Military Review

British women of the Great War. Retrospective

20



Women at the parade near Buckingham Palace in 1918 year.

More than one and a half million British women during World War I went to work for traditional male positions. Others became nurses to treat soldiers on the battlefield and on their return home.



Women from the Royal Air Force at the parade in 1919 year.

The Great War, as they call the First World War in the West, gave rise to female regular units. So, in 1916 to help the Royal the fleet The Royal Royal Maritime Service was established. In 1917, the Female Auxiliary Corps of the Army appeared, and in 1918 the Female Royal Air Force appeared. However, most of these women never approached the front line, but were engaged in auxiliary work.

However, there were others. For example, 20-year-old journalist Dorothy Lawrence (Dorothy Lawrence) in the 1915 year joined the British Expeditionary Force, posing as a man.



Nurses working both at home and on the front line in 1915.



A woman makes prostheses in a military hospital in Kensington.

But for the majority of British women, the war consisted in the fact that they had to take the places of men who went to the front in factories and mills. More than 247 thousands of British women worked in government docks, factories, arsenals and fire brigades.



Many women were involved in liner plants, January 1915.

Another 950 thousand arrived at military plants for the production of ammunition. Women worked in difficult conditions, because of the effects of sulfur, their skin turned yellow, for which they were called canaries. They produced 80% of all shells and ammunition for the British Army. By the end of the war, more than 400 people died as a result of explosions at work and from the harmful effects of chemicals, including nitric and sulfuric acid.



About 400 women died in factories from 1914 to 1918 a year.











Other British women were involved in agricultural work, civilian and even banking services.

The state organization, called the Women's Land Army, was responsible for providing the country with food, and by the end of the war 260 thousands of volunteers joined it.

A huge influx of women was observed in the transport industry. Their number increased by 555% and reached approximately 100 thousand people.





Despite their contribution, when the men returned home, the women lost their jobs. Nevertheless, their merits were appreciated and three years after the end of the war they received the right to vote, notes The Daily Mail.





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  1. Denis
    Denis 14 September 2013 08: 43
    +2
    Other British women were involved in agricultural work, civil and even banking services.
    Is it harder to work in the workshop or in open-hearth, especially highlighted?
    So nothing new or surprising
    Although there is, the article is clearly not British, it does not say that it was not without them that they won, they like this very much
    1. smile
      smile 14 September 2013 14: 28
      +1
      Denis
      But it says with undisguised pride that 3 years after the war, grateful British men allowed women to vote ... :)))) :))) only a third of a century later than in totalitarian Bolshevik Russia .... :)) ) To get angry not to get up ... they are also proud of it ... :))) Adnak democracy! :)))
      1. Denis
        Denis 14 September 2013 14: 44
        +1
        Quote: smile
        British men let women vote
        What would they hear from our women if they asked about the right to vote, is it necessary?
  2. svp67
    svp67 14 September 2013 08: 51
    +8
    Someone said that the war is not a woman’s face. Not true. The war has many faces. Just look at these old photos to understand that war is far from the best thing for people ...
    1. xetai9977
      xetai9977 14 September 2013 17: 38
      +4
      The war applies equally to men, women and children .... Everyone has a hard time ...
  3. Spstas1
    Spstas1 14 September 2013 09: 32
    +4
    It turns out that not only Soviet barbarians, as "philanthropists and liberals" used to say, forced women to work during the war, including in difficult professions ... When fate presses down, you have to use every opportunity.
  4. AK-47
    AK-47 14 September 2013 10: 23
    +1
    The Great War also gave rise to female regular units. So, in 1916, the Royal Royal Naval Service was established to help the Royal Navy. In 1917, the Women's Auxiliary Corps of the Army appeared, and in 1918 the Women's Royal Air Force appeared.

    The tradition remains to this day, women in Africa do not want to lag behind men.
    1. Denis
      Denis 14 September 2013 11: 44
      +2
      Quote: AK-47
      women in Africa do not want to lag behind men
      It seems that on the left flank of the baaAlshoy boss, judging by the dimensions
    2. svp67
      svp67 14 September 2013 14: 08
      +3
      Quote: AK-47
      Tradition is maintained

      Alas, this is often a necessity, and may they forgive us men, all the same, their job is to give life, not to take it away ...





      1. REZMovec
        REZMovec 14 September 2013 19: 54
        0
        Look at these faces - I won’t drink so much that I’m involved in the production of children with them. wassat
  5. Agent 008
    Agent 008 14 September 2013 11: 54
    +1
    Yes, these harsh British women are even more severe than our Chelyabinsk men ...
  6. Rider
    Rider 14 September 2013 12: 40
    +4
    "... those who fight in the war are the most wonderful people, and the closer to the front line, the more wonderful people you meet there; but those who start, kindle and wage war are pigs who think only about economic competition and I believe that everyone who profits from the war and who contributes to its incitement should be shot on the very first day of hostilities by trusted representatives of honest citizens of their country whom they send to fight ...

    E. Hemingway "


    World War I was unleashed by the industrial tycoons of England and Germany, in the struggle for markets for their products.
    those who wish can read a wonderful book - "A Century of War" - U. Engal.

    there, with all the details, it was described how business movers and shakers led their countries to a world carnage.
    and; who, how, and for what fed Nazi Germany.

    the book echoes many of N. Starikov’s thoughts
  7. does it
    does it 14 September 2013 13: 08
    +1
    We have the same in Russia. Until the nineties, women worked in the most difficult jobs.
    1. smile
      smile 14 September 2013 14: 34
      +1
      does it
      Why until the nineties? Even now I sometimes see railroad workers repairing tracks in any weather ... crowbars, pickaxes, sleepers, other pieces of iron ... and all this with female pens ... I can’t imagine what’s in the head of the railway authorities who take such women's work ...
      1. Denis
        Denis 14 September 2013 14: 47
        +2
        Quote: smile
        what's in the head near the railway authorities
        Believe that discipline and plump less
        And pay less, demons save
      2. Setrac
        Setrac 14 September 2013 17: 54
        +1
        Quote: smile
        Why until the nineties? Even now I sometimes see railroad workers repairing tracks in any weather ... crowbars, pickaxes, sleepers, other pieces of iron ... and all this with female pens ... I can’t imagine what’s in the head of the railway authorities who take such women's work ...

        The railroad workers do not have such a tool as a "pick", apparently you saw a railroad hammer. I have never seen a woman - a railroad worker, they will not take any man to us, although I heard at the level of folklore that somewhere in Siberia there are women railroad workers.
        1. smile
          smile 14 September 2013 22: 17
          0
          Setrac
          Maybe it’s not a pick, I don’t understand, and I didn’t look closely at what they dragged there in their railway cart, but it looks like. And I saw them many times, and the feeling is that there are no fewer of them among the travelers than men — and I’m not exaggerating or joking ... in general, horror, you would see how they look in work clothes ... and rightly so that you don’t take women for such work.
        2. Denis
          Denis 14 September 2013 23: 54
          0
          Quote: Setrac
          at the level of folklore, that somewhere in Siberia women are travelers
          Peter’s region is not Siberia, but he’s seen. He’ll go to work as a duty on moving, it seems that the work is not heavy, raise the barrier and all things. But not with these ghouls. Tighten the rail nuts, remove snow, scatter ice, scatter sand, fight in summer. Fun?
          Here, without a pickaxe, you laugh at it not childishly
  8. Vityaz68
    Vityaz68 14 September 2013 14: 36
    +3
    WOMEN IN THE ARMY - A NECESSITY ...
    AND IN VICTORIES IN THE GREAT DOMESTIC CONTRIBUTION OF WOMEN ARE HUGE !!
  9. ia-ai00
    ia-ai00 14 September 2013 21: 45
    +1
    I think not only British, Russian or German women are capable of showing patriotism when it comes to defending their homeland. Even in some African tribe, even in a great country, if the question arises: "to be or not to be," almost any woman will stand next to a man both at the bench and in the ranks.
  10. albanech
    albanech 16 September 2013 13: 47
    0
    I didn’t see anything surprising! Our women no less worked and served and serve!