Casualties in the wars in the Middle East in 1948–1991

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Casualties in the wars in the Middle East in 1948–1991

Leafing through the Library of Foreign Literature named after. Rudomino old periodicals, came across one sensible publication in the Los Angeles Times newspaper dated March 8, 1991 (p. A7). This was what I had been looking for for a long time, not because I did not have this information, but because I had the opportunity to compare my assessment data with information from a printed independent source.


You can distrust the media in general and foreign media in particular as much as you like, but what I translated and presented to the readers of Military Review gives at least an approximate idea of ​​the losses in at least some Middle Eastern wars and conflicts after World War II. There is no published accurate scientific (archival) data on this issue.



For unclear reasons, there is no information about losses in the Soviet-Afghan War, despite the fact that Afghanistan, like Iran, is included by the Anglo-Saxons in the concept of the Middle East.

There is also no data on losses in the following wars and conflicts (in chronological order):

– Israeli retaliation operations (1949–1966),
– civil war in Sudan (1955–1972),
– civil war in Lebanon (1958),
– Iran-Iraq conflict (1961–1970),
– uprising in Iraqi Kurdistan (1961–1975),
– Omani civil war (1962–1976),
– war of independence of South Yemen (1963–1967),
– Saudi-South Yemeni border conflict (1969),
– peacekeeping operation in Cyprus / Turkish occupation of Northern Cyprus (1974),
– Kurdish-Iraqi conflict (1974–1975),
– Iran-Iraq conflict (1974–1975),
– civil war in Turkey (1976–1980),
– civil war in Syria (1976–1982),
– Egyptian-Libyan war (1977),
– Israeli-Lebanese conflict (1978–1982),
– civil war in YAR (1978),
– civil war in Afghanistan (continues since 1978),
– inter-Yemen war (1979),
– civil war in Sudan (1983–2005),
– Turkish-Kurdish conflict (ongoing since 1984),
– conflict in Lebanon (1985–2000),
– first intifada (1987–1993).


Of course, about conflicts that continued and continued after 1991, estimated information could be provided at a time close to the time of publication, that is, on March 8, 1991.

Translation from English.

Losses in the Middle East wars


Here [is] an overview of casualties in conflicts in the Middle East since the [end of] World War II.

Gulf War, January 17–February 28, 1991: Allies have reported 178 combat deaths to date. No full Iraqi casualty figures have been released, but an Iraqi official said 26 Iraqis were killed in the first 20 days of the war. Other estimates place the number of Iraqi deaths in the tens of thousands. [1]

Iran-Iraq War, 1980–1988: Iran admitted the death of 135 thousand [its] military and civilians, but Western military analysts put the figure [of these losses] at 2-3 times higher. Iraq has not published [its casualty figures], but diplomats in Baghdad estimate them to be at least 100 dead. According to some Western estimates, losses on both sides amounted to 1 million killed and wounded. [2]

South Yemen Civil War [3], January 1986: Officials estimate the death toll to be approximately 4, but diplomatic sources say the figure is closer to 250.

Israeli invasion of Lebanon, 1982: Israel suffered 657 killed and 3 wounded. Syrian losses amounted to 887 killed and 370 thousand wounded. According to PLO estimates [1], about 4 thousand people were killed and 1 thousand people were captured. More than 6 thousand Lebanese and Palestinians, mostly civilians, were killed and 19 thousand wounded.

Lebanese Civil War, 1975–1990: About 150 thousand people died. More than 1 million people, a quarter of the population, were displaced.

Arab-Israeli War of 1973 [5]: Israeli losses amounted to 2 people killed and 569 thousand wounded during the 7,5-week conflict. Syria lost almost 3 thousand people killed and 3,5 thousand wounded. In Egypt there were about 21 thousand killed and 15 thousand wounded. Iraqi casualties were 30 killed and 125 wounded.

Jordan's war with the PLO and Syria, 1970 [6]: 600 people were killed in Jordan, 1,5 thousand were wounded. Syrian losses amounted to 600 people killed and wounded and 10 thousand Palestinians were killed and wounded.

Arab-Israeli War of Attrition, March 1969–August 1970: Israel killed 721 and wounded 2. Arab casualties are unknown, but at the height of the fighting, 659 people were killed daily in Egypt alone. [300]

Six-day Arab-Israeli War, 1967: in 6 days of fighting [8], Egypt lost 11,5 thousand people killed and 10 thousand prisoners, including nine generals. Syria's losses amounted to 1 thousand people killed, and Jordan lost 6 people. Israeli losses were 094 killed and 777 wounded.

Yemeni Civil War [9], 1961–1969 [10]: Figures vary, but some estimate that nearly 70 Yemenis and Egyptians who supported the Republican rebels against the royalists were killed or wounded.

Israeli Campaign, 1956: Israel suffered 172 killed and 817 wounded. Egyptian losses amounted to approximately 2–3 thousand people. [Total] British and French casualties during the Suez invasion [11], which coincided with the Israeli invasion of the Sinai Desert, were 82 killed and 129 wounded. [12]

Arab-Israeli War of 1948–1949 [13]: Israel lost 6,2 thousand people killed, and Arab losses are estimated at 2 thousand killed regular troops. Thousands of Arab and Palestinian irregular fighters are believed to have been killed.

Source: Associated Press

Comments


[1] In the Arab East it is considered the Second Gulf War (see below). On January 17, 1991, the Desert Storm operation of the anti-Iraq coalition forces began. It was preceded by the Desert Shield operation of the anti-Iraqi coalition forces. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, which provoked a reaction from the UN Security Council, began on August 2, 1990.

[2] In the Arab East it is considered the First Gulf War.

[3] At that time - the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

[4] Palestine Liberation Organization.

[5] Among the Arabs it is known as the “October War,” and among the Jews as the “Yom Kippur War.”

[6] These events are known as Black September.

[7] On the Arab side, only Egypt participated.

[8] From 5 to 10 June.

[9] We are talking about North Yemen: in 1962, a revolution took place in the Mutawakkili Kingdom of Yemen, as a result of which the Yemen Arab Republic emerged.

[10] In reality, these events, known in the Arab East as the Yemeni September 26 Revolution, took place between 1962 and 1970.

[11] This refers to the Suez Canal zone.

[12] We are talking about the so-called “Triple Aggression” of Israel, Great Britain and France against Egypt.

[13] Fighting between Arabs and Jews in Palestine began in 1947, when the State of Israel had not yet been declared, which happened on May 15, 1948.
23 comments
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  1. +4
    14 May 2024 05: 13
    Thanks Pavel, interesting material, especially in light of the latest discussions at VO!
    1. The comment was deleted.
      1. +2
        14 May 2024 07: 50
        Obviously, these authors are trying to add weight to their wretched publications with this “flair of mystery.”
        With language removed. hi
  2. +6
    14 May 2024 06: 13
    If the author had summed it up losses by country- there would be no price for him...
    1. 0
      14 May 2024 08: 56
      If the author had summed up the losses by country, he wouldn’t have had a price...

      What's the point? The value of the work is only as a view of English-language journalism of that time. No more, no less.
      Systematization of information presupposes initial skills in information and analytical work.
  3. -1
    14 May 2024 12: 23
    Quote: Dekabrist
    Local authors have resorted to making some kind of “historical detective stories” out of thin air.


    First of all, translation is just translation. How can you suck it out? Especially with comments.

    Secondly, what is in this translation or in the original detective story?
  4. -1
    14 May 2024 12: 38
    Quote: Dekabrist
    although there are quite a lot of sources with these losses


    I wrote that “there is no published accurate scientific (archival) data on this issue.” There are only evaluative information published in various dubious publications. But there really are a lot of them...

    Dekabrist, You don’t understand what a “source” is. This is not just any publication. This is a document, preferably published with scientific criticism.
    1. 0
      14 May 2024 16: 20
      There are only evaluative information published in various dubious publications.

      That is, you consider a book, say, written by the President of Israel, a “dubious publication”? What then is the price of your writing?
      Doesn't the crown weigh on you?
  5. -2
    14 May 2024 12: 45
    Quote: Dekabrist
    although there are quite a lot of sources with these losses. They are even in the English-language Wikipedia. In the same Wikipedia, if you are too lazy to look at other sources...


    What to talk about with those for whom Wikipedia is an authoritative source...
  6. -2
    14 May 2024 12: 52
    Quote: Dekabrist
    if you are too lazy to look at other sources, especially in Arabic


    Please provide sources in Arabic. And at the same time I’ll see how much you know Arabic...
  7. -2
    14 May 2024 12: 59
    Quote: parusnik
    With language removed.


    parusnik
    (Alexey Bogomazov)
    , after what happened to you last time, you dropped to the level of a kulak henchman...
  8. -1
    14 May 2024 13: 24
    Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
    Thanks Pavel, interesting material, especially in light of the latest discussions at VO!


    You are welcome!
  9. -1
    14 May 2024 14: 30
    If so many conflicts are not included, then what's the point of reading this article?
    1. +1
      14 May 2024 16: 43
      The nature of the exclusion from the list of conflicts may also be suggestive.
      For example, what conflicts were then perceived by the Western press as third-party conflicts for which the West is not responsible.
      The cons are not mine, if anything.
  10. -1
    14 May 2024 15: 39
    Very informative article. good
  11. -2
    14 May 2024 17: 19
    Quote: Dekabrist
    That is, you consider a book, say, written by the President of Israel, a “dubious publication”?


    When you show me such a book, then we’ll discuss it.
    1. +1
      14 May 2024 20: 12
      Then show me such a book

      Why are you flaunting your ignorance on the issue so clearly?
      Read, you are our five-star.
  12. -3
    14 May 2024 17: 23
    Quote: Dekabrist
    What then is the price of your writing?


    At this point in time, the price of my translation is 5 stars, “like the best cognac.” Let's see how many there will be...
    1. +1
      14 May 2024 20: 15
      5 stars, “like the best cognac.”

      Five-star cognac is as far from the best as from the Earth to the Moon. This is not even a vintage cognac, but an ordinary one. To put it mildly, you are also not an expert in cognacs.
  13. -3
    14 May 2024 17: 26
    Quote: Dekabrist
    Doesn't the crown weigh on you?


    The point is not whether the crown is pressing on me or not, but that you recognized the existence of this crown...
    1. +1
      14 May 2024 19: 52
      You acknowledged the presence of this crown...

      You don't know history well. Crowns are different. Including tin ones.
  14. -3
    14 May 2024 20: 58
    Quote: Dekabrist
    Why are you flaunting your ignorance on the issue so clearly?
    Read, you are our five-star.


    Yes, I read this book back in 2005. And what?
  15. -2
    14 May 2024 21: 09
    Quote: Dekabrist
    Five-star cognac is as far from the best as from the Earth to the Moon. This is not even a vintage cognac, but an ordinary one. To put it mildly, you are also not an expert in cognacs.


    “In all-Union technical conditions, vintage cognacs were drinks that were produced in individual wine-growing regions from their own alcohols under various names. Today, this requirement has disappeared from the standards, as has the very concept of “vintage cognac”.”

    Everything is clear, are you a “specialist” in cognac?
  16. -3
    14 May 2024 21: 15
    Quote: Dekabrist
    You don't know history well. Crowns are different. Including tin ones.


    Please name who in history had tin crowns?

    Dekabrist, You have not provided a single source in Arabic. And how he trumped, how he trumped...