Dutch human rights activists blocked the supply of spare parts for F-35 fighter jets to Israel

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Dutch human rights activists blocked the supply of spare parts for F-35 fighter jets to Israel
A Dutch appeals court on Monday ordered the Dutch government to stop exporting parts for F-35 fighter jets to Israel, citing a clear risk of violating international law.

In December, three human rights organizations Oxfam Novib, Pax Nederland and The Rights Forum filed a civil lawsuit against the Netherlands, arguing that the ongoing transfer of aircraft parts makes the Netherlands complicit in possible war crimes committed by Israel in its war against Hamas.



There is no denying that there is a clear risk that exported F-35 parts are being used for serious violations of international humanitarian law

Judge Bas Boulet said as he read out the ruling, drawing cheers from several people in the courtroom.

The court ordered the export of spare parts for the F-35 to cease within seven days. The decision came after Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte traveled to Israel to meet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to discuss the Gaza conflict. Rutte was also expected to meet separately with the Palestinian prime minister.

We are extremely grateful that there is justice and that the court was willing to speak out about justice,

Leading lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld told reporters after the hearing.

In January, a lower court sided with the government, allowing Holland to continue sending U.S. parts stored in a warehouse in the city of Wensdrecht to Israel. The Netherlands is home to one of three European regional F-35 depots.

Other countries are also considering limiting sales weapons Israel. Human rights groups in the UK have filed a similar lawsuit against their government in an attempt to block arms exports to Israel. In the United States, Senate Democrats are pushing a bill that would require President Joe Biden to seek congressional approval before greenlighting arms sales to Israel.

Late last month, the UN's top court ordered Israel to do everything possible to prevent death, destruction and any acts of genocide in Gaza. While the decision came after an appeal in the Dutch case, lawyers for the groups say the judges were likely considering a legally binding order from the International Court of Justice.

The court's decision left some options open for Dutch authorities to export aircraft parts used in operations outside Gaza. Apparently we are talking about Syria. The Dutch Foreign Ministry said it was studying the decision. The government has eight weeks to appeal, although the export ban will remain in place.
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  1. +5
    12 February 2024 17: 45
    ***
    — But Ukraine is different! ...
    ***
    1. 0
      12 February 2024 17: 50
      — But Ukraine is different! ...
      And Syria is different too!
  2. +1
    12 February 2024 17: 47
    So the Americans will give these spare parts, nine percent of the State Department is Zionists and the entire economic elite is also one of these.
  3. -5
    12 February 2024 17: 47
    Wow, the Dutch are doing something for the F-35 - interesting, covers? wink
    1. +7
      12 February 2024 17: 52
      Quote: Bone1
      Wow, the Dutch are doing something for the F-35 - interesting, covers?

      Holland is the most advanced country in the world in terms of electronics, they produce the most modern lithographs for the production of microchips.
      1. -3
        12 February 2024 17: 54
        How about that? - So they make lithographs for F-35s? laughing
        1. +7
          12 February 2024 17: 59
          Quote: Bone1
          How about that? - So they make lithographs for F-35s?

          A lithograph is much more difficult to produce than an F-35.
          1. -2
            12 February 2024 18: 03
            Au-conversation was about spare parts for the aircraft lol
        2. +1
          12 February 2024 18: 00
          Representatives of ASML this week explained that the High-NA generation lithographic systems it produces weigh 150 tons and, when disassembled, occupy 250 containers. To make such a scanner ready for operation requires the work of 250 engineers over six months. Currently, ASML has between 10 and 20 orders for the supply of such scanners from customers, and memory manufacturers such as Micron and SK hynix are also showing interest in them. By 2028, ASML plans to produce up to 20 such systems on an annual basis. Chip manufacturers using new equipment can reduce the geometric dimensions of semiconductor elements by 40%, increasing the density of transistors by up to three times. One such system costs about $380 million. Several copies of such equipment will be shipped to customers during this year.
          https://3dnews.ru/1100090/asml-schitaet-chto-litograficheskie-skaneri-novogo-pokoleniya-nachnut-ispolzovatsya-v-massovom-proizvodstve-chipov-s-2026-goda
      2. 0
        12 February 2024 17: 55
        DAF cars make truck tractors, they were delivered to us.
    2. +1
      12 February 2024 17: 59
      Quote: Bone1
      Wow, the Dutch are doing something for the F-35 - interesting, covers? wink


      The F-35 is assembled from components whose production has been established in all NATO countries. Each country does something different.
      1. -5
        12 February 2024 18: 01
        And what do drug addicts do?
        1. +2
          12 February 2024 18: 35
          Here you go https://web.archive.org/web/20070929041202/http://www.niid.nl/file.aspx?i=962
          1. +1
            12 February 2024 19: 40
            So Nikolai Severny is going over the hill, or what? And if so, when?
            1. +1
              12 February 2024 19: 41
              Quote: Nagan
              So Nikolai Severny is going over the hill, or what?

              Where will he go?)))
              1. 0
                12 February 2024 19: 43
                Quote: Senior Sailor
                Quote: Nagan
                So Nikolai Severny is going over the hill, or what?

                Where will he go?)))

                Look forward to.hi
          2. +1
            12 February 2024 20: 32
            Uv. Senior sailor! I don’t know what’s on the iconography of high-tech products in 2006 (I’m not competent, unfortunately), but in the mass production of later years in the field of ship repair, the Dutch did not show themselves in the best way. Only the price and terms turned out to be at the “European” level. And the Dutch turned out to be of Polish-Arab origin. But the quality and timing, of course, suffered not because of the nationality of the performers, but because of the arrogance of the purely Dutch authorities. I tell you from personal experience as a 2nd class mechanic. hi
            1. +3
              12 February 2024 22: 09
              Perhaps and even probably you are right. But I'm afraid this isn't just happening to the Dutch now. request
  4. 0
    12 February 2024 18: 45
    International cooperation is such a... complicated matter, even allies can mess things up at some point.
  5. +1
    12 February 2024 22: 52
    Well, let's start with the fact that the government of the Netherlands will protest everything, primarily because they have no idea how to do it. On the territory of the Netherlands there are only warehouses managed by Americans, at their bases. The second is one of the authorities, and not the final one
  6. 0
    13 February 2024 06: 12
    The international isolation of the Zionazi regime is gradually increasing. I hope it gets to the point where no one wants to get dirty with these “creatures” and will shy away from them like lepers.