Military Review

"A terrible and frightening sight." Dramatic death of the battleship "Barham"

71
"A terrible and frightening sight." Dramatic death of the battleship "Barham"
The explosion of the British battleship "Barham"


Queen Elizabeth-class dreadnought


In the course of the naval arms race, which began even before the outbreak of the First World War, the project of battleships of the Queen Elizabeth class was born. The lead ship of the series was named after Queen Elizabeth I of England and was launched in 1913.

The new dreadnoughts excelled their predecessors in firepower, speed and had powerful armor. Huge colossus with a full displacement of 33 thousand tons, a length of almost 200 m, a width of 27 m. Reservation: the main belt from 203 to 330 mm, at the stern and bow - from 102 to 152 mm. Speed ​​- 23 knots. Main artillery: 381 mm (8 guns - 4 turrets). Crew - up to 1 people.

A feature of the new battleships was the fuel they used. England switched the fleet from coal to oil. The first battleships to use oil heating were the Queen Elizabeth-class battleships.


Barham at Scapa Flow. 1917 year

"Barham"


The battleship "Barham" ("Barem") was launched in October 1914 and commissioned in October 1915. The flagship of the 5th battleship squadron, which included ships of the same type. During the Battle of Jutland (May 31 - June 1, 1916), the largest naval battle of the First World War, the 5th Squadron was part of the vanguard of the British fleet and entered into battle with the German battlecruisers. The battleship Worspite was badly damaged, having sustained 13 hits from 280 mm shells. The dreadnought "Malaya" was hit by 8 shells. Barham received 6 hits, 28 people were killed and 37 injured.

After the battle, the battleships were repaired, and they returned to service. After the conclusion of the Washington Agreement in 1922, England sent for metal or reclassified most of its obsolete dreadnoughts. But the battleships of the Kiun Elizabeth class were retained. "Barham" was part of the Atlantic and Mediterranean squadrons.

In the 1920s, the ships were reinforced with anti-torpedo protection, deck armor and air defense systems. In the first half of the 30s, the battleship underwent a major modernization: the stern superstructure, the torpedo tube were rebuilt, anti-aircraft artillery, underwater protection, and turret armor were reinforced again.


Barham. Mid-1930s photography

Unlucky battleship


In the early days of World War II, Barham served with the British Mediterranean Fleet. Then he received the order to join the fleet of the mother country, which directly defended Great Britain. On December 6, 1939, the dreadnought left Malta, accompanied by two destroyers. A week later, when the ships approached the Clyde base in Scotland, a catastrophe occurred: "Barham" accidentally rammed the destroyer "Duches" in thick fog, killing 129 people.

On December 15, the battleship as part of the metropolitan fleet went out to meet the convoy with troops from Canada. The operation was successful, the convoy reached its destination. However, a detachment of ships, led by a battleship, remained at sea for patrolling. The British feared a new breakthrough by German ships into the Atlantic.

While patrolling, Barham collided with the German U-30 submarine Lieutenant Commander Fritz Julius Lemp. On December 28, 1939, the submarine fired four torpedoes at the British squadron. One hit the ship of the line, four sailors were killed, two were wounded. Barham was injured but managed to make it to Liverpool. This attack showed that British large ships were vulnerable to torpedo attacks.

After six months of repairs, the battleship returned to service.

In September 1940, the British High Command decided to launch an operation against the Vichy forces in Senegal. The British wanted this colony and the French troops stationed there, including the unfinished battleship Richelieu, to side with the Free France led by de Gaulle and the anti-Hitler coalition. Also, the port of Dakar was the best naval base in the region, and some of the gold from France and Poland was located here.

However, the French troops in Dakar at this time considered de Gaulle a traitor and resisted, repelling the attack of the British fleet under the leadership of Cunningham. The battleship Resolution was torpedoed by a French submarine and sent to the United States for repairs. And "Barham" withstood two hits from the coastal battery.

Following this setback, Barham returned to service in the Mediterranean Fleet. He accompanied convoys to Malta and Alexandria, fired at Bardia, took part in the battle at Cape Matapan in March 1941, where 3 Italian cruisers and 2 destroyers were sunk and the battleship was damaged.

During the Battle of Crete in May 1941, Barham was attacked by a German aviation... The ship was hit by a 250-kg bomb, a fire started, 5 people died, 6 were wounded. In Alexandria, the battleship could not be repaired - the dry dock was small. The Barham was taken to Durban, South Africa for repairs. In August 1941, the battleship returned to Alexandria and again became the flagship of the 1st squadron.


The British battleship "Barham" is at the head of the battleship formation. 1941 g.

Torn to pieces


At first, the situation in the Mediterranean theater was not bad for the British. The French fleet and its bases, which after the defeat of France could have been captured by the Germans and Italians, were partly captured by the British, partly sunk and neutralized. The Italians were rather passive and could not stand up to the British on their own. But with the appearance of the Luftwaffe in the Mediterranean, the capture of Greece and Crete by the Axis countries, the landing of Rommel's corps in Libya - the situation changed not in favor of England.

In addition, Hitler sent his submarines to the Mediterranean. In September 1941, the first German submarines broke through Gibraltar into the Mediterranean Sea. They were based in Italy and Greece. On November 13, the German submarine U-81 of Friedrich Geggenberg knocked out the newest British aircraft carrier "Arc Royal", which had previously become famous during the hunt for the German battleship "Bismarck" (The Hunt for the Bismarck). The aircraft carrier sank the next day, the crew was rescued.

On November 13, 1941, the submarine U-331, under the command of Hans-Dietrich Freyer von Tiesenhausen, set out on its third military campaign. On November 17, the boat delivered a group of saboteurs to Egypt with the aim of blowing up the railway. The mission was unsuccessful: the saboteurs were able to plant mines, but were discovered and caught by the British. Tiesenhausen unsuccessfully waited for the group, then received an order to go east, to Es-Sallum, where the British army began an offensive against the German-Italian forces in Libya (Operation Crusader. How the Desert Fox slept through an attack by the British 8th Army; Part 2). British ships shelled the coast, supporting the advance of their troops.

A German submarine patrolled the area for almost a week in search of a target. Fate smiled at the German submariners on November 25, 1941.

The Germans noticed a faint noise from the engines. The main body of Cunningham's Mediterranean fleet was on course. Three British battleships, accompanied by destroyers, went to intercept the Italian convoys. Tiesenhausen began to maneuver to reach the target. The Germans were able to slip through the destroyers and chose a target.

Barham.

At 16 o'clock. 25 minutes the submarine fired four torpedoes from a distance of about 400 m. Soon the Germans heard three explosions, then another. But they could only guess where they got to and what their success was. Immediately after the volley, the boat showed the wheelhouse on the surface, it was noticed. Battleship Valiant tried to ram the enemy, but U-331 managed to go deep. The Germans happily escaped the depth charges from the destroyers.

In the meantime, tragedy broke out on the surface. The British dreadnought received three torpedoes and lay down in the water with a lined side. When his pipe reached the water, there was a powerful explosion that blew the ship to pieces. Obviously, there was a detonation of the ammunition of the main battery guns. But this is only a version. The exact cause of the explosion is unknown.

The sea giant literally disappeared into a cloud of smoke. Cunningham wrote that it was "a terrible and frightening sight."

The death of the dreadnought was so fast that most of the crew did not have time to escape. Some of the sailors were unable to get onto the deck due to the fact that the Barham was heavily heeled. And those who were able to do this were killed in the explosion. 862 people died. The commander of the ship, Jeffrey Cook, was also killed. More than 440 people were picked up from the water. "Barham" was the only battleship that the submarine sank on the high seas.

Interestingly, the death of the ship could be filmed. The squadron included a cameraman who filmed the actions of the ships at sea. He managed to capture the tragic death of "Barham".

Tiesenhausen was awarded the 1st class Iron Cross for his success, then the Knight's Cross. Mussolini awarded the captain of the Kriegsmarine with Italy's highest military award - the Gold Medal for Bravery.


Sinking British battleship "Barham"


British battleship explosion
Author:
Photos used:
https://ru.wikipedia.org/, http://waralbum.ru/
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  1. Vladimir_2U
    Vladimir_2U 24 November 2021 05: 07
    +2
    Obviously, there was a detonation of the ammunition of the main battery guns. But this is only a version. The exact cause of the explosion is unknown.

    Here is a riddle, and what could it be in PRINCIPLE besides the main battery shells?
    1. Machito
      Machito 24 November 2021 05: 52
      +4
      For Barham. Without clinking glasses. drinks
    2. 210ox
      210ox 24 November 2021 06: 28
      +5
      Steam boilers can be carried away like this.
      1. Grossvater
        Grossvater 24 November 2021 06: 46
        +13
        First of all, the boilers are water-tube boilers, they will not burst like that, the water content is low, these are not Scottish ones. Secondly, the explosion of boilers will not rupture a bark of this size.
        And yes, Lizzie's design speed is 25 knots. On 23rd they began to crawl after all the interwar additional loads.
        1. Crowe
          Crowe 24 November 2021 06: 54
          +18
          The cause of the explosion is considered to be the detonation of ammunition in the aft cellar of the main caliber guns. According to the commission investigating the circumstances of the Barham's death, the detonation was caused by a fire in the ammunition cellars of 102-mm guns.
          the death of the ship was able to be filmed
          The video cannot be sent, here is the link
          https://youtu.be/KK-oUaqZD9Y
          1. Vladimir1155
            Vladimir1155 24 November 2021 08: 22
            +7
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWLfDJ0XyRg очевидно что крупные надводные корабли (линкоры) устарели еще до ВОВ,
          2. The comment was deleted.
          3. Crowe
            Crowe 24 November 2021 13: 54
            +20
            color versionIt is clearly visible that the explosion at the stern of the ship
        2. NDR-791
          NDR-791 24 November 2021 06: 56
          +7
          By the way, I'm wondering what they tried to provide twice as much anti-torpedo protection?
          In the 1920s on ships anti-torpedo protection has been strengthened, deck armoring and air defense equipment. In the first half of the 30s, the battleship underwent a major modernization: the stern superstructure, the torpedo tube were rebuilt, the anti-aircraft artillery was reinforced again, underwater protection, armoring of towers.
          Really just stupidly hung up the armor plates? And how did the machines cope with this bullying?
          1. Crowe
            Crowe 24 November 2021 07: 06
            +16
            During the modernization "Barham" was equipped with anti-torpedo bullets, divided horizontally into the upper (covered the armor belt) and lower (extended from the bottom to the lower edge of the armor belt) parts. Longitudinal spaces were located between the outer wall of the boule and the anti-torpedo bulkhead: the boule cavity, the double bottom cavity and the outer compartment. The outer compartment and double bottom space were supposed to be used as fuel tanks and at the same time - as part of the protective system. Theoretically, the mine protection of each ship was supposed to withstand the explosion of a torpedo warhead weighing 335 kg. In the area of ​​the main artillery cellars, where there were no fuel tanks (which reduced the effectiveness of underwater protection), water protection compartments were attached to the sides. These compartments, equipped with pumps, were located at the sides, in the double bottom space, as well as in the outer cavity of the boule.
            And how did the machines cope with this bullying?
            After the modernization, the standard displacement of the ship increased to 31 tons, and the total displacement to 350 tons, which negatively affected its speed characteristics. Nevertheless, the replacement of the elements of the power plant was not carried out, and the maximum speed obtained during sea trials was 35 knots. was attributed to the poor condition of the bottom.
            1. NDR-791
              NDR-791 24 November 2021 07: 15
              +7
              With protection it became clear. 22,3 knots for the Second World War is very small, the Grand Fleet did not have enough ships for all the Wishlist if they left five of these old men in the ranks? wassat And here it is: obtained during sea trials, the maximum speed of 22,3 knots is also was attributed to the poor condition of the bottom.
              I can't laugh at all))) This is after the dock work ??? wassat laughing belay
              I think not the royal fleet, but someone in a row (especially close ones) suffered without such alterations.
              1. Alexey RA
                Alexey RA 24 November 2021 14: 34
                +10
                Quote: NDR-791
                22,3 knots for the Second World War is very small, the Grand Fleet did not have enough ships for all the Wishlist if they left five of these old men in the ranks?

                At the beginning of the war, the Royal Navy did not have any new LCs at all. And "Lizas" with their 22-24 knots. were still fast battleships. In addition to them, the "Nelsons" remained in the ranks with their formal 23 bonds. and "Eras" with their 20 ceremonial nodes.
                However, the old LC served everyone - the Yankees, the Japanese, the French, the Italians. Only the Germans did not have them. smile
                And the reason is known - the Washington Treaty and battleship vacations. Until the time allowed for the construction of new aircraft came, while the project was finally approved, while the shipbuilding industry began to swing ... in general, the first British post-Washington aircraft entered service more than a year after the start of the war, in December 1940. And the second LK, even in his first battle with the Bismarck, came out with a brigade of Vickers-Armstrong specialists on board.
                Quote: NDR-791
                And here it is: the maximum speed of 22,3 knots obtained during sea trials was also explained by the poor condition of the bottom.
                I can't laugh at all))) This is after the dock work ???

                They write that this is 7,5 months after the last docking.
          2. Santa Fe
            Santa Fe 24 November 2021 07: 32
            +8
            By the way, I'm wondering what they tried to provide twice as much anti-torpedo protection?

            There was no torpedo protection.

            As all examples show, an underwater explosion was guaranteed to lead to flooding of the compartments located in this place.

            The protection was the size of the ship and partly the internal layout, the location of the power plant echelons, the dispersion of generators, etc.

            For late battleships, in 8/10 cases, one or two torpedo hits did not lead to consequences.

            Barham project 1912 with a standard displacement of 30k tons, almost half the size of battleships of the WWII period

            So it happened

            About the size of Byrn
            1. NDR-791
              NDR-791 24 November 2021 07: 39
              +5
              Quote: Santa Fe
              There was no torpedo protection.

              In fact, the goal of all measures was to remove as far as possible the epicenter of the explosion from the hull set. That's all. Now, if he continued to be coal, and not oil, then such a protection could well work. In these spaces (including the new boules) there would be coal pits. And including where the cellars were.
              1. Santa Fe
                Santa Fe 24 November 2021 08: 09
                +6
                In fact, the goal of all measures was to remove as far as possible the epicenter of the explosion from the hull set.

                Bullets of large width were used only on the largest ships.

                And even then not along the entire length of the hull

                Resistance to torpedo hits was tied to displacement and dimensions
                1. Alexey RA
                  Alexey RA 24 November 2021 15: 02
                  +6
                  Quote: Santa Fe
                  Bullets of large width were used only on the largest ships.

                  And even then not along the entire length of the hull

                  Resistance to torpedo hits was tied to displacement and dimensions

                  Well, why only the sizes. There was also an internal PTZ, without boules. It was originally put on their LK by the same Yankees:
                  The ideology of constructive anti-torpedo protection of ships was based on the principle of the greatest distance between the vital mechanisms and systems of the ship from the place of the explosion of the torpedo (outer skin) and providing the gases with free space for expansion. Due to the absence of extensive coal pits, the width of the protection turned out to be significantly less than on previous battleships. The underwater protection of battleships of the "Nevada" type had a width of 3 m and included a double side (the distance between the skins is 0,99 m), followed by an empty compartment 1,906 m wide, and then a 38-mm anti-torpedo bulkhead.

                  And when these ships fell into the hands of modernizers, the PTZ became even deeper - and not only outward, but also inward:
                  On the hull, the main work consisted of strengthening the anti-torpedo structural protection. At the same time, behind the old - anti-torpedo bulkhead at a distance of 1,754 m from it, another longitudinal bulkhead with a thickness of 9,53 mm was installed, which became possible due to a decrease in the width occupied by the power plant after its replacement. In fact, as a result, a very effective filtration chamber (which was not used for storing fuel and was always kept empty) was created "on a part of the territory" of the former boiler rooms, in case of damage to the main anti-torpedo bulkhead.
                  This bulkhead itself was also strengthened, bringing its thickness to 28,6 mm. The distance from it to the inner surface of the double side was 1,906 m, the distance between the planks of the double side was 0,99 m. The thickness of the plating sheets of the inner side was 9,53 mm, the outer 15,9 mm.
                  In addition, the battleships received boules with a maximum width of 1,98 m, which brought the width of ships to 32,92 m - the maximum allowable for passage through the Panama Canal.
                  (...)
                  After modernization, the total depth of anti-torpedo protection of the battleships in the mid-section was 5,795 m.

                  Moreover, this was not the limit - the old people "Texas" and "New York", due to the transfer from coal to oil, acquired a PTZ with a depth of as much as 9,15 meters amidships, of which the boules were only 1,83 m.
            2. Ashes of Claes
              Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 09: 55
              -4
              Quote: Santa Fe
              About the size of Byrn

              Bayern somehow sounder))
              1. Santa Fe
                Santa Fe 24 November 2021 10: 24
                +6
                I am not a supporter of the translation of personal names and titles

                In this case, it turned out that there is a translation in Russian that corresponds to the meaning. But I don’t know German and always considered the LK type Bairn
                1. Ashes of Claes
                  Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 11: 37
                  +3
                  Quote: Santa Fe
                  I don’t know German and always considered the LK type Bairn

                  I agree completely - Bayern, Sachsen, Ostfriesland, DeutschlandAnd not Bavaria, Saxony, East Frisia and Germany. hi
              2. Usher
                Usher 27 November 2021 02: 17
                0
                Bayern is a literal translation, you are not talking, for example, about the actor Fox Mulder, Fox Mulder? In warship I got sick with this Bavaria.
      2. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 24 November 2021 08: 23
        +7
        Quote: 210ox
        Steam boilers can be carried away like this.
        Not with the early 20th century battleship.
    3. Pushkowed
      Pushkowed 24 November 2021 10: 00
      +12
      By the way, when in 1914 the British "Odeshes" was blown up by a mine, they managed to remove the crew from it, he overturnedand then exploded. "Barham" also turned over and exploded. What were the main battery packs that exploded from overturning?

      Maybe the shells fell on the charges when turning over? Or vice versa?

      On the other hand, the Royal Oak also rolled over, but did not explode. But "Vanguard" (which is old, still like "St. Vincent") exploded in WWI and without turning over, and generally without any influence of the enemy.

      British ships at the beginning of the century were generally something particularly explosive. But that's why they exploded so often when overkill?
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 24 November 2021 10: 31
        +8
        Quote: Pushkowed
        What were the main battery packs that exploded from overturning?
        It is unlikely that someone bothered and designed the ammo rack to protect the projectiles during overkill. It's just that the British turned over more often than others, that's all. )))
    4. Region-25.rus
      Region-25.rus 24 November 2021 16: 15
      +4
      Here is a riddle, and what could it be in PRINCIPLE besides the main battery shells?
      -
      When his pipe reached the water, there was a powerful explosion
      and the boilers could burst! It's cold water! And the boilers are so hot! And with the interaction of these two components, you can easily get "big bada-boom" hi
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 24 November 2021 17: 11
        +2
        Quote: Region-25.rus
        and the boilers could burst!

        Not with the early 20th century battleship.
        1. Region-25.rus
          Region-25.rus 24 November 2021 17: 16
          +2
          Not with the early 20th century battleship.
          he is a steam boiler and in the 21st century a steam boiler)) (in the last century he stoked a little)))) Chimneys of course are protected from the ingress of fragments, but the water will still penetrate.
          1. Vladimir_2U
            Vladimir_2U 25 November 2021 05: 35
            +1
            Quote: Region-25.rus
            a steam boiler, and in the 21st century, a steam boiler))

            Well, of course, you can blow up on a moonshine still)))
            But the scale is different for the explosions.
            First of all, the boilers are water-tube boilers, they will not burst like that, the water content is low, these are not Scottish ones. Secondly, the explosion of boilers will not rupture a bark of this size.
            1. Region-25.rus
              Region-25.rus 25 November 2021 09: 25
              +1
              Well, of course, you can blow up on a moonshine still)))
              heard cases))) Even in my military unit (about half a year before my arrival) one unique steam boiler in the stoker blew up. The building survived, but the boiler was then restored brick by brick. Spun to .... wassat Fortunately, the stoker survived.
              First of all, the boilers are water-tube boilers, they will not burst like that, the water content is low, these are not Scottish ones. Secondly, the explosion of boilers will not rupture a bark of this size.
              Well ... I won't argue here. It's just that the detonation of the cellars when overturning is confusing anyway what I'm certainly not an expert, but (!!!) I think fuses are designed for higher loads than falling from a rack with a snout. And the charges .... request Well, there is a pretty strong fire needed for ignition. They (charges) are stored in pencil cases. Well, as an option - at first the boilers in the womb were exploded, the bulkheads were blown away by the explosion, and then ... and then the broads! By the way, Yamato also said goodbye beautifully -

              py-sy
              I do not argue! Just because of my poor knowledge, I try to analyze the event hi
              1. Vladimir_2U
                Vladimir_2U 25 November 2021 09: 31
                +1
                Quote: Region-25.rus
                By the way, Yamato also said goodbye beautifully -

                The British of such vitality would simply be envious. Although the years of design are different, of course.

                Quote: Region-25.rus
                I do not argue! Just because of my poor knowledge, I try to analyze the event
                Good luck to us in our hard work, colleague! hi
                1. Region-25.rus
                  Region-25.rus 25 November 2021 09: 32
                  +1
                  Good luck to us in our hard work, colleague!
                  well, it's more like a hobby) Distracting the brain from other work (also brain), but it is not easy drinks
  2. north 2
    north 2 24 November 2021 07: 12
    +14
    it is noteworthy that the Tiesenhausen before the October Revolution were in the tsarist service, and Hans Dietrich Tiesenhausen, who sank the battleship "Barham" until 1917, was served by the Russian Empire. They kept the British Tiesenhausen in the camp until the end of WWII and sent them home to Germany. But Tiesenhausen did not want to live in Germany and moved to live in Canada and there until the end of his life worked as a simple photographer, And this Tiesenhausen died not so long ago, somewhere after 2000.
    1. Charlie
      Charlie 24 November 2021 07: 22
      +4
      Probably lived in French Canada))
    2. Ashes of Claes
      Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 09: 34
      -2
      Quote: north 2
      And this Tiesenhausen died not so long ago, somewhere after 2000.

      "somewhere after"? )) Like "if my memory serves me right"? Anyway, see the wiki, why not write the exact date - 17.08.2000/XNUMX/XNUMX?
  3. Crowe
    Crowe 24 November 2021 07: 16
    +19
    TISENHAUSEN'S LUCK

    On November 25, 1941, U-331 under the command of Chief Lieutenant Hans-Dietrich Freiher von Tiesenhausen discovered the battleships Queen Elizabeth, Barham and Valiant from the Alexandria Squadron, marching in zigzag with nine destroyers. It happened off the Libyan coast near Tobruk in the midst of the autumn battles of 1941.
    Prior to that, for several weeks Tiesenhausen had been waiting in vain for some transport or tug to appear. During the day, I had to stay under water and only emerge at night in order to ventilate the interior and charge the batteries. But even at this time, flares soared into the air every now and then, flooding everything around with a ghostly orange-yellowish light.
    From the continuous flashes of flame escaping when fired from artillery guns, the horizon above the land in the direction of Tobruk seemed to shudder. During the day, planes often appeared, and then each time it was necessary to urgently go under water. The scorching rays of the sun heated the water to such an extent that it almost boiled. It was unbearably hot inside the boat. During the movement, the heat was further intensified by the heat generated by the electric motors.
    Only on November 25, at 14.30, ahead of the starboard side of the submarine, the watch found either smoke or thickening of clouds. Tiesenhausen ordered to follow the previous course and after ten minutes through binoculars he was able to distinguish the destroyer masts. At the same time, the contours of a group of ships heading south appeared on the horizon. It was a combination of warships.
    The enemy often changed course, making it difficult for the submarine to launch an attack. Eventually the ships changed course again and went straight to the submarine, unaware of its presence.
    Further events unfolded very quickly. The ships deviated to the west, and Tiesenhausen gave the appropriate command to the helmsmen. The two warships were now fully visible. Realizing that it was time to go under the water, Tiesenhausen ordered: “Urgent dive! At combat posts! "
    At about 16 pm the weather began to favor the attack: light, foaming crests of waves stretched across the entire surface of the sea. The enemy, of course, did not see the periscope, which only slipped out of the water for a short time. With such excitement, the trace of a small breaker from the periscope is hardly noticeable.
    The battleship formation was rapidly approaching: three battleships in a wake column, guarded by four destroyers. Tiesenhausen could not even believe that such a large unit, suspecting nothing, continued to follow in the direction of the submarine. He saw how the signal flags were raised, crawling to the yards and dazzling there, above. They probably meant an order to change the order. Indeed, two destroyers, located closer to the lead battleship, came forward. It is between them - a distance of about 500 meters - that U-331 will have to pass.
    Tiesenhausen watched both ships alternately. Finally, when they were close enough, the command came: "Lower the periscope!" Now the acoustician got down to business. His task was to especially carefully monitor the noise of the propellers of the two destroyers and continuously report the bearing.
    Soon the destroyers passed by without noticing the boat. The periscope was raised again. Now there was a line for the ships of the line.
    The torpedo tubes have been charged for a long time, the torpedo devices are installed in accordance with the conditions of the attack. There was deathly silence in the boat.
    When the ship of the line was near, Tiesenhausen had the opportunity to estimate its size. The huge ship completely covered the entire field of view of the periscope! Tiesenhausen tried to get even closer, but failed.
    So far, only Gunther Prin in Scapa Flow has managed to destroy the battleship in this war. Will Tiesenhausen, a young and unknown commander, be able to repeat the success of the Scapa Flow Bull?
    1. Crowe
      Crowe 24 November 2021 07: 20
      +20
      Meanwhile, the three battleships followed one another with a small ledge. Tiesenhausen began to turn the boat around in time to take a position for the attack. Time flew by with a fabulous speed. One of the battleships was about to hit the cross hairs of the periscope.
      From the bow compartment, a report was received through the negotiating pipe about the readiness of the torpedo tubes for a salvo, but it is not yet possible to open fire. U-331 was almost exactly abeam the battleship.
      After a second report on the readiness for a volley, Tiesenhausen immediately commanded: "Fire!"
      Four torpedoes flew out of the vehicles one after the other. The commander, quickly turning the periscope in the other direction, managed to notice that the third battleship, with all its gray bulk, was advancing directly onto the boat.
      There was only one way out - a quick dive, which was not at all easy to accomplish. And yet the Germans had time: the boat sank ... But then suddenly it began to surface.
      The upper edge of the wheelhouse appeared above the water. What this threatens, perhaps only the commander clearly imagined: there would be a ramming strike. The battleship was getting closer and closer to the submarine, but none of the team had yet suspected of the impending danger.
      "Get out of the wheelhouse everyone!" Ordered Tiesenhausen. In an instant, the senior navigator threw down everything he could, and when there was no one left in the wheelhouse, he closed the hatch leading to the central post.
      A collision could happen every minute: after all, the third battleship was going directly to the boat. Is the boat submerged? As if in response to this question, there were three explosions in a row, then another. No one in the boat paid attention to these sounds: everyone in the control room felt that a serious danger was impending. Apparently, these were hits from German torpedoes.
      The boat with the edge of the wheelhouse protruding from under the water was visible on the surface for 45 seconds. As it turned out later, the third ship of the line, the Valiant, did everything in its power to ram the German submarine.
      In the central post, they continued to tensely monitor the arrows of the instruments, but everything still remained unchanged - neither the immersion, nor the expected impact.
      Finally, U-331 began to dive with a strong bow trim. The instrument arrows continued to show an increase in depth. At 80 meters, the arrows lingered, then stopped altogether. But the boat continued to submerge, still keeping the trim on the bow. At any moment one could expect that the battleship would start dropping the "vabos".
      Tiesenhausen could not understand what was happening to U-331. The chief engineer took new measures to make the boat go deeper, but judging by the instruments, everything remained unchanged.
      Suddenly it dawned on the commander, he recalled an incident in the Atlantic. "Report the readings of the depth gauge in the bow compartment!" Tiesenhausen's voice interrupted the tense silence.
      The sailor made the necessary switch with lightning speed. Everyone who could see the readings of the device was breathtaking: no one had ever been to such a depth. The depth gauge needle stuck to the stop, which technically was not even foreseen for the submarine.
      “Probably never before two simple arrows, making an unexpected leap, did not make such a strong impression,” Tiesenhausen later recalled, talking about this episode. The following happened: the depth gauge of the central station, as well as the pressure gauges in the compartments and tanks, were turned off by mistake. Of the four handles too close to each other, the sailor, in excitement, took the wrong one and closed the valves. A mistake like this could easily lead to disaster. Now, when the valve was opened, the arrow of the depth gauge in the central station also went through the entire scale and rested against the limiter.
      So at what depth was the boat? Its body has been cracking unpleasantly for a long time. Previously, they did not pay special attention to this, because, with their heads pressed into their shoulders, every second they expected the submarine to be rammed by a colossus approaching it.
      In the meantime, the crackling of the boat's interior timber began to intensify. Each of the crew thought of only one thing: will the U-331 "seven" withstand such a load? The submarine, built in 1940 in Emden at the Nordseeerke shipyard, ended up at a depth of 260 meters.
      Minutes of the hardest tension dragged on, but suddenly the depth gauge needle trembled and began to move backwards along the scale. The maximum permissible depth for which the "seven" was designed is 100 meters. However, such boats had a triple safety margin and sometimes could sink to 120, 130 and even 140 meters if they had to avoid depth charges. But who would have thought that the hull of a submarine would withstand a dive of 260 meters!
      1. Crowe
        Crowe 24 November 2021 07: 21
        +19
        The main ballast tanks were supplied with compressed air, which forms something like "air cushions" on which the boat can hang, as it were.
        When the danger was over, everyone remembered the battleship. During the attack, the distance to him was 375 meters, and until now no one knew what happened to him. Meanwhile, U-331 continued at great depths to move farther and farther from the battlefield in a northern direction. Of course, the boat was noticed, but none of the enemy ships was able to accurately pinpoint its location.
        Tiesenhausen had never expected to break away from the British so easily. At 21.00 he ordered to surface, reported to the command by radio about the attack of the battleship and continued to follow in a certain area of ​​the boat.
        That they had managed to destroy the British battleship Barham, the commander and his crew learned much later. If at the moment when the British ships were being rebuilt, U-331 did not have time to slip into the gap formed between the battleships, the boat would have been discovered.
        “The steel bulk would surely iron us,” said Tiesenhausen. An accidentally given order to make a 360-degree turn before diving was the only way to save the boat from the ramming threat. The ships of the line Queen Elizabeth, Barham and Valiant, following in the wake before that, had to turn to the left in order to rebuild. At the moment of turning on the Valiant, a strong explosion was heard from the Barham, which followed in the middle. The Valiant was about 120 meters away to starboard when the submarine's wheelhouse appeared on the surface in front of it.
        Seeing U-331, the Valiant commander decided to ram her. But since the huge ship was still turning in the opposite direction by inertia, he could not quickly go on the opposite course and the boat managed to hide under water.
        For 45 seconds, the submarine's wheelhouse was visible on the surface. Valiant even tried to destroy it with automatic artillery mounts. But the boat was too close to the starboard side of the battleship: the barrels of the guns could not be lowered even lower and the shells flew over the conning tower and the top of the U-331 periscope. When the submarine, which was in some 30 meters from the steel giant, disappeared under water, the Valiant had to urgently turn to the left so as not to collide with the Barham, which had already begun to roll on its side.
        Of the four torpedoes fired from the boat, three hit the target, and one of them hit the artillery cellar. It was because of this that the fourth explosion was heard, which reached the crew of U-331. After the explosion, the battleship with a displacement of 31 tons sank after 100 minutes and 4 seconds, killing 45 people.
        Kurushin M.Yu. "Steel coffins of the Reich"
      2. Ashes of Claes
        Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 10: 42
        +6
        Quote: Crowe
        There was only one way out - a quick dive, which was not at all easy to accomplish. And yet the Germans had time: the boat sank ... But then suddenly it began to surface.

        I don’t understand why this intrigue No. plunged then suddenly surfaced. ”I think Tiesenhausen took a conscious risk, giving four-torpedo volley simultaneously of all TA. He knew perfectly well that he would be pushed upstairs, and he would show the British the wheelhouse for some time before an emergency dive. In my opinion, the order was as follows: salvo-sub-ascent- "Dive! All in the nose!"
        ))
        1. Crowe
          Crowe 24 November 2021 12: 09
          +12
          The author is an artist, he sees it this way, but you and Busch Harald saw the battle in the same way:
          The submarine starts to come in. Three battleships follow one another with a small ledge. For the U-turn, the boat commander uses all means: the right electric motor is operating at full power, and the other is stalled; the rudder is put to the left on the side: otherwise it is impossible to have time to take a position for an attack. Time flies with a fabulous speed. The battleship is about to arrive at the crosshairs.
          - Prepare to fire in one gulp!
          The heading angle is still too large - more than 90 degrees. A report on the readiness of torpedo tubes comes from the bow compartment through a negotiating tube.
          Everything is ready, but you cannot open fire yet. The submarine is now almost exactly abeam the battleship, and its middle part completely fills the entire field of view of the periscope. Everything is prepared. Only the boat itself was not far enough away from the enemy. Will she have time to take the desired position before the ship of the line leaves?
          From the bow compartment they once again report on readiness for a salvo. Finally!
          “A salvo!” Tiesenhausen orders and immediately commands: “Fire!
          1. Crowe
            Crowe 24 November 2021 12: 09
            +11
            Four torpedoes are fired from the vehicles in the prescribed manner. The commander quickly turns the periscope in the other direction and draws attention to the fact that the third battleship, with all its gray bulk, is advancing directly onto the boat. A giant steel mountain! Dive immediately!
            To do this with the necessary speed is a very difficult task under the given conditions. The boat now has a limited speed, as the four heavy torpedoes just fired severely disrupted the boat's buoyancy and trim. Before receiving an appropriate amount of water into the torpedo replacement tanks, the bow of the boat tends to break out upward. The rudder is put on board, the steel masses passing nearby cause deep waves of the sea, and all this greatly complicates the quick departure of the boat to the depth. True, at first the boat sank, but then it began to surface.
            The officer of the central post immediately, as expected, began to take water into the bow tanks to extinguish the buoyancy. Senior mechanic with the command "All in the bow!" concentrates in this compartment as many people as possible. All who can move away from the combat posts run there. Such a command always means that a serious danger is impending.
            1. Crowe
              Crowe 24 November 2021 12: 11
              +11
              “Mr. Chief Lieutenant!” Is heard in the conning tower from the central post. There they observe the readings of the trimometer and depth gauge, the position of the horizontal rudders set for diving. - Mr. Chief Lieutenant, the boat is floating, the upper edge of the wheelhouse is above the water.
              Only the commander can clearly imagine what this threatens. A ramming strike will follow. The battleship is getting closer and closer to the boat. None of the team even suspects the impending danger.
              “Get out of the wheelhouse, everyone!” The order from Tiesenhausen is issued.
              The chief navigator in an instant throws down everything that is possible, and when there is no one left in the wheelhouse, he tightly battens the hatch between the central post and the conning tower. “Perhaps only the wheelhouse will be damaged,” the boat commander hopes. A collision can occur every minute: after all, the third battleship went exactly to the boat and was so close to it. Has the boat still not sunk?
              Three explosions are heard one after another, then another, and all are not very strong. At the moment, no one is paying attention to these explosions: everyone in the control room feels that a serious danger is impending. No wonder the "old man" ordered to leave the wheelhouse and not take his eyes off the depth gauge. But all the same, they were, apparently, torpedo hits. Four hits! However, the noises of propellers are clearly audible with a simple ear, and they are listened to more attentively than to explosions, since now it is much more important to go to the depth. This must be done by all, even the most extreme, means.
              "This was the submarine war"
              Busch Harald
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 24 November 2021 13: 41
      +11
      Hans Didrich von Tiesenhausen
      German Hans Diedrich von Tiesenhausen

      Date of birth February 22, 1913
      Place of Birth
      Riga, Russian Empire
      Died August 17, 2000 (87 years old)
      A place of death
      Vancouver, Metro Vancouver [d], British Columbia, Canada
      Type of troops War Ensign of Germany 1938-1945.svg Kriegsmarine

      Awards
      Iron Cross 2nd Class (January 30, 1940)
      Submariner's badge (February 26, 1940)
      Medal "In Commemoration of March 22, 1939" ("Memel Medal") (June 25, 1940)
      Medal "In Commemoration of October 1, 1938" ("Sudeten Medal") (September 6, 1940)
      Iron Cross 1st Class (7 December 1940)
      Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (27 September 1942)
      Mentioned in the Wehrmachtbericht (November 26, 1941, January 27, 1942)

      PS Tiesenhausen Hans Didrich - Born in Russia, Eastsee German from the Tiesenhausen family known in Russia. Pyotr Tizengauzen is a close friend of Lermontov, a participant in the Caucasian War. Fyodor Tizengauzen - Adjutant of Emperor Alexander I; was killed at Austerlitz.
      Years of service 1934-1945
      Rank lieutenant commander
      Commanded U-331 [1]
      Retired interior designer, photographer.

      1. Crowe
        Crowe 24 November 2021 13: 59
        +13
        The German submarine U-331 goes on the same third military campaign from the base on the island of Salamis
        The crew of U-331 is congratulated after defeating Barham.
        The drawing that the crew of U-331 made on the torpedo tube after the sinking of Barham.
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 24 November 2021 14: 14
          +8
          Hello my friend! hi

          Someone, like Ruge, read that before everything happened, Tiesenhausen ordered to describe the circulation, as a result of which he came to this advantageous position, later he was nobody. including myself, he could not explain why he did it, the situation did not dictate the need, in terms of he did not have it. So say after that that "the demon pushed by the arm" or "the devil was leading on a string." request
          The result is well known.
          1. Crowe
            Crowe 24 November 2021 14: 54
            +9
            Greetings to sea souls! Exactly about this I read about this in Bush Harald's book "Such was the submarine war"!
            The two warships are now visible all the way to the tops of the masts. The boat appears to be exactly on the enemy's course. It's time to go under the water.
            Now we can already determine for sure: this is a large formation of warships. Why does the commander, before issuing the appropriate command, order to describe the full circulation? Now he himself cannot explain this. Probably by intuition. At first glance, it seems that there was no need for this maneuver. Meanwhile, he played a decisive role in saving the boat and in achieving success in subsequent events. It was only much later that Tiesenhausen realized that this maneuver was of paramount importance.
            - Urgent dive! On combat posts!
            Luck, inspiration, omens - these are all that I have always believed in, although it’s time to be in God, it would seem ... Well, and sailors without luck and nowhere at all - no matter how much I read about such things - everywhere it is present ..
            1. Catfish
              Catfish 24 November 2021 15: 07
              +5
              I read Bush, but I don’t really remember a damn thing, it was a long time ago, only Prine’s breakthrough in Scapa Flow remained in my memory, and then in general terms. request
          2. Ashes of Claes
            Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 16: 21
            -3
            Quote: Sea Cat
            Tiesenhausen ordered to describe the circulation, as a result of which he came to this advantageous position,

            Yes, no, this is all literary, I think) Tiesenhausen hung around for a week between Bardia and Mersa Matruh, until he saw the mast of the convoy.
            1. Catfish
              Catfish 24 November 2021 16: 36
              +4
              I don't know about Bush, but Admiral Ruge, in my opinion, is very far from such a thing as "literaryism", especially since he read the boat's logbook, where there was not a word about any "convoy masts" before the order to make a circulation ...
              1. Ashes of Claes
                Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 17: 14
                -1
                Yes, this ordinary patrol was in a very limited area, everything is one continuous "circulation". I don’t understand what mysticism can be attached to)
                1. Catfish
                  Catfish 24 November 2021 17: 35
                  +4
                  I don’t understand what mysticism can be attached to)

                  Without a devil in this life it is in no way impossible. laughing
      2. Crowe
        Crowe 24 November 2021 14: 06
        +11
        Hans Didrich von Tiesenhausen
        On April 1, 1934, he began service in the Reichsmarine. After completing his studies and training on April 1, 1937, he was awarded the rank of lieutenant zur zee. After completing anti-aircraft gunner courses at the Coastal Artillery School in Wilhelmshaven, he served on the light cruiser Nürnberg. In March 1938, the Baron was transferred to Pillau to serve in the Kriegsmarine coastal artillery units. In October-December 1939, von Tiesenhausen studied at the Diving School in Kiel, after which on December 23 of the same year he was appointed officer of the watch on U 23, commanded by Otto Kretschmer.
        Together with Kretschmer, von Tiesenhausen made three campaigns, and then, after the latter left U 23, another campaign with another commander. On May 6, 1940, the Baron was sent to a month-long torpedo training course at Mürvik, and then transferred to the headquarters of the 1st Submarine Flotilla in Kiel. On July 30, 1940, von Tiesenhausen was appointed as the first watch officer on the new boat U 93 of the VIIC series, on which he made two voyages to the Atlantic.
        In January 1941, von Tiesenhausen was sent to the submarine commander's courses in Memel, after which he was assigned to the VIIC U 331 series boat, which was being completed, which entered service on March 31 of the same year. From July 1941 to September 1942, von Tiesenhausen made nine trips on U 331, the lion's share of which fell on the Mediterranean Sea. There he achieved outstanding success when on 25 November 1941 he attacked a British squadron and sank the battleship Barham. For this attack, von Tiesenhausen was awarded the Knight's Cross on January 27, 1942.
        The next, tenth, campaign was the last for U 331: on November 17, 1942, off the coast of Algeria, she was attacked and seriously damaged by British aircraft, and then finished off by a torpedo from one of the Albacores from the aircraft carrier HMS Formidable. Together with most of his crew, von Tiesenhausen was captured and sent first to England and then to Canada.
      3. Captain45
        Captain45 25 November 2021 12: 17
        +3
        Quote: Sea Cat
        Fyodor Tizengauzen - Adjutant of Emperor Alexander I; was killed at Austerlitz.

        He was 18-19 years old and he was married to Kutuzov's daughter, died leading the attack, after the death of the regimental commander, he arrived with a report, as I remember when I read about the battle at Austerlitz. Here is fate - one fought for Russia and died for it, and the descendants fought with Russia.
  4. kig
    kig 24 November 2021 07: 53
    +13
    A couple of additions.

    The German boat, making its way inside the convoy, was spotted by the acousticians of the destroyer Jervis at a distance of about 1100 m, but the signal was considered false, because the bearing to it changed in the mouth of 40-60 degrees, which was larger than the size of the submarine. After the salvo, the boat showed its wheelhouse and was fired upon by the "pom-pom" of one of the battleships from a distance of 30 m. During an urgent dive, the boat sank to a depth of 265 meters, which exceeded its design depth by 150 m.
    U331 was a VIIC type, made 10 cruises and sank three ships. In November 1942, she was attacked by an aircraft and was damaged, including the bow hatch jammed in the open position. She could not dive and signaled to the plane that she was giving up. An English destroyer was sent for her, but before the destroyer, planes from the aircraft carrier had time to reach her, who did not know that the boat had already surrendered. Having received an aircraft torpedo, the boat sank. Rescued 17 people including the commander. He spent the rest of the war in a camp in Canada. He returned to Germany in 1947, but in 1951 he moved to Canada, where he worked as an interior designer and photographer. He died in 2000.

    The British Admiralty officially recognized the sinking of the battleship only in January 1942. Relatives received notifications only a few weeks later, and each had a note where relatives were warned against discussing the sinking of the ship with anyone.
    1. Ashes of Claes
      Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 11: 17
      +7
      Quote: kig
      and sank three ships

      In fairness, two. Tank landing TLC abeam Sidi Barrani was only damaged by artillery fire after she missed with torpedoes.
      ))
  5. parusnik
    parusnik 24 November 2021 07: 59
    +10
    The battleship commander Jeffrey Cook did not leave the bridge of his ship.
    1. Ingvar 72
      Ingvar 72 25 November 2021 18: 28
      +4
      Or maybe he didn’t have time? repeat
  6. Ashes of Claes
    Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 09: 05
    +9
    A small and, perhaps, useless fact from the biography of Barham (in my opinion, "Barham" is more correct, well, God bless him):
    On May 30, 1916, just before the Battle of Jutland, 9 Barham's sailors received a routine smallpox vaccination (mandatory in the fleet since 1800). And on the morning of the 31st, 8 out of 9 complained of poor health and were sent to the ship's infirmary. At about five in the evening, in the midst of the battle, one of Defflinger's shells hit the infirmary and killed all patients and staff. But the ninth boy, Jim's namesake from Treasure Island - Henry Hawkins - despite the pain in his hand, took his post in the gun tower and survived. Fate.
    1. Crowe
      Crowe 24 November 2021 12: 03
      +10
      Small and possibly useless fact
      Why! I really like to read in the comments instead of complaining about the scarcity and low information content of the authors' works, something interesting and new, I am always grateful to people for this! Otherwise they would have looked at poor Daches when he was still alive, on which, by the way, among others, Lieutenant George Murray, the nephew of the admiral of the fleet Andrew Brown Cunningham mentioned in the article, the commander of the Mediterranean fleet, as U-331 under the command of the Baron Hans-Dietrich von Tiesenhausen goes on that very third military campaign from the base on the island of Salamis, how they are then awarded, what kind of drawing they made on the TA after the battle, damn it, this function has stopped working altogether, now I can only send a lot of bukaff.
      1. Ashes of Claes
        Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 13: 36
        +7
        Wounded dog vice-adm. Evan-Thomas Jack on Barham Deck after Jutland.
      2. Ashes of Claes
        Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 13: 43
        +5
        Quote: Crowe
        how they are then awarded, to

        ))
        baron - baronial cross)
        1. Crowe
          Crowe 24 November 2021 14: 03
          +9
          destroyer "Daches", killed in collision with "Barham"
          1. Ashes of Claes
            Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 15: 14
            +5
            Quote: Crowe
            destroyer "Daches", killed in collision with "Barham"

            I'm embarrassed to ask: how could D-154 Duchess (in your photo), launched in 1951, die from a collision with Barham? Actually, Duchess was safely transferred to the Australians and sold for metal at the age of 20. Daring-class - post-war.
          2. Ashes of Claes
            Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 15: 59
            +5
            Here is the "same" Duchess N64:
            1. Crowe
              Crowe 24 November 2021 16: 42
              +8
              Oh, woe to me, boyar! Shame on my gray hair! Exactly, thanks for the amendment - I admit my guilt, measure, degree, depth. I got confused in photos and names and sent the wrong one! It was he on yours, but his brother
              HMS Crescent
              Interestingly, all one to one - was sunk on June 25, 1940 as a result of a collision with Hms calcutta
              Fate, you can't get away from it ...
              1. Ashes of Claes
                Ashes of Claes 24 November 2021 21: 05
                -2
                Quote: Crowe
                .I got confused in photos and names and sent the wrong one!

                Well, nevertheless - 8 pluses. Do they mechanically sculpt? laughing
                1. Ingvar 72
                  Ingvar 72 25 November 2021 18: 30
                  +4
                  Quote: Ashes of Klaas
                  Well, nevertheless - 8 pluses. Do they mechanically sculpt?

                  Like-minded people, we support our people both in sorrow and in joy! bully
              2. Usher
                Usher 27 November 2021 02: 22
                -1
                How can you possibly confuse a post-war ship with a pre-war one?
              3. ban
                ban 29 November 2021 07: 42
                +1
                Isn't Kolkata accidentally pictured?
                wassat
  7. Sarbala
    Sarbala 24 November 2021 10: 19
    +3
    fired four torpedoes from a distance of about 400 m

    Isn't it dangerous to shoot torpedoes from such a distance?
    1. Flank
      Flank 24 November 2021 15: 38
      +7
      Not dangerous. They have a fuse for 300 meters. If the boat sterns from a distance of less than 300 meters, the torpedo will not explode. Actually, play Silent Hunter, it is a very accurate simulator of a German submarine of that time.
  8. Engineer
    Engineer 24 November 2021 11: 49
    +11
    Quote: Santa Fe
    There was no torpedo protection.

    Was.
    Simply, instead of completely preventing flooding as planned, it only actually shrinks the "inner" hole in practice.
    Indomitable torpedo hit
    https://www.armouredcarriers.com/adm-26727-hms-indomitable-torpedo-damage-16th-july-1943
    The hole in the outer board is huge, but the through hole as a result of the penetration of the PTZ is already much smaller. This is especially evident in the plan of the lower deck.
    As a result, the flooding is localized, respectively, the impact is reduced
  9. The comment was deleted.
  10. Kostadinov
    Kostadinov 24 November 2021 16: 31
    +4
    Maybe the steam from the cauldron exploded first and then the ammunition detonated.
  11. Markus wolf
    Markus wolf 24 November 2021 18: 15
    +4
    Thanks to all! This is exactly the option when the comments are more interesting to read than the material itself ... !!!!
    1. Astronomy
      Astronomy 24 November 2021 22: 46
      +1
      I agree, similarly I read everything to the end and learned a lot from the comments
  12. CastroRuiz
    CastroRuiz 2 December 2021 18: 13
    0
    Not bad for Bismark's revenge. :)