Military Review

The Hunt for the Bismarck

111
The Hunt for the Bismarck
"Bismarck" before the sea battle, May 24, 1941


80 years ago, in a fleeting battle in the Danish Strait, the Germans sank the British battle cruiser Hood - the most famous and strongest at that time in the royal navy... Almost the entire crew was killed - only three of 1419 people slept.

His rival - the battleship Bismarck - broke into the operational space of the Atlantic Ocean. The main forces of the British fleet rushed in pursuit of the Bismarck. The German battleship was sunk on May 27, 1941. Of the 2200 people on the Bismarck team, 1995 died.

Atlantic theater


The British Royal Navy had an overwhelming superiority over the Kriegsmarine (Navy) of the Third Reich. So, four battleships of the German fleet - "Scharnhorst", "Gneisenau", "Bismarck" and "Tirpitz", the British could oppose 15 battleships and battle cruisers (and five more were under construction). Also, Britain had a great advantage in the number of aircraft carriers, cruisers and destroyers.

The main threat to the British in the Atlantic came from Reich submarines. However, the Teutons decided to repeat the recent experience of the First World War - cruising operations. Then the German raiders, sent to the ocean communications, caused a lot of damage to the shipping of the British Empire and its allies. In August 1939, the heavy cruiser ("pocket battleship") "Admiral Graf Spee" went to sea and at the end of September began cruising operations in the Atlantic. The cruiser died after a battle with an English squadron in December 1939. But before that, the Germans managed to capture and sink 9 ships with a total displacement of 50 thousand tons. Other raiders chalked up more than 100 ships with a total displacement of over 600 thousand tons.

So, from January to March 1941, the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau operated in the Atlantic under the leadership of Admiral Gunter Lutyens (Operation Berlin). They successfully broke through the British operational zone, returned to Brest without loss, destroyed 22 ships with a total displacement of more than 115 thousand tons.


Group photo of the crew of the British battle cruiser Hood. Photo taken at the British Navy base in Malta.


View of the battle cruiser Hood from the battleship Prince of Wales shortly before the battle with the German battleship Bismarck. This is Hood's last known photograph. May 24, 1941

"Teachings on the Rhine"


The German command positively assessed the experience of battleships, cruisers and auxiliary cruisers at sea and expected a lot from this method of war. Therefore, in the spring of 1941, the Teutons decided to launch another major raid on British convoys crossing the Atlantic from the United States to England. The battleship "Bismarck" was to bind the British large ships guarding the transports, and the heavy cruiser "Prince Eugen" - to destroy the merchant ships. It was assumed that later they could be joined by the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, which remained in French Brest. If necessary, large surface ships will support the submarines. For this, a submarine officer was sent to the Bismarck.

The operation was highly classified. The Germans conducted additional aerial reconnaissance of the British naval bases and the North Atlantic, set up several false radio points, whose active work was supposed to distract the enemy. The operation was led by Admiral Lutyens, who had already checked in during the raid of the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. He was now in command of the Bismarck, at that time the most powerful ship of its class in the world, and second only to the British battle cruiser Hood in grandeur.


On May 18, 1941, German ships left Gotenhaven (now Gdynia) and headed for the Baltic straits. On May 20, the Germans were spotted by the Swedish cruiser Gotland. Sweden remained neutral, but on May 21, the British knew about the movement of enemy ships.

The Germans arrived in the Korsfjord, near the Norwegian Bergen. The Eugen was refueled. On the same day, Lutyens' detachment went to the Atlantic. On May 22, an English reconnaissance aircraft flew over Korsfjord. Having received the air reconnaissance report, the British Admiralty realized that the enemy was already in the ocean. Fleet Commander Admiral Tovey ordered the cruisers under Rear Admiral Wake Walker (Suffolk and Norfolk) to increase surveillance. British ships were already patrolling in the Danish Strait - between Greenland and Iceland. Light cruisers were sent south of Iceland.

From the main base of the British fleet in Scapa Flow (harbor in Scotland in the Orkney Islands), a detachment of Vice Admiral Lancelot Holland left. He carried the flag on the battle cruiser Hood, followed by the new battleship Prince of Wales and six destroyers. The detachment received the task of blocking the exit from the Danish Strait from the south. The main forces of the British - the battleship King George V, the aircraft carrier Victories, 4 cruisers and 7 destroyers, moved to the southwest coast. Later they were joined by another battleship. In general, the hunt for the Bismarck has begun. German radio intelligence intercepted an order from the British Admiralty to begin searching for two battleships sailing from Bergen to the North Atlantic Ocean.


German heavy cruiser "Prince Eugen". Keel. Germany. 1941 g.


View from the heavy cruiser "Prince Eugen" to the battleship "Bismarck". In the foreground is the cruiser signalman. May 1941


Battleship Bismarck docked in Kors Fjord after crossing from the Baltic Sea during Operation Rhine Exercises. The photo was taken aboard the heavy cruiser Prince Eugen. May 21, 1941

The death of "Hood"


May 23, 1941 at 19 o'clock. 22 minutes The British heavy cruiser Suffolk spotted the enemy 7 miles away. The British prudently went into a strip of fog and began to follow the Germans by radar. Admirals Tovey and Holland received heading, speed, and location data. Then the Norfolk approached the Germans, but was driven away by the Bismarck's fire. The British command received fresh information. The British cruisers were now walking right and left behind the enemy at a respectful distance. Meanwhile Holland's detachment was marching westward at full speed.

The Germans knew that the British were "on the tail." In the evening, Eugen's commander Brinkman was informed of the intercepted Suffolk radio messages. It was not possible to break away. The Germans guessed that the enemy had instruments that neither fog nor smoke would interfere with. However, Lutyens did not interrupt the operation and did not return. Obviously, the German admiral was eager to carry out the order at any cost.

At midnight on May 24, the British lost radar contact with the enemy. Upon learning of this, Holland decided that the Germans broke away from the group of cruisers and went back. It was logical. The British admiral turned north after them. Holland drew up a battle plan: Hood and Prince of Wales would concentrate fire on the Bismarck and the cruiser on Prince Eugen, but did not inform Rear Admiral Wake Walker. At 2 hours 47 minutes. Suffolk has detected the enemy again. The Germans were still going southwest. "Holland" turned around again, developed an almost maximum speed of 28 knots, and lost her destroyers. They stayed to the north and, like the Wake Walker cruisers, did not participate in the battle.

May 24 at 5 o'clock 35 minutes the British discovered the Bismarck. Holland decided to attack, not to wait for Tovey's battleships. At 5 o'clock. 52 minutes The Hood opened fire from the bow towers from a distance of approximately 12 miles, continuing to approach the enemy. This distance was considered dangerous for "Hood": enemy shells, falling along a steep trajectory, could hit the relatively weakly protected decks of the old cruiser. And under them - ammunition cellars. Both German ships fired at the Hood in concert. The first salvo of the British battle cruiser lay far from the Prince Eugen. The Prince of Wales hit the Bismarck with only the fifth or sixth salvo. But after the second volley of German ships on the "Hood", a strong fire began in the ammunition cellars. At about 6 o'clock, when the opponents were separated by 7-8 miles, Holland turned to the left to bring the aft towers into action. Here the Bismarck hit 380-mm shells of the main caliber on the deck of the Hood between the second pipe and the mainmast. Almost immediately there was a powerful explosion, "Hood" was torn in half and quickly sank. Of the 1419 sailors, only three were rescued. Admiral Holland was also killed.


German battleship Bismarck firing at the British cruiser Hood in the Danish Strait

Bismarck moved fire to Prince of Wales. Soon, the British battleship was hit by three 380-mm shells and four 203-mm shells from a German cruiser. The battleship did not receive serious damage, however, due to a technical malfunction, the bow turret of the main caliber (356 mm), and then the aft one, failed. As a result, the Prince of Wales was left with one main caliber turret. In order not to share the fate of the flagship, at 6 o'clock. 13 minutes Commander Leach ordered a smokescreen to be set up and withdrew from the battle. The German battleship was hit by three shells from the Prince of Wales. There was no serious damage. However, one shell hit the bow, under the armor belt, a trim arose, and the full speed dropped to 26 knots. The second round pierced the fuel tank. Not dangerous, but there was a loss of fuel. Also, a distinct oil trail allowed the British to spot an enemy battleship.

After the sinking of the Hood, Lutyens had a choice: either return to Norway (1150-1400 miles), or head to the French ports of Brest or St. Nazaire (1700 miles). But the way to the Norwegian ports occupied by the Germans passed too close to the British bases. In addition, the English battleship Prince of Wales was nearby. The Germans did not know that he was seriously injured and dropped out of the game. Also in France, one could count on the support of two more German battleships. They could come out to meet and help break through to the French port. German Admiral Lutyens contacted the headquarters, reported the situation and received permission to release the cruiser into an independent raiding, and go to the French coast himself.


"Bismarck" in the battle in the Danish Strait


The German battleship "Bismarck" shoots at the British battleship "Prince of Wales"

Pursuit and discovery of the "Bismarck"


Having received news of the death of Hood, the British naval command sent to help the battleship Rodney, the aircraft carrier Ark Royal, and the cruiser Sheffield. Another battleship and 4 destroyers were removed from the convoy, the third was sent from Halifax. "Bismarck" at 18 o'clock. unexpectedly turned on the Wake Walker cruisers, which were following the enemy, and forced them to retreat. This maneuver helped the cruiser Brinkman get lost in the ocean. Yes, he was not particularly looked for, the main target was "Bismarck". After 10 days "Prince Eugen" came to "Brest".

About 23 pm 9 British torpedo bombers from the aircraft carrier "Victories" went to the battleship and achieved one hit on the starboard side. The torpedo exploded near a powerful armor belt and did not do much harm. At about 3 o'clock. On May 25, the British cruisers lost the enemy. They began searching in the west and southwest of the site of the last radio contact. Tovey's unit was also chasing the enemy. His ships went northeast towards Iceland. The Bismarck walked quietly 100 miles behind it and headed south-east. The British intercepted radio messages from the Bismarck. Tovey received this data from the Admiralty, but not the exact coordinates, but the bearings, hoping that there were radio direction finders on his ships. But they didn't exist!

On the same day, another mistake occurred that unexpectedly led the British to success. At 13 o'clock. 20 minutes. the British tracked down a radio message sent from the Atlantic. It was handed over by a German submarine that discovered a British aircraft carrier. It was not possible to read the text, but it was decided that the transmission was carried out from the Bismarck, going to the west coast of France. Then the British detected an active radio exchange of the German group "West", which confirmed the British in the previous conclusion. All squadrons were ordered to march south-east. The German battleship at this time broke away from the enemy by 160 miles.

At 10 o'clock. 20 minutes. On May 26, the German battleship was discovered 690 miles from France from the British flying boat Catalina. The British realized that it was difficult to catch up with the enemy battleship. It was necessary to suspend it by any means. This could have been done by the sea aviation... Formation "H" under the command of Admiral Sommerville went from Gibraltar, having in its composition the aircraft carrier "Arc Royal". At 14 o'clock. 50 minutes torpedo bombers "Suordfish" flew from the aircraft carrier to the place of detection of the enemy. By this time, the British light cruiser Sheffield was in the area where the Bismarck was discovered. British aircraft attacked their ship, luckily for them, none of the 11 torpedoes hit the target.

By 17 o'clock. 40 minutes Sheffield spotted a German battleship and began pointing aircraft at it. At 20 o'clock. 47 minutes Fifteen aircraft, despite the darkness, launched a new attack on the Bismarck. Two torpedoes hit the ship of the line. One hit the armor belt, but the other exploded in the stern and damaged the rudders. "Bismarck" has lost the ability to maneuver and control. Interestingly, before going to sea, Lutyens predicted the following outcome:

"The only thing I fear is that one of the English torpedo bombers would not shoot down the steering control of the battleship with his" eel "(the slang for the German sailors' name for a torpedo. - Author.).


Torpedo bombers on the deck of the aircraft carrier "Victories" before the raid on the German battleship "Bismarck"


View from a British torpedo bomber on the German battleship Bismarck before the start of a torpedo attack. May 26, 1941


Torpedo bomber "Suordfish" flies over the aircraft carrier "Arc Royal"

The last battle of "Bismarck"


At this time, the British command was already considering ending the pursuit of the Bismarck.

Large ships are starting to run out of fuel, due to the dashing march to the north. The battle area approached the Luftwaffe's sphere of action. But a successful torpedo hit changed everything. Late in the evening of May 26, a German battleship fired at Sheffield, injuring several people. On the night of May 27, he entered into battle with British destroyers (among them was the Polish "Perun"). The Bismarck stopped 400 miles from France.

At 8 o'clock. 47 minutes On May 27, the British battleships Rodney and King George V approached. They opened fire from 12 miles. "Rodney" also fired a torpedo salvo. "Bismarck" began to answer. But he could not inflict great damage on the enemy: the battleship could not maneuver, evade, was an ideal target, and the roll negatively affected the accuracy of shooting. Also, one of the first hits was destroyed the main rangefinder post.
At this time, the German submarine U-556 was passing through the battle area. British large ships (battleship and aircraft carrier) went without escort and did not change course. The goal was excellent. But the submarine was returning from the campaign and had already used the ammunition.

The British heavy cruisers Norfolk and Dorsetshire entered the battle. At 10 o'clock, having spent the shells, the main caliber of the Bismarck ceased fire, then the middle one fell silent. Most of the top commanders were apparently killed. The British ships were running low on shells and fuel. Admiral Tovey ordered the cruiser Dorsetshire to finish off the enemy. The British calmly approached the dying, but not surrendering battleship.

“It burned from the aft bridge,” recalled a participant in the battle. - The guns of tower A, in front of the bridge, were thrown back, like antlers, severe damage was seen on the forecastle. I remember well that the left side paneling was red-hot and when it was overwhelmed by waves, clouds of steam rose. "

The British calmly, as in an exercise, drove torpedoes into the starboard side, bypassed the battleship and drove another one into the left. At this time, German sailors, dying but not surrendering, opened the kingstones and put explosives in the turbines.

"Bismarck" in this battle showed the highest survivability. And there is a possibility that the death of the ship was caused by the actions of the Germans themselves. At 10 o'clock. 36 minutes the blazing Bismarck banked, rolled over and sank. The British rescued 110 people, three more - after a while German submarines. On the battleship there were 2200 people (according to other sources - 2403). Admiral Lutyens and the captain of the ship, Captain Lindemann, were killed along with the battleship.

The Germans investigated the death of the Bismarck and came to the conclusion that the matter was a violation of the secrecy regime. The German naval command refuses to raids by large surface ships and relies on the actions of the submarine fleet.

The British, after the almost instant death of the Hood and the subsequent stubborn resistance of the Bismarck, overestimated their views on the combat capabilities of German ships. They began to keep in the fleet of the mother country a sufficient number of battleships and aircraft carriers to fend off a new enemy raid. This worsened the capabilities of the British Navy in other naval theaters. Also, this operation showed the growing role of naval aviation and aircraft carriers in naval battles.


Surviving German sailors from the battleship Bismarck board the British cruiser Dorsetshire. Of the 2200 people of its crew, about 800 sailors left the dying battleship. An hour after the battleship sank, the cruiser Dorsetshire picked up 86 sailors, the destroyer Maori - 25 more. But because of the alarm played with the appearance of the German submarine, they left the battlefield, leaving the rest of the crew in the water. The approaching submarine U-74 rescued three sailors, and the next day two more sailors from the Bismarck were picked up by the German hydrometeorological ship Saxenwald.
Author:
Photos used:
https://ru.wikipedia.org/, http://waralbum.ru/
111 comments
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  1. igordok
    igordok 25 May 2021 05: 49
    +6
    Thank you. Basically nothing new.
    Recent trilogy from TacticMedia. So, nothing new, but interestingly presented.


    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 21
      -1
      Quote: igordok
      Recent trilogy from TacticMedia. So, nothing new, but interestingly presented.

      The author of the videos has a very rich imagination ...
      It may be interesting, but in some places it does not correspond to historical realities.
    2. Khibiny Plastun
      Khibiny Plastun 26 May 2021 11: 27
      +4
      Article in "Technology of Youth" for 1991. Almost word for word. But there is also a photo of the Bismarck at the bottom of the Atlantic. I took a magazine to compare.
      1. anjey anjey
        anjey anjey 26 May 2021 16: 15
        +1
        I confirm, I remembered the first few paragraphs, where I have already read it. Impudently reprinted from "TM", without a twinge of conscience.
        1. Khibiny Plastun
          Khibiny Plastun 26 May 2021 21: 36
          +1
          Well, if the photo of Lutyens and Tovey was reprinted, then the full correspondence. And so on VO many-shame does not smoke eyes does not eat .. Plagiarism-ss .. Well at least not completely interrupted the number, and then there is still a fantasy dregs. And, here's another article about MIG 31. We are waiting for an article about MIG.
          Samsonov (s) hint. wink
  2. Olgovich
    Olgovich 25 May 2021 05: 58
    +4
    m battle in the Danish Strait, the Germans sank the British battle cruiser Hood - the most famous and strongest in the Royal Navy at that time. Almost the entire crew was killed - out of 1419 people only three slept.

    His rival - the battleship Bismarck - broke into the operational space of the Atlantic Ocean. The main forces of the British fleet rushed in pursuit of the Bismarck. German battleship was sunk 27 May 1941 years... Out of 2200 team members Bismarck killed 1995.


    In the "strange war" there were quite fierce and large-scale battles.

    The deaths of enemy battleships are strikingly different: how easily the HKD was destroyed and how tenacious was Bismarck.

    They write that Bismarck was already within the range of the Luftwaffe bombers, but did not receive help ...
    1. BISMARCK94
      BISMARCK94 25 May 2021 06: 06
      +4
      Such hits are more dependent on luck than on calculations) but Hood was, although modernized, but still an old man.
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 25 May 2021 06: 39
        +6
        Such hits are more dependent on luck,


        The notorious "Golden Bullet".
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 22
          +3
          Quote: Sea Cat
          The notorious "Golden Bullet".

          So golden that for 80 years they have been wondering what came and where.
      2. antivirus
        antivirus 25 May 2021 17: 03
        -1
        "there was no sadness, the summer was just leaving .." .. the era of main-caliber guns was leaving .. the Germans who lost the WWI and the British who won it (but faced unreasonably high losses) amused themselves.
    2. Revolver
      Revolver 25 May 2021 09: 02
      +5
      Quote: Olgovich
      The deaths of enemy battleships are strikingly different: how easily the HKD was destroyed and how tenacious was Bismarck.

      Remember, HMS Hood was not a battleship, but a battle cruiser. Moreover, an English battle cruiser. Armament is at the level of a battleship, and armor is at the level of a cruiser. As my son, a gamer, says, "glass cannon", and someone else, I don't remember who, called these battle cruisers "eggshell waving a hammer." In the battle of Jutland, English battlecruisers also exploded from the first successful hit. But the British did not learn the lessons that the English battle cruiser should not go into battleships. And, accordingly, they ran into.
      1. Macsen_wledig
        Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 24
        +6
        Quote: Nagan
        As my son, a gamer, says, "glass cannon", and someone else, I don't remember who, called these battle cruisers "eggshell waving a hammer."

        In general, 12 "cemented armor on 2" lining made of DS steel (close in characteristics to homogeneous armor) is not such an "eggshell".
      2. Rurikovich
        Rurikovich 25 May 2021 12: 33
        +5
        laughing
        The Hood had a 305mm main armor belt. Later Americans, who were fast with 16 "art, had 310mm. The Bismarck itself was 320mm. It's not about the thickness, but about the distance at which the battle is being fought, where the projectile hit, at what angle, what kind of projectile, etc. There is a version that the "Hood" was destroyed by the fire of 102mm ammunition, which arose from the hits of the 203mm shells of the "Eugen." overcome the three armored decks of the ship and had to explode. So here, too, not everything is so simple)))
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 46
          +3
          Quote: Rurikovich
          There is a version that the "Hood" was destroyed by the fire of 102mm ammunition, which arose from the hits of 203mm shells from the "Eugen".

          Both British commissions of inquiry considered this version untenable.
          1. Rurikovich
            Rurikovich 25 May 2021 14: 07
            +2
            I do not argue, I said "version"))))
      3. Alf
        Alf 25 May 2021 21: 02
        +2
        Quote: Nagan
        In the Jutland battle, English battlecruisers also exploded from the first successful hit.

        Admiral Jellicoe in that battle, having received a report on the drowning of his next battle cruiser, said, “Something is wrong with our damn cruisers.
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 10: 30
          +4
          Quote: Alf
          Admiral Jellicoe in that battle, having received a report on the drowning of his next battle cruiser, said, “Something is wrong with our damn cruisers.

          This was said by David Beatty, who was the commander of these same battle cruisers.
          1. Alf
            Alf 26 May 2021 19: 41
            +1
            Quote: Macsen_Wledig
            Quote: Alf
            Admiral Jellicoe in that battle, having received a report on the drowning of his next battle cruiser, said, “Something is wrong with our damn cruisers.

            This was said by David Beatty, who was the commander of these same battle cruisers.

            Yes ? Well, tady Oh! Thanks for the amendment.
    3. Paragraph Epitafievich Y.
      Paragraph Epitafievich Y. 25 May 2021 11: 17
      +7
      Quote: Olgovich
      In the "strange war" there were quite fierce and large-scale battles.

      The battle in the Danish Strait took place on May 24, 1941. What the fuck is this "strange war"? By that time, she had long since ceased to be strange.
  3. The comment was deleted.
  4. Dimka75
    Dimka75 25 May 2021 06: 37
    +2
    Hood there. Bismarck here. As a result, they drowned.
    Nothing new. Usual graphomania.
    commanded "Bismarck" - at that time the strongest ship of its class in the world
    the best :-)
  5. Rurikovich
    Rurikovich 25 May 2021 06: 47
    +15
    Samsonov, it was the hit from the "Wales" that became the main argument for the termination of the operation by Lutyens! The projectile pierced the bow of the battleship just above the waterline without exploding, because the 60mm protection in that part of the ship is not a very weighty argument for the platoon of the fuse of an armor-piercing projectile. So, not only was the hole in the part where the bow breaker was formed at high speed, so the projectile damaged the bypass pipeline of the bow fuel tanks. As a result, the ship received about 2000 tons of water and this very water began to fall into the fuel tanks, which had to be cut off from the rest, as a result, the cruising range decreased. Another shell hit the turbo generator compartment near the bow boiler rooms, passing under the armor belt. By the way, it exploded, damaging the bulkheads, which led to the flooding of this compartment and the flow of water into the bow boiler rooms of the port side. So, Mr. Samsonov, these two hits led to the fact that the Bismarck got a trim on the bow of 3 degrees and a roll to the left side of 9 degrees, a drop in the cruising range and a loss of full speed! Here is a photo of the battleship from "Eugen" after the battle

    Trim on the nose is noticeable.
    The third round did not explode and damaged the catapult, which robbed the battleship of its eyes and was discovered too late.
    The loss of a unit, the deterioration of the tactical parameters of the ship in speed and the inability to correct damage on the high seas were the key factors in the termination of the operation. hi
    1. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 25 May 2021 11: 11
      +6
      Quote: Rurikovich
      So, Mr. Samsonov, these two hits led to the fact that the "Bismarck" got a trim on the bow of 3 degrees and a roll to the left side of 9 degrees, a drop in the cruising range and a loss of full speed!

      EMNIP, the combination of roll and trim led to partial exposure of the starboard propeller blades. The situation was further aggravated by the flooding of boiler room # 2 (minus two boilers).
      1. Rurikovich
        Rurikovich 25 May 2021 11: 58
        +2
        I was too lazy to write about it, in the morning there is little time, I have to get ready for work))). Even as a concomitant aggravation of this situation, it looks like the adoption of additional ballast in the aft compartments of the starboard side to eliminate the exposure of the propeller. And this is additional weight and a drop in speed hi
      2. Macsen_wledig
        Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 28
        +1
        Quote: Alexey RA
        The situation was further aggravated by the flooding of boiler room # 2 (minus two boilers).

        KO-2 of the left side "died" after the attack of aircraft from the "Victories", when from the concussion of the torpedo explosion all the sealings of the holes took off - the damage control division was no longer able to control the flooding of the KO.
  6. BISMARCK94
    BISMARCK94 25 May 2021 07: 00
    +2
    And there is a possibility that the death of the ship was caused by the actions of the Germans themselves.

    And there is. The Germans blew it up themselves, you can see about this in the documentary by James Cameron, filmed during his expedition on the Mir spacecraft.
    1. Andrei from Chelyabinsk
      Andrei from Chelyabinsk 25 May 2021 12: 07
      +8
      Quote: BISMARCK94
      And there is.

      So no :)))) the Germans really destroyed the ship themselves, but by that time it was already completely broken and was slowly sinking to the bottom. They just speeded up the process.
    2. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 12: 29
      +3
      Quote: BISMARCK94
      The Germans blew it up themselves, you can see about this in the documentary by James Cameron, filmed during his expedition on the Mir spacecraft.

      Nothing is visible in that documentary: all the details are hidden by silt.
  7. Per se.
    Per se. 25 May 2021 07: 43
    +6
    Admiral Lutyens and the captain of the ship, Captain Lindemann, were killed along with the battleship.
    Who knows, ignore Lutyens' request, keep the radio silence, the history of this ship would have turned out differently. Admiral Lutyens had bad feelings before the raid, most of all he was afraid of getting an "eel" in the propellers (torpedo). And so it happened, an aviation torpedo from the Swordfish damaged the propellers and jammed the rudder of the battleship. Nevertheless, "Bismarck" fired back to the last, and was flooded by its own team.
    The British pilot, who distinguished himself on his torpedo bomber, will not be able to repeat his success later, when the German ships will break through the English Channel into Norway, his torpedo bomber will be shot down.

    Be that as it may, the Germans caught up with the British in this battle enough "Bismarck". Further, one news of the departure of his "sister ship", "Tirpitz", doomed the convoy PQ-17 abandoned by the guard to perish.
    In the photo "Bismarck", in its "eternal parking lot". - the bottom of the Atlantic. A well-made ship, even laid down on the bottom with an "even keel".
    1. Paragraph Epitafievich Y.
      Paragraph Epitafievich Y. 25 May 2021 14: 24
      +4
      Quote: Per se.
      The British pilot, who distinguished himself on his torpedo bomber, will not be able to repeat his success later, when the German ships will break through the English Channel into Norway, his torpedo bomber will be shot down.

      John Moffat, credited with the steering wheel hit, died four years ago at the age of 97)
      1. Per se.
        Per se. 26 May 2021 07: 00
        +2
        In the hunt for the Bismarck, his plane survived, when the German ships broke through from Brest through the English Channel (Operation Cerberus), the British pilots were not so lucky. In the attack on the German ships, after passing the cliffs of Dover, 6 Suordfish participated, all torpedo bombers were shot down. I do not see the topic of "crime", many pilots were shot down during the war, then they fought on. Anyway, thanks for the addition.
  8. Dimka75
    Dimka75 25 May 2021 07: 48
    +18
    The "article" is ripped off from the article "Hunt for Bismarck" from the TM magazine May 1991.
    Even the paragraphs and key phrases are the same. And the title is 1 in 1.
  9. TermNachTer
    TermNachTer 25 May 2021 08: 33
    +3
    Britain had 15 battleships and battlecruisers in general and not in the North Atlantic. There were also other theaters where battleships and aircraft carriers were required. cruisers, destroyers and further down the list. In the North Atlantic, in the fleet of the Metropolis and Formation "H", the Britons had a very dangerous minimum. Metropolitan Fleet - battleships King George V and battle cruiser Hood. "Prince of Wales" - conditionally combat-ready. As part of the "H" compound - the battle cruiser "Ripals", for which a duel with the "Bismarck" is practically suicide, its armor "did not hold" the German 380 - mm., At any distance. Two aircraft carriers with funny air groups. The "Victories" - 6 "fullmar" and 9 "suordfish", despite the fact that he could carry 36 of all types.
    1. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 25 May 2021 11: 48
      +7
      Quote: TermNachTER
      "Prince of Wells" - conditionally combat-ready

      More precisely - practically incapable of combat. The ship was accepted by the fleet on March 31.03.41, XNUMX conditionally, without completing the tests - only to raise morale (now we have two new LCs). In fact, at the time of acceptance, the SUAO was not even completely mounted on the ship. The tests of the ship were formally completed the day before the launch, along with the Hood.
      Why formally? And because the work on the ship continued - the LK went into battle with the factory brigades, which were perfecting its systems. On Tsushima they wrote that in the SUAO "Prinza" the factory team worked together with the sailors in the battle, whose efforts were able to maintain the system in working order.
      The readiness of the "Prince" can be judged by its shooting:
      Volley No. 1: failure of gun No. 1 of tower A.
      Volley # 5: failure of one more gun of the A.
      Volley # 11: malfunction of one of the Y turret guns.
      Volley # 20: The only operational gun remains in tower Y.
      1. Rurikovich
        Rurikovich 25 May 2021 12: 17
        +2
        Of the 74 "ordered" shells, the Prince of Wales fired only 55. Due to constant malfunctions of the 4-gun turrets, there were gaps in the volleys. In fact, only the 2-gun turret worked flawlessly.
        1. Alexey RA
          Alexey RA 25 May 2021 12: 31
          +6
          Quote: Rurikovich
          Due to constant malfunctions of the 4-gun turrets, there were gaps in the volleys. In fact, only the 2-gun turret worked flawlessly.

          And Balda says reproachfully - you, lord, would not be chasing technical novelty. smile
          And what is characteristic - the limes already had experience in operating the BSh GK of a fundamentally new design. In the 20s, they designed and manufactured three-gun turrets for Nelson and Rodney, after which they had been refining them for more than 10 years. Replacement of hydraulics; introduction of an additional turret shoulder strap, preventing displacement in the horizontal plane (already on built ships!); fine-tuning the systems of mutual isolation and security, which regularly gave false alarms and "non-profits", which led to delays in firing, etc. This business was completed only by 1939.
          And now, already having this experience, they decided to put limes on the new LK ... four-gun BSh GK of a fundamentally new design.
          Ahhh, here we go again. © CJ
          1. TermNachTer
            TermNachTer 25 May 2021 14: 52
            +1
            You can, purely for fun, see how the "Rodney" shot, also "not a fountain". But Dalrymple - Hamilton nevertheless received a membership degree from the Order of the Bath, a very high award, usually given to admirals.
            1. Bormanxnumx
              Bormanxnumx 26 May 2021 12: 55
              +1
              Quote: TermNachTER
              You can, purely for fun, see how the "Rodney" shot, also "not a fountain". But Dalrymple - Hamilton nevertheless received a membership degree from the Order of the Bath, a very high award, usually given to admirals.

              Maybe "not a fountain", but the artillery of the main battalion on Bismarck was knocked out in 25 minutes. mid-range combat
          2. Cherry Nine
            Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 20: 22
            +1
            Quote: Alexey RA
            , already having this experience, they decided to put limes on the new LK ... four-gun BSh GK of a fundamentally new design

            I think you are aware that they had no options. Thanks to Mr. Baldwin, Mr. Hoare, and the wise, peace-loving policies of the beloved Conservative Party.
            1. Cherry Nine
              Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 22: 03
              0
              Quote: Cherry Nine
              Mr. Hora

              I did not lie to Sir Samuel Hoare. This was his predecessor, Viscount Monsell.
      2. TermNachTer
        TermNachTer 25 May 2021 14: 44
        +2
        I absolutely agree with you. But I did not understand the battle in the Danish Strait, in detail, to the smallest detail. He simply told the author that his wording was somewhat incorrect. Why, an inexperienced reader might think that the entire Royal Navy was involved against the two German ships.
  10. Olezhek
    Olezhek 25 May 2021 09: 45
    +2
    But what should be noted - the Germans showed themselves in a naval battle very, very well
    Surprisingly good.
    Bismarck was just a little unlucky
    I could have run to France
    1. TermNachTer
      TermNachTer 25 May 2021 14: 49
      +1
      There is very little chance. If the Britons acted more thoughtfully and the element of luck. The death of "Hood" is a combination of circumstances favorable for the Germans. If the British had not lost the Germans and Holland started the battle as planned, the result was most likely very sad for the Germans - the British have a two-fold advantage, and King George and Rodney are on the way.
      1. Olezhek
        Olezhek 26 May 2021 10: 37
        +2
        There, Bismarck and Prince Eugene challenged the entire British fleet.
        .so we fought well
        1. TermNachTer
          TermNachTer 26 May 2021 10: 43
          +2
          A very dubious operation, from all points of view. Like the whole concept of building a fleet in Germany.
          1. Olezhek
            Olezhek 26 May 2021 10: 46
            +1
            About the concept of building a fleet and about the Z plan - a separate big conversation
            And about the "dubious operation" - compare with the actions of our Black Sea Fleet during WWII request
            1. TermNachTer
              TermNachTer 26 May 2021 12: 56
              +1
              If you are hinting at the supply of Odessa and Sevastopol, then this was a necessary measure. Raid "Bismarck", as well as "Scharnhorst" and "Gneisenau" - were not a vital necessity.
              1. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 33
                +3
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Raid "Bismarck", as well as "Scharnhorst" and "Gneisenau" - were not a vital necessity.

                Is it not a vital necessity to interrupt the supply communications of the enemy, whose whole life depends on these communications?
                Interesting logic ...
                1. TermNachTer
                  TermNachTer 26 May 2021 13: 39
                  +2
                  Could they interrupt them? destroy one or two convoys, and even then not completely. The most important ones went under the cover of battleships. These are all Raeder's theories that had nothing to do with reality.
                  1. Macsen_wledig
                    Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 48
                    +1
                    Quote: TermNachTER
                    Could they interrupt them? destroy one or two convoys, and even then not completely.

                    And this will cause a collapse of supply for a period, during this period you can invent something in the military plan.

                    Quote: TermNachTER
                    The most important ones went under the cover of battleships.

                    Just about the "most important": you can't get enough of all LK convoys ...

                    Quote: TermNachTER
                    These are all Raeder's theories that had nothing to do with reality.

                    Why then did the British catch the Bismarck so hysterically, because in your opinion it did not pose a big threat ... :)
                    1. TermNachTer
                      TermNachTer 26 May 2021 13: 57
                      +1
                      Not a single day was England on the brink of collapse, everything was reasonably abundant. The British themselves considered submarines more dangerous than battleships. What is hysteria among the Britons? The fleet of the Metropolis and the "H" formation are involved against the Germans. Two battleships and two battlecruisers, because it was necessary to block several directions at once. "Rodney" joined "after the fact". There was an opportunity to destroy the enemy battleship, which created certain difficulties, why not use it? "Tirpitz" mostly hid in the bases.
                      1. Macsen_wledig
                        Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 27
                        +1
                        Quote: TermNachTER
                        Not a single day was England on the verge of collapse, everything was reasonably abundant.

                        And I did not say that I was ... I spoke about the possibility.

                        Quote: TermNachTER
                        What is hysteria among the Britons? The fleet of the Metropolis and the "H" formation are involved against the Germans.

                        The Britons pulled everything they could reach into the sea. Just read Tovey's report of the operation.
                      2. TermNachTer
                        TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 33
                        +1
                        Of course that's all. They had to block three possible directions of movement. Three LKs are involved, Rodney is being repaired in the USA, practically incapable of combat, Prince of Wells, not yet accepted from the plant, practically incapable of combat. "Hood" is just old. Rhinaun is even older and weaker. Two aircraft carriers with very weak air groups. At the same time, "Bismarck", instead of raiding, ran away to Brest with all his might. But could not.
                      3. Macsen_wledig
                        Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 15: 03
                        +1
                        Quote: TermNachTER
                        3 LKs involved

                        You think badly ... :)
                        As I say, read Tovey's report. It is on the network.
  11. Victor Leningradets
    Victor Leningradets 26 May 2021 13: 21
    +1
    If you started a fight at close range (and you approach it when you have only 28 knots against 30 for the enemy), you would be guaranteed to go to the "same place". The German SKC-34 pierces Hood's side armor with a bevel of up to 100 cab. The Bismarck Citadel is practically invulnerable at close range, only towers and barbets. Bismarck's rate of fire is higher than that of the British. And the Prince's 12 torpedoes are no small matter.
    The only correct tactic for Holland is to fight on parallel courses at a long distance in the hope of hitting the enemy's deck, slowing him down and finishing off two new battleships already in close combat.
    1. TermNachTer
      TermNachTer 26 May 2021 13: 26
      +2
      It was supposed to "dash" from the dark part of the horizon, on a collision course. Admiral Holland specialized in artillery, he knew everything + and - perfectly. Not so much "Hood" was inferior to "Bismarck" in the thickness of the main belt. 305 - mm. against 320.
      1. Victor Leningradets
        Victor Leningradets 26 May 2021 13: 37
        +1
        He was losing catastrophically!
        The given thickness of the Hood's vertical protection is 340 mm; Bismarck - 620 - 680 mm. It's all about a gentle bevel 100 - 120 mm thick. For 356 and 381-mm shells, this is an insurmountable obstacle, the only hope for "diving".
        The turret forehead (360-mm) and the barbet (340-mm) are quite vulnerable. And at long distances, the decks (50 + 100 mm above the cellars and 50 + 80 mm above the boiler rooms) and the roofs of the towers (130 mm) are quite vulnerable.
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 55
          +1
          Quote: Victor Leningradets
          He was losing catastrophically!

          According to British calculations, the ZSM "Tirpitz" under fire from 14 "KD5 guns was in the range of 16-21,5 thousand yards. At other distances, vital parts" got "either through the side or through the deck.
          1. Victor Leningradets
            Victor Leningradets 26 May 2021 14: 09
            +1
            The 100-mm bevel behind the 320-mm belt is not penetrated by a 356-mm projectile at close range. The only one who can break through the bevel is the Yamato projectile (due to the gigantic mass.
            It's just that the Britons ignore the fact that the Germans hid all the most valuable under the lower deck and consider breaking the 12,6 "belt for the near zone of the ZSM. But the decks are a German jamb.
            1. Macsen_wledig
              Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 39
              0
              Quote: Victor Leningradets
              The 100-mm bevel behind the 320-mm belt is not penetrated by a 356-mm projectile at close range.

              The British considered the possibility of hitting through the upper belt and the main armored deck. :)
              1. Victor Leningradets
                Victor Leningradets 27 May 2021 15: 25
                0
                Anyway, this is the outer border of the ZSM. And then - hardly. After breaking through the 145-mm belt, the projectile is normalized, and it is guaranteed to lose the armor-piercing cap - the output will not bite the deck. What happened according to the testimony of the Germans in the final battle - breaking through the combination of the upper belt + bevel when the "Bismarck" rolls towards the fire.
          2. Cherry Nine
            Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 20: 26
            0
            Quote: Macsen_Wledig
            According to British calculations, the ZSM "Tirpitz" under fire from 14 "KD5 guns was in the range of 16-21,5 thousand yards. At other distances, vital parts" got "either through the side or through the deck.

            And what kind of calculations? It is especially interesting to get over the side, this is at a low German citadel.
            1. Macsen_wledig
              Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 20: 55
              0
              Quote: Cherry Nine
              And what kind of calculations? It is especially interesting to get over the side, this is at a low German citadel.

              See below.
              1. Cherry Nine
                Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 21: 19
                0
                It is written below that the British drew some kind of fantasy graphics for an alternative Bismarck. Moreover, this fantasy - a rare case for LK - was disproved experimentally.
                1. Macsen_wledig
                  Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 21: 31
                  0
                  Quote: Cherry Nine
                  It is written below,

                  Below is where?
                  1. Cherry Nine
                    Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 21: 43
                    0
                    In your post with zones of invulnerability. Did you mean any other post?
                  2. Macsen_wledig
                    Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 21: 46
                    0
                    Quote: Cherry Nine
                    In your post with zones of invulnerability. Did you mean any other post?

                    About ZSM 2 posts. From 1355 and from 1422.
                    Now I would like to understand which one you mean.
                  3. Cherry Nine
                    Cherry Nine 26 May 2021 22: 08
                    0
                    14.22
                    However, if initially
                    Quote: Macsen_Wledig
                    According to British calculations, the ZSM "Tirpitz" under fire from 14 "KD5 guns was in the range of 16-21,5 thousand yards. At other distances, vital parts" got "either through the side or through the deck.

                    it is not reality that is described, but the picture of the battle for Holland, then the question is removed.
                  4. Macsen_wledig
                    Macsen_wledig 27 May 2021 11: 07
                    0
                    Quote: Cherry Nine
                    However, if initially
                    it is not reality that is described, but the picture of the battle for Holland, then the question is removed.

                    A bit wrong. This is reality, as it was seen by the British admirals and on the basis of which they made their tactical formations.
  12. TermNachTer
    TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 02
    +1
    I'm embarrassed to ask - where are these scary figures from? Go to Wikipedia, see the performance characteristics of "Huda" and "Bismarck". If you want to dig deeper, read Nathan Okun. He, however, also has controversial statements, but in general, it is close enough to reality.
    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 22
      +2
      Quote: TermNachTER
      I'm embarrassed to ask - where are these scary figures from? Go to Wikipedia, see the performance characteristics of "Huda" and "Bismarck".

      Why do I need Wikipedia?



      Quote: TermNachTER
      If you want to dig deeper, read Nathan Okun.

      Why should I read this liar? :)
  • Macsen_wledig
    Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 41
    +2
    Quote: TermNachTER
    It was supposed to "dash" from the dark part of the horizon, on a collision course.

    Nifiga she was not dark. :)
    Sunrise on May 24 local time at 01:51.
    1. TermNachTer
      TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 06
      +1
      There is sunrise and sunset. It was supposed to "jerk" from the sunset part of the horizon, when the British are hard to see at dusk, while the Germans are illuminated by the rising sun. It did not work, because the Wake - Walker cruiser was lost to the Germans.
      1. Macsen_wledig
        Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 17
        +1
        Quote: TermNachTER
        It was supposed to "jerk" from the sunset part of the horizon, when the British are hard to see at dusk, while the Germans are illuminated by the rising sun.

        What was supposed to be unknown, since there were no survivors from Holland's headquarters.
        If you guess using afterthought, then the Germans were north-west of the British and to be south-west of the Germans, going south-west, you have to try very hard.

        Quote: TermNachTER
        It did not work, because the Wake - Walker cruiser was lost to the Germans.

        Taking into account the weather conditions in the Danish Strait, thinking about the sun looks rather ridiculous: the sun first appeared only at 13:40 on May 24th.
        1. TermNachTer
          TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 24
          +1
          Admiral Holland's plan of action was known to Tovey and the other senior officers. The Germans and the British were where they were, because Wake - Walker lost the Germans. If he had led the Germans, he would have brought them exactly to a position convenient for Holland. I do not know. when the sun went down and went out there, somehow I did not really penetrate. But the British first discovered it visually and only then accompanied the radar. The battle between the "Bismarck" and Holland's detachment was also fought visually, without the use of "flares".
          1. Macsen_wledig
            Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 42
            +1
            Quote: TermNachTER
            Admiral Holland's plan of action was known to Tovey and the other senior officers.

            Where can I find it?

            Quote: TermNachTER
            But the British first discovered it visually and only then accompanied the radar.

            Well, yes ... Because the Bismarck just drove out of the fog onto the Suffolk ...

            Quote: TermNachTER
            The battle between the "Bismarck" and Holland's detachment was also fought visually, without the use of "flares".

            Because it was light, what are the lighting shells for?
            1. TermNachTer
              TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 49
              +1
              Then tell me - was it light or dark? Could Holland have come up from the dark side of the horizon or not? You can get acquainted with the memoirs of Tovey. Since he was Holland's immediate superior.
              1. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 15: 01
                +1
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Then tell me - was it light or dark?

                There was civil twilight (the sun is not lower than 5 degrees below the horizon). Between midnight and approximately 03:40 am, visibility was limited to 1 to 2 miles due to snow and rain by 05:30, visibility had improved to 17 miles.

                Quote: TermNachTER
                You can get acquainted with the memoirs of Tovey.

                Can you credit?
              2. TermNachTer
                TermNachTer 26 May 2021 15: 12
                +1
                Alas, I cannot give an exact link. I read Tovey's explanations, after the battle, on the death of Hood, on some British website. Unfortunately, I did not save it, I read it for general development and that's it.
              3. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 16: 50
                +1
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Alas, I cannot give an exact link.

                Clear.
                Most likely you have read
                SINKING OF THE GERMAN BATTLESHIP BISMARCK ON 27 MAY, 1941.
                The following Despatch was submitted to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty on the
                5 July, 1941, by Admiral Sir JOHN C. TOVEY, KCB, DSO, Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet.
                But, unfortunately, there is less about Holland's plans and then in the retelling of Leach ...
              4. TermNachTer
                TermNachTer 26 May 2021 17: 29
                +1
                I won't argue, I don't remember exactly. Are you suggesting that the commander of the Prince of Wales, the second and last battleship in Holland's squadron, has not been fully briefed for all occasions?
              5. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 18: 10
                +1
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Are you suggesting that the commander of the Prince of Wales, the second and last battleship in Holland's squadron, has not been fully briefed for all occasions?

                In any case, there are only two things that can be learned from Leach's report:
                1. Scapa agreed that the choice of target in battle is independent
                2. On the night of the 24th, Holland announced that the battleships would attack the Bismarck, the cruiser Eugen.
              6. TermNachTer
                TermNachTer 26 May 2021 20: 36
                0
                Tovey said that he wanted to tell Holland to put in the lead, a better armored "Prince", but did not, so as not to break the radio silence. Holland decided to go head-first. According to the plan, it was assumed that the cruisers Wake - Walker, attack the "Eigen". Churchill then snapped at him strongly. So there was a detailed plan, approved by Tovey. This is why Holland deviated from him, we will no longer know.
              7. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 20: 54
                0
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Tovey said that he wanted to tell Holland to put in the lead, a better armored "Prince", but did not, so as not to break the radio silence.

                Actually, Leach suggested it ...

                Quote: TermNachTER
                According to the plan, it was assumed that the cruisers Wake - Walker, attack the "Eigen".

                What Holland reported to Leach on the night of the 24th: if the plan had been originally, then it would make sense to report it additionally.

                Quote: TermNachTER
                Churchill then snapped at him strongly.

                Churchill was "offended" by Wake Walker and Leach for somewhat different reasons.

                Quote: TermNachTER
                So there was a detailed plan, approved by Tovey.

                I would like proofs.
                Tovey himself writes that he simply relocated Holland's squadron to Hvalfjord so that it could make it to the Danish Strait and the Faro-Icelandic passage ...

                Quote: TermNachTER
                This is why Holland deviated from him, we will no longer know.

                Yes, yes ...
              8. TermNachTer
                TermNachTer 26 May 2021 21: 39
                0
                Are you saying that Tovey, Holland, and Wake-Walker acted on a whim, as "God willing"? Regarding the "lead" to put "Prince", Tovey claims that this is his idea. They did not transmit it, only because German radio intelligence would not have detected it.
              9. Macsen_wledig
                Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 21: 48
                0
                Quote: TermNachTER
                Are you saying that Tovey, Holland, and Wake-Walker acted on a whim, as "God willing"?

                Regarding actions in battle, there are "Combat Instructions" of the Admiralty.

                Quote: TermNachTER
                Tovey claims that this is his thought.

                Finally give a link to the document ... :)
  • Macsen_wledig
    Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 37
    +1
    Quote: Victor Leningradets
    If I started a fight at close range (and you approach it when you have only 28 knots on the force against 30 for the enemy)

    The Germans marched at 27 knots.

    Quote: Victor Leningradets
    Bismarck's rate of fire is higher than that of the British.

    This cannot be said about the shooting of the Bismarck in the Danish Strait.

    Quote: Victor Leningradets
    The only correct tactic for Holland is to fight on parallel courses at long range in the hope of hitting the enemy's deck.

    Everything would be fine, but "Combat Instructions" recommended a distance of 65 cables ...
    1. Victor Leningradets
      Victor Leningradets 26 May 2021 13: 53
      +1
      Hello, Maxim!
      Well, there is no arguing about the speed, in fact - so, but there was a margin of up to 30 knots. The rate of fire was determined not by the technical side of the matter, but by the method of sighting at the target changing course. And at close range, there is not much time to waste.
      Having actually disassembled the German PMV ships, the British did not understand the purpose of the hollow bevel behind the main armor belt and did not take it into account for the armor resistance of the vertical barrier. Hence the blind belief that they are opposed by about 14 "armor, and as a result - a combat distance of 65 cab.
      By the way, as a battleship, Hood does not look so bad in comparison with the same Vanguard, which, although younger by 26 years, is also protected very mediocrely from 381-mm shells, not to mention 406-mm.
      1. Macsen_wledig
        Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 02
        +1
        Quote: Victor Leningradets
        Well, there is no arguing about the speed, in fact - so, but there was a margin of up to 30 knots.

        In 1 knot. Brinkmann wrote in a report that the Bismarck was issuing "passport" 29 knots at sea.

        Quote: Victor Leningradets
        The rate of fire was determined not by the technical side of the matter, but by the method of sighting at the target changing course.

        Exactly. The British noted that the Bismarck fired about 1 salvo per minute.
        But not "passport" in any way 2 ... 2,3.

        Quote: Victor Leningradets
        Having actually disassembled the German PMV ships, the British did not understand the purpose of the hollow bevel behind the main armor belt and did not take it into account for the armor resistance of the vertical barrier.

        Read about the shooting of "Baden" ...

        Quote: Victor Leningradets
        By the way, as a battleship, Hood does not look so bad in comparison with the same Vanguard, which, although younger by 26 years, is also protected very mediocrely from 381-mm shells, not to mention 406-mm.

        It was built more against Japanese LKR than LK ...
        1. Victor Leningradets
          Victor Leningradets 26 May 2021 14: 25
          +1
          Speed ​​is a delicate thing, it depends on both the state of the mechanisms and the state of the hull, as well as the load of the ship.
          Here, the ship is brand new, fresh from the dock and has "lost weight" enough in fuel during the transition and forced march.
          29-knots passport speed at a power of 138 hp and a displacement of 000 tons. The German cars gave a significant boost (up to 43200%), but the mechanics reasonably feared for the boilers. So, if necessary, Bismarck would even give 25 knots. But he didn't need it.
          I read about the shooting of "Baden" and grinned. Even he showed. that hitting the towers is the most effective. But the interaction of the projectile with a complex obstacle, which is in particular the Belt / Bevel, eluded the British. They believed that the bevel is protection from fragments.
          1. Macsen_wledig
            Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 35
            +1
            Quote: Victor Leningradets
            Speed ​​is a delicate thing, it depends on both the state of the mechanisms and the state of the hull, as well as the load of the ship.

            The fact is that when maneuvering together, the Germans gave out a maximum of 29,5 knots for a very short time.

            Quote: Victor Leningradets
            So, if necessary, Bismarck would even give 31 knots. But he didn't need it.

            When required, for some reason he did not give out.
            And then he could no longer because of the damage.
      2. TermNachTer
        TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 11
        +1
        Reservation systems, large ships, FDA and WWII were significantly different. There was a transition to the "all or nothing" principle. On all new LCs, there was no bevel of the PSU to the side. There was one thick BP, sometimes another thin one on top, to stop projectiles falling at a large angle and aerial bombs.
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 14: 36
          +1
          Quote: TermNachTER
          Reservation systems for large ships, PVM and WWII were significantly different.

          The Germans remained "with their own", so to speak, because of which they often write that "Bismarck" is a filed "Bayern" ...
          1. TermNachTer
            TermNachTer 26 May 2021 14: 40
            +1
            Find on the Internet drawings (midship - frame) "Bayern" and "Bismarck", and compare. Bayern was taken conditionally, as a starting point, when designing.
            1. Macsen_wledig
              Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 15: 05
              +1
              Quote: TermNachTER
              Find on the Internet drawings (midship - frame) "Bayern" and "Bismarck", and compare. Bayern was taken conditionally, as a starting point, when designing.

              You won’t believe it, but I know ... bully
              1. TermNachTer
                TermNachTer 26 May 2021 15: 07
                +1
                Well then, compare the bevel of the armored deck of the cruiser Aurora and the Scharnhorst (not the one that was sunk near the Falklands).
                1. Macsen_wledig
                  Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 15: 12
                  +1
                  Quote: TermNachTER
                  Well then, compare the bevel of the armored deck of the cruiser Aurora and the Scharnhorst (not the one that was sunk near the Falklands).

                  In my heart I can't imagine why you are ...
  • Daniil Konovalenko
    Daniil Konovalenko 25 May 2021 11: 27
    +2
    One hit the armor belt, but the other exploded in the stern and damaged the rudders.
    "Here the bullet whizzed through and yeah" (c)
  • Macsen_wledig
    Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 13: 01
    +2
    German heavy cruiser "Prince Eugen". Keel. Germany. 1941 g.

    The author's photo is attributed incorrectly.
    "Prince Eugen" at the dock in Brest, June-July 1941.
  • NF68
    NF68 25 May 2021 16: 25
    +1
    An immense number of articles have been written on this topic for a long time.
    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 16: 52
      +4
      Quote: NF68
      An immense number of articles have been written on this topic for a long time.

      If only articles ... :)
      An immense number of books have been written on this topic.
      1. NF68
        NF68 25 May 2021 16: 55
        +1
        Quote: Macsen_Wledig
        Quote: NF68
        An immense number of articles have been written on this topic for a long time.

        If only articles ... :)
        An immense number of books have been written on this topic.


        That's for sure. Now, if someone had found so far little-known information and posted it here, it would have been a completely different matter.
  • Looking for
    Looking for 25 May 2021 18: 50
    +1
    not tired of procrastinating ???
    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 25 May 2021 18: 52
      +2
      Quote: Seeker
      not tired of procrastinating ???

      The truth is born in a dispute .... :)
  • Taoist
    Taoist 25 May 2021 20: 37
    +6
    am A little Bismarck in your tape ...





  • The comment was deleted.
  • Tavrik
    Tavrik 26 May 2021 10: 20
    +3
    Quote: Olgovich
    The deaths of enemy battleships are strikingly different: how easily the HKD was destroyed and how tenacious was Bismarck.

    No wonder. They were completely different ships. Hood is a battle cruiser, fast, with weak armor, and Bismarck is a full-fledged battleship. They were built at different times, for different tasks. By the way, in what agony Hood and his brothers were born - that is still an epic ...
  • Tavrik
    Tavrik 26 May 2021 10: 34
    +4
    Quote: Per se.
    Further, one news of the departure of his "sister ship", "Tirpitz", doomed the convoy PQ-17 abandoned by the guard to perish.

    Well, yes, only the British abandoned the convoy not because they were afraid of Tirpitz, but because they rushed to intercept him, believing that he, under the cover of the convoy, would try to break into the Atlantic. In short, they were too smart ... Tirpitz was not intercepted (he did not even think to break through), but the convoy was lost ...
    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 12: 25
      +1
      Quote: Tavrik
      Well, yes, only the British abandoned the convoy, not because they were afraid of Tirpitz, but because they rushed to intercept him, believing that he, under the cover of the convoy, would try to break into the Atlantic.

      It's not right and wrong ... :)
      We will probably never know the reason for the dissolution of the convoy: in 2017 they promised to declassify the documents, but, judging by indirect information, the secrecy was extended further ...
      The cruiser Hamilton was called back (albeit in very categorical terms that gave free rein to different interpretations) for one simple reason: his cruisers were supposed to move west on the evening of July 3 and already went east for a day under the personal responsibility of the squadron commander. Support tankers also remained in the west. But the actions of Broome, who commanded the direct escort of the convoy, which rushed westward along with the cruisers, leave many questions.
      1. Tavrik
        Tavrik 26 May 2021 12: 50
        +1
        Is there anything else secret there? I read the texts of the radio messages in Broome's book. Who, to whom, when, what commands he gave. Yes, Hamilton "went far", it was necessary to turn back.
        The "jamb" is that Bruma was not at all determined what to do next after the convoy was disbanded. The transports have spread all over the sea, Hamilton goes west to prevent the mythical breakthrough of Tirpitz ... Battleships are also there. Put yourself in Broome's shoes. So he asked the senior chief "what should I do?", And he did not think for a long time, gave the command: "Follow me!"
        What I don't understand is why the Admiralty decided to break through Tirpitz to the west, if, according to Lunin's report, Tirpitz was moving east?
        1. Macsen_wledig
          Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 13: 23
          0
          Quote: Tavrik
          Is there anything else secret there?

          A lot of things with a term of 75 years. It was anyway. What is there now I do not know.

          Quote: Tavrik
          Put yourself in Broome's shoes. So he asked the senior chief "what should I do?", And he did not think for a long time, gave the command: "Follow me!"

          The joke is that this is Brum's initiative: he had no orders, and according to military logic (the last order is being executed), he had to follow to the east, as far as possible, supporting the ships breaking through to Russia.

          Quote: Tavrik
          What I don't understand is why the Admiralty decided to break through Tirpitz to the west, if, according to Lunin's report, Tirpitz was moving east?

          Where did you get the idea that the Admiralty decided that the Tirpitz would break into the Atlantic?
          This is not the case in British works, the only place where I have seen such reflections is in the Preface of the Patients to one of their translated works.
  • General70
    General70 26 May 2021 16: 37
    +2
    https://kino-o-voine.ru/potopit-bismark-velikobritaniya-ssha-1960/ hi hi hi wink
    1. Macsen_wledig
      Macsen_wledig 26 May 2021 16: 53
      +2
      Quote: General70
      https://kino-o-voine.ru/potopit-bismark-velikobritaniya-ssha-1960/

      Yes ... Good movie.
      Sorry Cameron did not remove the remake. :(