The Russian historian believes that the Maynila incident was not a pretext for the start of the Winter War between the USSR and Finland

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The Russian historian believes that the Maynila incident was not a pretext for the start of the Winter War between the USSR and Finland

According to many modern historians, the reason for the Winter War between the USSR and Finland was the so-called Maynila incident, when on November 26, 1939, Finnish troops allegedly fired artillery at the Soviet border village of Mainila.

In turn, Russian historian Oleg Kiselev categorically disagrees that this particular event became a casus belli, which marked the beginning of a bloody confrontation. He expressed his opinion during a conversation with one of the hosts of the TacticMedia channel, Sergei Villanov.



The expert recalled that on the same day, Molotov told the Finnish ambassador that the USSR leadership was outraged, but did not intend to “inflate” this outrageous incident if the parties came to a consensus. The next day, this statement was published by the Pravda newspaper.

In addition, Kiselev expressed confidence that during the shelling, if there was one at all, there were no casualties, despite the statement about the death of several Soviet soldiers and an officer. After all, their last names are still not known.

According to the historian, the Maynila incident was most likely “staged” by the USSR. But this was not done at all in order to get a reason to launch an attack on Finland.

According to the expert, it was rather “the last Chinese warning” that the situation is on the brink and another incident will lead to irreparable things. After this, the Soviet leadership demanded that Finland withdraw its troops from the border in order to defuse the situation.

At the same time, many experts interpret this step as preparation for an attack on Finland. Allegedly, the USSR was trying to “clear the way” for the entry of troops.

However, Villanova's interlocutor thinks differently.

It turns out that we staged a provocation so that the Finns would withdraw their troops from under our first and most powerful and crushing blow? This is some kind of stupidity. We will then run into them. Only they will be in pre-prepared positions

- Kiselev explained.

Summing up, the historian noted that the Maynila incident was rather a kind of “foul of last resort” on the part of the USSR, which was supposed to “sober up” the Finns and bring them to the negotiating table.

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  1. -2
    22 June 2024 06: 58
    Eh, I didn’t add nits to the end, Comrade Stalin! wink
    1. +3
      22 June 2024 07: 08
      It’s clear that it’s Stalin’s fault that the current truth-tellers sold everything 30 years ago..... Because “Stalin didn’t finish off,” but we poor people, it seems, are not supposed to...

      Eh, it’s a pity that they weren’t consistent here either, they didn’t completely plunder the country... But the roots, of course, come from Stalin?
      1. +3
        22 June 2024 07: 28
        “The roots, of course, come from Stalin,” forgive me, but isn’t it too much for one person: “BUILD, UPROAD”? Stalin was an ordinary person: he could make mistakes, he could get tired, but where were the others?
      2. +2
        22 June 2024 07: 32
        Well, not thirty, but when Khrushchev returned Porkkala. And in vain, such gestures of “good will” are not very good... In Finland, Fink’s “party” is still strong up to the Urals... It’s not noticeable among ordinary people, but among small-town politicians it’s no-no and it’s slipping through.
        1. 0
          22 June 2024 07: 53
          Quote: Medvedev_Dmitry
          In Finland, Fink's "party" to the Urals is still strong...

          Until what Urals? You're not taking enough... ALL Finno-Ugric peoples, and this is up to the Khanty and Mansi, should be part of Finland!!!
          1. +4
            22 June 2024 07: 58
            To the Ural mountains, to be more precise... I just thought that it was clear that the Ural is not only a river.... hi By the way, you are from Semsk, I saw your comment, so I’m asking. smile He served there in Aktogay.
            1. +1
              22 June 2024 08: 08
              Quote: Medvedev_Dmitry
              By the way, you are from Semsk

              Now they call it "Semey" negative
              1. +1
                22 June 2024 08: 15
                And the Abai region.. But once upon a time F.M. Dostoevsky had to eat cabbage soup there... I think it’s still a wild place... Of course, with a touch of civilization... iPhones, etc.
                1. +1
                  22 June 2024 12: 09
                  The last time I visited was in 2016, I visited the graves of my ancestors... The Russians who stayed were assimilated - either married to a Kazakh woman or married to a Kazakh man. Otherwise, there are no options - no normal work, no damn thing. There is clanism everywhere. Zhuznost wassat
                  All the Soviet legacy is down the drain! The Irtysh Shipping Company was destroyed, the river station was demolished, the technical school was closed, the ships, as well as the ship repair plant, were scrapped, the backwater was covered with mud, no one maintained the fairway in working order - not a single dredger, bridges, both old and new, began to crumble...
                  And so it is in all industries! Well, besides oil production and trade...
        2. -2
          22 June 2024 08: 20
          Next time we need to finish on Observatory Hill; in Helsingfors.
          1. 0
            30 June 2024 18: 45
            I'm afraid that there won't be a next time (given the current political situation). sad
      3. +3
        22 June 2024 07: 41
        Quote: ivan2022
        But roots, of course, they come from Stalin?

        Mines. That's what they call it now!

        Perhaps Stalin was not a professional in chess, but it seems to me that he would have beaten one grandmaster cleanly.
      4. +3
        22 June 2024 07: 48
        Quote: ivan2022
        But the roots, of course, come from Stalin?

        No, no... It was Lenin who planted the bomb! Don't you know? wassat
    2. +3
      22 June 2024 07: 48
      Quote: Dutchman Michel
      Eh, I didn’t add nits to the end, Comrade Stalin!

      Historians like Kiselyov?
      1. 0
        22 June 2024 10: 37
        Historians like Kiselyov?
        No. Finns
    3. +1
      22 June 2024 08: 11
      When I was a pioneer (about 60 years ago), one competent comrade told me that there was shelling.
      And the crew of the Finnish gun (according to the stories of local Finns) spoke ... Russian.
      Apparently it was not in vain that the Red Army soldiers returning from captivity were filtered much more carefully than after the end
      WWII. Accordingly, Lev Davidovich (the head of the ENTIRE counter-revolution, appointed by the West as the head of the “government in exile” was eliminated after the end of the Winter War.
      1. +1
        22 June 2024 08: 27
        The Finns don’t treat Russians very well, that generation, I still found some.
      2. 0
        8 July 2024 08: 44
        Good morning wish.
        “After the end of the “winter war,” it just happened to coincide.
        Remember Siqueiros' attack? L.D. became very cautious as Mercader was brought to him. This type of surgery is not done in one day.
  2. +6
    22 June 2024 07: 16
    There have been a lot of experts lately, all sorts of science fiction writers like Rezun. Everyone is researching something there, trying to explain to people what and how. We've been through all this for a long time, are there any results? Eat. And who does what and how is no longer important.
    1. 0
      22 June 2024 07: 33
      This expert has rummaged through tons of archival documents and can describe events on one or another section of the front almost day by day.
      And here you are with your valuable opinion.
      1. +3
        22 June 2024 07: 37
        But personally, do you care what was the reason? The issue had to be resolved, and it was resolved. The border was moved away from Leningrad. What's next? And if this had not been done then, it is not a fact that Leningrad would have been able to be defended in 41.
        1. +1
          22 June 2024 07: 47
          And I’m wondering how it was, I love history, not confirmation of my only correct point of view
          1. 0
            22 June 2024 07: 51
            So for God's sake. I'm talking about the love of history. Well, they wouldn’t have flinched on their own then, they would have come up with something else. The main thing is the result. And what happened there and what, what was the reason for it - this is the tenth thing.
          2. 0
            23 June 2024 22: 36
            And I’m wondering how it was, I love history, not confirmation of my only correct point of view
            Then it’s strange: after all, expert opinions are proof of “one’s only true point of view” (in contrast to history, where the subject of research is the patterns of social development identified on the basis of objective facts).
      2. +3
        22 June 2024 08: 03
        Quote: Cartalon
        This expert has rummaged through tons of archival documents and can describe events on one or another section of the front almost day by day.
        And here you are with your valuable opinion.

        Do you know him personally? I don’t see any of his works, except for one book co-authored with Yu.M. I didn’t find mine. No monographs, no dissertations... only videos on the Internet... Or is this now the expert level? wassat
      3. +4
        22 June 2024 08: 45
        This expert has dug through tons of archival documents and can almost day by day describe the events on this or that section of the front.

        Isn't this one in London?expert"interrupted"tons of archival documents", which even in our archives are classified as secret?
        1. +1
          22 June 2024 12: 15
          Quote: Luminman
          Wasn’t it in London that this “expert” rummaged through “tons of archival documents”?

          No. In the Internet. Judging by his videos...
          1. +1
            22 June 2024 16: 35
            Quote from: AllX_VahhaB
            In the Internet. Judging by his videos...

            That's it...
        2. 0
          10 July 2024 21: 14
          Quote: Luminman
          Was it not in London that this “expert” rummaged through “tons of archival documents” that are classified as secret in our archives?
          -The Georgian University sold maps of the USSR from the Supreme Economic Council of the 1920s at a scale of 1:25 until 000. In the Library of the US Congress, these same maps were in the public domain before the sanctions.
          And we still have them marked “Secret” - although 100 years have passed.
          Therefore, if we have something stamped, this does not mean at all that it is like that everywhere, including according to such documents
          1. +1
            11 July 2024 10: 29
            A Georgian university sold maps of the USSR from the Supreme Economic Council of the 1920s at a scale of 1:25 until 000. The same maps were in the public domain in the US Library of Congress before the sanctions
            Are you sure these cards are not fake? Our information was divided into two parts - one for Comrade. Stalin and those to whom it is due, the other is for the broad masses...
            1. +1
              11 July 2024 10: 59
              Are you sure these cards are not fake? Our information was divided into two parts - one for Comrade. Stalin and those to whom it is due, the other is for the broad masses...
              - are you serious?
              It’s easy to lie to the Shirnarmass, “Oh, how good everything is!”, and report to Comrade Stalin that the people are spitting.
              If the map does not coincide with the terrain, everyone who uses the map notices it immediately, even then or now.
              Making fake cards 1920h - Now? Well, in theory it’s possible, but what does it mean?
              After the collapse of the USSR, NATO bought from the headquarters of all Limitrophes/Georgia complete sets of all military-scale maps of the USSR General Staff for the entire territory of the USSR and adjacent countries.
              Therefore, there is zero meaning in the stamp on the maps of 1920-40. The enemy has these cards - and this is “secret” for HIS military and people. Someone gets paid extra for "secret"
              1. +1
                11 July 2024 16: 36
                Quote: your1970
                It’s easy to lie to the Shirnarmass, “Oh, how good everything is!”, and report to Comrade Stalin that the people are spitting.

                We had a special department under the NKVD that dealt with disinformation. They collected 50 million tons of grain, but announced that it was 100 (or 20, I don’t know which way it all worked). They smelted 20 million tons of steel, but they said it was 50 or 10. And only the top leadership of the country knew the real state of affairs. There was a similar department in the KGB, and its former chairman V. Semichastny spoke about this. Surely, something similar exists within the FSB. What I mean is that in no case should you trust official information...

                Quote: your1970
                If the map does not coincide with the terrain, everyone using the map notices it immediately

                You can only notice this when you are actually on the ground. I’ll give one example from Schellenberg’s memoirs, where they could not come to a common opinion - which branch of the railway runs from one point to another - a single track or two? And this could be easily found out by simply sending an agent there. But they didn’t send it. And why? Because counterintelligence worked well, which fed all of them with contradictory data...

                Quote: your1970
                After the collapse of the USSR, NATO bought from the headquarters of all Limitrophes/Georgia complete sets of all army-scale maps of the USSR General Staff for the entire territory of the USSR and adjacent countries

                After the withdrawal of troops from the former republics of the USSR, all any serious documentation was taken away, including rusty bolts and burnt out light bulbs! A regiment from one such republic was transferred to our airfield, I say this not by hearsay. And the cards could be bought at any Soyuzpechat kiosk or Voentorg store...
                1. 0
                  11 July 2024 21: 48
                  After the withdrawal of troops from the former republics of the USSR, all any serious documentation was taken away, including rusty bolts and burnt out light bulbs! - everything that could be sold/changed/thrown away during the withdrawal from the republics was used.
                  Because
                  any Soyuzpechat kiosk or Voentorg store maps of scale 1:500 were sold....
                  But the cards of the Georgians and the USA are real.
                  And 1:25 is still under the heading.

                  Let me give you one example from Schellenberg's memoirs - a fantasy book written by someone unknown.
                  It’s enough that they cut gold chervonets with scissors belay. But at the same time they write about working agents in the USSR - who lived in the country and were required to know what kind of money was circulating. This is an axiom - any samples of money, documents, passports, etc. have always been of keen interest to the intelligence services
    2. 0
      22 June 2024 07: 39
      They earn money... And yes... The documents are in the archives. Although Nadys re-read Molotov’s interview, there was so much wisdom and obscurity there... But, I must admit, they did it well... No matter how banal it may sound, the USSR was a stronghold and a power.
      1. +2
        22 June 2024 07: 56
        Do you think that a book about the Winter War can make a lot of money?
        1. 0
          22 June 2024 08: 01
          Now they make money not on books, but on the number of views and likes
        2. 0
          22 June 2024 08: 08
          Probably possible. So I had Sokolov’s book “Secrets of the Finnish War” right at my fingertips. Quite an intelligent book, everything is laid out on the shelves, including about the reasons. With an analysis of “all flights”, the reasons for our failures at the first stage, with the entire course of the database, losses.
          1. 0
            22 June 2024 08: 21
            Sokolov's book "Secrets of the Finnish War"

            Sokolov is a half-baked liberal and Russophobe...
            1. 0
              22 June 2024 08: 25
              I don’t know about him personally, I don’t know him. But there is no sense of any kind of Russophobia in the book. Everything is quite clear, what, where and how. Without excessive jingoism, but also without attacks on our Motherland, leadership, military commanders and personally Comrade. Stalin.
              1. 0
                22 June 2024 08: 29
                But there is no sense of any kind of Russophobia in the book.

                I haven’t read this book, but I’ve read others - wherever possible he pours the g...on everything he can...
                1. +1
                  22 June 2024 08: 31
                  I will not argue, perhaps.
            2. 0
              22 June 2024 08: 40
              Why should a liberal be beaten? In modern baryshy Russia, a liberal is a respected person, and there is only one president.
    3. +2
      22 June 2024 07: 53
      “there are too many experts” “it’s a sacred thing to “warm up” from the “imperial period”: look how smart I am: I know what Stalin or Alexander 3 were thinking about. If you don’t believe me, go and ask them!
      It seems to me that such “wise men” only dishonor the past
      1. -1
        22 June 2024 07: 57
        You disgrace the past with your ignorance and unwillingness to know it.
        1. +2
          22 June 2024 08: 37
          Depending on which experts “enlighten”, some “experts” visit so many “noodles” that ....
  3. +4
    22 June 2024 07: 23
    . the Maynila incident was not a pretext for the start of the Winter War between the USSR and Finland

    Then anything could be the reason. Stalin solved problems. And he didn’t need reasons or pretexts for this.

    That's interesting. Is Finland’s entry into a military alliance hostile to us, which is waging an indirect war with us, a reason or a pretext? In any case, Stalin would definitely not have allowed this. And I would solve it quickly. And they wouldn’t dare!
    1. +5
      22 June 2024 07: 43
      And they didn’t dare... England puffed out its cheeks, the Scandinavians volunteered to help, the Germans... But it didn’t work out. Comrade Stalin had a core...
    2. +2
      22 June 2024 08: 18
      ? In any case, Stalin would definitely not have allowed this. And I would solve it quickly. And they wouldn’t dare!

      Well, if Estonia, located very close to Leningrad, was accepted into NATO, then Finland was even more so. You are confusing the modern leadership with Comrade. Stalin...
  4. 0
    22 June 2024 07: 34
    Here we are again starting to make excuses, instead of being proud of the correct strategic decision to start a war and push the threat away from Leningrad. Another thing is that they began hostilities on a strictly scheduled day, fearing the anger of the leader, who, having compared the potentials of the two armies, considered any delay in defeating the Finns inappropriate. But the weather was bad for the first three days of the assault on the Mannerheim line, when it was impossible to use bomber aircraft. And the concrete fortifications on the line did not respond to conventional artillery, which is why many of our soldiers died, who were thrown into the assault.
    And also, having defeated the Finns in the north in the Petsamo (Pechenga) region, they left this territory to them after signing the surrender. And all because of the reluctance to quarrel with the Anglo-Saxons and the French, whose assets were in the unique nickel mines of Petsamo and whose ally was Finland at that time. Thanks to this indecision, Nazi Germany clung to Petsamo to the last, having from here the only source of nickel for the production of its armor. The Germans built unique coastal artillery systems there with all-round coverage and a huge 381mm caliber. The concrete platforms under them, with a diameter of 40 meters, are now called by cunning ufologists “airfields for flying saucers,” allegedly being developed in the Reich.
    And only after the defeat of Finland in 1944, the Petsamo (Pechenga) district was taken from the Finns, cutting them off from the sea access to the Arctic and depriving them of the richest nickel deposits.
    1. +3
      22 June 2024 08: 15
      Petsamo (Pechenga) was taken from the Finns, cutting them off from the sea access to the Arctic and depriving them of the richest nickel deposits

      I remember at one time the liberals even apologized for the Winter War and scolded the bloody Stalin and his henchman Molotov for everything. But as for me, it was necessary to take the Alan Islands from them...
    2. +2
      22 June 2024 09: 24
      And all because of the reluctance to quarrel with the Anglo-Saxons and the French, whose assets were in the unique nickel mines of Petsamo and whose ally was Finland at that time.

      It would be good if Finland remained their ally further. :((
      1. +1
        23 June 2024 06: 30
        It would be good if Finland remained their ally further. :((

        At this moment, somehow not everyone thinks about it when they glance at a page in a school history textbook. If, on the one hand, it was stated there (in the textbook) that Stalin (USSR) definitely knew that only Germany was preparing to attack the USSR, then why attack the ally of England and France and worsen the international situation for itself? It turns out that there was already complete confidence in the danger from Finland, which would soon fall under Hitler? It turns out that Stalin understood that neither England nor France would send their troops into Finland to protect it, just as they did not do so to protect Poland...? But why then didn’t Stalin keep Petsamo for himself, understanding this situation and the future value of this district for Germany, as his main enemy? Where, moreover, did the state border pass within the same 30 km from Murmansk, the main port in the North?
        For some reason the puzzles don’t fit into a single picture of our actions in that war with the Finns. If Petsamo (Pechenga) was captured, then its value for the defense of the country was no less than the Karelian Isthmus. But... again they played halfway...
        Doesn’t it remind you of anything with the war with Georgia on August 8.08.2008, XNUMX, when you also stopped halfway? And from here petty thoughts creep in - Where will we stop in the current NVO... again at half the way and goal?
        They say history teaches... but it can’t teach anyone
        1. +1
          23 June 2024 22: 47
          Quote: Saburov_Alexander53

          They say history teaches... but it can’t teach anyone

          On this occasion, the classic one comes to mind: “One person can lead a horse to water, but forty people cannot make it drink!” Mayne Reid
  5. +2
    22 June 2024 08: 12
    It turns out that we staged a provocation so that the Finns would withdraw their troops from under our first and most powerful and crushing blow? This is some kind of stupidity.

    In the first half of the 20th century, the international legal system developed an attitude towards those who started a war as a criminal. There were several international agreements on this topic, for example, the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, or the Convention on the Definition of Aggression of 1933, concluded at the initiative of the USSR. They were used, for example, at the Nuremberg Tribunal when indicting the Nazis.
    Violation of these agreements was taken quite seriously, for example, when starting the war against Poland, the Germans carried out a large-scale Operation Himmler, which consisted of repeated attacks by the Germans themselves, under the guise of Poles, on German targets - Attack on the forestry in Bycin (Pitszyn), Attack on the customs point in Rybnik-Stodoly (Hochlinden) or the well-known Attack on the radio station in Gleiwice (in fact, there were quite a lot of such attacks).
    It is not surprising that the USSR also tried to create a pretext for starting a war with Finland.
    After the war, the UN Charter clearly separated the criminal-aggressor and the victim of aggression in Article 51 of the Charter, UN Resolution 3314 was adopted on the definition of aggression, the concept of aggressive war as a crime was included in national legislation - in the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation, for example, this is Article 353. Planning, preparing, unleashing or waging an aggressive war and Article 354. Public calls for unleashing an aggressive war.
    1. -1
      22 June 2024 08: 27
      Article 353. Planning, preparation, initiation or waging of aggressive war

      September 3 France and Britain declared war on Germany. Can they be considered aggressors and warmongers?
      1. +1
        22 June 2024 08: 32
        No. Germany was the first to start a war against Poland, thus becoming an aggressor, and Poland a victim of aggression, having the legal right to individual and collective defense. As part of this defense, France and England declared war on Germany.
        1. -2
          22 June 2024 08: 37
          Germany was the first to start a war against Poland

          The provocation at the radio station in Gleiwitz became known only after the end of the war. And before it began, from a purely legal point of view, France and Britain were the real aggressors. Even a newspaper True branded them as warmongers...
          1. +2
            22 June 2024 09: 11
            The provocation at the radio station in Gleiwitz became known only after the end of the war.

            Wrong. All these details became known after the war from Nebe’s interrogation, but the provocation itself was understandable, like other provocations from Operation Himmler.
            And before it began, from a purely legal point of view, France and Britain were the real aggressors.

            From a purely legal point of view, Germany was the aggressor.
            Even the newspaper Pravda branded them as warmongers...

            Why "even"? Quite natural. In 1939, the USSR and Germany, in addition to the non-aggression treaty, concluded a Treaty of Friendship; it is not surprising that Pravda was blamed not on friendly Germany, but on England and France. In 1941, opinion, of course, changed dramatically.
            https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Договор_о_дружбе_и_границе_между_СССР_и_Германией
            1. -1
              22 June 2024 16: 31
              Quote from solar
              All these details became known after the war from the interrogation of Nebe

              There were no interrogations of Arthur Nebe after the war - he was executed in March 1945 for participating in a conspiracy against Hitler...

              Quote from solar
              From a purely legal point of view, Germany was the aggressor

              Can you substantiate this legal point of view?

              Quote from solar
              it is not surprising that Pravda blamed not friendly Germany, but England and France

              Let me remind you once again that war on Germany was declared on September 3 by Britain and France, and not vice versa...
              1. 0
                22 June 2024 16: 46
                There were no interrogations of Arthur Nebe after the war - he was executed in March 1945 for participating in a conspiracy against Hitler...

                Yes, not Heaven. The details of the attack after the war were told during interrogations by the head of the VI-F group, SS Sturmbannführer Alfred Naujoks, who led the operation.
                Can you substantiate this legal point of view?

                I justify that Germany attacked Poland, committing an act of aggression.
                Let me remind you once again that war on Germany was declared on September 3 by Britain and France, and not vice versa...

                You forgot - they did this within the framework of legitimate collective self-defense against German aggression.
                hi
          2. 0
            22 June 2024 21: 36
            No, because they acted in accordance with the alliance agreement with Poland.
  6. 0
    22 June 2024 08: 21
    Once again the liberals are returning to the delusion that the USSR invented shelling, etc. and so on. what kind of mother gave birth to these pro-Western lickspittles, and how our land bears these unfinished nits.
  7. 0
    22 June 2024 08: 26
    The reason for the outbreak of war can be anything, for example: the murder of Duke Ferdinand is the reason for the start of World War I, but the reason... In the case of Finland, it is the need to push back the border formed due to the rash decision of Ulyanov-Lenin.
    1. -1
      2 July 2024 17: 15
      Are you smarter than Ulyanov-Lenin?
      Heh... heh... Everyone... eclmn.. fancies himself to be something incomprehensible.

      Today, taking over a lousy urban-type settlement is a global problem, and Lenin, as it were, “signed the wrong paper, there’s no point in doing it” and after that millions........ (it’s a pity you can’t swear here.) ... ... For a hundred years they don’t know what to do, how to be.

      This is probably why they divided their country in peacetime and are now beating each other up. And it’s all Lenin’s fault.
  8. +2
    22 June 2024 08: 48
    The biggest fundamental and strategic mistake of Stalin (not even Lenin) was the division of Russian territory into the RSFSR, Belarus and Ukraine and part of the northern part. Kazakhstan. While fighting Russian chauvinism, he missed out on local nationalism. Well, then all sorts of Yeltsins used it. Now we have what we have.
  9. +2
    22 June 2024 12: 58
    It might not have been, it might have been, what to procrastinate on 85 years later.

    But people are not fools, they saw that the Karelo-Finnish SSR had suddenly been formed, and some kind of temporary Finnish government...
    It’s like now: welding umbrellas onto tanks and saying “there will be no war” with impunity, when Biden and Zhirik are already announcing the date...
  10. 0
    23 June 2024 18: 13
    The story is pretty nimble. You can turn it over this way and try it another way
  11. 0
    30 June 2024 18: 53
    You can “calculate” anything and any way you want. It is important how to “calculate” and that the result is correct. lol