should compare it with the same literacy rate in other developed countries - England, France, Germany, and so on and so forth.
            The same applies to the number of people with higher education.
            1. Azzzwer
              Azzzwer 3 September 2014 17: 11
              0
              Quote: Andrey from Chelyabinsk
              that in 1905 to 73,% of draft-age boys received literacy skills.
              Dear, we are now talking generally not about boys, but about the people in general. So, in these 73% there is a category that had unlimited access to the entire spectrum of education and a category that at best received education at the level of 3x classes of secondary vocational schools. That was the whole problem.
              Secondly, you never gave me statistics of people from peasant families with higher education! Yes, and compare
              literacy rate in Tsarist Russia, it should be compared with the same literacy rate in other developed countries - England, France, Germany and so on and so forth.
              1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
                Andrei from Chelyabinsk 3 September 2014 17: 17
                +2
                Quote: Azzzwer
                So, in these 73% there is a category that had unlimited access to the entire spectrum of education and a category that at best received education at the level of 3x classes of secondary vocational schools.

                Yeah. 1% of the population of Russia who had access to higher education gave birth to 73% of draftees ...
                Quote: Azzzwer
                Secondly, you never gave me statistics of people from peasant families with higher education!

                Should I? :))
                Quote: Azzzwer
                Yes, and compare
                literacy rate in Tsarist Russia, it should be compared with the same literacy rate in other developed countries - England, France, Germany and so on and so forth.

                No, dear, if you really want to declare "we are building battleships, and the country is wild" - then you need to prove this cunning thesis.
              2. Serg 122
                Serg 122 4 September 2014 09: 29
                0
                Secondly, you never gave me statistics of people from peasant families with higher education!

                If you argue - argue wisely! To have a higher education and to be literate, things are somewhat different plan. Yours faithfully... hi
        2. Azzzwer
          Azzzwer 3 September 2014 16: 01
          +3
          Quote: Azzzwer
          Mixed up nothing?
          And also on account of the fact that I mixed something up there (after looking for your data on the Internet I came across an interesting article) "Contemporaries, noting this, paid special attention to rural schools created by the peasants themselves at their own expense in all provinces of the country. studies of folk forms of education were carried out by zemstvo statisticians from Moscow, Voronezh, Tver, Tauride, Samara, Kursk and other provinces.It was found that everywhere peasant communities and individual groups of peasants whose children have reached a suitable age, hired teachers and provided alternately premises for classes or rented a hut together for such a school. Quite often, literate peasants, sometimes "wandering" teachers from the educated strata of the population, who moved from village to village, conducted training. "So this state of affairs indicates that the state did not particularly deal with this issue. And yet I expect statistics from you on the percentage of peasants and workers enrolled in universities in relation to other categories of the population of Ingushetia ...
        3. Azzzwer
          Azzzwer 3 September 2014 16: 20
          +1
          Quote: Andrey from Chelyabinsk
          Mixed up nothing?
          And also "Kavtoradze AG -" Military specialists in the service of the Republic of Soviets ":" The lack of sufficient combat experience of wartime officers could to some extent be compensated for by their theoretical training - general educational and special military ... However, the general educational qualification of wartime officers was low: despite its diversity - from primitive literacy to completed higher education, in general, over 50% of wartime officers did not even have a general secondary education. "
          1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
            Andrei from Chelyabinsk 3 September 2014 17: 01
            +1
            Quote: Azzzwer
            in general, over 50% of wartime officers did not even have a general secondary education

            Excuse me? You do not know how to prepare officers of the Red Army? Remind me, or how?
        4. Azzzwer
          Azzzwer 3 September 2014 17: 01
          0
          Quote: Andrey from Chelyabinsk
          Mixed up nothing? In 1913, among the recruits (in the army, esessno) there were only 27% of illiterates. This is from the first edition of TSB (1929-30gg), if that.
          And lastly, the Statistical Yearbook of Russia 1913 (Year Ten) Page 82: Table “Literacy of the Empire's population in provinces” *
          Note: *) Based on the data of the 1897 Census.
          1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
            Andrei from Chelyabinsk 3 September 2014 17: 09
            +2
            Quote: Azzzwer
            Note: *) Based on the data of the 1897 Census.

            Indeed - finally :))))
            You yourself at least realized that you just drove your 80% into the coffin? :)))
            EVEN in 1897 r literacy is on average and then 21%, and about how much it has grown to 1913 r I generally keep quiet
            1. Azzzwer
              Azzzwer 3 September 2014 17: 24
              +1
              Quote: Andrey from Chelyabinsk
              Indeed - finally :))))
              You yourself at least realized that you just drove your 80% into the coffin? :)))
              EVEN in 1897 r literacy is on average and then 21%, and about how much it has grown to 1913 r I generally keep quiet
              Yes, you really should be quiet. do you think that over 17 years, literacy among the entire population of the country has increased by 60%! Phenomenally! With such a growth rate of the population’s education, the Republic of Ingushetia had to mentally wound the enemy with its intellectual superiority over the enemy, and not put a million corpses in the fields of an imperialist meat grinder!
  5. Crang
    Crang 3 September 2014 14: 30
    +1
    Yes. Who then could have suggested that perhaps latest battleships in the history of the Russian Navy. That in 45 years they will be replaced by missile cruisers, BOD and SKR.
  6. svp67
    svp67 3 September 2014 14: 33
    +1
    This is how the famous "Marat" was born ... History
  7. Loner_53
    Loner_53 3 September 2014 14: 37
    0
    RUSSIA YOU HAVE AND WILL BE !!! soldier
    GLORY TO RUSSIA! hi
  8. vrach
    vrach 3 September 2014 15: 26
    +1
    Thanks for the stuff.
  9. Trapperxnumx
    Trapperxnumx 3 September 2014 15: 28
    +1
    Yes, the faces are very colorful !!! Thanks to the author for the wonderful photos !!!!
    1. xan
      xan 4 September 2014 11: 02
      0
      Quote: Trapper7
      Yes, the faces are very colorful !!!

      yes our faces! Remove crosses from your chest and dress in a modern way - you can’t tell.
  10. Victor Wolz
    Victor Wolz 3 September 2014 17: 00
    -1
    Photos are good, no ships.
  11. askold
    askold 3 September 2014 17: 58
    +3
    Oh, well, thanks to the author! Photo 9 I'll try to suggest, - "Your vagrant, and who is this? What are you, d ... k, this is our king, father!" lol
    PS and now about the sad. I watched a documentary film here, on the First, about the First World War. The idea of ​​course is correct, - you need to know, honor and remember the history. Well, then all the disagreements (as we were once taught at school) were heroes , I still accepted it. But why did the fleet get it so? About the allied English submarines, well, they told everything in detail. But I personally heard about the Slava dreadnought for the first time. And they tell so hard, what kind of ships are they , dreadnoughts, where did they come from, what does this word mean in translation. But, excuse me, where does the battleship "Slava" come from? create a roll of 3 degrees from the side opposite to the shooting. all the complexity and tragedy of the situation. This is a blooper, incompetent Well, before I remember in the credits they indicated, -military consultant such and such, but now the credits were quickly started up and everything is sewn-covered. It remains only to shout, "I do not believe ..." Well, or "judge, excuse me, a consultant for soap ... "In general, I wonder if he was there ???
    1. shurup
      shurup 3 September 2014 23: 05
      +4
      At your leisure, find all the mistakes in the phrase from the modern film: "The commander of the cruiser" Slava "Admiral Kolchak". It turned out that the number of errors exceeded the number of words in the phrase.
      1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
        Andrei from Chelyabinsk 4 September 2014 18: 01
        +2
        Quote: shurup
        At your leisure, find all the mistakes in the phrase from the modern film: "The commander of the cruiser" Slava "Admiral Kolchak"

        I'll try :)))
        1) "Slava" - never a cruiser, but a battleship (the last of the battleships of the "Borodino" class)
        2) Admiral cannot command a cruiser
        3) Kolchak never commanded "Glory"
        What am I missing? repeat
  12. Victor Wolz
    Victor Wolz 3 September 2014 20: 56
    -1
    Again, a lover of a floating barge minus))).
    1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
      Andrei from Chelyabinsk 4 September 2014 18: 02
      +1
      Quote: Victor Wolz
      Again, a lover of a floating barge minus))).

      Nah, not me. But if you insist so ...
  13. Cristall
    Cristall 4 September 2014 00: 45
    +1
    Heroic "Marat" ...
    But the name Petropavlovsk is unlucky ...
    One Petropavlovsk carried away Stepan Osipovich .. the second did not escape the bomb ...
    thank you for the photo .. steel and the instruments of death - warship.