Military Review

Luftwaffe Covert Flights

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Luftwaffe Covert Flights



Hidden airfields

Almost immediately after the fall of the Third Reich in May 1945, rumors about the secrets of the Nazi regime appeared and gained strength. They talked and talked about secret bases on the shores of Antarctica, about the fugitive Nazi villages in the jungles of South America, about the huge bunkers under the major cities of Germany, where the Werewolf militants have been hiding for years ... Surprisingly, a significant amount of these rumors turn out to be, if not true, then at least with some real foundation. In particular, traces of many secret airfields and submarine bases were and are being found in the most remote corners, where, it would seem, the notorious “echo of war” should not have reached.

In the summer of 1989, debris of the Soviet twin-engined Pe-3 fighter with the remains of a crew were accidentally discovered in the shallowed swamp in the Arkhangelsk Region. Searches of local historians in the archives showed that this plane was piloted by Lieutenant Ustimenko, who, together with the crew of his slave, was considered missing since November 1942. Perhaps this would not be surprising - the downed planes were and will still be found in various places for a long time - if not for one strange circumstance: there were several thousand kilometers to the front line from here, and the pawns were riddled cannon shells with a caliber of at least 30 mm.

And a few years later, east of Arkhangelsk, in the area of ​​the Okulov Lake, local residents stumbled upon a large sandy area covered with densely laid metal plates. The purpose of this structure, which was incomprehensible at first, became apparent when the ruins of wooden structures were found on the edge of this clearing, and there were fragments of a radio transmitter, barrels from aviation gasoline and small things of German soldiers of the Second World War. It was a secret Luftwaffe airfield. It is significant that in the late eighties similar secret take-off areas were found in several places in the Arkhangelsk and Vologda regions. Thus, it became possible to conclude that a whole network of secret Luftwaffe airfields operated in deserted areas of the Soviet North. Apparently, these jump sites were intended primarily for sabotage activities. The fact is that it was through the Vologda and Arkhangelsk regions that during the war years the goods delivered by Lend-Lease allies were delivered by rail from the ports of Murmansk and Arkhangelsk to the front. It is not surprising that in the second half of 1942, the RSHA and the Abwehr began a massive transfer to sabotage and reconnaissance groups in these areas.

Sparsely populated areas, full of dense forests or forest-tundra, impassable swamps and wastelands, created an almost perfect field for sabotage. In general, the specifics of the combat operations of German saboteurs and the few military units and bodies of the NKVD opposing them resembled the plot line of the famous story by Boris Vasiliev "And the dawns here are quiet ...". For example, at the end of June 1942 near Cherepovets and Vologda several Ju-52 planes fired five sabotage groups. These paratroopers included fighters of the notorious Brandenburg training regiment, which since its creation has specialized in sabotage and intelligence activities. True, the subsequent fate of these groups remained unknown.

During the night from 28 to 29 in August of the same year, two more groups of paratroopers from the "Brandenburg" composition landed in the Murmansk railway area. These groups managed to blow up the railway in two places and for more than a day to interrupt the movement of trains.

It must be said that the notorious "German mentality", which did not allow the German command to feel its Russian opponent, was also said here. For example, in early September of the same 1942 of the year, the German sabotage group was parachuted parachute north-west of Syktyvkar in order to destroy the bridge across the Vychegda River: the only railway linking Vorkuta with the central regions of the USSR ran through it. The saboteurs managed to destroy the guard of the bridge, but the explosion did not take place, since the criminal prisoners who worked nearby, unexpectedly for the Germans attacked them and literally tore them apart. Of course, hardly anyone would be able to explain to the German experts on the “Russian question” why the convicts of the Stalinist GULAG, offended by the authorities, not only do not join the “liberators”, but rather kill them with their bare hands.

Zeppelin Project

In general, in the autumn of 1942, a massive outburst of German spies was observed throughout the European part of the Soviet Union: in September and early October, numerous groups of paratroopers were thrown out in the Yaroslavl, Penza, and Saratov regions and in the Bologsky area. The fact is that even 15 February 1942, by order of Reichsführer Himmler, created a special intelligence agency, codenamed "Zeppelin". This structure was supposed to weaken the military-economic potential of the USSR with the help of sabotage, sabotage and terror. General management was carried out by the foreign intelligence chief of SD, Walter Schellenberg, and for planning specific operations, Otto Skorzeny, a specialist in sabotage work in the Third Reich, was attracted.

The project "Zeppelin" received a priority in the plans of the German special services. In all concentration camps, offices and recruiting centers were created, whose employees carefully selected the "contingent". Thousands of volunteers were to be selected from among Soviet prisoners of war, who after special training would have been abandoned in the rear areas of the Soviet Union. Indeed, by the end of 1942, about 15 had been recruited to thousands of people who were then trained in sabotage and intelligence schools. A network of such schools - around 60 - was promptly established under the auspices of Zeppelin. It is known that such special schools were located in Evpatoria, not far from Pskov, near Warsaw and near Breslau.

... In early September, a group of Estonian saboteurs was thrown near the Konosh station. They were all soldiers of the Finnish army. Separated, the saboteurs for nearly a month blew up a railway line and each time went unnoticed. To capture the elusive paratroopers in the area Konosha pulled together several army units: together with the fighters of the local fighter units, they combed the area, but the results did not work. At the same time, the NKVD radio service was able to intercept the cipher sent by the saboteurs to its center. The decipherment showed that the Germans decided to evacuate the group, and the export was to carry out a seaplane from Lake Lacha, located north-west of Konosha.

On the shores of the lake, an ambush was immediately organized from among the troops of the NKVD and the cadets of the local military school. Early in the morning of October 22, a flying boat He-115 appeared from the mist, which safely splashed down onto the lake. Soon, elusive Estonians appeared on the shore. Immediately after that, they were fired from rifles and light machine guns. However, even under fire, five saboteurs managed to jump into the plane, which immediately took off. The rest, shooting, went into the woods.

The Heinkel managed to take off, but the pilot was seriously injured and a fuel tank shot through, so after thirty kilometers the Germans had to make an emergency landing on a nearby lake. After leaving the damaged aircraft, the Estonians, together with a German flight engineer, tried to escape into the forest, but were soon surrounded by the troops of the NKVD. The German shot himself while the saboteurs surrendered. After some time, several more members of this sabotage group were identified and eliminated, trying to break through to the front line. Nevertheless, the group was not completely destroyed, several of its fighters still managed to escape to their own.

In general, sabotage and intelligence activities in the northern regions of the Soviet Union seemed so attractive to the leadership of German intelligence services that at the beginning of 1943, in the city of Rovaniemi (Finland), a special intelligence school was organized, where spies and saboteurs were trained to work in polar conditions. Since July of the same year, the Abvergroup-204, located in Pskov, was engaged in a similar activity.

After special training, agents from a nearby airfield in Pskov were thrown into the Soviet rear. Their tasks were most often sabotage on railway transport, the destruction of logistic bases and warehouses, and also the conduct of anti-Soviet propaganda. In some cases, the transfer was carried out at a distance of up to two thousand kilometers, and sometimes further. It was then that the most secret airfields were used for refueling and recreation, traces of which are still found in the Arkhangelsk and Vologda regions.

During 1943, the number of saboteurs abandoned to the Soviet rear almost doubled, and almost half of them were driven to a depth from 300 to 2000 kilometers from the front line. True, many prisoners of war went on recruitment with only one goal: to escape from the concentration camp, therefore, according to statistics from the NKVD, a third of all agents went to surrender immediately after landing. Although a certain percentage of Zeppelin agents did not give up, they also didn’t contact the German leadership anymore - they simply dissolved in the vast expanses of the country. An example of such unproductive work is the activity of the abvercommand-104, which, as part of the Zeppelin program, from October 1942 to September 1943 scored about the 150 groups of agents to the Soviet rear. Only two of them returned.

It must be said that the management of the Zeppelin constantly developed various projects for the transfer of large-scale air assault forces to the Soviet rear. So, in the summer of 1943, a plan was developed for the landing of four special groups of up to 400 people. At the same time, one group was to be landed in the Northern Urals, the second - in the Volga basin, the third - on the Kama and the fourth - in the Astrakhan region. For some reason, the Germans abandoned this idea. But the most ambitious project, matured and partially carried out at the RSHA, was a landing with the aim of organizing an uprising of GULAG prisoners. On this project it is necessary to stop in more detail

Grab the Urals

At the very beginning of the war, the commander of the 102 Infantry Division Ivan Bessonov was captured by the Germans. At the first interrogation, he stated that he considered himself unjustly offended by the Soviet authorities and therefore offered his services to the enemy. It turns out that from 1930 to 1940 the year he served in the border troops of the NKVD, but then during the Soviet-Finnish war he angered his superiors with something, and he was transferred to the army. This bending career did not suit Bessonov, so he decided, being captured, to open betrayal. Moreover, while in the camp for captive officers, he decided to create his own political organization, the “Political Center for Combating Bolshevism.” The German SD service took Bessonov under her care and soon transferred to the Buchenwald sonder camp, where he was able to do organizational work. By July 1942, a headquarters with several departments had been formed.

It was then, in order to prove his loyalty, Bessonov offered the Germans a large-scale plan to capture the Urals. The plan provided for the landing of an airborne assault force of six thousand people from among Soviet prisoners of war. The release was to be made in a large space from the Northern Dvina and Ob to Perm and Izhevsk. Immediately after the landing, the paratrooper assault detachments were supposed to seize the numerous gulag camps located in the area, arm the prisoners and organize a mass uprising against Soviet power. The main objective of the operation was the complete seizure of the Urals and the cessation of the railway communication of the European part of the Soviet Union with Siberia and the Far East.

With all its outward idiocy, such a plan, with the prosperity of all circumstances, could have worked. Bessonov, thanks to his past service in the NKVD, knew the location and security system of the camps. It should be borne in mind that only in the Komi Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic at that time no less than 250 of thousands of prisoners were “in prison”; even if it were possible to arm and sagit against at least half of them, a pro-German army would appear in the Soviet rear, equal to about ten divisions. Especially since the situation in the gulag was really quite tense, the riots of prisoners occurred during the war. For example, in January 1942, the rebels managed to even capture the village of Ust-Usa, a district center a hundred kilometers from Pechora.

The 2 Squadron Aufkl.Gr.Ob. dL, which specialized in throwing saboteurs and agents into the enemy’s deep rear, there were He-111 airplanes that made it possible to deliver troops from airfields in Finland and northern Norway to areas of Vorkuta and Salekhard with an intermediate landing at secret bases in the Arkhangelsk region. In the case of the capture of Salekhard, it was possible to arrange supplies by sea.

One way or another, but in October 1942, the Bessonov plan entered a phase of practical implementation: The Political Council on Combating Bolshevism began preparing sixty radio operators at once, a detailed program of military seizure of the Urals zone was developed, and the release of anti-Soviet propaganda literature began. In the area of ​​Breslau, in a secret reconnaissance center, a three-battalion assault brigade was formed. By the summer of 1943, everything was supposed to be ready, but in the spring Bessonov was suddenly arrested and again placed in a concentration camp. The fact is that at this time Bessonov’s main competitor, the notorious General Vlasov, came onto the scene.

But despite the refusal of the Bessonov plan, the leadership of the German intelligence services decided to make a test throw into the territory of the Komi Republic. The terrain there was almost ideal for a hidden landing of a diversionary group: numerous swamp forests, rare settlements, but there were dozens of bridges on the Vorkuta - Pechora-Kotlas-Vologda railway.

Finally, 6 on June 1943, a group of twelve former Soviet prisoners of war, which first underwent special training at the Abwehr intelligence school near Riga, and then a lengthy briefing just before leaving Narvik (Norway), made a parachute landing around the village of Kozhva twenty kilometers from Pechora. The main task of the group was to prepare in the deserted area of ​​the runway to receive aircraft with new batches of saboteurs; in addition, it was supposed to try to conduct a series of explosions on the Pechora railway.

Despite the trial character of the assault mission, the Germans did not stint on equipment: along with the saboteurs, the 22 cargo container was dropped from weapons, explosives, radios, products and uniforms. All saboteurs were dressed in the uniform of the NKVD officers and had impeccable documents, as well as money and ration cards. The team was led by a proven agent of the Abwehr Nikolaev.

The next day after landing, Nikolaev managed to collect the saboteurs dispersed during the throwing and found almost all cargo containers. But what happened next was not part of the Abwehr’s plans: one of the militants unexpectedly shot Nikolayev, after which the whole group went to surrender to the Soviet authorities. True, it turned out that local representatives of the NKVD not only did not know anything about the landing force, but were also completely unprepared for such a development of events. Indeed, the appearance in the depths of Russia, thousands of kilometers from the front, militants in the form of the NKVD with weapons and explosives could cause shock to anyone. The local authorities decided to start a radio game with the Germans, but already during the session it turned out that the command map with coded coordinates had been lost. The Germans, obviously, decided to elementary check whether the radio operator works under the control of the Russians. There was nothing to answer, so the radio game ended, without really starting.

The Abwehr reconnaissance groups no longer abandoned their own in this area.

Without the top secret "

... On the night of June 19, the front line at high altitude crossed the Heinkel-1943 unmarked and plunged into Soviet territory. In the area of ​​Yegoryevsk, Moscow Region, two German intelligence agents were parachuted from a plane. Thus began the active phase of Operation Joseph, prepared by Zeppelin-Nord, one of the branches of the Unternemen Zeppelin reconnaissance unit VI of the RSHA (VI C / Z).

However, the ambitious plans of the enemy did not come true.

In the early morning of June 20, 1943, a man came to the Egoryevsky District Department of the NKVD of the Moscow Region. He said to the surprised duty officer, that he was a front-line intelligence officer of a special department of the North-Western Front, Severov, who had infiltrated German intelligence. Together with his partner, Boytsov was abandoned by the Germans on parachutes to the rear of the Red Army to perform a special mission. Naturally, Severov and the Fighters were immediately delivered to Moscow at the disposal of the Main Directorate of Counterintelligence Smersh of the USSR NPO.

It soon became clear that Severov did indeed perform special missions of the Soviet authorities. Due to the fact that the group had a very interesting task, on which it was possible to carry out serious counterintelligence activities, soon the head of the SEMC Smersh was authorized to hold a radio game with a branch of the intelligence agency VI C / Z Zeppelin-Nord. Thus began one of Smersh’s largest radio games, “Riddle,” conducted from 27 on June 1943 to 7 on April 1945. The Fighters were used as a radio operator, which seemed logical, based on the assignment he received. All encryptions going to Zeppelin were signed with the pseudonym Joseph (Joseph).

In parallel, work continued on calling an enemy aircraft into our territory. On the night of 14 on 15 in August 1944, in the area of ​​Yegoryevsk, on a specially prepared counterintelligence site equipped with trap pits, an enemy aircraft of unknown design landed, sent to deliver the extracted materials. However, the unexpected happened. To the surprise of the Sirsh people, he was not stuck in any of the traps. When counterintelligence officers understood this, they opened fire to kill, but the plane successfully maneuvered on the runway, turned around under fire, took off and safely left the front line ...

The solution to such a failure was possible only after a month, when a similar special aircraft of the Arado-232 brand was captured in the Smolensk region during the radio game “Fog”. It turned out that the plane that had arrived after the materials allegedly obtained by the German agent was specially designed to land reconnaissance groups deep in the rear of the enemy. Instead of the usual chassis, he was equipped with rubber tracks, which enabled him to land even on wetlands. This allowed his crew to successfully avoid the trap.

Then, in the spring-summer of 1944, the last surge of German activity occurred, when several ambitious projects were undertaken. These include the saboteurs of the “Alash” detachment in Kazakhstan with the aim of organizing an anti-Soviet uprising, and preparing for the bombing of the Ural industrial centers with Vau-1 cruise missiles. But, of course, the most impressive was the plan of the assassination attempt on Stalin. This episode is repeatedly described in the literature; therefore, we will mention it only insofar as the special purpose aircraft also took part in it.

September 30 1944 received a memorandum No. 4126 / M from the USSR NKGB. The document reported: “5 September p. the city near the district center of the Smolensk region - with. Karmanova NKVD-NKGB detained a suspect unknown in the form of a major of the Red Army. He followed a motorcycle with a sidecar on the way to Rzhev and presented documents to the name of Hero of the Soviet Union Tavrin Pyotr Ivanovich. Together with him, a woman was detained, who was driving in a motorcycle stroller, who called herself Tavrina’s wife, Shilova Lydia Petrovna. During the search, the detainees seized a special Panzerknack with 9 charges. The study found that the Panzerknack projectile (caliber 30 mm, length 170 mm, weight 235 grams) is an armored-piercing high-explosive grenade of cumulative action with armor penetration 35 — 40 mm with a range of up to 300 meters. The device is connected with a thin wire to an electric battery and is operated by pressing a button ...

From September 1943 of the year to August 1944 of the year inclusive Tavrin, first in Pskov, and then in Riga and Berlin under the leadership of Skorzen, head of the Eastern Division of the SD, employee of the SD (who participated in the abduction of Mussolini) training as a terrorist to commit terrorist acts against the leaders of the USSR. In addition, the processing of Tavrin for a long time led by a traitor to the Motherland in Germany - the former secretary of the Rostokinsky District Committee of the CPSU (b) in Moscow G. N. Zhilenkov.

P. Tavrin (right) and Deputy Head of the German Zeppelin-Nord intelligence agency in Riga G. Greif


On the night of 4 on September 5 with. He was transferred across the front line from the Riga airfield on a four-engine German transport aircraft equipped for landing on unsuitable sites and landed with a motorcycle in the area with. Karmanova. The transfer was organized by the German intelligence agency SD in Riga, conditionally referred to as "Zeppelin".

The purpose of the transfer is to organize and carry out a terrorist act against T. Stalin, and, if appropriate, also other members of the government — Beria, Kaganovich and Molotov. Attached album of evidence in the case.

To identify further intentions of the German intelligence in the case of Tavrin started a radio game with the Germans. 25 October with. A two-way communication was established with the enemy’s radio center. As a radio operator, Tavrina’s wife, Lydia Yakovlevna Shilova (arrested), who had a course of radio service from the Germans and was thrown to the rear with Tavrin, was used ... ”

We can only add to what has been said that the unique aircraft that made the transfer crashed on the way back, and the performers almost immediately after landing were in the hands of the NKVD.

Tavrin at the motorcycle before throwing over the front line


The plane for the saboteur

What was this "miracle plane"? The aerodynamic scheme of the aircraft was chosen by Wilhelm Van Nes, chief designer of the company, from the conditions for ensuring a given dependency: payload — range at a sufficiently high cruising speed for its class from good take-off and landing data, operation from unprepared platforms, high flight performance in the entire range operational flight conditions.

The high location of the wing with the placement of engines on it and the spaced two-fin vertical tail allowed to obtain a favorable change in the longitudinal moment of the aircraft in a wide range of angles of attack. The two-spar wing consisted of a rectangular center section and trapezoidal consoles. Creating a wing with highly efficient mechanization required a lot of research before settling on retractable flaps that took about 53 percent of the wing span and increased the wing area by almost 25 percent. In addition, during takeoff, an intensive blowing of the wing with screws located opposite, in the middle of the flaps, increased the lift force by almost 30 percent. All this allowed us to obtain the maximum lift coefficient.

To reduce the length of the run was supposed to use brake parachutes, and to reduce the takeoff, if necessary, could be used rocket boosters. The layout of the plumage was chosen by an exploded two-keel scheme, fashionable at that time, in order to remove the horizontal plumage from the range of the bevel flow from the wing with fully released mechanization. This arrangement allowed us to choose a relatively small in area horizontal and vertical tail with low aerodynamic drag.

Taking into account the maximum payload, dimensions and amount of cargo transported, as well as ensuring the possibility of dropping them on parachutes, the dimensions of the cargo compartment and the fuselage, the shape of its tail section were determined. As a result of the development of all variants, the cargo compartment turned out to be 6,6 m long, 2,3 m wide and 2 m high. These dimensions met the requirements of the customer regarding the capacity of the cargo compartment.
To reduce the frontal resistance of the fuselage, it was decided to make the lower bypass of the rear part of the fuselage Ar-232 rounded, which made it possible to obtain a fuselage with good aerodynamic characteristics with a small drag coefficient.

The most interesting innovation proposed by Van Nes is the chassis design. For operation from normal, prepared airfields, the aircraft had the usual three-post landing gear with a nose wheel, and for operation from unprepared sites under the belly of the aircraft, an additional landing gear consisting of 22 small pneumatics. Such a landing gear made it possible for the aircraft to land on an extremely inappropriate terrain, for example, on fallen tree trunks up to 15 cm thick and ditches 1,5 m deep. Naturally, if such a landing was planned, then the carrying capacity was reduced. For its unusual chassis scheme, Ar-232 received the nickname “Centipede” from German soldiers.

To reduce the time for loading and unloading in the cargo compartment of the fuselage, a rail with a hoist was installed on the ceiling. The rear part of the fuselage could be lowered with the help of a hydraulic drive, as a loading ramp, which at the same time facilitates the landing of troops and cargoes. The defensive armament consisted of three MG-81 Z machine guns. One in the nose with 1000 ammunition rounds of ammunition, on the top of the fuselage - with an arsenal of 1600 shots and above the ramp - 2000 cartridges.

With the development of Ar-232 planned to attract transport operations in North Africa and the Arctic. To perform tasks in diametrically opposite climatic conditions, the standard equipment of the aircraft included winter and summer sets of equipment and accessories, such as: an additional radio kit, a rescue rubber raft, an oil heating radiator, an autonomous starter and various tools to perform repair work away from their bases.

At the end of the war, Ar-232 participated in several special missions. About one of them - the operation "Scherhom" - it is worth mentioning in more detail. After the defeat of Army Group Center in the summer of 1944, the remnants of German units were surrounded. One of the groups was commanded by Sherhorn, who tried to get to his westward, but received an order to organize in the rear of the Soviet troops a kind of partisan war.

G. SherhornFor the supply and subsequent evacuation of the Sherhorn group and others like it, they wanted to attract six Ar-232, transferred to KG 200, but in reality at the time of the beginning of December 8 operation only two cars were transferred. Until February, 1945 th they carried out single flights to supply the group of Sherhorn. Non-systematic flights were caused by bad weather, technical problems and strong opposition in the air.

Despite the incredible activity of the Germans, the operation eventually proved to be useless. Soviet intelligence showed all its skill: Sherhorn had long been captured, and the German command of radio reports hoped for success.

By the way, the Ar-232 B-017 - one of the two cars participating in that operation, was later captured by the British in excellent condition and flown around. Eric Brown, a RAF test pilot who tested the aircraft in the air, confirmed the excellent flying qualities of the German “transport worker”. After the war, this machine was used for communication between England and Germany, and in November, 1945 was participating in the demonstration of captured aircraft in Farnborough.

Unfortunately, the production of the world's first specialized military transport aircraft, capable of operating from completely unprepared landing pads, fell victim to the reduction of types of Luftwaffe aircraft at the end of World War II with a red pencil stroke. And for this reason, Ar-232 could not get as widely known as Ju-52.

Indeed, most of the Germans sabotage and reconnaissance groups were carried out by the famous Ju-52, so be sure to say a few words about it.

Seemingly bulky and outwardly angular, the Ju-52 by the beginning of World War II would seem to have completely lost any combat potential. But this unpretentious combination of corrugated plating, non-removable landing gear and three air-cooled engines, known in the Luftwaffe under the nickname "Aunt Yu", played a more important role during the war than many combat aircraft.

Goebbels with a group of fighters reconnaissance and sabotage units


The first three-engine Ju-52 / 3 m designed by Ernst Zindel made its first flight in April 1931. The success of the trials led to the decision to focus on creating just this option. All the airframes already on the assembly line in Dessau were converted to three engines. In 1941, the Ju-52 / Зm-g7 e went to the series with an increased cargo hatch in the board and autopilot. Externally, they were distinguished by large fairings on the wing behind the engines, and some cars - by an additional rifle installation on the cab, called the “condor cap”. Later this installation became standard.

The Ju-52 / 3 m-g8 e got a big cargo door plus an additional door in the cab floor. During production, the MG-15 was installed instead of the MG-131 top machine gun. For re-equipment in solving various problems, seven standard “conversion kits” were used, which are installed directly in the units.

The latest production version of the Ju-52 / 3 m-g14 e was put into production at the end of the autumn 1943 and was produced until the middle of the 1944, when production was discontinued. He used the pilot's armor protection, the armament consisted of a MG-15 machine gun on a mobile unit on the cab roof, two MG-15 in side windows and a MG-131 machine gun on the upper open turret. With the exception of aircraft made in Hungary, lutfwaffe took 1944 Ju-376 / Зm from German and French factories during 52. Since the beginning of 1939, 3225 aircraft have been launched.
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  1. Starover_Z
    Starover_Z 18 September 2013 08: 36 New
    26
    The saboteurs managed to destroy the guard of the bridge, but the explosion did not take place, since the criminal prisoners working nearby, unexpectedly for the Germans attacked them and literally tore them apart. Of course, hardly anyone could explain to German experts on the "Russian question" why the prisoners of the Stalinist Gulag, offended by the authorities, not only do not join the "liberators", but, on the contrary, kill them with their bare hands.

    This is how the ideological education of Soviet people affected.
    They sit, suffer, but they beat the enemy! Because they won the war!
    They did not sell their homeland for food, a warm corner and money!
    1. Rink
      Rink 18 September 2013 10: 29 New
      12
      Quote: Starover_Z
      This is how the ideological education of Soviet people affected.
      They sit, suffer, but they beat the enemy! Because they won the war!
      They did not sell their homeland for food, a warm corner and money!

      Yes, often our ordinary people performed amazing deeds.

      But at the same time it saddens that:
      ... captured by the Germans commander of the 102nd rifle division Ivan Bessonov. At the first interrogation, he stated that he considered himself unjustly offended by the Soviet regime and therefore offered his services to the enemy.
      ... from 1930 to 1940 he served in the border troops of the NKVD, but then during the Soviet-Finnish war he angered his superiors with something, and he was transferred to the army (note: you didn’t get fired or imprisoned - just transferred! (approx.). Such a bend in his career did not suit Bessonov in any way ... ... to prove his loyalty, Bessonov proposed to the Germans a large-scale plan for the capture of the Urals.
      .
      ..treatment of Tavrin ... was conducted by a traitor to the Motherland located in Germany - a former secretary of the Rostokinsky district committee of the CPSU (b) of Moscow G. N. Zhilenkov.


      And now tell me that the Stalinist purges of the NKVD and the army were not justified before the war, and that good honest fighters and commanders were simply recognized as unreliable and "cleaned up"? "Bending career", you see some did not suit! I think those convicts who broke the Germans with their bare hands were ordinary repeat offenders. It was they (though they themselves were not a present), they did not sell their homeland. In contrast to the "political", which just easily became traitors and gladly switched to the service of the Germans. Moreover, they put forward their initiatives!

      Nah ...
      I personally have long been convinced: had it not been for the 37th year, the army would not have survived in the WWII. There were no less potential traitors in the army and party than there are now NPOs and grant recipients at all levels of government.
      Only now no one can drive them away from the feeder.
      They stuck tightly.
      1. Gato
        Gato 18 September 2013 11: 08 New
        +4
        Quote: Skating rink
        recognized unreliable and "cleaned"

        They cleaned it, but unfortunately they did not clean it all.
        For example, the Vlasovites Mr. Kononov, who went over to the Germans along with most of the 436 joint ventures 155 sd (and with them political commander (!) Panchenko). Crossed, as they say, with songs and banners.
        By the way, Kononov himself is a former secretary of the party bureau of the regiment.

        Well, a few hundred thousand “heavis” are also an example.
      2. washi
        washi 18 September 2013 14: 50 New
        +2
        Unfortunately you are right.
        The same Pavlov with the company, instead of following the directive of 18.06/XNUMX. disarmed the troops. Yes, and Zhukov has questions.
      3. Captain Vrungel
        Captain Vrungel 18 September 2013 19: 06 New
        +8
        Here they are "heroes of the current time." The corporate thugs at power or power thugs (for good pennies) howl at corporate parties, but for very good ones ... "art has no boundaries" ....
    2. jasper
      jasper 18 September 2013 11: 18 New
      -1
      nd love homeland is this called ideological education? and why did this upbringing not save the union at 91?
    3. Volkhov
      Volkhov 18 September 2013 14: 14 New
      +1
      The incident speaks of the mass landing of patriots in the first place and the topic is not developed - what happened to the convicts and the convoy armed with what was busy?
      1. washi
        washi 18 September 2013 14: 51 New
        +1
        The convoy fought with the ZK. The manual is "gone"
      2. Rink
        Rink 18 September 2013 16: 49 New
        0
        Quote: Volkhov
        The case speaks of the mass landing of patriots in the first place ...

        Well no.
        It’s just that the Deutsch didn’t run into political prisoners, but simple.
        In the camps, after all, not only urki but thieves in law were sitting. There were also simple Soviet people — some for everyday life, some for absenteeism or a drunken debauch. Someone for the "spikelets", someone for stupidity, someone on the denunciation of the informer by mistake - there have always been judicial errors, and not only in the USSR. Yes, and thieves with thieves, although you can’t call them good people, had patriotic feelings no weaker.

        If there were political ones, they would have rolled the red carpet, and then they stood in line, being recorded as traitors.
        1. Volkhov
          Volkhov 18 September 2013 18: 55 New
          +1
          For these conclusions you need to have a to-do list. So far, one thing is clear - people are patriots, but they were in the war.
          1. Rink
            Rink 18 September 2013 21: 07 New
            -1
            Quote: Volkhov
            So far, one thing is clear - people are patriots, but they were in the war.

            Well, you see as you like to see more.
            And I would say differently:

            In the Great Patriotic War EVEN THOSE WHO SITTED - all the same were patriots!


            1. Gato
              Gato 18 September 2013 23: 23 New
              0
              Quote: Skating rink
              In the Great Patriotic War EVEN THOSE WHO SITTED - all the same were patriots!

              Come on, don’t tell! There were also former Basmachi, Dashnaks, and NKVD officials (for example, until 1939-1940, 70% of the leadership of the NKVD of the Ukrainian SSR were Jewish, not much less in the RSFSR). What camp patriots were they?
              And this situation seems to me a little easier.
              Imagine: ZK build a bridge thousands of kilometers from the front. Then some sabotage appears and try to blow it up. Suppose they blew it up. Showdown begins - who is to blame. The local NKVD will probably try to blame everything on the sabotage of the ZK itself, for whoever believes in German saboteurs in such a wilderness. And if he believes, he will accuse the same NKVD of sloppiness. Does he need it? Therefore, for ZK the only way out is to tear sabotage. If you are lucky, then you can also cut off the deadlines, otherwise they will solder another piece of gold for sabotage in wartime (or even brush your foreheads with green paint).
  2. drop
    drop 18 September 2013 08: 41 New
    22
    The material is very interesting. In my youth I had to work in the North. Based on the results of the materials I published the novel "Ice Wall". As early as 21 on June 1941, the Finns landed troops in the 6 area of ​​the White Sea-Baltic Canal lock in order to interrupt the wiring of ships to the Northern Fleet. The landing was destroyed. I released a novel, and also the novel "Dawns Here Are Quiet" appeared. This is our history and the glorious work of the special services to protect our state. Bright memory to our fathers and grandfathers.
    1. mejik
      mejik 18 September 2013 11: 15 New
      +8
      Dear Yuri Grigoryevich! We hope that you will not make us wait long and will present TOPVAR with your articles based on your knowledge and experience. Sincerely yours, a simple ordinary person.
  3. avt
    avt 18 September 2013 08: 58 New
    +5
    Quote: Drop
    The material is very interesting.

    But not complete and does not match the title. Where is, for example, infa on flights of Condor in the Kalmyk and Kazakh steppes, when they established an air bridge to Japan? I'm not talking about flights to Iran and Iraq.
    1. 0255
      0255 18 September 2013 09: 35 New
      +2
      The material is very interesting.

      But not complete and does not match the title. Where is, for example, infa on flights of Condor in the Kalmyk and Kazakh steppes, when they established an air bridge to Japan? I'm not talking about flights to Iran and Iraq.

      I hope this info appears on TOPWAR. But it would be nice to see photos and diagrams of this Arado-232 in the article, otherwise I’m too lazy to type in search engines)))
      We are waiting from the author the whole truth about German flying saucers)))
      1. Gato
        Gato 18 September 2013 10: 39 New
        10
        Especially for the lazy: laughing
        1. 0255
          0255 18 September 2013 12: 40 New
          +1
          Thank you fa photo)))
        2. Bosk
          Bosk 18 September 2013 22: 32 New
          0
          Somewhere information slipped that these 11 pairs of small wheels were used as an auxiliary support during loading and unloading, and not as an additional chassis.
        3. Bosk
          Bosk 18 September 2013 22: 36 New
          +1
          By the way, in this photo you can clearly see that it stands with an open cargo compartment, with emphasis on all the chassis.
      2. Sirozha
        Sirozha 18 September 2013 14: 00 New
        +6
        https://www.google.com.ua/search?q=ar-232+%D1%81%D0%B0%D0%BC%D0%BE%D0%BB%D0%B5%D

        1%82+%D1%84%D0%BE%D1%82%D0%BE&oq=ar-232+&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j69i57j0l2.3656j0&sou

        rceid = chrome & ie = UTF-8 - and here is the search result)
        1. 0255
          0255 18 September 2013 15: 48 New
          0
          I wonder if such aircraft survived in our time?
          1. patrianostra
            patrianostra 18 September 2013 19: 37 New
            +2
            U-52 in latin america dosihpor fly
            1. Gato
              Gato 18 September 2013 23: 52 New
              +1
              Quote: patrianostra
              U-52 in latin america dosihpor fly

              As a rare bore and bookworm I will allow myself to correct you a little hi :
              U-52 (submarine) has not flown for a long time (does not want and does not swim), because it was sunk in May 1945.
              And this is the Junkers Ju-52 / 3m (or a similar modification)
          2. Bosk
            Bosk 18 September 2013 22: 28 New
            0
            Until the end of the war, only one apparatus was preserved, and on this basis it is thought that it is unlikely to have survived to this day.
  4. Yun Klob
    Yun Klob 18 September 2013 09: 14 New
    +8
    Interestingly, the bulk of the spies were caught by the personnel of patrols and regulatory posts of the Road Forces, at that time subordinate to the NKVD. The road forces provided road maintenance, restoration of bridges, traffic regulation on roads and camouflage on them.
    The effectiveness of patrols and regulatory posts forced spies and saboteurs to advance to places of combat missions bypassing roads, which in turn attracted the attention of local residents and again made it possible to quickly neutralize the enemy.
    Subsequently, the road troops were transferred to the rear, and during the reforms of Serdyukov practically eliminated.
    1. Gato
      Gato 18 September 2013 10: 44 New
      +3
      Quote: Yoon Clob
      Subsequently, the road forces were transferred to the rear

      Yes, as part of the road-curfew service. In the SA, they were organized into separate battalions, which in the threatened period were supposed to be deployed into brigades, as far as I know of corps and army submission.
  5. smiths xnumx
    smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 09: 37 New
    +5
    The Italians indulged in similar things during the War years, who tried to establish an "air bridge" with Italy.
    On June 29, 1942, a SM.21GA aircraft belonging to one of the SA S squadrons took off from Guidonia airfield, 75 km northeast of Rome, in strict secrecy. On the same day, it landed at the Ukrainian Zaporozhye airfield. The next day - June 30 - he again took off and headed east. Overcoming a distance of 6200 km in twenty-one hours, the plane landed safely at Paoto's Chinese airfield. After the crew rested and refueling, the plane flew on July 3 to the capital of Japan.

    This long flight, most of which passed over the territory of the Soviet Union, the Italian leadership pursued several goals at once. Firstly, it hoped to strengthen ties with imperial Japan, and secondly, to increase the prestige of its aircraft, which had been shaken after the defeats of 1940–1941. in East and North Africa. The third reason that prompted the Italians to take such a risky flight was the desire to test in practice the possibility of regular flights between Rome and Tokyo to exchange strategically important materials and raw materials.

    The return flight SM.75GA no route Tokyo - Paoto - Zaporozhye - Guidonia also passed without any difficulties. However, the similar flight of the Japanese plane that followed it ended in failure, and the idea of ​​regular flights between Italy and Japan had to be abandoned.
    http://www.plam.ru/hist/samolety_prizraki_tretego_reiha_sekretnye_operacii_lyuft

    vaffe / p14.php

    SM.75GA
  6. svp67
    svp67 18 September 2013 09: 44 New
    +3
    THANKS to the author, the material is really interesting. And apparently, it’s worth trying to fully understand why people who formally betrayed their homeland, well aware that when they fall into the hands of the NKVD, they will be detained, in most cases, when they fall into the territory controlled by the Soviet authorities, they independently terminated the execution of the the German command of operations and surrendered to the authorities of the USSR ...
    1. Vladimirets
      Vladimirets 18 September 2013 11: 48 New
      +4
      Quote: svp67
      And apparently, it’s worth trying to fully understand why people who formally betrayed their homeland, well aware that when they fall into the hands of the NKVD, they will be detained, in most cases, when they fall into the territory controlled by the Soviet authorities, they independently terminated the execution of the the German command of operations and surrendered to the authorities of the USSR ...

      It seems to me that there are two main reasons. The first part of saboteurs is people, by the will of fate, who were captured and sought to simply get to their people at any cost and atone for their blood with blood. The second part is simply cowards who sought to survive at all costs, they went to recruit in order to survive, and during the abandonment they perfectly understood that even if they completed the task they were unlikely to return. And so, surrendering, there was hope for a pardon, and getting into the camps is still not shooting or death during liquidation.
  7. albanech
    albanech 18 September 2013 10: 19 New
    +5
    Good article! Thank! Nice to read! I will not repeat with other comments!
  8. Denis_Rossiya
    Denis_Rossiya 18 September 2013 10: 52 New
    +2
    The first paragraph of the article was intriguing! But in the end, it came down to sabotage operations in the war. In general, it is very interesting to read.
  9. mithridate
    mithridate 18 September 2013 10: 52 New
    +1
    article is really good
  10. Gato
    Gato 18 September 2013 10: 53 New
    +2
    the sides of the pawn were riddled with cannon shells with a caliber of at least 30 mm.

    You have to understand that at the secret airfield the Germans even installed anti-aircraft guns and the Pe-3 ran into them?
    Because in 1942, as far as I know, there were no such caliber on German fighter cannons.
    1. svp67
      svp67 18 September 2013 11: 22 New
      +4
      Quote: Gato
      You have to understand that at the secret airfield the Germans even installed anti-aircraft guns and the Pe-3 ran into them?
      Because in 1942, as far as I know, there were no such caliber on German fighter cannons.


      Here is an excerpt from the "source"
      http://samlib.ru/s/shewljakow_m_w/pe-3.shtml
      ... Having examined the crashed plane, we came to the conclusion that he crashed while trying to make an emergency landing. At the very last moment, the planning fighter caught on trees, rolled over and hit the ground. It remained unclear what exactly caused Ustimenko to interrupt such a crucial flight and to look for the most suitable place to sit in a deserted tundra? Technical malfunction, as suggested back in 1942?
      No, there were holes from the heavy machine gun on parts of the casing and parts! These stood on German fighter jets, but how could they end up near Arkhangelsk?
      At our request, the navigators made calculations. It turned out that the enemy fighter was supposed to start from the nearest airfield of the Luftwaffe, fly over the Kola Peninsula, the throat of the White Sea, then go deep into the Arkhangelsk tundra. That is, before meeting with the “pawn” to go almost a full radius, in a matter of seconds hit the target and immediately go to the opposite course - otherwise he would not have enough fuel to reach his own. That was incredible.
      But maybe the Germans knew where and why they were going - at a specific time and at a specific point on the Pe-3 route according to their intelligence. No, this was excluded, since the departure time and the route of the couple were kept in the strictest confidence.
      So really the Germans in our territory had a "jump airfield"? It was not possible to explain the death of the "pawns" by anything else. It was difficult to believe, besides the archives did not have any information on this subject, and historians unanimously claimed that the foot of the German occupier had not set foot on the territory of the Arkhangelsk region.
      Nevertheless, we decided to check this version as well. In July 1989, our pilots made an aerial photograph of one of the "suspicious" areas and found a deserted, elongated area resembling an airfield near Lake Okulov. We headed there.
      It was really an airfield, and not ours, but a German one, as evidenced by the covering of the runway with Russian steel plates. We saw dilapidated residential buildings, facilities for servicing military equipment. Later, geologists of the Jurassic intelligence expedition said that in that area they found fuel barrels that had a swastika in their markings. They met old hunter-hunters who saw German soldiers here during the war.
      All this not only struck us, but also posed a lot of new questions. For example, okay, the fact of the existence of a secret enemy airfield allows us to explain the secret of the death of the found "pawn" and other disappeared vehicles, but when, how did it appear in our rear? And what happened to another fighter - Gorbuntsova? He, as we know, was a slave, and when the enemy appeared, he undoubtedly entered the battle. So, somewhere nearby lies the second plane, and it is possible that the downed German ones. In short, it’s too early to put an end to it. "Search" continues the search ...
      1. Gato
        Gato 18 September 2013 12: 47 New
        0
        Quote: svp67
        No, there were holes from the heavy machine gun on parts of the casing and parts! These were on German fighters

        Thank you!
        That is why I was embarrassed about the words about the gun of the caliber "not less than 30 mm." It is unlikely that the Germans kept the MZA at the airfields of the jump.
        1. svp67
          svp67 18 September 2013 17: 53 New
          +3
          Quote: Gato
          Thank you!

          Yes, it would be for what. Actually, I was reading this article as a kid in the Technique of Youth in the 80s, I became very interested. It turns out that here, deep in the rear, the Germans had a jump airfield ... They acted famously, we can say at the limit of arrogance. And over time, I learned that they also had the operational base of their submarines in our north, and even not one. In how they fought, you bastards ... There is something to learn.
          1. Gato
            Gato 19 September 2013 00: 03 New
            +3
            Quote: svp67
            Actually, I read this article as a kid in the Technique of Youth in the 80s

            Similarly, that's why I got hooked on this topic. hi There was a magazine - a song! I don’t know how for you, but for me, he has largely determined the worldview. Now it also seems to be there, but is lost amid informational spam.
            1. studentmati
              studentmati 19 September 2013 00: 06 New
              +1
              Quote: Gato
              Now it also seems to be there, but is lost amid informational spam.


              Truth cannot be lost. Exclude the word it seems, it is also interesting in content.
              1. Gato
                Gato 19 September 2013 00: 45 New
                +4
                Quote: studentmati
                it is also interesting in content

                I don’t argue, but I want to clarify: my parents wrote out several magazines since 1976 (I was in the 2nd grade then), namely:
                "Technique for Youth" (beyond any competition)
                "Modeller-constructor" (also out of competition, except for "TM", but more specialized in technical details)
                "Young technician" (interesting, but the level is much weaker)
                "Around the World" (well, this is for general development).
                In addition, they wrote out for themselves (of course, I also read) "Radio" and "Science and Life" (if anyone remembers the crosswords with fragments over which doctors of science sobbed).
                In those pre-Internet times, these were the best and probably the only sources of systematic military-technical information - some series "Naval Collection", which are similar to airplane and tank! One can not even speak of a patriotic orientation - these publications cost more than all the newspapers Pravda, Krasnaya Zvezda, etc., taken together.

                Then I came across issues of “TM” of the late 90s - but ... Not that anymore, they began to resemble Popular Mechanics more - although, this is my subjective opinion ...
                1. Alex
                  Alex 30 January 2014 11: 56 New
                  +1
                  I’ll add my own five kopecks: “Chemistry and Life” and “Knowledge is Power”. And someone after this will say that there was no science in the Union. From my own experience I know that many of our students were taller than some of the Amerov graduates of eminent colleges.
            2. svp67
              svp67 19 September 2013 00: 08 New
              +2
              Quote: Gato
              There was a magazine - a song! I don’t know how for you, but for me, he has largely determined the worldview.

              Well, what can I say - hi in front of the editors of TOE "Youth Techniques" ... Apparently people were VERY in love with their work and this was felt in THEIR magazine, which also became MY ...
              1. Gato
                Gato 19 September 2013 00: 46 New
                +3
                Quote: svp67
                before the editors of TOY "Youth Techniques"

                hi hi hi
                1. Bosk
                  Bosk 19 September 2013 19: 33 New
                  +2
                  And I still have the firmware of the magazine "Youth Technology" from 76 to 91, gather dust on the mezzanines, as they did not beg me to throw them into any one because it is interesting to leaf through from time to time, all the same, as before they stated differently ... I would say that it’s more interesting ... more substantial ...
                  1. Gato
                    Gato 19 September 2013 22: 12 New
                    0
                    Quote: Bosk
                    as they did not beg me to throw

                    After moving, everything was “settled down” after me - in the sense it was gone. But - this is nonsense, downloaded scans from EX.UA (about 15 GB) - and everything is fine
                  2. Alex
                    Alex 30 January 2014 12: 02 New
                    +1
                    Quote: Bosk
                    And I still have the firmware of the magazine "Youth Technology" from 76 to 91, gather dust on the mezzanines,
                    I also saved mine, made some bindings. Three years ago in Neta I found everyone else from the very beginning of the release (which is interesting, they didn’t stop releasing even during the war!), Now I can’t take my son (26 years old) from the computer, he looks at everything and amazes me with revelations. That's really the truth
                    as previously stated differently ... I would not say that it is more interesting ... more informative or something ...


                    Thanks to all the enthusiastic employees of the TECH editions of these WONDERFUL magazines! hi love(women worked there too!) good
  11. smiths xnumx
    smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 11: 12 New
    +5
    Pilots of the Lufthansa in the prewar years carried out flights from Europe to the Far East. So, on November 30, 1938, the FW-200V1 "D-ACON" flight captain Henke got up from the Tempelhof airfield in Berlin. Having overcome a distance of 13 km with one intermediate landing, he then landed in Tokyo. Almost three months before that - on August 844 - the same plane made a non-stop flight Berlin - New York, flying 10 km.
    During the outbreak of war, the distance to Japan was significantly reduced, since now it was possible to use airfields in Finland, Norway and Russia for flights. Therefore, when the Luftwaffe was given the task of establishing an “air bridge” with the Japanese, several options for possible routes were developed at once:
    - from the Finnish airfield of Kemi to Sakhalin Island - with a length of 6350 km,
    - from the airport of Kirovograd, in Ukraine, to the airport of Paoto, near the Chinese city of Hankou, which was in the territory occupied by the Japanese, - 6125 km long,
    - from the Finnish Petsamo or the Norwegian Kirkenes to the Qiqihar airfield, in the territory of Manzhou-Go, - about 6400 km long,
    - from Crimea already on flying boats to the Bay of Bengal, to the coast of Burma occupied by the Japanese, - 7000 km long.
    Later, routes from Zaporozhye and Grigoryevka airfields, near Odessa, to the same Chinese Paoto or directly to Tokyo were added to them.
    However, the Japanese were afraid that if it became known about the flights of the Luftwaffe aircraft through the Soviet space to Japan and vice versa, then this could be used by Moscow as a pretext for declaring war on them.
    There is no information about whether the route from Crimea to the Bay of Bengal was tested in practice. Six-engine flying boats Bv-222 could well overcome this distance without landing. Other flying boats of the Bv-138, Do-24 or Do-26 type needed an intermediate landing for refueling, for which a secret base could be created somewhere on the flight route. It doesn’t sound so fantastic, considering that the Luftwaffe were able to create a network of such bases, for example, in the Arctic. It is likely that somehow preparation in this direction was nevertheless conducted. In any case, the inhabitants of East Kazakhstan claimed that they had seen some flying boats boarding with crosses on board boarding Lake Balkhash.
    1. smiths xnumx
      smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 11: 13 New
      +3
      At the end of 1943, the Wehrmacht High Command again raised the issue of organizing an “air bridge” to Japan. As a result, on January 4, 1944, Hauptmann Heinz Brown, who was in command of the 2nd FAGr.5 squadron at that time, was ordered to form a special unit for flights to the Far East. It was unofficially called the Command of Japan (Koshmando Japan) and was located at the airfield of the Luftwaffe flight test center, which was located at Rechlin airfield, 44 km southwest of Neubrandenburg. Brown had three Ju-290 aircraft at his disposal: A-2 “9V + AK”, A-3 “9V + IK” and A-4 “9V + KK” - and accordingly three crews — his own and two crews from Lufthansa ".
      It was assumed that the Junkers would fly from one of the airfields in northern Finland or Norway. The most suitable place for departures of the Ju-290 is the Nautsi aerodrome, approximately 25 km east of the village of Janiskoski. After take-off, the Junkers had to first fly to the northeast, to the Barents Sea, to bypass the areas of Soviet fighter aircraft on the Kola Peninsula. There, they headed east and after some time, passing the New Earth, turned away to the southeast. The further route of their flight passed over the sparsely populated areas of Western and Central Siberia in the direction of Lake Baikal. There was no mention of air observation posts there, and one could be calm, but the planes would not be detected. After this, the Junkers, flying over the eastern part of Mongolia, were already over the territory of Manzhou-Guo, where they could land at Paoto airfield or could proceed further directly to Japan. The return flight went along the same route, with the assumption that each aircraft would have to take on board 2 tons of tungsten, a vital German military industry.
      The plan was absolutely real, and there were no technical obstacles to its implementation. However, so far no evidence has been found confirming that flights from the Finnish Nautsi airport to the Far East and vice versa were carried out in practice. At the same time, there is information that allegedly on April 8, a certain Ju-290A-9 nevertheless completed a successful flight from the Grigoryevka airfield, near Odessa, to the Mukden airfield (now Shenyang), in Manzhou Guo, and vice versa. Two other Ju-290A-9s, supposedly also carrying out two flights, took off and returned to the Posen airfield (now Poznan). The Junkers delivered the BMW 801 aircraft engines to the Japanese, while some metal alloys and natural rubber were transported back.
      http://www.plam.ru/hist/samolety_prizraki_tretego_reiha_sekretnye_operacii_lyuft

      vaffe / p14.php

      Ju-290A-5 W.Nr.0180 KR + LK, Junkers airfield in Dessau, March 23, 1944. Later it was used in the 1st Squadron FAGr.5 and had the on-board code “9V + KH”

    2. avt
      avt 18 September 2013 16: 01 New
      0
      Quote: smiths xnumx
      However, the Japanese were afraid that if it became known about the flights of the Luftwaffe aircraft through the Soviet space to Japan and vice versa, then this could be used by Moscow as a pretext for declaring war on them.

      I don’t know for the Japanese, but the Germans got to fly over our territory when the NKVD fighters calculated their intermediate airfields in Kalmykia and Kazakhstan and caught them on the landing. We dug trenches and several heaps of Condor across the runway.
  12. Hort
    Hort 18 September 2013 12: 02 New
    +3
    Germans to the north were generally of particular interest. And not just because of the convoys.
    They even landed in Taimyr. The known fact of the shooting of the port of Dixon by the cruiser "Admiral Scheer". And also the Germans landed ashore (away from Dickson, of course) and made meteorological measurements.

    Well, about the theory with the base in the Antarctic, in general, a separate story, which by indirect indications fully claims to be a true hypothesis :)
    1. smiths xnumx
      smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 12: 03 New
      +8
      In addition to secret airfields, the Germans created in the Soviet Arctic and a whole network of secret naval bases. The secret base base of submarines on the island of Alexandra Land has already been discussed above. A large base Kriegsmarine existed in the Lena River Delta. It was there that in 1963, among the stones of the mountain talus, the remains of a German non-commissioned officer submarine were found. And in 1975, thirty years after the end of the war, nearby, on one of the islands called the Pillar, the base itself was discovered. The Germans built there a two-hundred-meter concrete berth five to six meters high and a fuel depot, connecting them with a narrow gauge railway. The base was hidden from the wind by a hundred-meter-long rock, beyond which there was a platform where about 600 barrels with diesel fuel and kerosene of 300 liters each were stored.

      What were the goals of its construction is still a mystery. The size of the base suggests that it was intended not only for submarines, but also for large surface warships such as the heavy cruiser Admiral Scheer. But the most mysterious one is how a considerable amount of building materials were required on the Laptev Sea coast, which were required for its construction?

      Other secret bases of the Kriegsmarine submarine were also located at the mouths of the Ob and Yenisei rivers. According to one version, the Germans planned to use all bases as starting points for climbing upstream all these rivers with the aim of suddenly capturing Yakutsk, Krasnoyarsk and Novosibirsk. The Germans were also spotted on the Taimyr Peninsula, where, according to some reports, they even carried out some secret geological work.
      http://www.plam.ru/hist/samolety_prizraki_tretego_reiha_sekretnye_operacii_lyuft
      vaffe / p10.php
      1. Vladimirets
        Vladimirets 18 September 2013 12: 49 New
        +2
        Quote: smiths xnumx
        Other secret bases of the Kriegsmarine submarine were also located at the mouths of the Ob and Yenisei rivers. According to one version, the Germans planned to use all bases as starting points for climbing upstream all these rivers with the aim of suddenly capturing Yakutsk, Krasnoyarsk and Novosibirsk. The Germans were also spotted on the Taimyr Peninsula, where, according to some reports, they even carried out some secret geological work.

        It’s hard to come up with more stupidity. Groundless statements from the series of OBS. Apparently, taking a few real and incomprehensible facts, the author left everything else to the mercy of wild imagination. Where did the data on the submarine base at the mouth of the Lena come from? Does the author even imagine the distance from the Laptev Sea to Yakutsk? And from the mouth of the Yenisei to Krasnoyarsk? What a sudden takeover? What nonsense is this? What forces would the Germans capture these cities? Submarine?
        1. smiths xnumx
          smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 12: 57 New
          +2
          Well, to begin with, there was an attempt to capture Dixon Island in the north-eastern part of the Yenisei Gulf of the Kara Sea, when the Yenisei Bay entered the Arctic Ocean by the German heavy cruiser Admiral Scheer during Operation Wunderland. The tasks were set for him:
          Destroy allied transports and caravans encountered on the way to Taimyr;
          to land 180 assault rifles on Dickson in the amount of XNUMX machine gunners, capture an island, a base, a hydrometeorological center and a radio station, obtain climate maps and maps of the passage of communications and fairways;
          destroy the fishing fleet and “clog” the Kara Gate.
          "Admiral Scheer" was accompanied by 5 submarines and destroyers, who were looking for transports and caravans.
          Dixon urgently received an order on August 26 to restore the dismantled artillery mounts and prepare for battle. Available: 45 mm anti-aircraft battery (battery commander Lieutenant Kubyshkin), 130 mm guns were already loaded on barges (for Novaya Zemlya) and it was difficult to bring them ashore due to weather, and the two 152 mm that were on the shore leaned against the rocks, pointing to the sea, and used as a temporary firing position. The SKR-19 patrol boat and the Revolutionary steamboat brought themselves on alert. The commander of the northern Baltic Fleet detachment Babintsev came to the aid, organized and armed two detachments of militias (machine guns, rifles, hand grenades). He led the battle.
          Starting to fire from all guns along the Dickson coast, Bolken wanted to identify the firing points of the defense and the power of Soviet guns. The guns of the SKR-19 patrol boat and the Kornyakov battery answered him. According to the plan, taking fire on itself, the SKR-19 went on a rapprochement with the cruiser, ready to flood itself in the channel to block the enemy’s path. Sheer received a strong blow from the coastal battery, so he began a maneuver for retreat. On the "SKR-19" a fire broke out and the guns began to be transported. "SKR-19", also conducting shelling, goes to Aircraft Bay. Releasing a smoke screen, the Admiral Scheer received another heavy shell and left the fire zone.
          Going around Dickson from the west, a German cruiser fired at a port, a radio station on New Dickson, set fire to a coal depot on Cone Island. Here the Admiral Scheer was again fired at by the coastal battery, a fire broke out on the deck and the cruiser was forced to retreat.
          Negotiations were held from the island with a Soviet aircraft approaching Dixon. In open text, they requested a squadron of aircraft from the island, and the pilot replied that they would arrive in 30 minutes. There were no planes: both the pilot and the island were bluffing. But the “Admiral Scheer” took the game seriously. Dixon’s defenders lost 7 people dead, the islands in the Arctic Ocean are named after them. More than thirty wounded were treated in Norilsk. In 1943, the German command made another attempt to block the port of Dixon by setting minefields. On September 23-25, 2 German submarines delivered 48 bottom mines with magnetic and acoustic detonators on approaches to the port. Observation posts discovered one of the submarines, after which the channel was trawled. During the first half of October, the enemy managed to destroy the minefields and ensure the safe movement of transports and warships.
          http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%E8%EA%F1%EE%ED_%28%EE%F1%F2%F0%EE%E2%29

          1. Vladimirets
            Vladimirets 18 September 2013 13: 34 New
            +1
            I know about the battle of the coastal battery with Scheer, by the way, the Germans themselves did not admit serious damage to their raider, and explained the smoke from it with a smoke screen. But what does this prove?
            1. smiths xnumx
              smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 13: 52 New
              0
              This proves the importance that the Germans attached to the Northern Sea Route and the fact that in 1942 they were not afraid to risk their "pocket battleship" to interrupt shipping on it. Moreover, the Germans were unlikely to risk a raid without information about the ice situation and weather, which indicates at least aerial reconnaissance and at most the presence of German meteorological stations. As for the opinion of the Germans, so what else could they say, based on the results?
              1. The “Sheer” came to abandon the landing.
              2. The raider ceased fire and left the Kara Sea without command permission. It was a real escape.
              Damage to such a powerful raider as Admiral Scheer negatively affected the activities of the German Navy in the Northern Sea Route area.
              3. The Sheer managed to sink only one Sibiryakov steamboat and damage the S.’s steamers during the raid on Dixon Dezhnev "and" Revolutionary ".
              For the "pocket battleship" the results are not very impressive.
              In addition to the Sheer raid, the Germans took other actions:
              August 1 - German U-209 submarine fired at the tugboats Nord, Komsomolets, Komiles (faulty) and 2 barges from the Yugorsky Shar Strait to the area of ​​Matveyev Island. Both barges and the Komiles tug were sunk, and the damaged Komsomolets tug went ashore. More than 300 people died. The Ulm German mine layer was sent to the northwestern coast of Novaya Zemlya (it had 260 mines on board). A German submarine off the island of Mityushev was fired at by the anchored motobot Chaika, and then took him in tow to the sea (without crew), where the ship was sunk.
              August 2 - in the region of Belushya Bay 2, German submarines fought an artillery battle with minesweepers T-855 and T-904. On the approaches to Dixon, U-601 sank the Kuibyshev transport with torpedoes (the entire crew of the ship died)
              August 3 - minesweepers TS-58 and TS-39 fired at U-209 near Belushya Bay.
              August 4 - in the vicinity of Belushya Bay 2 submarines fought an artillery battle with minesweepers T-855 and T-904. 150 miles southeast of Medvezhy Island, three English destroyers drowned the Ulm German mine layer.
              August 6 - At the western entrance to the Matochkin Strait, Shar U-589 fired 16 non-contact mines (on October 11 these mines were blown up and sank SKR-23 "Monsoon"). A German submarine fired at the radio station Khodovarikha (Pechora Sea).
              August 21 - at the transition from Matochkin Shar to Belushya Bay, U-456 carried out an unsuccessful torpedo attack on the Fedor Litke patrol ship and the minesweeper TShch-57. From the cruiser Admiral Sheer in the area of ​​Kravkova Island, a caravan of ships was found consisting of the Krasin and Lenin icebreakers, the Sedov icebreaker, 8 transports and a tanker, but could not get close to them due to the severe ice situation.
              http://rumarine.ru/books/5/Vitaliy-Dotsenko_Mify-i-legendy-Rossiyskogo-flota/27
              1. Vladimirets
                Vladimirets 18 September 2013 14: 20 New
                +1
                Quote: smiths xnumx
                This proves the importance that the Germans attached to the Northern Sea Route and the fact that in 1942 they were not afraid to risk their "pocket battleship" to interrupt shipping on it.

                And who argues with this? Value by value, but base ??? Where is there even a hint that they built bases on our coast of the Arctic Ocean?
                1. smiths xnumx
                  smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 14: 30 New
                  +2
                  Well, the Germans had a base in the Arctic in 1939-1940. already there was “Port Nord” (or “Baza Nord”) in the West Face the Germans built moorings, erected barracks on the shore and, possibly, put up a defensive minefield. But with the capture of Norway (in April-June 1940) the need for this base disappeared: the Germans received convenient bases in Scandinavia, allowing their submarines to deploy directly into the Atlantic.
                  Here's the video:

                  Well, these are photographs of the German Metrological Station on Spitsbergen

                  1. smiths xnumx
                    smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 14: 36 New
                    0
                    Operation Schatzgreber (Franz Josef Land 1943/44)
                    The "Weather Detachment" consisted of 10 people under the scientific leadership of the State Counselor Walter Dreez and the military leadership of Lieutenant Alfred Macus. The group arrived in the high-latitude Arctic on WBS 6 under the command of Captain Hartmann. Even before leaving Kiel, they were bombed and part of the equipment was destroyed or lost, so they sometimes did not know if they had what they needed in the warehouse.
                    On September 22, the ship, along with its U387 escorting it, moored to Alexandra's Land. The station was equipped one kilometer from the coast with the help of a submarine crew. It consisted of 5 prefabricated houses and a warehouse. On September 30, the ships left the station.
                    On October 15, weather data began to be measured and sent to Troms (Norway).
                    In October, a reserve camp was built 5 km from the station, in case a group was discovered by the enemy. Then another one, 30 km.
                    By the spring of 1944, a shortage of some necessary equipment and materials began to affect, so I had to send the Focke-Wulf "Condor" twice in May to dump cargo. Moreover, for the first time, part of the equipment was damaged during the reset and therefore had to fly a second time.
                    On May 30, a polar bear was shot, whose meat diversified the food of the group. But soon after this the first of the soldiers fell down, the one who ate the most meat. within a month 7 others got into beds, and two more felt sick. Leg pain, fever, etc. The only one who was not affected by the disease was the orderly of the group who did not eat meat. On the radio from Oslo, a terrible diagnosis was made - Trichinosis ...
                    Evacuation by water was impossible, landing the plane on ice, too - it was already melting. It was necessary to tidy up the runway on the ground. If this did not succeed, it was planned to drop a doctor with a parachute or land a large "flying boat" after the ice melted.
                    It suddenly turned out that the chief of the expedition, Dreez, as a result of the disease, lost his mind and refused any help on the radio. He was replaced by Lieutenant Macus and canceled all of his radiograms.
                    On July 7, the Focke-Wulf 200 landed with lieutenant Stanke near the station. The take-off was prepared only at 650 m, too little, and he sat on an unprepared but quite suitable site, damaging only one landing gear. At the same time, the car got stuck in a swampy area. Two days later, he was dumped the spare tire and repaired, dragging it on a specially made wooden structure to hard ground. After that, the crew and several meteorologists who stood on their feet cleared another 550 m of take-off, where patients were to be delivered on a stretcher (5 km from the station). The insane Dreese considered the arriving crew of the plane and Dr. Wendt to be enemies who wanted to take his people against their will and to shoot some of them. During one of his attacks, he rushed at them with a knife and was eventually tied up by his comrades. At the same time, he showed superpower, which happens with riotous, and even injections of a sedative helped only for a short time. He was the last to be assigned to the plane. Since he was reckoned with the real danger that he could pose for the safety of others during the flight of Stanke, Dr. Wendt and the co-pilot hold a meeting where they make a difficult decision that the threat is too great and that Dreese should be shot. When Dr. Wendt approached Dreese with a gun in his hand, he calmed down and acted prudently. He was delivered to the plane and tied to the floor.
                    On July 10, Stanke managed to take off and brought the car to Banak, and from there to Trondheim. Further, the expedition members were sent by train to Oslo, to the infirmary, where they gradually recovered (I don’t know if all or not).
                    http://reibert.info/threads/%D0%92%D0%BE%D0%B9%D0%BD%D0%B0-%D0%B2-%D0%90%D1%80%D
                    0%BA%D1%82%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%B5.26576/
                  2. Vladimirets
                    Vladimirets 18 September 2013 14: 41 New
                    0
                    Quote: smiths xnumx
                    Well, the Germans had a base in the Arctic in 1939-1940. already there was “Port Nord” (or “Baza Nord”) in the West Face the Germans built moorings, erected barracks on the shore and, possibly, put up a defensive minefield.

                    Base is said loudly. The USSR really presented Germany a place for the base, only the Germans did not really build anything there. It was, in general, an ordinary fjord without any infrastructure, mooring and parking facilities. In addition, the Kriegsmarine warships never appeared there. The Kola Peninsula before the war and the Taimyr with the Laptev Sea during it are all different things. The seas west of Novaya Zemlya were still of interest to the Germans for the possibility of intercepting allied convoys, but what should they do east of it? The Dixon attack, in my opinion, is more likely an exception proving the rule.
                    1. smiths xnumx
                      smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 14: 49 New
                      0
                      • according to German sources, the location of “Basis Nord” was indicated by coordinates 69 degrees 25 minutes north latitude, 32 degrees 26 minutes east longitude. General management of the base was entrusted to the Administration of Kriegsmarine;
                      • On November 1939, 38, German submarines U-36 and U-XNUMX entered the base;
                      • from December 1939 to April 1940, the captain tsurzee Nischlag was the senior naval commander in the base, and from July 1940, captain Haushofer was corvette (he was the commander of the supply ship Fenitsia);
                      • Until December 1939, at Bazis Nord there was a high-speed transport - the Iller banana truck. On December 1939, 5, the German supply ships Cordillera and Fenitsia arrived at the base. Behind them is the supply tanker Jan Wellem, whaler Sachsenwald, meteorological vessels Viking-XNUMX and Kedgen;
                      • in early April 1940, three tankers from the “avant-garde squadron” were expected to be in the base, which were planned to be used to refuel the German destroyers that arrived in Narvik. However, in fact, there was only one tanker, the Jan Bellem tanker, which was January 20, 1940 went to the Atlantic, having on board, a supply of food for the heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper and submarines located in the North Atlantic. On April 50, the tanker crew secured the entry of German destroyers into Narvik and then replenished them with fuel supplies. However, after two days a German tanker was attacked by English destroyers, damaged and washed ashore at the entrance to the Ufut fjord, where it lay until the early XNUMXs.
                      http://www.tinlib.ru/istorija/arkticheskie_tainy_tretego_reiha/p7.php

                      October 23, without a pilot and border inspection in the Kola Bay came the American cargo ship "City of Flint" under ... the German flag. He was captured in the Atlantic by the cruiser Deutschland, a team led by Captain Joseph Gainard arrested. Guarded by 18 German sailors armed with carbines, pistols and grenades, he was brought to Murmansk. So easily, as to their home, the Germans brought a trophy to a foreign port. The dissatisfied head of the People’s Commissariat of Foreign Affairs Molotov told Ambassador Schulenburg: "There is still a difference between the harbors of the belligerent and the neutral, which the German sailors must understand." The disarmed Germans were placed in the premises of the Epron club under port security. Their fate was dealt with at the highest level. Shulenburg prompted Molotov to get out of his ticklish position. According to Article 21 of the Hague Conference of 1907, in wartime, ships could enter other people's harbors in the event of an accident, lack of fuel, food or the handing over of prisoners. Like, the ship is for repair. On October 26, TASS published the following message: “The internment of the German team of the City of Flint steamer was canceled by the maritime authorities of Murmansk due to the fact that, as it turned out, the steamer was brought into the port for machine repairs.” On October 28, City of Flint left Murmansk and soon returned to the United States. 14 German sailors and 4 officers from the crew of the cruiser Deutschland traveled by train to their native Reich.
          2. Hort
            Hort 18 September 2013 13: 39 New
            0
            did not quite understand which island? Dikson is located on the coast of the Taimyr Peninsula. Or is it a mistake on the Wikipedia crept in?)
      2. Gato
        Gato 18 September 2013 12: 53 New
        +4
        Quote: smiths xnumx
        Other secret bases of the Kriegsmarine submarine were also located at the mouths of the Ob and Yenisei rivers.

        In this sense, the posting of the auxiliary cruiser Komet via the NSR in the summer of 1940 is of interest. Is it not then that the Germans began to collect intelligence on the location of future bases?
        1. dzvero
          dzvero 18 September 2013 13: 23 New
          0
          read somewhere, but unfortunately forgot where, other bases. so it was speculated that their creation was coordinated with the Soviet services.
          1. smiths xnumx
            smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 13: 57 New
            +1
            Dear Ivo, on September 28, 1939, an agreement on friendship and cooperation between the Soviet Union and Germany appeared, signed by Molotov and Ribbentrop. The treaty also touched on the northern problem. At the first stage of World War II, the German fleet faced a task of paramount importance - the implementation of the naval blockade of Great Britain. The German fleet did not have naval bases with access directly to the Atlantic. The Kriegsmarine naval bases located in the North and Baltic Seas were controlled by the British Navy. In order to enter the Atlantic, German raiders and submarines had to overcome the powerful lines created by the British in the English Channel, at the exits from the North Sea, in the Danish Channel and on the Faroe-Icelandic Line. Therefore, the Germans asked Stalin to provide them with a base point in the Kola Bay, in Murmansk. Almost all fall, the Bremen liner stood at the berths of this port. During this time, German sailors collected complete information about Murmansk. Attempts by the NKVD officers to stop their actions came to naught. Moscow has forbidden to restrict the actions of the "guests", considering them their allies.
            At the same time, the Soviet government believed that the long stay of German warships in Murmansk would become known to the world community and could cause protests, especially from the British. The Germans were offered to relocate to Teriberka, they refused, but agreed to settle in West Face.
            The secret object was code-named "Port Nord" (or "Base Nord"). In a short time, the Germans built moorings in Zapadnaya Litsa, erected barracks on the shore and, possibly, put up a defensive minefield. But with the capture of Norway (in April-June 1940) the need for this base disappeared: the Germans received convenient bases in Scandinavia, allowing their submarines to deploy directly into the Atlantic.
            http://rumarine.ru/books/5/Vitaliy-Dotsenko_Mify-i-legendy-Rossiyskogo-flota/27
            . Yours faithfully! hi
            1. dzvero
              dzvero 18 September 2013 15: 09 New
              +1
              thank you
              too many dark pages. it is difficult to explain German interest in eastern Siberia. Navigation along the Northern Sea Route to Japan? looking for an entrance to the hollow earth? There are some facts about German activity in the region (submarines, bases), but there is nothing in the general picture of their actions.

              for those interested in a lot of interesting things here:
              "Swastika over Taimyr"
              http://www.e-reading-lib.com/book.php?book=146182

              "Arctic Secrets of the Third Reich"
              http://www.e-reading-lib.com/book.php?book=132313
              1. Vladimirets
                Vladimirets 18 September 2013 15: 41 New
                0
                Quote: dzvero
                "Arctic Secrets of the Third Reich"
                http://www.e-reading-lib.com/book.php?book=132313

                It’s very interesting to read on the subway or bus when your head doesn’t understand, and the narrative conflicts are fascinating. As soon as you think about what is written, you can immediately see solid speculation and assumptions, generously diluted with real facts and characters.
                1. dzvero
                  dzvero 18 September 2013 16: 52 New
                  0
                  So I am about the same. The facts are there, but their interpretation is at the level of speculation. Probably 'someone' has a much more complete picture of events, but it’s unlikely to burn from the desire to share smile
                2. pensioner
                  pensioner 18 September 2013 18: 38 New
                  +1
                  Quote: Vladimirets
                  "Arctic Secrets of the Third Reich"

                  This one is much better.
                  Kovalev, Sergey Alekseevich
                  Arctic shadows of the Third Reich
                  Website "Military literature": militera.lib.ru
                  Edition: Kovalev S.A. Arctic Shadows of the Third Reich. - M .: Veche, 2010.
                  Book on the website: http://militera.lib.ru/research/kovalyov_sa01/index.html
                  OCR: Vitautas & Kali

                  Additional processing: Hoaxer ([email protected])
                  Kovalev S.A. Arctic Shadows of the Third Reich. - M .: Veche, 2010 .-- 448 p. - (Maritime Chronicle). - Mintage 5000 copies. - ISBN 978-5-9533-4348-0.
                  Publisher's abstract: The Arctic in the plans of the Third Reich occupied a special place. The waters of the northern seas were accessible to German submarines, the numerous Arctic islands were an ideal place for repair bases and tracking stations, and the northern sea routes were of strategic importance to Germany. In addition, according to some reports, Hitler's plans included the construction of the so-called Uranium Project in the European north. One of them may have been built in the Kola Bay under the rocks of the Devkina Creek. The book of the military journalist Sergei Kovalev talks about the unknown operations of the Kriegsmarine and about the "special projects" of the Third Reich in the Arctic regions of the Soviet Union and Europe.
                  DJVU + OCR
                3. Denis
                  Denis 18 September 2013 19: 43 New
                  +1
                  Quote: Vladimirets
                  As soon as you think about what is written, you can immediately see solid speculation and assumptions, generously diluted with real facts and characters
                  An article at the essay level for high school students and then on a weak C grade, just for trying
                  Lacking technical mistakes
                  flying boat He-115
                  The author would at least look at the picture, an ordinary float plane, and this is generally difficult:
                  preparation for the bombing of industrial centers of the Urals with Fau-1 cruise missiles
                  This is at the level of tales about the bases in Antarctica. Fau tola Channel could not always fly
                  And discussions about the Gulag at the level of perestroika historians
                  landing with the aim of organizing an uprising of the Gulag prisoners. This project is worth a closer look
                  Stop and think!
                  The Gulag is not Solzhenitsyn, even many who went on the 58-th article were for power. And the household workers for being late or absenteeism or for something stolen from work? Those were very harsh, but laws. The criminals didn’t favor politics either. And who would raise the uprising
                  Even given as an example
                  the situation in the Gulag was really quite tense, the riots of prisoners occurred during the war. For example, in January 1942, the rebellious convicts even managed to capture the village of Ust-Usa, a district center a hundred kilometers from Pechora
                  attracted not on business. Yes, they captured and what then the Germans were called?
                  In short weak, and often crazy
            2. Hort
              Hort 19 September 2013 07: 18 New
              +1
              it is more correct to say that it was a friendship and border treaty. He fixed the consequences of the partition of Poland, so to speak. Cooperation there was very indirectly affected. At least you cannot name it a full-fledged allied treaty
        2. 0255
          0255 18 September 2013 16: 11 New
          0
          In this sense, the posting of the auxiliary cruiser Komet via the NSR in the summer of 1940 is of interest. Is it not then that the Germans began to collect intelligence on the location of future bases?

          Hitler wrote Mine Kampf about the fight against Jews and Slavs in 1923, when he first tried to become the head of Germany. The question of an attack on the USSR was only a matter of time. Churchill at the end of the 30s presented Hitler with Austria, he allowed to conquer Poland only so that he would attack the Union as soon as possible. Therefore, the intelligence by the cruiser "Comets" in 1940 is not surprising.
          1. Gato
            Gato 18 September 2013 22: 21 New
            +3
            Quote: 0255
            Hitler wrote Mine Kampf about the fight against Jews and Slavs in 1923.

            Have you read Mine Kampf? About Russia there are literally a couple of lines. Commander Schiklgruber makes the main emphasis on Anglo-French Jewry (especially French), and by the Slavs he primarily means Poland. Russia (Soviet) has nothing to do with the Treaty of Versailles, therefore, this stream of consciousness of the future Fuhrer of the entire German people is more directed against France.
          2. Alex
            Alex 30 January 2014 12: 18 New
            +1
            Quote: 0255
            Therefore, the reconnaissance by the cruiser Komet in 1940 is not surprising.
            Moreover, in 1940, Hitler’s success was not just dizziness and euphoria, but complete exaltation with a loss of reality. After all, it’s a disease, in two or three months he was going to destroy the USSR (not to capture Moscow, not to destroy the army, but to destroy the COUNTRY).
        3. smiths xnumx
          smiths xnumx 18 September 2013 16: 15 New
          +1
          No, it started much earlier ...
          The German Navy leadership began to show keen interest in the Arctic long before the start of World War II. For a detailed study of this important springboard of the future war, the Nazis were able to organize several Soviet-German "scientific" expeditions in the 1930s. The first of these was the international expedition on the airship “Count Zeppelin” in 1931 to the unexplored regions of the Arctic. The expedition members almost continuously aerial survey of the coast, made measurements of geomagnetic anomalies, studied the patterns of movement of drifting ice. The abandoned estuaries of frozen rivers, previously completely unknown islands, were marked on the map. It resulted in kilometers of film and photo materials transferred to Abwehr and the German Navy.
          Soon, several marine joint Soviet-German expeditions were organized to study the Soviet North in more detail. The most famous of them is the sailing in 1939 of the research vessel Murmanets, from which the German polar explorers landed on the islands of the Kara Sea. Moreover, it is known that on the ship the "scientific staff" spoke exclusively in German. A little-known echo-sounder in the USSR was mounted on the Murmansk, the indicator part of which was brought to the "German" compartment, where Soviet sailors and researchers were strictly forbidden to enter. Similar German "research" parties worked on the islands of White and Vilkitsky. The information collected by these “scientific” parties was subsequently used to select locations and create bases and meteorological stations of the Kriegsmarine, the German Navy.
          http://www.b-port.com/smi/8/1310/25046.html#ixzz2fFJ5vpUg
          1. pensioner
            pensioner 18 September 2013 18: 17 New
            +1
            Quote: smiths xnumx
            The first of these was the international expedition on the airship “Count Zeppelin” in 1931 to the unexplored regions of the Arctic.

            Quote: smiths xnumx
            It resulted in kilometers of film and photo materials transferred to Abwehr and the German Navy.
            When ours asked their share of cinema-photographic materials, the Germans said: "But no!" request . Ours asked: "How is it not?" fool . The Germans replied: "So it is. Burned ..." laughing
    2. Alex
      Alex 30 January 2014 12: 05 New
      +1
      Quote: hort
      Well, about the theory with the base in the Antarctic, in general, a separate story, which by indirect indications fully claims to be a true hypothesis :)
      Well, unless a hypothesis, and even then relative logic ...
  13. Valery-SPB
    Valery-SPB 18 September 2013 12: 40 New
    +2
    Perhaps this would not be surprising - the downed planes were and will be for a long time to be found in a variety of places - if not for one strange circumstance: there were several thousand kilometers to the front line from here at that time, and the sides of the "pawn" were riddled cannon shells with a caliber of at least 30 mm.


    Indeed, a strange circumstance. Apparently there was a little-known war with Japan, up to the front line with which there could be several thousand kilometers. But in a straight line from Arkhangelsk to Murmansk and to Leningrad somewhere 1300-1400 km.
    1. Evgan
      Evgan 18 September 2013 17: 20 New
      0
      Well, just 500 km from Arkhangelsk to the Soviet-Finnish border
  14. Aleks tv
    Aleks tv 18 September 2013 13: 34 New
    +6
    Very interesting and rare material.
    These pages of the history of the Second World War are little known and studied.


    I learned a lot.
    Sincere thanks to the author.

    ps
    Article three people put a minus ...
    Maybe these are Zeppelin’s defects? They read material, remember, get angry and minus ...
    I am writing with humor, I can’t explain it differently ...
    lol
  15. washi
    washi 18 September 2013 15: 01 New
    +3
    Thank you all for clarifying.
    Question one: Why were the IVSs not allowed to complete the investigation of the start of the war?
    Can we chew those heroes?
    Maybe not the heroes of our military and party leaders, but traitors?
    The people are the heroes of almost everything. There are even no questions.
  16. kush62
    kush62 18 September 2013 16: 16 New
    +1
    Unfortunately, the production of the world's first specialized military transport aircraft capable of operating from completely unprepared runways was the victim of a reduction in the types of Luftwaffe aircraft at the end of World War II with a red pencil stroke.

    Why "Unfortunately? Unclear.
  17. pensioner
    pensioner 18 September 2013 17: 29 New
    0
    The scale of casting German agents to our rear is certainly impressive. Winter 44g. the Germans made an attempt to throw over the air a group of agents of 4 people in the district of Sverdlovsk. For an unknown reason, the release took place over the forests of the Kirov region. After 2 months of wandering and hunger strike, a group of 3 people (1 ate from hunger) surrendered to the NKVD in the Kirov region. From the very beginning they had a chance to surrender, but they preferred to leave and try to complete the task. And this is after the Germans were defeated in Kursk, on the Dnieper near Leningrad. What moved these people?
    1. Hort
      Hort 19 September 2013 10: 51 New
      0
      Warrior spirit, I think. No matter how pathetic it sounded. Well, a commitment to ideology and their homeland-Vaterland
  18. Sunscorpion
    Sunscorpion 18 September 2013 17: 37 New
    0
    Quote: yasenpen
    nd love homeland is this called ideological education? and why did this upbringing not save the union at 91?

    You know, to answer your question you must either write another thick book, or just keep silent. Try to analyze all the components yourself (political and geopolitical, economic, ideological, educational, personal ambitions and other other other), otherwise the question is almost rhetorical
  19. xomaNN
    xomaNN 18 September 2013 18: 26 New
    0
    The flip side of the enormity of the territory of the then USSR, even in conditions of military vigilance, there were many "white spots" in the territory. The extra argument that air defense and missile defense in Russia was more dense.
  20. avt
    avt 18 September 2013 18: 47 New
    +1
    Quote: svp67
    Quote: Gato
    Thank you!

    And over time, I learned that they also had the operational base of their submarines in our north, and even not one. In how they fought, you bastards ... There is something to learn.

    On New Earth, it seems, moreover, they discovered it only after the war.
  21. The comment was deleted.
  22. stasdolgov
    stasdolgov 18 September 2013 23: 02 New
    0
    Quote: smiths xnumx
    Well, these are photos of the German meteorological station on Spitsbergen

    By the way, in the photo submariners with U 307 teddy bears "indulge"
    Here are the other “hunters” with U 601 with booty:



    For fun, see how many of these bear eaters rest at the bottom of the sea http://www.neptun-pro.ru/Objekty.html
    1. Ivan Kalinovich
      Ivan Kalinovich 19 September 2013 02: 39 New
      +1
      stasdolgov SU, YOUR virus web page: http: //www.neptun-pro.ru/Objekty.html
      it’s better not to switch to it !!!
  23. stasdolgov
    stasdolgov 19 September 2013 08: 23 New
    +1
    Quote: Ivan Kalinovich
    stasdolgov SU, YOUR virus web page: http: //www.neptun-pro.ru/Objekty.html
    it’s better not to switch to it !!!

    Unfortunately, Yandex is sick of it. He writes. that such a page is infected. I answer: “and now” - without changing anything, they check and write “now another thing!” I don’t know how to deal with this anymore. I constantly check the content - everything is in order.