Military Review

The beginning of the Second World War. Westerplatte

30
"Do not count on descendants. Ancestors also counted on us."



Defense Westerplatte (scheme)


Defense Westerplatte

1 September 1939, the German troops invaded Poland. By this time, Germany had already annexed Austria (the so-called Anschluss) and the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia, but so far has not met any serious resistance to its aggressive actions. On the first day of the war, the Germans faced the task of taking a military transit warehouse on a peninsula in the Gdansk Bay. The stubbornness with which the small contingent of Polish soldiers stood against the Reich war machine came as a surprise to the German command. AT history This event is called Westerplatte defense.

The Free City, near which the military warehouse is located, was a disputed territory between Germany and Poland. From the very beginning of 1933, it was clear that the Germans would sooner or later attempt to seize territories that they considered historically to be theirs. In connection with this, preparation of the warehouse for possible defense began. A number of fortification works were carried out, 6 camouflaged guard rooms were created, existing civilian and military facilities were prepared for defense. In addition, the Polish soldiers equipped special posts equipped with machine-gun nests - the post "Prom", "Fort", "Lazienki", "Power Plant", "Pier" and "Line of the railway." The defense was created by captain Mechislav Krushevsky and engineer Slawomir Borovsky.

Position preparation was carried out until the 1939 year. Initially, the garrison was about 80-90 people, but after provoking 1938, it was decided to increase it to 210 people (including civilian personnel). According to the plan, it was supposed after the outbreak of armed conflict to transfer here another 700 man from the Intervention Corps. However, 31 August 1939, Lieutenant Colonel Vincent Sobotinsky arrived in Westerplatte, who told Heinric Suharsky, the warehouse commander, about canceling plans to defend Polish sites in Gdansk, and the Germans would most likely strike the next day. The lieutenant colonel urged the major to take a “weighted decision” in the event of a war.

German soldiers on the Westerplatte peninsula (Westerplatte) in Poland. The Polish garrison (about 200 soldiers) was the first to take the brunt of the German troops invading Poland, and only surrendered after a week of fighting.


For the capture of well-fortified Polish warehouses, the Germans sent a training battleship Schleswig-Holstein to the Bay of Gdansk. He was supposed to provide artillery support to the advancing German assault detachments of Marines Marinesturmkompanie of about 500 men. In addition, German units numbering up to six thousand people were present in the area, about 2 thousand were part of the SS-Heimwehr Danzig special brigade.

The Germans planned to launch an offensive early in the morning with a massive artillery bombardment, after which the SS Heimwehr battalion, two companies of police forces and a company of marines would go on the attack. The shelling from the battleship began in 4: 45 and fell to the post of "Prom" and in the area of ​​CP No. 6. After that, assault troops entered the battle. Unexpectedly, the Germans were faced with a powerful defense and were stopped by machine-gun fire from the positions of "Val" and "Prom".

Throughout the first day, German troops made numerous attempts to break the defense of the Poles. The attacks were carried out from different directions, but the Polish forces were able to successfully repel all attempts by the Germans to move forward. At the end of the first day, the Polish casualties amounted to 4 people killed and several injured. German assault troops lost around 100 people, much of whom were marines.

After the first setbacks, German troops began to actively use heavy artillery and Aviation. September 2 from 18:05 to 18:45 47 diving bomber Yu-87 dropped a total of 26,5 tons of bombs. During the raid, KP No. 5 was completely destroyed, and all the soldiers there were killed. However, the psychological damage from the attack was much greater. The besieged Polish fighters panicked and a riot arose. The command took the toughest measures and shot four soldiers. However, the Germans did not manage to take advantage of the achieved effect and started a new attack only at 20:00, when the Polish fighters managed to recover. After an evening attack, the commander of the garrison, Henrik Sukharsky, decided to surrender. Deputy Frantisek Dombrowski removed him from command and assumed control of the garrison. Legionnaire Jan Gembur, who hung out a white flag by order of the commander, was shot and the flag was removed.

Violent battles lasted for the next three days. The Germans developed a special attack plan, which was attended by two battalions of the Krappé regiment, a company of marines and 45 sailors, armed with four machine guns. Artillery preparation alternated with assault attacks, which, however, the Poles were able to successfully repel. At night, the Germans attempted to imperceptibly break through the canals in boats, but were discovered and shot with machine guns. The third day passed for the Poles without a loss, and the declaration of war by Germany by England and France raised the morale of the personnel.

German Junkers U-87 (Ju-87) dive-bombers in the sky of Poland.


The fourth day began with a powerful artillery strike, in which, among other things, 210 mm mortars and 105 mm German ship guns took part flotilla. One of the shells of the German destroyer nearly got into the oil tank in the port of Gdansk, so the Germans refused to use the fleet and recalled their destroyer. By the end of the day, the garrison began to have problems with food, drinking water and medicine. None of the Polish soldiers died that day, however, fatigue was already noticeably felt and Major Sukharsky again spoke of surrender.

On the fifth day, the Germans transferred their fire to the trees surrounding the bunkers. They believed that snipers could be hiding there. Several attacks were made by KP No. 1, 4, as well as the Fort post, but they did not bring any visible effect. The soldiers' morale continued to fall.

6 September the Germans again tried to burn the forest. To this end, a tank with gasoline was dispersed by rail, but the defenders managed to undermine it away from their positions. Similar attempts continued in the evening of the same day, but were unsuccessful. Major Sukharsky again convened a meeting at which he called for surrender. Commander Captain Dombrowski and Lieutenant Grodetsky decided to continue the defense, they were supported by the majority of personnel.

The Germans launched a general attack on a weakened garrison on the morning of September 7. The assault on Westerplatte began with a massive artillery bombardment of all heavy weapons available to the Germans. The main blow fell on the gearbox number XXUMX, which was soon completely destroyed. The shelling lasted about two hours, after which the German assault troops launched an offensive from the south-east. The Poles managed to recapture the Germans during the hour and a half fight and prevent a hand-to-hand fight, which the defenders simply did not have.

German sailor and soldiers at the column of Polish prisoners in the vicinity of Danzig (Gdansk).


Major Sukharsky, who oversaw the destruction of CP No. XXUMX, again raised the issue of surrender. He convinced the defenders to pass weapon and in 10: 15 ordered surrender. Sukharsky notified Marshal Rydz-Smigly about his decision, who awarded military defenders and another military rank to all defenders of the garrison.

Westerplatte defenders lost 16 people killed and 50 injured. Many of them were sent to labor camps, where they worked in German factories and plants. Some of them subsequently fled and fought on the side of the Home Army, as well as in other military formations of both the West and the USSR. From the 182 defenders, the Westerplatte 158 survived to the end of the war. Major Henrik Suharsky before the end of the war spent in the German oflag, died 20 August 1946 year in Naples.

The Germans lost to 200-400 soldiers killed and wounded, and their attack on Hel was delayed for a week.

Soldiers of the Polish garrison Westerplatte in German captivity.
TANGO WESTERPLATTE CLIP.

Originator:
http://weapon2.ru/news/oborona-vesterplatte.html
30 comments
Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must to register.

I have an account? Sign in

  1. zadorin1974
    zadorin1974 13 August 2013 08: 35 New
    15
    The Breta fortress held out until the last bullet and the last defender, despite hunger and a complete lack of medicines. And the Poles always loved themselves more than their homeland
    1. stroporez
      stroporez 13 August 2013 13: 32 New
      +1
      here you are wrong ......... to put it mildly, I do not like Poles, but to call them cowards indiscriminately ....... my grandmother lived all her life in the Rivne region, graduated from the Polish gymnasium, by the way Valentina Dovger her classmate .... and about that they are Poles, Pilsudchukes I know from her. so, from her words, even when the order came from Warsaw to lay down arms, many continued to fight with the Germans. and how the Germans hunted our partisans , in the same way they hunted for the remnants of the Polish units and this continued even after the attack on the USSR ..........
    2. carbofo
      carbofo 13 August 2013 22: 22 New
      +6
      In some places, the Poles offered normal resistance from a military point of view, but before the sacrifice they still had a thin gut.
      Europeans are not used to fighting with all their heart.
  2. common man
    common man 13 August 2013 09: 49 New
    16
    ... arrived Lieutenant Colonel Vincent Sobotinsky, who informed Henrik Suharski, the warehouse commander, about the cancellation of plans for the defense of Polish facilities in Gdansk ...
    Probably that says it all.
    The defense of Westerplatte is practically the only national pride of the Poles of the first period of the war. And it happened contrary to the will of the leadership.
    1. I think so
      I think so 13 August 2013 21: 07 New
      +5
      And what to be proud of? "200-400 killed and wounded German soldiers ..." The usual ratio of killed to wounded is 1 to 3 totaling 200-400 / 4 = 50-100. 50-100 killed and 150-300 wounded Germans ... a knock in the sea ... A small skirmish at the battalion level ... Not to mention surrender with the possibility of further resistance ... Well, of course, for the Poles, and THIS was a feat. immediately paws to the top ...
  3. anip
    anip 13 August 2013 10: 01 New
    +3
    Quote: man in the street
    After an evening attack, the commander of the garrison, Henrik Sukharsky, decided to surrender. Deputy Frantisek Dombrowski removed him from command and assumed control of the garrison. Legionnaire Jan Gembur, who hung out a white flag on the orders of the commander, was shot and the flag was removed.

    As always: the switchman is to blame.
  4. Son
    Son 13 August 2013 10: 05 New
    +2
    My opinion: - Respectable soldiers ..!
    1. sq
      sq 13 August 2013 10: 15 New
      +3
      If I’m not mistaken, there were many soldiers from Western Belarus and Ukraine.
  5. Terrible ensign
    Terrible ensign 13 August 2013 10: 17 New
    +6
    I remember there was some Polish film (the turn of the 60-70s) dedicated to the battles on Westerplatte.
    The main role was played by the same actor as Janeka from "Three Poles, a Georgian and a Dog" ... Everything was shown, as usual, in a heroic manner.
    Reading this material, we are convinced once again: reality and historical truth, approximated even, to one degree or another, do not correspond to the propaganda myth.
    As always and everywhere, there are heroes who strive to the end to fulfill their duty to the motherland and the people, there are cowards striving to preserve the skin at all costs. It’s shitty, it’s really shitty when the last of these are commanders ... Dombrowski, along with the legionnaire who hung out a white rag, should have shot the boss Sukharsky as well. At worst, arrest. A simple removal from command led to what it led to ...
    Once again I am convinced that the Poles are full of arrogance and ambition, and how it comes to that, thoughts appear in their boshki that had to be thought through to the end far ahead of time. Attempts by the soldiers to rebel indicate that there was a low motivation for military personnel aimed at fulfilling the BZ, panic prevailed ... Colleague Zadorin pointed out quite rightly ...
    Only the dead do not shame.
    1. Revolver
      Revolver 14 August 2013 03: 06 New
      +1
      Quote: Scary ensign
      Once again I am convinced that the Poles are full of arrogance and ambition, and how it comes to that, thoughts appear in their boshki that had to be thought through to the end far ahead of time.

      Well, the Poles are still those frames. Only they could attack the tanks with cavalry in an equestrian formation with peaks and sabers bald. And it seems they even tried to cut through the armor, however, without much success. I don’t know what is more here - courage or stupidity.
      However, there were other Poles. For example, Rokossovsky. So do not generalize.
  6. Larus
    Larus 13 August 2013 10: 32 New
    +2
    Hmm .... and then the Poles showed their "courage". So the Motherland is not protected !!! And I will remind the author that the war began in 1938 with the Munich Agreement, so stubbornly hushed up by the countries of the West and 6.
    1. misham
      misham 13 August 2013 12: 01 New
      -5
      fought as it should. Fought heroically. Without any hope of success. Knowing that help will not come, the ammunition will soon end and the wounded cannot be helped.
      The Poles have 1,2 mortars + a gun, that's all, against them are Fritz with heavy weapons, aircraft and the main caliber of the battleship. The fact that there are few dead, deeply buried in the ground and thoroughly strengthened. The destruction of the Westerplatte garrison for the Germans is only a matter of time and quantity of ammunition. Comparison with Brest (ours lasted a month and they lasted a week) is not entirely correct. The Brest Fortress lasted until JUNE 29 (the last bastion of the Eastern Fort fell). All that was then was a small guerrilla warfare of surrendering heroes.
      1. Alex
        Alex 9 February 2014 20: 16 New
        +1
        Quote: misham
        Comparison with Brest (ours lasted a month and they lasted a week) is not entirely correct.
        Yes, not correct. And the timing is not the point. Something I do not remember that the commander of the garrison twice a day offered to surrender. And so that among the soldiers of the garrison a riot begins because of a burning desire to surrender soon. And you can argue with the rest.
  7. Stiletto
    Stiletto 13 August 2013 10: 46 New
    +3
    We had different concepts about motivation:

    Major Sukharsky, who observed the destruction of KP No. 2, again raised the question of surrender. He persuaded the defenders to surrender their weapons and in 10: 15 gave the order for surrender. Sukharsky informed Marshal Rydz-Smigly of his decision, who appropriated MILITARY AWARDS AND ANOTHER MILITARY RANGE TO ALL DEFENDERS OF THE GARRISON. And, in theory, he should have ordered the execution.
  8. Poppy
    Poppy 13 August 2013 10: 55 New
    +2
    seriously fought, as many as 16 killed
  9. Kars
    Kars 13 August 2013 11: 04 New
    +4
    training battleship "Schleswig-Holstein". He was supposed to provide artillery support
  10. Standard Oil
    Standard Oil 13 August 2013 12: 14 New
    +7
    For a long time I thought about how to call the territorial entity, which, due to a misunderstanding, exists in Eastern Europe and licks the ass of the American Master to mirror cleanliness, but it turns out that old Winston long ago came up with a very precise definition for a country called Poland, as a "Hyena of Europe", namely a hyena, small, vicious and mean eating up for its masters, a country with a huge inferiority complex and envy of its neighbors, with ambition, but regularly disappearing from the map of Europe and constantly sticking a spoke in its wheels, whether it be the Russian Empire, the USSR or Russia, who, one wonders, prevented the Poles from concluding an alliance not with shaking fear of France or the fraudulent Great Britain, who threw Poland at the mercy of the Germans in the hope that they would go to the east, and from the USSR, which offered help and was in full readiness? No, Polish Russophobia overshadowed the eyes, ears and common sense of Poles and they made another billion-dollar stupidity. How long did Poland last? Three weeks? A month? There is a lot of ambition, and toge zilch and another disappearance from the map of Europe.
    1. sergey1972
      sergey1972 13 August 2013 13: 33 New
      +6
      to the above, I want to add that Poland was not only not going to conclude an agreement with Russia, but on the contrary offered Germany to attack the Soviet Union together (documents are available). And indeed Poland is a European hyena throughout its worthless history. Poland always went for strong and picked up the rest for him: after Germany rejected the judicial region from the Czech Republic, Poland also bit off part of Czechoslovakia. Well, and, of course, Poland, taking advantage of Russia's weakness in the 20s, occupied Russian territories: western Belarus and Ukraine. we will not talk about more distant historical times, where Poland also proved to be a hyena and, I'm sorry, a prostitute.
  11. tilovaykrisa
    tilovaykrisa 13 August 2013 15: 19 New
    +5
    Quote: zadorin1974
    The Breta fortress held out until the last bullet and the last defender, despite hunger and a complete lack of medicines. And the Poles always loved themselves more than their homeland


    As the major from the movie Red Heat used to say - "Capitalism ....." The saying is true for them, their shirt is closer to the body, they tried to surrender all week and the stupid Germans did not understand this at all, and the bastard is the major who spoiled everyone, would put his captain against the wall would have held out for another week or two.
  12. washi
    washi 13 August 2013 15: 23 New
    +2
    However, the psychological damage from the attack was much greater. The besieged Polish fighters panicked and riot arose
    And what else to expect from the lords? They are a crowd of one heroes (like Caucasians). And then an ally with whom the peace treaty, with which Czechoslovakia and Lithuania had already been divided, gathered to divide Ukraine ...
     misham  Today, 12:01 ↑ New
    fought as it should. Fought heroically. Without any hope of success. Knowing that help will not come, the ammunition will soon end and the wounded cannot be helped.
    This is not about the Poles. This is about ours.
    Read about the battles in Ukraine. Surrendered by the shelves of local conscription. The same applies to the Baltic divisions, but, for example, the 7th Estonian reached Victory
    1. misham
      misham 13 August 2013 19: 28 New
      -5
      The defense of the Brest Fortress is practically the only example of heroic resistance to the large military formations of the Red Army in June 41. Yes, there were border guards and garrisons of individual bunkers of the Stalin line. There were of course some successes such as the capture of Przemysl or the landing on the Danube. Personnel and cropped divisions, mechanized corps of the Red Army melted in the border battle
      Indiscriminately blaming the Poles that they fought wrong is not worth it. In 39 years, no one knew how events would go. Who could have imagined the horrors of the "new order" and the war of destruction? Both Germany and Poland signed the Geneva and Hague conventions. Surrender is not a military crime.
      1. Alex
        Alex 9 February 2014 20: 26 New
        +1
        Quote: misham
        Indiscriminately blaming the Poles that they fought wrong is not worth it. In 39 years, no one knew how events would go. Who could have imagined the horrors of the "new order" and the war of destruction?
        That's it. Pan will always consider that it will cost him more: death in the name of freedom and independence of the Motherland, or a poor existence in a warm pigsty.

        The defense of the Brest Fortress is the practical only example of heroic resistance to the large military formations of the Red Army in June 41.
        Maybe for the week of June and so. But on the account of the only one ... It was like there was no Odessa defense when five people with their bodies stopped the attack on the day, when a miners' battalion with grenades and shoulder blades covered the battery, when ... What can I list when the opinion is already in advance formed and it remains only to string the facts.
  13. Avenger711
    Avenger711 13 August 2013 15: 26 New
    -3
    "There are deceitful people in this country, and for this God gave them a serpentine tongue."
  14. creak
    creak 13 August 2013 16: 13 New
    +5
    There were also Poles in the Polish Army, which together with the Red Army contributed to the defeat of Germany. My father, who went through the whole war, saw them in action and, according to him, they fought quite worthily.
    So indiscriminate judgment is inappropriate ...
  15. GUSAR
    GUSAR 13 August 2013 20: 38 New
    0
    It is useless to insult the Poles, they fought with dignity throughout the war, Poland washed herself with her blood and drank a lot of German blood, they were the first to take the blow of Germany, and did not bend the whole war, demonstrating extreme stubbornness. For this, the Poles deserve at least respect, but the fact that they are behaving now to put it mildly ... that's another story after all ...
    1. Tykta
      Tykta 14 August 2013 02: 36 New
      -1
      Quote: GUSAR
      It is useless to insult the Poles, they fought with dignity throughout the war, Poland washed herself with her blood and drank a lot of German blood, they were the first to take the blow of Germany, and did not bend the whole war, demonstrating extreme stubbornness. For this, the Poles deserve at least respect, but the fact that they are behaving now to put it mildly ... that's another story after all ...

      you just have a bad idea of ​​the forerunner of war, the Poles themselves provoked the Germans, like the Czechoslovakians. The USSR offered to conclude bilateral agreements with both of them, but the interests of local and European elites turned out to be more "incidental" than demonic Russia. Mukhin has interesting arguments and assumptions, read
  16. Des10
    Des10 13 August 2013 21: 56 New
    +5
    On this site, unfortunately, it is customary to insult. Poles, Americans, Jews, French ... doesn't really matter. This style is just allowed. For most people who use insults, another argument is not available, for various reasons.
    My grandfather - Vinogradsky Vasily Ivanovich, the navigator pilot - before the war he moved the whole family to Riga, where the regiment of bomber aviation was based. Family: his mother Elizabeth,
    wife Yadviga Boleslavovna (Kvyatkovskaya), son Eric (3 years) and daughter Emma (6 years).
    On the morning of June 29, 1941, he ordered them to take the necessary things and wait for the car at the porch. They gathered quickly on the road, but the one and a half truck with the Red Army arrived after dinner, and sat on knots and trunks in the morning. While traveling around the city - from them from the attics, roofs - the local patriots fired.
    At the railway station in the evening I managed to get into the freight terminal (a window at the top and bunks in 3 floors). The ambulance train — on which they were to be evacuated — had already departed.
    On June 30, the Germans entered Riga.
    In the morning the train stopped, it was necessary to repair the tracks, collect the wounded. The sanitary train on which they were late went off the rails after the bombing. Adults came out to help, children were not allowed, but they saw everything ...
    Settled in Lukoyanov, Nizhny Novgorod region.
    Yadviga Boleslavovna did not receive a food certificate from her husband throughout the war. Therefore she
    at 25 years old (primary education, without profession) to feed her mother-in-law to Elizabeth and
    two children, got a job as a trapper at a lumbering.
    Elizabeth starved to death. She politely refused food: "Thank you, I'm not hungry." Her ration was eaten by children. She died quietly. When she was taken out of the house to the cemetery, she practically did not weigh anything.
    At the beginning of 1943, a subpoena came - Jadviga Boleslavovna (polka) - was mobilized into the Polish Army, the children had to be registered in an orphanage. Outraged barrack neighbors wrote a collective letter to I.V. Stalin. And the answer came: “Let him raise children.”
    After the war, the regiment commander, where his grandfather served, ordered him to find and bring his family to Moscow.
    Eric graduated from high school with a Silver Medal, a candidate of physical and mathematical sciences. Due to rickets suffered in childhood, he completely lost his hearing. Emma left her studies at a radio engineering institute and went to the Urals with my father.
    Yadviga Boleslavovna - received a pension of 36 rubles. She was very happy when promoted to
    47 rubles in 1976. When Luzhkov raised his pensions (thanks for that), she refused our help at all. At her place, in all sorts of places, bags of rusks were hidden. And she always worked. She lived for 91 years.
    My grandmother's birthday is May 9th.
    And there are Poles.
  17. Starshina wmf
    Starshina wmf 14 August 2013 07: 37 New
    -1
    Poles are generally a strange nation. Others would have fought for their homeland. I remember reading somewhere that there was some kind of Polish army, which was sitting in our rear. I ate, received weapons and uniforms, and then washed off to the British. And they didn’t fight very hard there.
    1. adehduard
      adehduard 1 September 2013 15: 59 New
      +1
      These Poles, who did not fight very hard (General Anders), took Monte Cassino Mountain and died in their thousands. In general, it is strange to say that the Poles are a strange people. They are quite combat-ready and their history has proved it more than once.
      1. stalkerwalker
        stalkerwalker 1 September 2013 16: 10 New
        +3
        Quote: adehduard
        These Poles, who did not fight very hard (General Anders), took Monte Cassino Mountain and died in their thousands

        The USSR let them out of the camps, watered, fed, dressed, shod. But these guys refused to fight (although they promised it more than once, they haggled along with a piece of gold).
        Quote: adehduard
        They are quite combat-ready and their history has proved it more than once.

        Yeah. In the meaningless massacre of the Warsaw uprising, in the forests of eastern Poland and Western Ukraine and Belarus against the local population.
      2. Alex
        Alex 9 February 2014 20: 36 New
        +1
        Quote: adehduard
        These Poles, who did not fight very hard (General Anders), took Monte Cassino Mountain and died in their thousands.
        Dying in thousands, storming a mountain in a foreign country in the forehead ... Somehow it does not penetrate me. It does not penetrate, because I do not see how you can fight for Poland in Italy. With the Polish Army, as well as with the Czech battalion (later, the army) of Freedom, everything is clear: the direction of the strikes and the intentions of the Red Army were quite obvious and the liberation of Poland and Czechoslovakia was only a matter of time. So where to fight the patriots: in the Red Army or in the English army?

        You know, even the French, who wanted to fight with the Germans, made their way from Africa to Stalingrad so that only they would be given a fighter.
  18. pinecone
    pinecone 14 August 2013 11: 03 New
    0
    On September 1, 1939, German troops invaded Poland. By this time, Germany had already annexed Austria (the so-called Anschluss) and the Sudeten region of Czechoslovakia.

    By then, Czechoslovakia no longer existed at all. In March 1939 Slovakia declared its independence, Teshinsky region went to the Poles, Carpathian Hungarians, and the Czech Republic was included in the German Reich as a protectorate.
  19. Des10
    Des10 14 August 2013 11: 16 New
    +1
    Quote: Starshina wmf
    I remember reading somewhere that there was some kind of Polish army, which was sitting in our rear. I ate, received weapons and uniforms, and then washed off to the British. And they didn’t fight very hard there.

    some and somewhere is a normal level.

    “Since the beginning of 1942, the question of the timing of sending Polish divisions to the front has been brought to the fore. In February 1942, the USSR government asked the Polish side to send the 5th Infantry Division to the front, which had been trained by that time. Anders rejected the possibility of entering into battle one separate division, the decision he made was supported by V. Sikorsky.
    In March 1942, the government of the USSR reported that due to the complication of the food situation in the USSR, the number of food rations for Polish military units in the USSR that did not take part in the hostilities would be reduced to 44 thousand.
    At the end of March 1942, the first stage of the evacuation of Anders' army to Iran was carried out - 31 soldiers of the Polish army and 488 civilians left the USSR.
    On September 1, 1942, the evacuation of Anders' army was completed. In total, during the two evacuations, 75 servicemen and 491 civilians left the USSR. "
    "In May-June 1945 the Polish Army numbered about 400. It was the largest regular military force that fought alongside the Soviet troops."

    Well, how they fought is a separate conversation, each army had its own heroes and their own "not very zealous" fighters.
  20. xomaNN
    xomaNN 14 August 2013 18: 54 New
    0
    The Poles undoubtedly had to create a myth from this battle, more beautiful than a real battle. But against the backdrop of the mediocre military campaign of the Polish Army in 39, this battle is really distinguished by its resistance to defense.
  21. adehduard
    adehduard 1 September 2013 15: 27 New
    0
    No need to question the feat. Moreover, it is not necessary to compare the ability to exploit different peoples. Heroes are everywhere. Brest Fortress is a feat. But mass surrender near Minsk, Kiev, Vyazma is not a feat. These are the realities of war. Do you spit in the face of our 1941 soldiers?
    1. stalkerwalker
      stalkerwalker 1 September 2013 16: 13 New
      +3
      Quote: adehduard
      No need to question the feat.

      Westeplyatte is a feat. Undoubted and undeniable. As an exception to the general rule. There were no more feats. Only provocations.
      1. Alex
        Alex 9 February 2014 20: 41 New
        +1
        Quote: stalkerwalker
        Westeplyatte is a feat. Undoubted and undeniable.
        If there were more such feats, look, and the mediocrity of the leadership would not be so catastrophic.