Military Review

Russian-Japanese war: our victory was frustrated by the fifth column

45
Russian-Japanese war: our victory was frustrated by the fifth columnWho and how led sabotage in the rear of the Russian army


In the year of the 110 anniversary of the start of the Russo-Japanese War, the editors of KM.RU decided to publish a series of articles on this topic. In the previous materials we examined the course of the defense of Port Arthur, the tragedy of Tsushima and the causes of the war. And now we come to the main question: why did the most powerful Russian Empire lose to Japan.

It is not a secret for anybody that the description of the Russian-Japanese war in Russian historiography is extremely ideological in nature, and the inertia of the Soviet attitudes is still being felt. Every schoolchild "knows" that the defeats at the front of the Russian-Japanese war undermined the already "rotten tsarism", respectively, accelerating the process of "popular indignation" that had gained momentum in the 1905 revolution. However, the revolution began four months before the Tsushima battle and seven months before the signing of the peace treaty. That is, until the end of the war was still very far away, its outcome is unclear, there is no talk of any defeat yet, but, nevertheless, strikes start throughout the country and then a real terrorist war unfolds.

Militants pursue mayors, officers, large manufacturers, even policemen. Under the blow are people known throughout Russia. So, 4 February 1905, the son of Alexander II - Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich was killed by a terrorist, and a prominent statesman Earl Shuvalov was shot on June 28. Shortly before this, the sailors of the battleship Potemkin rebelled, a rebellion broke out a little earlier in the Polish city of Lodz. In this regard, it is interesting to see where the revolutionaries came from. weapon.

So, I'll start with the famous stories about the steamer "John Grafton". In London, a steamship was bought to deliver weapons to revolutionaries (estimate the scale!). Several thousand small arms (in particular, Swiss Vetterli rifles), ammunition and explosives were loaded onto it. The ship arrived first in Copenhagen, then in Stockholm (the Japanese embassy moved there from Russia at the beginning of the war), and then sailed to the shores of Finland, where it ran aground. The team unloaded the weapons on the neighboring islands, but most of them did not reach the addressee. Nevertheless, during one of the key episodes of the 1905 revolution, the December uprising in Moscow, the police recorded that some of its members were armed with Vetterli rifles.

Who was the organizer and direct participant of this operation? The headquarters was in London. And here is a list of people involved in the case.

Wilson is chairman of the British Mariners' Union, member of the British Parliament. Akashi is a Japanese military attache in Stockholm. Strautman - the captain of the steamer, a member of the London group of the Latvian Social Democratic Party. Wagner - worked in a glass factory in Woolwich. Mink - lived for many years among immigrants in London on Commercial Road. Strauss - in the spring of 1906, he left for Libau with weapons for the Baltic region, was arrested and hanged. Kristap - subsequently served in the intelligence service of the Red Army. Zilliakus is one of the leaders of the Finnish Active Resistance Party. Lehtinen - subsequently a member of the CPSU (b). The Socialist-Revolutionaries Tchaikovsky, Teplov, Volkhovsky, Cherkezishvili, Rutenberg, the Bolsheviks Litvinov and Burenin ... As we see, the struggle against the Russian statehood was joined by completely different forces.

Here is the second, no less famous story about the supply of weapons to revolutionaries. Another ship, the Sirius, is bought, it is also loaded with weapons - 8500 Vetterli rifles and a large batch of cartridges (data spread from 1,2 to 2 million pieces). The ship sailed from Amsterdam to the shores near the city of Poti. "Sirius" arrived at the place where its contents were loaded onto four longboats, and they spread like cockroaches. Something that our border guards intercepted, but a significant part of the weapons to the revolutionaries still came.

It is clear that war is first and foremost a struggle between systems, economies, industry and resources in general. So, the entire war in Japan went coal supplies from Britain, there were purchased warships; US arms exports, which began before the war, increased dramatically in 1905. The question arises: how much money did the Japanese make a militarized dash? Mainly on the US and British: it was the United States and Britain that provided the relevant loans to Japan. In general, Japan covered 40% of its military spending with foreign loans.

This is only a tiny fraction of the vast array of facts that clearly indicate that Russia was fighting, in fact, not with Japan, but with a coalition that included the largest, richest and most powerful countries in the world - the British Empire and the United States. Japan, by and large, only provided manpower for the war, but weapons, money, energy resources - that is, everything that plays a decisive role in the wars of the industrial age - were provided by truly developed and strong powers.

It is noteworthy that 30 January 1902 was signed the Anglo-Japanese treaty, according to which England could come to the aid of Japan only if Japan wages a war with two or more countries at the same time. But after all, the war seems to be Russian-Japanese, that is, Japan fought only with Russia. So? Not this way. Montenegro declared war on the Japanese. Perhaps this decision lobbied London through its diplomatic channels. After all, Russia received no more or less serious support from the Balkan country.

When it comes to the Russo-Japanese War, a cliché about “technical backwardness of Russia” always pops up. True, it usually does not indicate from whom Russia lagged behind. Since Japan is constantly mentioned and the war itself is called Russian-Japanese, it is logical to conclude that it means lagging behind a real rival. When the conviction arises that Russia lagged behind the Land of the Rising Sun, more global conclusions about the “rottenness” of the Russian Empire are already automatically made.

What is the objective side of the question? The fact is that Japan was largely armed with Western weapons, and, as mentioned above, it received money for militarization in the same place in the West. So if you can talk about the backwardness of Russia, it’s not from Japan, but from the most developed countries of the West. On the contrary, Russia was much more powerful than Japan, including in the industrial and — more broadly — economically, overtaking the enemy and in terms of the development of the military-industrial complex.

By the way, Russia also bought weapons in the West, which makes the thesis about lagging behind Japan even more ridiculous. Both countries acquired weapons from the most developed countries of the world. However, for more than a hundred years, our country has been in the grip of black PR, according to which “backward and rotten Russia” could not even cope with Japan. The Russian-Japanese war is considered to be the beginning of all the misfortunes that befell Russia in the 20th century.

The answer is simple. It was adopted by anti-state journalism even before the 1917 revolution of the year. After this, the stamps of Bolshevik and revolutionary propaganda became part of the official state ideology, and people have been brainwashed for decades. Relevant textbooks, books, articles, “historical” works, and so on were written. Over the years, stamps have become perceived as a self-evident truth.

But the mythology of the Russo-Japanese War is by no means limited to inventions about Russia's technical backwardness. During negotiations with Russia, a meeting of representatives of the highest authorities of Japan was held. Present were the emperor, genro, cabinet representatives and senior military officials. War Minister Terauti then declared that the war could not continue any longer, since there were not enough officers. Finance Minister Sone said that it was impossible to continue the war because there was no money for that, he was supported by other participants in the meeting. The head of the army headquarters, Yamagata, said that the only way out was to make peace. The general conclusion of the meeting: Japan needs peace.

A prominent historian, professor Syumpei Okamoto, appreciated the martial law of Japan as follows: “It is obvious that the military prospects of Japan were dismal. At that time, the Russian army was three times stronger than the Japanese. While the Japanese army was controlled mainly by reserve officers, since most of the regular officers were killed or wounded, the Russian army was mainly composed of first-class military personnel who had recently arrived from Europe. ”

By the way, for those who believe in screaming about the “shamefully and foolishly” lost Mukden battle, I will again quote Syumpei Okamoto: “The battle was fierce, it ended on March 10 with the victory of Japan. But it was a very uncertain victory, since the losses of Japan reached the 72 008 people. Russian troops retreated to the north, "maintaining order," and began to prepare for the offensive, while reinforcements were all arriving. At the imperial headquarters, it became clear that Russia's military might was greatly underestimated and that up to a million Russian soldiers could be in northern Manchuria. Russia's financial capabilities also far exceeded those of Japan ... After the “calculated retreat,” Russian forces replenished their military might on the Manchurian border. ”

Do not forget that the population of Japan was three times less than the Russian; accordingly, its mobilization potential was significantly lower than the capabilities of our country. Japan had no illusions about its forces. Pre-war calculations showed that resources would be enough for a year of hostilities, which, in fact, was confirmed, since in reality Japan barely lasted a year and a half, and that was largely due to the revolution that broke out in Russia. Thus, from the very beginning, all of Japan’s hope was for a blitzkrieg, for a quick victory, until Russia pulled the main forces towards Manchuria. But to break the Russian army failed. The balance of forces changed in favor of Russia, that is, as a result of the “infinite shameful defeats” of Tsushima, Mukden, the surrender of Port Arthur, our army was much stronger than the Japanese by the time of the peace negotiations, and the Japanese did not have enough funds or soldiers to continue the war.

The first offer to make peace was followed by the Japanese back in 1904. And only the revolutionary events unfolding in the country forced Emperor Nicholas II to go to the world war, which in no way was the result of a military defeat. Our victory was thwarted by people who launched a terrorist war in Russia called the “1905 revolution of the year”, those who had already dreamed of changing the state system in Russia and made all possible efforts to that end.
Author:
Originator:
http://www.km.ru/v-rossii/2014/05/08/istoriya-rossiiskoi-imperii/739451-russko-yaponskaya-voina-nashu-pobedu-sorvala-
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  1. 225chay
    225chay 15 May 2014 09: 26
    +8
    here you go! And then many people are keen to throw mud at Russia and talk about its "decrepitude". Of course, we have a huge territory, and there are enough internal enemies (all kinds of columns) and now even with the top
    1. Mitek
      Mitek 15 May 2014 09: 35
      +2
      Quote: 225chay
      here you go! And then many people are keen to throw mud at Russia and talk about its "decrepitude". Of course, we have a huge territory, and there are enough internal enemies (all kinds of columns) and now even with the top

      Now there are more of them than usual (. Okay Makarevich ... it’s written on his forehead that he’s cunning ... but I didn’t expect from Shevchuk. From the first war I had the highest opinion of him, and now ... 18 will be All-Russian traitors ’action.
  2. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 09: 45
    +1
    Finally, people begin to see and doubt Soviet propaganda historiography. I’ll add from myself that before the signing of the peace, the Russian army was superior to the Japanese in machine guns, guns and rifles. If not for the 1905 revolution of the year, we would have crushed them.
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 15 May 2014 12: 27
      +13
      Quote: Nikich
      Finally, people begin to see and doubt Soviet propaganda historiography. I’ll add from myself that before the signing of the peace, the Russian army was superior to the Japanese in machine guns, guns and rifles. If not for the 1905 revolution of the year, we would have crushed them.
      Indeed, in order to defeat Japan it would be necessary to retreat to the Ural Mountains, thereby exhausting the enemy with endless transitions, and for this, you don’t need to know either tactics or strategy! The reason for the defeat is the incompetence of the high command, the country's leadership and the political and economic system! And why not sing songs about the fifth column! Something always disturbs a bad dancer! It would be adequate guidance, the activities of the fifth column would be stopped in the bud!
      1. KC4E
        KC4E 15 May 2014 12: 33
        +5
        And I agree. In the war of 1904-1905. Russia lost only from the mediocrity of the top leadership and command.
      2. KC4E
        KC4E 15 May 2014 12: 36
        0
        Except for history ... Even from the work of "Tsushima", it was all clear where the defeat came from. Because of the mediocrity of the high command, they lost the war.
        1. fleks
          fleks 16 May 2014 06: 50
          +1
          not quite so, from the betrayal of senior officials, well, the Makarevichs and the Purishkevichs also spoiled a lot
      3. The polar
        The polar 15 May 2014 13: 55
        +4
        I would like to add that there was a strong hat-hating mood in the country. Like "we, one left, with some kind of Japan"
      4. AntonR7
        AntonR7 15 May 2014 17: 08
        +2
        You are not right in everything. Yes, of course, if there had been such leaders as Suvorov and Skobolev in the military leadership, then things would have turned out differently, but it was impossible to write off the revolution by the then-established Makarevichs, since certain forces were engaged in suppressing it and the stability of the state was called into question.
        The author is well done, there are more intelligent people.
  3. zollstab
    zollstab 15 May 2014 09: 48
    0
    There is an anthropometric rule - the smaller the person, the greater his ambitions ... Napoleon, Hitler, Lenin .... Such crippled people can infect many and destroy countries.
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 15 May 2014 12: 30
      0
      Quote: zollstab
      There is an anthropometric rule - the smaller the person, the greater his ambition ... Napoleon, Hitler, Lenin ....
      You forgot to attribute the court also to Nikolash Ubogovo, who allowed the country to be drawn into an international massacre!
      1. AntonR7
        AntonR7 15 May 2014 17: 11
        0
        He was a good king, read the memoirs of people close to him, he didn’t allow it, all of Europe at that moment was sitting on a powder keg, and each power was waiting for an opportunity to unleash a massacre while it had forces.
    2. KC4E
      KC4E 15 May 2014 15: 58
      +2
      In fact, Hitler’s height was 1m75cm.
  4. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 09: 48
    +6
    And here is the poster for this case.
  5. Werther
    Werther 15 May 2014 10: 11
    +2
    Thank you, very interesting article!
  6. Energet1k_
    Energet1k_ 15 May 2014 10: 23
    +2
    Once again I am convinced that every revolution in Russia was organized with the indirect or direct participation of the West, and these revolutions were by no means for the good of Russia. Any adequately thinking person will understand why the fire in Ukraine and all these actions of the Navalny are "blowing up" today!
  7. Standard Oil
    Standard Oil 15 May 2014 10: 39
    +5
    The Americans and the British prepared Japan well for the war, provided diplomatic and financial support. Everything turned out "as it should." Those Japanese were not the current Americanized cattle, just give them a reason to fight, I don't know what about human resources, but according to their Kokutai, the emperor would have recruited There are as many people as you need and a crowd of suffering would have gathered. Tsushima disgrace, again, even Trafalgar looks like something more respectable. Well, the racial intelligentsia sending congratulations to the Japanese emperor, in general, the edge. A mediocre rag again does not add optimism. To me, the influence of the "fifth column" cannot be decisive, but it does its bit, but it alone is not enough.
    1. The polar
      The polar 15 May 2014 13: 58
      +6
      Let me disagree. In 1917, it was the fifth column, in the person of the interim government, that destroyed the army
      1. Standard Oil
        Standard Oil 15 May 2014 14: 32
        +2
        Here, yes, "Order No. 1" is a "masterpiece".
    2. Patton5
      Patton5 15 May 2014 20: 30
      +2
      The fifth column only brings in something when the state system is rotten to the ground, and the "defeat" in the Russian-Japanese war has many factors, and the incompetent tsar is like an apotheosis ...
  8. dmb
    dmb 15 May 2014 11: 14
    +9
    "People have been brainwashed for many decades," - D. Zykov on Soviet ideology. Now D. Zykov himself is engaged in this, in connection with which he is very popular among the illiterate strata of the population. Let's leave the Soviet ideology alone. Any historical event should be evaluated in terms of its consequences, and according to Zykov, the "more technically competent and powerful" Russia lost the war to the "backward" Japan at sea. Who will we blame, the revolutionaries? So in fact all the crews have fulfilled their duty to the end. Well, perhaps Rozhdestvensky with Nebogatov. So their favorite Zykov, the tsar-father, to command and appoint. Or is it all the same to blame for "7 pounds of august meat", which hung ballerinas-mistresses with bruliks at the expense of the naval treasury. Or was Stoessel's wife, who speculated with food in besieged Port Arthur, was an ardent Bolshevik, and Kuropatkin, who began to retreat even before the start of the revolution as a Left Socialist-Revolutionary? The writings of Mr. Zykov are cheap and stupid propaganda; they have nothing to do with history.
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 15 May 2014 12: 31
      +1
      Quote: dmb
      ,; they have nothing to do with history.
      stand in solidarity
  9. nnz226
    nnz226 15 May 2014 11: 42
    +4
    And yet! All battles were LOST! Let the Japanese have won a "Pyrrhic victory" at Mukden, but they won! There would not have been such a revolutionary movement in Russia had it not been for "Bloody Sunday" on January 9, 1905. Blame for this directly "the owner of the Russian land" incompetent Nikolashka II! It is also his fault that at the head of the Russian army were stupid mediocrities with generals' epaulettes on their shoulders, although the generals should have a head on their shoulders! And the talented generals moved and hindered them in every possible way! Stoesseli flourished (surrendered Port Arthur), and the Kondratenki could not overcome the inertia of the generals! It was for this that the mighty empire received the first revolution, and under the mediocre rule, also the second and third! 2 years later, and Nikolashka absolutely rightly ended his days in the basement of the Ipatiev House!
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 15 May 2014 12: 33
      +3
      Quote: nnz226
      and Nikolashka absolutely rightly ended his days in the basement of the Ipatiev House!
      One pity that there was no public trial of this mediocrity!
  10. rotmistr4
    rotmistr4 15 May 2014 11: 49
    +2
    History will put everything in its place !!!
    1. Azzzwer
      Azzzwer 15 May 2014 12: 33
      +1
      Quote: rotmistr4
      History will put everything in its place !!!
      She already set everything up! The 1905 and 1917 revolutions prepare for the victory in May 1945!
  11. Manul49
    Manul49 15 May 2014 12: 34
    +2
    Englishwoman smacks, as was rightly said a very long time ago (Attributed to Suvorov).

    It’s not a sin to see about it:
    https://lurkmore.to/%C0%ED%E3%EB%E8%F7%E0%ED%EA%E0_%E3%E0%E4%E8%F2

    And its 5th column must be crushed.
  12. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 12: 54
    -2
    Quote: Azzzwer
    Quote: rotmistr4
    History will put everything in its place !!!
    She already set everything up! The 1905 and 1917 revolutions prepare for the victory in May 1945!

    And the revolution of 1917 is a loss in the First World War. And during the Second World War more than half of the soldiers prayed, and they didn’t shout too much for Stalin, for Stalin. Mats basically. Unlike For Faith, Tsar and Fatherland
  13. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 12: 55
    -2
    Quote: Azzzwer
    Quote: nnz226
    and Nikolashka absolutely rightly ended his days in the basement of the Ipatiev House!
    One pity that there was no public trial of this mediocrity!

    It is a pity that there was no public trial of Lenin. That's really who destroyed a great country. And at the expense of mediocrity, read the story "comrade". Especially about the Russian indicators of 1913
    1. parus2nik
      parus2nik 15 May 2014 13: 47
      +5
      It is a pity there was no public trial of Lenin. That's who the great country ruined.
      Those. you support the February revolution, which marked the beginning of the collapse of the Empire and organized by the liberals?
    2. Walking
      Walking 15 May 2014 13: 53
      +5
      The country was ruined by leaders of the State Duma, representatives of the upper strata of society, industrialists, bankers who wanted more power, more profit and arranged the February revolution. Having received power, they could not take advantage of it and the country was shaken by what the Bolsheviks took advantage of.
  14. parus2nik
    parus2nik 15 May 2014 13: 45
    +5
    It’s clear why they lost to Tsushima ... if there hadn’t been a revolution .. And Port Arthur wouldn’t have surrendered .. And the Varangians and Koreans would have smashed the Japanese squadron into dust .. and so, the revolution .. By the way, Nikolai, the emperor’s king, asked Witte to surrender South Sakhalin..but he probably did it under the pressure of the revolution .. Yes, the revolutionary actions continued until 1907, when the war was already over ...
  15. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 13: 58
    0
    Quote: parus2nik
    It is a pity there was no public trial of Lenin. That's who the great country ruined.
    Those. you support the February revolution, which marked the beginning of the collapse of the Empire and organized by the liberals?

    And I more than do not support their revolution. Like the Bolshevik
  16. Nikich
    Nikich 15 May 2014 13: 59
    -1
    Quote: Hiking
    The country was ruined by leaders of the State Duma, representatives of the upper strata of society, industrialists, bankers who wanted more power, more profit and arranged the February revolution. Having received power, they could not take advantage of it and the country was shaken by what the Bolsheviks took advantage of.

    I agree. But all this liberalization went after the events of 1905-1907
  17. cat1973
    cat1973 15 May 2014 15: 20
    0
    We lost Tsushima due to the stupidity of Rozhestvensky. And Port Arthur withstood the siege !!!! If Makarov and Kondratenko had not died !!
    1. Patton5
      Patton5 15 May 2014 20: 38
      0
      .A Port Arthur withstood the siege !!!! If Makarov and Kondratenko had not died !!
      endured if hung Stessel
  18. 933454818
    933454818 15 May 2014 17: 28
    0
    I will add a little - Japanese ship shells "shimosa" - this is an English development, transferred to the Japanese
    1. Patton5
      Patton5 15 May 2014 20: 44
      0
      Yes, as it were, trinitrophenol did not represent a big secret, but was extremely dangerous when used, and therefore it did not receive development in Russia
  19. parus2nik
    parus2nik 15 May 2014 18: 29
    0
    Quote: Hiking
    Having received power, they could not use it.

    Like, show off ... having made a revolution ..
  20. cucun
    cucun 15 May 2014 20: 14
    +1
    Do not forget that the same rotten "intelligentsia" sent postcards to the Japanese emperor with congratulations on the victory over Russia. I'm pretty sure, and now such TV..and scratching their paws.

    P.S. However, they have no one to congratulate. bully
  21. Falcon5555
    Falcon5555 15 May 2014 20: 19
    +1
    And only the unfolding revolutionary events in the country forced Emperor Nicholas II to go to the world, which in no way was the result of military defeat. Our victory was thwarted by people who launched a terrorist war in Russia under the name of the “Revolution of 1905”, those who already dreamed of changing the political system in Russia and made every possible effort to achieve this.

    Here it is slightly shifted from a sore head to a healthy one. Tsushima is the result not only of failures in tactics and strategy, but also of the originality of the shells that were in charge of some great prince. The revolution is also a consequence of the fact that everyone was tired of praying like a god for the "tsar-father" and all his brothers-in-arms, useless "grand dukes", etc., who could not cope with matters, but very pleasantly "reigned" for themselves. Rifles were smuggled in - if there was no one (and at whom) to shoot them, then they would not have been imported. In addition, the remoteness of the theater of operations and, in general, there is little need for those territories for Russia, so there is no need for war, even though it is a shame that they were attacked and beaten.
  22. Gray 43
    Gray 43 16 May 2014 00: 03
    0
    Reading the works of V. Pikul involuntarily hooked on the theme of the Russo-Japanese war, let this author not pretend to be an accurate description, but the facts about the sponsors and the reasons for this war are the same. Kuropatkin was still that commander, Stessel was a match for him, and soldiers and sailors paid for their mediocrity with their lives. England didn’t need Russia, but they feared Japan’s strengthening - the war could have exhausted both warring parties, and this would have been beneficial for the industrialists. Admiring the stamina and courage of their ancestors, I am sure that it was not the troops who lost the war, but their leadership.
  23. Nikich
    Nikich 16 May 2014 09: 32
    0
    Quote: Falcon5555
    And only the unfolding revolutionary events in the country forced Emperor Nicholas II to go to the world, which in no way was the result of military defeat. Our victory was thwarted by people who launched a terrorist war in Russia under the name of the “Revolution of 1905”, those who already dreamed of changing the political system in Russia and made every possible effort to achieve this.

    Here it is slightly shifted from a sore head to a healthy one. Tsushima is the result not only of failures in tactics and strategy, but also of the originality of the shells that were in charge of some great prince. The revolution is also a consequence of the fact that everyone was tired of praying like a god for the "tsar-father" and all his brothers-in-arms, useless "grand dukes", etc., who could not cope with matters, but very pleasantly "reigned" for themselves. Rifles were smuggled in - if there was no one (and at whom) to shoot them, then they would not have been imported. In addition, the remoteness of the theater of operations and, in general, there is little need for those territories for Russia, so there is no need for war, even though it is a shame that they were attacked and beaten.

    Sorry, of course, but most of this "useless fraternity", as you put it personally, fought in the First World War. Nikolai personally took command of the troops and went to the front. Something we did not observe in the Soviet leaders
    1. Falcon5555
      Falcon5555 16 May 2014 13: 58
      +2
      personally fought in World War I.

      Did you go on the attack, or did you sit in the headquarters? And how did you manage? At least the headquarters coped with the business? As I understand it, Nikolai's "personal" command consisted of sitting at headquarters in the rear. It was "bold". Moreover, the problems were similar in the Japanese war. There were problems with shells in Tsushima. And in the First World War - the lack of artillery and shells too. I do not know if the problem of weight and type of gunpowder was solved, and by the way it would be interesting to know, but it is known that there was a significant shortage of artillery and shells for it. So they coped with matters in the first world war - your assessment?
  24. Nikich
    Nikich 18 May 2014 05: 49
    0
    They did it. Just too much we trusted the Entente. They were rescued several times. See the initial phase of the war. We just defeated the Austro-Hungarian army. For all the years of the war, we never let the German army into the original Russian territory (even when the revolutionary events happened). Even a little more and the Germans would have lost (as we see from history, it happened) Russia turned out to be the only country to lose the loser
  25. Andrey Arkharov
    Andrey Arkharov April 13 2015 15: 10
    0
    The greatness and power of Russia was very much feared by the countries of the "civilized" world. It was clear that very soon all these countries would be pushed into the background by the mighty Russian giant.
    Then in 1905 they did not succeed, but it came out in 1917, and now it is also happening. Only Russia needs a strong Russia.
    Only, the concept of the "Fifth Column" in the historical context, for me carries a positive meaning, because my sympathies are on the side of Franco. It would be more correct to name the article:
    “The Russo-Japanese War: Democrats Disrupted Our Victory”.