Military Review

Rifles with levers and applied magazines

54
Rifles with levers and applied magazines
Lever-action rifles of all kinds are very popular in modern cinema. Frame from the film "Crossfire" (2001). Sharps Lever Rifle with Scope



“Trying to move calmly, as if on a walk,
Henri took a few steps forward,
bent down and picked up the winchester.
Looking around and not noticing any changes,
Henri jerked the bolt and threw out the spent cartridge case.
So he was not mistaken, the shot was fired
from this gun.
With the little finger, removing the earth from the trunk,
she got quite a bit
Henri sent the shutter forward
and drove a new cartridge into the barrel.
Now he had the real in his hands weapon,
not like browning.
Feeling much more confident
Henri took the butt under his arm,
put the barrel on the bent left arm
and looked around."

Yuri Tupitsyn "Blue World"

Weapon stories. In general, people very quickly realized that the one who shoots second is the first to be killed. And what if you still have bullets in your rifle, but your opponent doesn’t, then ... you are stronger anyway, if you don’t miss, of course. And so the lever systems spread. They were convenient for riders mastering the Wild West, but in the infantry they were still content with "single shots" with bayonets.


A still from the film The Last Battle on Saber River (1997). The main character with a Spencer carbine

As noted in the previous article, there were a lot of designs for repeating rifles with a lever that controlled the shutter, and not only in the USA, but also in Europe. For example, in England in 1881, a Needham rifle with a unique grommet-drum system appeared under the same designed cartridge with a reverse taper sleeve.

12 rounds were loaded into the underbarrel tubular magazine. From it, the cartridges in turn, with each retraction of the bracket-lever, were fed into a flat drum for two cartridges.

A hammer blow on the primer caused a shot, and the movement of the lever back and forth first led to the filing of the next cartridge into an empty chamber, and then to the fact that the appendage of the trigger knocked out an empty cartridge case from another chamber, since its conical shape made it easy to do.

It turned out that he designed the most ... repeating drum rifle in the world. But she did not receive distribution because of her specific cartridge and a number of defects.


Needham rifle device 1881

The famous John Browning was also noted for lever-action rifles, and he offered them in abundance and also patented them in abundance.

For example, look at the original lever-action rifle he patented in 1879. The lever-bracket, acting on the vertical shutter, sliding in the grooves of the receiver (very short, which is always beneficial!), Lowers it down through the earring. At the same time, the bolt with its protrusion presses the extractor lever and it ejects an empty sleeve from the chamber.

Naturally, in this case, the trigger is automatically cocked, striking the striker located inside the massive shutter. The construction is simple and obviously very solid. But ... the rifle is single-shot, and this is its drawback.


J. Browning 1879 rifle. Diagram from US patent

The famous American gunsmith Ebenezer Townsend Starr, who supplied carbines to northerners in 1882, offered his "single-shot", clearly trying to outdo Browning. In his rifle, by lever action, the bolt was thrown back, like the bolt of a Spencer rifle, and half out of the neck of the box.

At the same time, its protrusion fell into the cutout of the extractor plate and pushed it out of the chamber along with the spent cartridge case. With a sharp movement of the lever, the sleeve, most likely, simply flew out of the chamber.


Diagram of the design and operation of the bolt mechanism of the 1881 Ebenezer Starr rifle. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982

A year later, Brown Standard offered its own version of a vertical bolt operated by a lever and with a hidden trigger. For some reason, the diagram does not show the extractor, but, of course, it should have been. The role of the lever was performed by a slightly enlarged trigger guard.


Scheme of the device and operation of the bolt mechanism of the Brown Standard rifle of 1882. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982


In 1887, Kuno Buchel rifles (upper), Adolf Lindner, similar to the Peabody rifle, and with a hidden trigger (middle) and O. Lettov’s rifle, also with a vertical lever-operated bolt, which was located ... in front of the trigger guard . J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982

Drum rifles continued to appear, again, with a lever ...


Rifle A. Swingle. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982


Rifle G. Piper. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982

Well, in the most active way, John Browning continued to create lever rifles, who now focused his attention on rifles with a middle magazine. He received a patent for one of them in 1891. Its shutter was fixed with a U-shaped wedge that rose and fell in the grooves of the receiver, so its locking was exceptionally strong.

The attached store, the Lee system, was designed in such a way that the cartridge was first removed from it by the shutter and fell on the tray. With the reverse movement of the shutter, the tray raised the cartridge to the chambering line. The system was ingenious, but apparently seemed unnecessarily complicated.


Scheme of the action of the shutter of a rifle by J. Browning in 1891 from a US patent


More rationally designed was his 1895 stack-loading rifle from the US patent.

And although she also did not get into mass production, the Browning rifles of 1894 and 1895 gained worldwide fame.


The mechanism of the Savage rifle with a hidden trigger, "Henry bracket" and a drum magazine. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982

The latest innovation in the field of repeating lever rifles was Savage's 1899 drum lever rifle. The military abandoned it, but as a hunting rifle, success awaited it.


Sevage's 1899 rifle magazine device. Scheme from the patent


Savage rifle advertisement

On this one can say история lever rifles ended, although they are still being produced. The fact is that all the “new” rifles of this type are nothing more than copies of the old ones, and only materials, finishes and a little design change in them.

Well, since one of the first rifles with a lever was a Spencer carbine with a magazine in the butt, we will talk about them today, although not about all of them yet.

So, the M1860 Spencer carbine with a lever and a butt magazine. Moreover, his store was interchangeable, for seven rounds, and was a rather long tube with a spring inside and a cartridge lock at the open end, which was inserted into the carbine into the hole in the butt. Since it took a long time to reload them, the shooters relied on a hexagonal pencil case, in which ten loaded magazines were stored.


Selected shooters of the 1st and 2nd regiments of Berdan snipers during the American Civil War. In the figure at the bottom left, a soldier is just pulling out a magazine from such a pencil case. Fred and Lillian Funken. Wars on the American Continent XVII-XIX centuries: War of Independence - Civil War - American-Mexican War - Conquest of the Wild West: Infantry - Navy. M.: Astrel / AST, 2003. S. 81


"Spencer" M1860 chambered for .56 caliber. Photo imfdb.org

Already in 1870, Benjamin Hotchkiss proposed a rifle with a tubular magazine in the butt, but with a sliding rotary bolt. The company undertook to produce this rifle ... Winchester, and although it was not accepted into service in the USA, it began to be used in China!

In 1880, Ferdinand Mannlicher decided that one tube in the butt was not enough, and put three in it. For 18 rounds! Rotating with the movement of a sliding rotary bolt, feeding cartridges in turn.

The main drawback of the rifle was too thick and also round, not oval neck of the box. Well, the mechanism itself was very complicated. In addition, a rifle with such a stock neck could not hit the enemy on the head!

Following the Mannlicher rifle, a Schulhof rifle appeared for 26 rounds, which were inside the butt in three separate canisters, and were also fed into the bolt alternately using a rack and pinion. Pricking the primer with neighboring cartridges in this arrangement was excluded. The rate of fire of the rifle was very high: 25 rounds in 30 seconds.

Another innovation was the top descent in the form of a key mounted on the neck of the stock. This rifle was even tested in Russia, but it is clear that no one dared to adopt it because of the complexity and high cost.

A very similar shop was proposed by August Larsen in 1883; his other development was, again, an applied vertical magazine for only 5 rounds, since a multi-cartridge applied magazine changed the balance of the gun very much.

Two original systems were proposed by Aries Jones in 1884: the first had a Peabody bolt, but a vertical magazine in the butt, and the cartridges in it were pressed from above by a lever with a spring, while in other similar rifles they fell on the feeder under their own weight. The movement of the cartridges occurred due to the movement of the plate with projections under the fingers along the neck of the stock. The second sample had a magazine that was inserted from the top left and acted by moving the plate back and forth along the neck of the stock.


Schematics of Larsen and Jones rifles. J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982


In the same 1884, the Simson and Luke rifle appeared with a magazine in the butt and feed in the form of several pairs of connected lever "scissors". It is interesting that they did not have a cover in the butt of the magazine. That is, cartridges could be added there during the shooting process. But dirt could also get into it without interference! And Marcelius Hartley, again, connected the tubular magazine and the Peabody-Martini mechanism ... J. Lugs. Hand-feuerwaffen. Systematischer Überblick über die Handfeuerwaffen und ihre Geschichte. Band II. Berlin. Militarverlag der Deutschen Demokratische Republik, 1982

In general, at the end of the XNUMXth century, no significant designs of rifles with a magazine in the butt appeared. But there were two very original designs, which we will certainly tell you about.

Surprisingly, the tubular magazine in the butt was not forgotten in the coming twentieth century. But that's also a completely different story...

To be continued ...
Author:
54 comments
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  1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
    Kote Pan Kokhanka 27 November 2022 07: 02
    +9
    Thanks to Vyacheslav, apparently today his work is the only platform for discussion of members of the forum who bring them here for the sake of articles on history.
    Another innovation was the top descent in the form of a key mounted on the neck of the stock. This rifle was even tested in Russia, but it is clear that no one dared to adopt it because of the complexity and high cost.

    Innovation is relative. A similar approach was practiced on early wick squeakers.
    However, the evolution of the butt is no less interesting. By the way, the shank of the stock of the first samples of crossbows was customarily clamped under the armpit, and a number of gunshot samples assumed firing from the shoulder (as from a modern grenade launcher).
    All the good days!
    1. kalibr
      27 November 2022 07: 57
      +5
      Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
      All the good days!

      Join us!
  2. Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I 27 November 2022 10: 04
    +7
    So, the M1860 Spencer carbine with a lever and a butt magazine. Moreover, his store was interchangeable, for seven rounds, and was a rather long tube with a spring inside and a cartridge lock at the open end, which was inserted into the carbine into the hole in the butt. Since it took a long time to reload them, the shooters relied on a hexagonal pencil case, in which ten loaded magazines were stored.
    Unfortunately, Vyacheslav Olegovich repeats a very common misconception among "gunsmiths" about the stores of the Spencer carbine! There were no "interchangeable magazines for 7 rounds with a spring inside"! And they didn’t carry 10 loaded magazines in a pencil case! In a pencil case (Blakesley box) they wore tubes, "filled" with 7 cartridges ... And the spring was placed with a special tube-rammer ...

    When the cartridges were used up in the magazine, the rammer tube with a spring was removed from the butt ... cartridges from the tube (!) ... (you could insert cartridges with your fingers!), And finally inserted rammer tube with spring ! The cartridges in the non-removable tube in the butt entered the rammer tube, compressing the spring!
    1. kalibr
      27 November 2022 10: 18
      +3
      Quote: Nikolaevich I
      rammer, compressing the spring!

      I didn’t read about it anywhere ... Although I read a lot. Thank you! But what about the frying pan?
      1. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 27 November 2022 19: 35
        +3
        I remember! But a little out of shape... I commemorate my untimely deceased brother... the last person in my family...
        1. 3x3zsave
          3x3zsave 27 November 2022 19: 42
          +2
          My condolences, Vladimir!
          I think that I have the right to express them on behalf of the entire "historical party of VO".
        2. kalibr
          27 November 2022 20: 57
          +3
          I sympathize with you very much! No one has died for a long time, but when it happened, then, yes, it was not easy. Take heart!
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 27 November 2022 13: 56
      +6
      Volodya, hello! smile
      You said everything, I will add only illustrations.


      Left to right: original .56-56, .56-50, shotgun, modern .56-50

      Rammer.

      Case for shops to a carbine.

      The process itself.
      1. kalibr
        27 November 2022 16: 08
        +4
        Quote: Sea Cat
        The process itself.

        Thank you! Live and learn...
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 27 November 2022 17: 08
          +6
          Thank you! Live and learn...


          Please, I'm glad that the case had. smile
  3. Baker
    Baker 27 November 2022 11: 17
    +7
    While reading the article, an old Soviet cartoon comes to mind, where the character demanded "chopped and kneaded". The author "chopped" information at least five or even more articles, but decided to "knead" it into one article, and besides, he abundantly equipped it with schematic drawings. Although, as for me, articles of this format are better illustrated with photographs, because understanding the schemes is an amateur. And even with such an abundance of names and design schemes, a lot was left "overboard", for example, the British conversion of the Martini-Henry rifle into a magazine, undertaken by Harston.

    By the way, the Jones system, which is mentioned in the article, is also an attempt to convert the Martini-Henry rifle into a magazine one. The British really wanted to make a new, shop rifle out of an old rifle.

    Jones, unlike Hurston, did not limit himself to one option, but gave out as many as four on the mountain.
    1. kalibr
      27 November 2022 11: 20
      +6
      Quote from Baker
      better illustrated with photographs,

      And where to get them? The fact is that you, as a reader, can take any photo. And I only public domain or having received permission from the owner. Can you imagine the amount of work and correspondence?
      1. Baker
        Baker 27 November 2022 11: 25
        +4
        As a reader, you can take any photo

        I usually use photos from books and photoshop to not bother.
        1. kalibr
          27 November 2022 11: 30
          +5
          Quote from Baker
          photos from books and photoshop.

          I do not have so many books, although the library is large, and I have no time to do Photoshop. Not to mention that it does not protect against copyright infringement. Only yesterday I had to attribute only one (!) photo of a miniature from Froissart's book. And there are 86 of them (books) and they are scattered in 6 or 7 libraries of the world. It's been 2 hours since I checked everything. And this is just for the sake of making the right signature. Although there are authors who write here: "Illustration from a book of the Middle Ages." And people eat. And nothing. And even a foreign signature! So I don't need extra work.
          1. 3x3zsave
            3x3zsave 27 November 2022 11: 56
            +6
            it does not protect against copyright infringement.
            When a state recognized as a sponsor of international terrorism puts pressure on its citizens to use someone else's intellectual property, this is not even an oxymoron.
            1. kalibr
              27 November 2022 13: 58
              +8
              Anton, I still don't want to get into it. For example, I have just been refused photographs for a book by the director of the Armory in Vienna. "Because of the terrible war in Ukraine" and "sanctions" they can't... Well, I answered well, so to speak, "opened my eyes a little", like "doctor to doctor". Let him know how we look at all this and in what place of the "world" they are. I received permission from another place. The Ateneum Museum is silent, there are a lot of people in line. And, Anton, I don't want to take the opportunity to pirate. This will make my work more difficult, but then ... everything will be as it should be in a civilized society. And the fact that "there" they behave differently - God will judge. In any case, knowledge belongs to him, not to man.
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 27 November 2022 14: 33
                +7
                That's right, and Anton, in my opinion, dropped this topic in vain, here, especially on "History", the vast majority already understands everything and adequately evaluates everything.
                Do not try to teach despots to distinguish between black and white - rather, they will show you that you have red.
                1. 3x3zsave
                  3x3zsave 27 November 2022 14: 56
                  +4
                  You know, Uncle Kostya, I here, by a sinful deed, wanted to re-read Pikul, the "Far Eastern cycle" ... And I was surprised to find that you can legally download it only for money! Maybe someone has already privatized Pushkin? After all, the guarantor said that Alexander Sergeevich is "our everything." Just did not specify whose "ours" ...
                  1. Catfish
                    Catfish 27 November 2022 15: 25
                    +5
                    After all, the guarantor said

                    And the guarantor, he is the guarantor, to guarantee himself anything, and we will stand on the sidelines and smoke in silence. bully
                  2. ArchiPhil
                    ArchiPhil 27 November 2022 18: 35
                    +4
                    Quote: 3x3zsave
                    wanted to re-read Pikul,

                    Do you need a pickle? Let's agree, no question. Legal? Well ... this is more difficult. laughing laughing laughing
                    1. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave 27 November 2022 18: 46
                      +2
                      Thank you, Sergey!
                      I already found, in my old information blockages.
                2. Baker
                  Baker 27 November 2022 17: 29
                  +3
                  here, especially on "History", the vast majority already understands everything and adequately evaluates everything.

                  1. Catfish
                    Catfish 27 November 2022 17: 57
                    +5
                    I am plagued by vague doubts


                    In vain, you should not think of people worse than they are. smile
                    Not everyone will just say what they really think. And judging only by stupid jingoistic patriots is a thankless task.
                    1. Baker
                      Baker 27 November 2022 19: 26
                      +5
                      do not think about people worse than they are
                      .
                      I have rather the opposite tendency - to think of them better than they are.
                      And urapatriotic manure has no effect on the course of my thoughts.
                      1. Catfish
                        Catfish 27 November 2022 19: 48
                        +2
                        Well, what are we talking about then, if both are about the same about everything and relate. smile drinks
                      2. Baker
                        Baker 27 November 2022 21: 02
                        +4
                        about the same

                        The choice of the order of approximation in our case is a rather complicated task. I would start with a zero order approximation.
                      3. Catfish
                        Catfish 27 November 2022 21: 47
                        +2
                        I would start with a zero order approximation.


                        Well, at least not to the freezing point. smile
                      4. Baker
                        Baker 27 November 2022 22: 58
                        +3
                        Well, at least not to the freezing point.

                        According to the third law of thermodynamics, absolute zero temperature cannot be reached in any final process associated with a change in entropy, it can only be approached asymptotically.
                      5. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave 27 November 2022 22: 42
                        +3
                        -273,15 Celsius? Well, then, "In the beginning was the Word."
                      6. Catfish
                        Catfish 27 November 2022 23: 05
                        +2
                        Well, then, "In the beginning was the Word."


                        And the word was obscene. laughing
                      7. kalibr
                        28 November 2022 07: 31
                        +2
                        Quote: Sea Cat
                        And the word was

                        Lie! Because it is addressed by a man to a woman in order to seduce her ...
                      8. Catfish
                        Catfish 28 November 2022 14: 11
                        +2
                        You sang so that all the dogs howled
                        And in the house nearby, grandfather fell ill in earnest,
                        And I wanted so without noise and without a fight
                        Hug, lift and smack you on a stump!

                        You loved to kiss in hickeys!
                        Sucked my mouth and nose! (And how to breathe??!).
                        She tore my hair, yelled in a wild voice
                        - And now, brothers, he was left without hair!


                        It is impossible to seduce others without cursing. laughing
                      9. kalibr
                        27 November 2022 21: 00
                        +3
                        Quote from Baker
                        think of them better than they are.

                        The approach is correct! Then you will always have moral superiority over others. You can always say, "I thought that ... and you .." And there will be nothing to cover it. And it will be very insulting!
                      10. Baker
                        Baker 27 November 2022 21: 21
                        +4
                        Moral superiority is a uniquely powerful and widespread form of illusion.
                      11. Catfish
                        Catfish 27 November 2022 21: 53
                        +4
                        Where do without them, without illusions. bully



                        does not bear the administration of the site, at all)))))))))))) 0
                      12. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave 27 November 2022 22: 46
                        +3
                        For hamsters are always right, and if they are not right, they will crush them with a mass.
                      13. kalibr
                        28 November 2022 07: 29
                        +3
                        Quote: 3x3zsave
                        For hamsters are always right, and if they are not right, they will crush them with a mass.

                        Then it will be bad for them, but that's later!
                      14. kalibr
                        28 November 2022 07: 28
                        +2
                        Quote from Baker
                        it's uniquely strong and wide

                        When an illusion is so widespread, it becomes a reality.
          2. Catfish
            Catfish 27 November 2022 14: 04
            +5
            Vyacheslav, good afternoon! smile
            I remember seeing a movie where President Lincoln gives a Spencer carbine as a gift to the main character with wishes to shoot more southerners. Unfortunately I don't remember the name of the movie. request
            1. Baker
              Baker 27 November 2022 15: 04
              +5
              I remember seeing a movie where President Lincoln gives a Spencer carbine as a gift to the main character with wishes to shoot more southerners.

              Your memory failed you. Lincoln gave a second model of the Burnside carbine to John Jordan Crittenden. Here is the carbine.

              On the buttstock is a plaque: "To Kentucky Statesman John J. Crittenden from President Abraham Lincoln February 1, 1862."
              And in your illustration - a test of a rifle that Spencer presented to Lincoln on August 18, 1863. It was after this that Spencer received a contract to supply his rifles to the army.
              This rifle also survived. Just the artist was not accurate in the details.
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 27 November 2022 15: 23
                +5
                Good day! smile

                Thanks for the correction and clarification. It is impossible to judge historical accuracy from the film, but I had no other information except from this film, and according to visual memory, they showed Spencer there. But there, as I remember, was not a "statesman", but almost a special agent of the State Department. Sorry, I don't remember the name of the movie and I couldn't find anything online.
                1. Baker
                  Baker 27 November 2022 16: 14
                  +4
                  and almost a special agent of the State Department

                  I don’t remember the film, but as for the “special agent of the State Department”, at that time it consisted of four bureaus: the diplomatic bureau, the consular bureau, the home bureau and the bureau of the keeper of the archive, the translator and the payout agent. Therefore, the presence of some kind of special agents in the composition of this office is extremely doubtful.
                  1. ArchiPhil
                    ArchiPhil 27 November 2022 16: 27
                    +5
                    Quote from Baker
                    I don't remember the movie

                    Isn't this *Lincoln*? A '12 movie from our Steven Spielberg?
                    1. Baker
                      Baker 27 November 2022 16: 32
                      +5
                      Did not see. And I'm not a fan of Lincoln. The administration with its requirements for the length of the comment is tired.
            2. Maxim G
              Maxim G 27 November 2022 18: 53
              +6
              Spencer's rifle flashed at the end of the film "Unforgiven" with Clint Eastwood.
          3. Baker
            Baker 27 November 2022 16: 30
            +4
            Not to mention that it does not protect against copyright infringement.

            Copyright - 50-70 years after the death of the author. To illustrate your articles, there are a lot of books published before 1972.
  4. kalibr
    27 November 2022 21: 04
    +1
    Quote from Baker
    To illustrate your articles, there are a lot of books published before 1972.

    I see you stubbornly trying to turn me to your side. But ... Firstly, I don’t have a library, and secondly, photos from books do not look good on the screen. Thirdly, photographs can be used not only in articles, but also in books, but pictures from books can only be used in articles. And that's not very smart.
    1. Baker
      Baker 27 November 2022 22: 29
      +2
      I see you stubbornly trying to turn me to your side.

      What do you! I'm just sharing information. You cannot teach old dogs new tricks.
      1. kalibr
        28 November 2022 07: 27
        +2
        Quote from Baker
        I'm just sharing information.

        Thank you, of course. But, alas, in my case this information is useless. And about the old dog, also very true. I am that same dog.
        1. Baker
          Baker 28 November 2022 13: 17
          +2
          But, alas, in my case, this information is useless.

          It's like looking. The conversion of a Martini-Henry rifle to a magazine rifle is quite a topic for an article, and not a hackneyed one at that. As well as lever-action sporting rifles. This is a topic that hasn't really been developed yet.
          1. kalibr
            28 November 2022 16: 33
            +1
            Quote from Baker
            quite a topic for an article,

            Yes, but where can I get information and photos? I wrote to you about today's problems ...
            1. Baker
              Baker 28 November 2022 16: 50
              +2
              I'll have to dig into the archives. I came across a few good articles. Maybe there are traces.
              1. kalibr
                28 November 2022 17: 21
                +1
                Quote from Baker
                Maybe there are traces.

                But you yourself can make such material and publish it either by agreeing with the administration, or in extreme cases through me.
  5. qwerty1
    qwerty1 5 January 2023 23: 07
    0
    About application stores:
    sometime in the early 70s I was a teenager in Moscow. And the father of my school friend (he was probably a KGB officer) had a small child. Modern look. And as I recall (of course, 50 years have already passed), cartridges were laid in this small thing just like in Marcelius Hartley in your picture. I remember that it was with a manual shutter, but maybe a semi-automatic, I don’t remember exactly. Do you happen to know what it could be, what kind of carbine? Soviet? Captured?

    Thank you.