Military Review

Battle of Austerlitz: battle on the left flank of the allies and defeat of the allied armies

174
Battle of Austerlitz: battle on the left flank of the allies and defeat of the allied armies
Antoine Charles Horace Vernet (1758-1836). "Napoleon Giving Orders Before the Battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805". Versailles


“... And with a cry, the formation falls down on the formation;
In an instant, an abusive meadow
Covered with hills of bloody bodies,
Alive, crushed, headless, "
A. Pushkin "Ruslan and Lyudmila"

Greatest battles in stories. In the previous article, we talked about how dramatic the battle with the French went during the Battle of Austerlitz in the center and on the right flank of the Allied army. But almost even more dramatic events had that day on the left flank of the Allied army, where, in accordance with Weyrother's plan, the Russian and Austrian troops managed to fulfill its first part: to take the villages of Telnits and Sokolnits. But General Buxgewden, who commanded three columns, did not succeed in further developing this success. Rather, he did not succeed until the very moment when his own troops were attacked by the French in the flank and rear from the Prazen Heights.


The dragoons of the Russian imperial army go on the attack. Fig. J. Rava

Theoretically, there was nothing terrible in this. Because the French, attacking Buxgewden and the columns entrusted to him, in turn turned their backs on the reserves of the heir to Constantine and could well become victims of the terrible force of the blow: from the front - the units of Dokhturov and Langeron that turned to face them, and from the rear - the regiments of the Imperial Guard. But ... in reality, it did not work out that way. The forces of Bagration and Constantine on the right flank of the allied army, Napoleon managed to pin down, while on the left, as is very often the case in the troops attacked in the flank and rear, confusion and confusion arose, disastrous for any army participating in the battle. And today our story will go about such events ...


Map of the Battle of Austerlitz 2 December 1805

While the troops of Bagration were retreating, and VK. Prince Constantine was gathering his defeated battalions, on the left flank of the allied army events took on a truly dramatic character. All three columns of Buxgewden were trapped in the space between Sokolnitsa, Telnitsa, Aujezd and the lakes. Napoleon moved closer to the battlefield, to the southern end of the Pratzen plateau, and from there, being at the chapel of St. Anthony, gave orders, directly observing the battle. General Langeron at this very time, according to his recollections, told Buxgewden everything that he thought about his command, then in Russian speaking, "had a fight" with him. It seems that he was already very drunk, but ... how to verify this kind of statement? Then Kutuzov's order came to start a retreat, but it was impossible to execute it, since the French attacked from three sides at once and put very strong pressure on the allied forces.


French grenadiers at Austerlitz. Fig. J. Rava

Generals Oudinot and Thiebaud were wounded here, but Generals Przhibyshevsky, Selekhov and von Shtrik surrendered to the French.

In turn, Buxgewden, having received an order to retreat, deployed a battery of 24 cannons against the French - an impressive enough force, and under their cover began a withdrawal from Auyezd. Behind it was a bridge, which the general and two infantry battalions managed to cross safely, but which collapsed when the Austrian artillery passed through it. To some extent, the Allies were helped by the lack of artillery from the French. Napoleon saw this too and sent a horse battery of the guards to help those who fought for Aujezd.


Fight of the imperial cavalry guards with the French guards rangers. Fig. J. Rava

This immediately turned the tide of the battle. The allies began to retreat, with many running straight across Lake Zachan, while others, and above all the artillerymen with their cannons, moved through the dam, which was half under water and ice. It is clear that the ice could not bear the weight of the guns and horses, and they began to fall through. However, the depth in the lake and ponds was shallow, people were up to their chests, so they just managed to get out, but a lot of guns and horses fought in teams and lines were lost.


Guards Cossacks are attacking! Fig. J. Rava

The dramatic nature of the situation very soon gave rise to the myth that the Russian army, during the retreat, sank in the lake near Zachan and the Zachan fish ponds. And that the French specifically fired cannonballs on the ice, it broke, and people drowned in them by the thousands. However, Napoleon himself had a hand in spreading this myth. The fact is that in the morning of the next day, he issued an order, which said:

“Soldiers, I am pleased with you: on the day of Austerlitz, you accomplished everything that I expected from your courage. You have adorned your eagles with immortal glory. An army of 100 thousand men under the command of the Russian and Austrian emperors was cut up and scattered in less than four hours. Those who eluded your sword are sunk in the lakes ... "


The battalions of the Russian imperial army are going to their death. A still from the film "War and Peace" by S. Bondarchuk

And here is what the historian E.V. Tarle wrote about those dramatic events:

“They were especially amazed, for example, by the fact that the commander of the left wing of the Russian troops Buxgewden, having 29 battalions of infantry and 22 squadrons of cavalry, instead of helping the perishing Russian army, spent the whole time of the battle near the third-stage point of the battle, where he was held for hours by a paltry French detachment. And when Buxgewden finally guessed to start a retreat, he did it so late and so unskilfully that several thousand from his corps were thrown to the ponds and drowned here, since Napoleon, noticing this movement, ordered to hit the ice with cannonballs. "

That is, thousands drowned ... But then their corpses would have to float up in the spring, and the ponds would have to be cleaned, the dead would have to be buried, but no one reported this anywhere.


Napoleon is watching the battle. A still from the film "War and Peace" by S. Bondarchuk

But the French, eyewitnesses of the battle at the lakes, later wrote that only two killed Russian soldiers were found in the lake near Zachan, but the corpses of 140 horses and 18 cannons. In the local fish pond, three dead bodies were found, hit by bullets, and 250 horse corpses. There was even an official report to the Austrian government - about the burial of bodies in ponds, and it indicated that the remains of two soldiers and 180 horses were found with 18 guns! The adjutant of Marshal Augereau Marbo, arriving at Napoleon's headquarters with a report and being in front of him, took part in the rescue of one Russian soldier who was floating on an ice floe, whom he and others were dragged ashore. Marbeau himself was quickly warmed, so that he did not even catch a cold, but the Russian saved by him asked to serve in the French army. And then he met him already in the regiment of the Polish lancers who belonged to the emperor's guard, and he was still grateful to his savior. And Napoleon should have seen all this, but he also preferred to talk about the thousands of Russian soldiers drowned in the lakes ...

After Buxgevden left, General Dokhturov, who defended at Telnitsa, took command of the surrounded allied forces. But he had to retreat along a narrow dam (only two people could pass through it at the same time!), And even covered with ice, so the evacuation of the troops proceeded very slowly.

Langeron later wrote that the soldiers threw their guns and did not obey both the officers and even the generals, however, the latter also fled like the lower ranks. And after the collapse of the bridge at Auyezd, Lanzheron himself had to leave his horse and go further to save himself on foot.

The French considered the prisoners in thousands, in particular, more than 1200 people were taken from the lakes alone, and 4000 more from Auyezd!


Prince Andrew under the sky of Austerlitz. A still from the film "War and Peace" by S. Bondarchuk

The retreat, he said, lasted all night. The soldiers of the regiments mixed among themselves walked continuously, without even a crumb of food, which they took away from the local residents and ... the wounded, who did not have the strength to defend themselves from violence. The fugitives covered 60 kilometers in forty hours, and

“Many officers, generals and soldiers ate nothing! <...> If the enemy decided to overtake us - and I do not understand why he did not do this - he would have interrupted or captured another 20 people. "

On December 3, the retreating and scattered parts of the Russian army reached the location of the allies in Chaycha. Tsar Alexander had to spend the night in a shack on straw, which the Bible says leads to humility. Meanwhile, the Austrian emperor sent Liechtenstein to Napoleon with a proposal for an armistice. And the French emperor agreed to it. And it was signed already on December 4 in a place called "Burnt Mill". Moreover, there, too, there was no room for the high negotiating parties, and both emperors negotiated in the fresh frosty air, periodically warming themselves around the bonfires laid out by Napoleon's guards. In a conversation with Napoleon, Franz called the British “dealers in human flesh"And for some reason strongly scolded the Cossacks. Somehow they did not please him very much. The main thing, however, is that he accepted all the conditions of Napoleon, and nothing more was required of him. At the same time, he pledged to immediately expel all Russian troops from his territory.


Anthony-Jean Gros (1771-1835) "Meeting of Emperors Napoleon and Franz II after the Battle of Austerlitz". Painting 1812 Versailles

Napoleon himself was so intoxicated with his victory - after all, everything turned out as he had foreseen, as planned, and this greatly raises a sense of his own importance - that he thought about pursuing the defeated enemy only on the morning of December 3. Moreover, on the road to Olmuts, only a lot of abandoned carts were found. So the order of pursuit came to the generals of the Great Army rather late, and Marshal Davout was the fastest to carry it out. He had enough strength for the final defeat of the Allied forces: Friant's division, dragoons Klein and Lassal, and then also Guden's division, but ... having caught up with the rearguard of General Murfeld, who was covering the withdrawal of troops, he was a day late. The truce had already been concluded, of which Murfeld immediately notified Davout! He did not believe it and was ready to fight, but then Napoleon Savary's adjutant general arrived and confirmed the truce negotiated at the "Burnt Mill". So Napoleon did not hesitate quite a bit, and the victory would have been much more significant in all respects. However, one can only rejoice at this, since this oversight of his saved the lives of many more Russian soldiers and officers. On the other hand, if he made a mistake as a commander, then, without a doubt, he was at the height of his position as a statesman.


Alexander Stankievich (1824-1892) "Napoleon and Franz II meet after the Battle of Austerlitz." Painting from 1841 at the National Museum in Warsaw

Under the terms of the peace treaty signed on December 26 in Prespourg, Austria paid Napoleon an indemnity of 40 million florins, abandoned Dalmatia and Venice, which joined Italy, and new states arose on its territory, completely dependent on France. Russian troops were to immediately leave its borders. Moreover, the "road map" for their outcome was signed by Napoleon himself. It is interesting that the representatives of Russia did not participate in the negotiations on December 26, as did the representatives of England. They simply "forgot" to invite!

Addressing his soldiers in his next proclamation, Napoleon wrote the following:

“Soldiers of the Great Army, I promised you a great battle. However, thanks to the bad actions of the enemy, I was able to achieve the same successes without any risk ... In fifteen days we completed the campaign. "
(Bulletin of the Great Army, October 21, 1805.)

According to the most common data, the losses of the French amounted to 12 thousand killed and wounded, 573 were captured, and 1 banner was lost. The allied army lost 16 thousand killed and wounded, 20 thousand prisoners, lost 186 guns and 46 banners, although the story about captured and lost banners will follow. However, one more person who did not directly participate in the battle itself should be recorded among the victims of Austerlitz.

When the first newspapers arrived in England with reports of the defeat of the Allies at Austerlitz, British parliamentarians immediately began to loudly accuse Prime Minister Pitt of the shame he had brought to England, and even about the millions of pounds thrown into the wind shouted at all corners. And the poor fellow's nerves could not stand it. Pitt fell ill, went to bed and died on January 23, 1806. So Austerlitz killed this, the most stubborn, consistent and talented opponent of Napoleon. After him, Fox became the head of the British cabinet, who immediately offered Napoleon to make peace.

To be continued ...
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  1. SERGE ANT
    SERGE ANT April 27 2021 18: 44
    +15
    The crows are circling over the field,
    Where the battle is over and the army has rested,
    Here are the corpses of a thousand soldiers
    The earth has covered with itself forever.

    Yesterday the battle was raging here,
    Three emperors in armor
    Divided the world in their own way
    But only one succeeded.

    Under the gray skies of November
    The regiments were striving for battle,
    And everyone believed that it was not in vain
    They converged on mortal combat.

    Flowed in a green wave
    Columns of Russian grenadiers.
    And a white and gold wall
    The regiments of the Austrian musketeers.

    And against them he stood in a cloak,
    Arms crossed, wearing a black hat,
    Confident in your star
    Boanaparte is a formidable figure.

    Guards regiments behind him,
    In bear hats under the eagles,
    Sharp bayonets sparkled
    And they waited in silence for the hour of the battle.

    He calculated everything perfectly,
    Only the sun has dispersed the fog,
    He sent his army
    On the assault - glory awaited them.

    Like a storm there was a blow.
    Like the butter knife cut the troops,
    The French soldier knew for sure
    That there is a rod in the marshal's knapsack.

    The battle was not long
    The Austrians ran quickly,
    Only the Russians kept the line,
    And they stood under fire to death.

    And Alexander cried later,
    After a bloody battle
    Let Napoleon become a "brother"
    But the pain is not washed away by defeat.

    The eagles lifted the French
    In the blue sky of Europe,
    Austerlitz like the light of a star
    The new world illuminates the trails.

    The war ended with tilsit,
    The calm did not last long
    And the dim light of Borodin
    Already from the distance it seemed.
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka April 27 2021 18: 59
      +9
      Thanks to Sergey for the poem, Vyacheslav - for the war exposition, Kamradam - impatience raging in the comments!
      Good evening everyone, with respect Vlad!
      1. depressant
        depressant April 27 2021 19: 23
        +8
        Vladislav, good evening! And good evening everyone! A beautiful poem with the implicit spirit of the finale softens the bitterness that arises when reading about the outcome of the battle. However, sadness evokes a description of any battle, even won.
        1. 3x3zsave
          3x3zsave April 27 2021 20: 02
          +6
          However, sadness evokes a description of any battle, even won.
          But what about:
          "We are breaking, breaking!
          Swedes bend! "(C)
          Or that:
          "Vivat, Russia!
          Vivat, dragging! "(C) ???
          1. Korsar4
            Korsar4 April 27 2021 20: 24
            +6
            “And the first, on a huge horse,
            The prince got into the German system ”(c).

            However, with a high probability, the participants in all this would agree with Lyudmila Yakovlevna.

            But berserkers have their own scale.
            1. 3x3zsave
              3x3zsave April 27 2021 20: 32
              +6
              And I don't mind her either.
              1. Korsar4
                Korsar4 April 27 2021 20: 36
                +6
                In peacetime, the gathering of people is chaotic.
                Sometimes at mass events I wonder how realistic it is to organize a semblance of order.

                In general, I don't really like crowds of people.
                1. 3x3zsave
                  3x3zsave April 27 2021 20: 40
                  +6
                  In general, you love trees more than people. If only they could still speak! ...
                  1. Korsar4
                    Korsar4 April 27 2021 20: 47
                    +6
                    I do not know.
                    Do you think I am more critical of people?

                    Thought.
                    1. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave April 27 2021 20: 50
                      +6
                      I think yes. You love trees, you endure people. This was probably not always the case, but it did.
                      1. Korsar4
                        Korsar4 April 27 2021 21: 04
                        +5
                        “No, no, and burglary is also subject to prohibition” (c).
                      2. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave April 27 2021 21: 06
                        +5
                        "I respect the Criminal Code!" (FROM)
                      3. Korsar4
                        Korsar4 April 27 2021 21: 14
                        +5
                        There are many nice people. Or is it a pretense?
                      4. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave April 27 2021 21: 23
                        +4
                        Whose side: yours or nice people?
                      5. Korsar4
                        Korsar4 April 27 2021 21: 34
                        +3
                        With my. Judging others is not a good idea.
                      6. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave April 27 2021 21: 45
                        +4
                        "Do not judge, and it will be credited to you," Jacques de Molay said then. "
                        (Angerand de Marigny, "My Meetings with the Templars")
            2. Astra wild2
              Astra wild2 April 28 2021 07: 56
              +3
              Good morning. Yesterday I could not find the time and I am writing today.
              Probably, a colleague of "Corsair" in childhood lived near the forest?
              I have a friend, up to 14 years old, in the countryside and she has a wild bush, the forest is very expensive. She laughs, probably in a past life she was some kind of forest bird
            3. 3x3zsave
              3x3zsave April 28 2021 08: 01
              +3
              Hello My Fair Stranger!
              This is not necessary at all. As an antithesis - my personal example. He spent all his childhood in a small town in the middle of the polar taiga, but he became an urbanist to the core.
  • kalibr
    April 27 2021 19: 34
    +10
    What good poetry. It's a pity I didn't come across ...
    1. depressant
      depressant April 27 2021 19: 43
      +7
      I used to read them in poetry. ru, and here, if my memory serves me, the author himself granted)))
  • kalibr
    April 27 2021 19: 45
    +7
    Quote: SERGE ant
    And the dim light of Borodin
    Already from the distance it seemed.

    Did you write it all?
    1. depressant
      depressant April 27 2021 20: 13
      +6
      No, it was not Sergeant who wrote it)))
      My memory has changed! wassat
      The author is a certain [Boris M]. The original poem contains more stanzas. Or maybe Sergeant is [Boris M]? That's the way with the Internet - you won't find the ends, and is it necessary? laughing Poems are good!
      1. Richard
        Richard April 27 2021 21: 30
        +9
        you will not find the ends

        And is it really necessary to look for them? Thanks anyway Sergeantfor good poetry in the topic of the article
      2. vladcub
        vladcub April 27 2021 23: 25
        +6
        Good evening. Lyudmila Yakovlevna, I also already saw this poem, somewhere I saw, but I am not a poetic nature and did not remember the author
        1. depressant
          depressant April 27 2021 23: 47
          +7
          Good evening, Svyatoslav!)))
          For some reason this battle touched me, began to enlighten, found these poems, and in general, much surprised me. For example, the names of the villages around Austerlitz, some of them ... Russian, or something. How so, I thought, this is Bavaria. And it is the Czech Republic! Slavkov u Brna - this is how the city is now called, aka former Austerlitz.
          1. vladcub
            vladcub April 28 2021 16: 20
            +3
            Probably, there used to be one common Slavic language. And then the division began
            For example: the Bulgarian spoken language is understandable to Serbs, Croats, Montenegrins, Boysnians, Greeks.
            That a new grammar is being introduced - rather political games
            1. depressant
              depressant April 28 2021 16: 50
              +3
              I once had a self-study guide for the Bulgarian language. I remembered from there "Tova e book")))
              And imagine, I discovered at the same time that the Bulgarian language is much easier and easier to understand by ear than Ukrainian.
              1. vladcub
                vladcub April 28 2021 17: 44
                +1
                I do not know. I tried but NOT FIGA could not understand Bulgarian. And I can understand the Ukrainian colloquial language. Perhaps because my native language is surzhik? We have: a scherch, and they have a scherch, a barestka-barestka, etc.
                1. depressant
                  depressant April 28 2021 18: 05
                  +2
                  Ukrainian vernacular can really be understood. But when the intelligentsia speaks ... It sounds, by the way, beautiful, it is impossible to understand.
                2. depressant
                  depressant April 28 2021 19: 01
                  0
                  In Ukrainian, Svyatoslav, those are still pearls.
                  Can you tell me what a lazne is?
                  1. vladcub
                    vladcub April 28 2021 19: 10
                    +2
                    I don't remember well, perhaps - scrambled eggs? All the same, surzhik is not 100% Ukrainian.
                    And I haven't been using surzhik for forty years.
                    1. depressant
                      depressant April 28 2021 19: 38
                      0
                      No, Svyatoslav, as far as I remember - a bath!
                      Tell me, can you guess? Never!
                      At one time I had to ask what the sign on the institution meant, which looked like a state one.
              2. Undecim
                Undecim April 28 2021 17: 45
                +1
                And imagine, I discovered at the same time that the Bulgarian language is much easier and easier to understand by ear than Ukrainian.

                Did you communicate with Bulgarians?
                1. depressant
                  depressant April 28 2021 18: 03
                  +2
                  Victor Nikolaevich, good evening! hi
                  The radio was caught. I lived on the Black Sea coast)))
                  By the way, the Turks were also caught.
                  1. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 18: 07
                    +3
                    Good evening, Lyudmila Yakovlevna.
                    Why I asked a question. I lived in Bulgaria for two years, but I did not notice that Bulgarian is more understandable by ear than Ukrainian.
                    1. depressant
                      depressant April 28 2021 18: 16
                      +4
                      You understand what is the matter here. After all, I grew up in a multilingual environment: Georgians, Abkhazians, Armenians, Greeks, as well as people who speak surzhik. Involuntarily listening to the speech and conjugating it with the mimicry of the speaker, with the reaction of the interlocutor, I learned to grasp the meaning, the knowledge of some words came. It is enough to learn 20-30 words, and over time you will begin to understand the meaning of the whole speech.
                    2. Undecim
                      Undecim April 28 2021 18: 26
                      +2
                      It is enough to learn 20-30 words, and over time you will begin to understand the meaning of the whole speech.
                      Yes, when by these 20-30 you have learned at least 400 more of the most used words, then ninety percent of the issue of everyday communication will be resolved.
                      It's just that in Slavic-speaking countries, the process is still going faster, since common roots make themselves felt. But in Hungary or Guatemala you have to start from scratch.
                    3. depressant
                      depressant April 28 2021 18: 59
                      +3
                      Now I will ask the question)))
                      Have you been to Guatemala?
                    4. Undecim
                      Undecim April 28 2021 19: 02
                      +1
                      Have you been to Guatemala?

                      Was. Not on vacation, at work. And in Hungary too.
                    5. depressant
                      depressant April 28 2021 19: 13
                      +2
                      I have read that some Russians settled there. Away from people. Medicine is far away, around the jungle, but at least far from people. I doubt that such difficulties, even for the sake of loneliness, can be endured. Especially with children. Some kind of wild decision. Maybe drug addicts? wassat
                    6. Undecim
                      Undecim April 28 2021 19: 21
                      +3
                      There are Russians in Guatemala, but where I was, except for colleagues at work outside the perimeter, I never met anyone. Yes, and "travel" outside the perimeter was not welcomed. Now it's easier, but a white man has to be on the alert there all the time.
                    7. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 April 30 2021 06: 24
                      +2
                      The eldest daughter worked in Guatemala for nine months. A doctor.
                    8. depressant
                      depressant April 30 2021 06: 38
                      +2
                      I wanted to ask: "Did you worry?" - and thought. The world has become such that the child is beyond the threshold, that's the reason. No matter how old that child is. Of course, it also depends on the level of anxiety of the parent.
                      But right now, I have another reason to worry. Sergey, Master of the Weather, return the earthly axis back, eh? What is it - at 3:30 it was light, as if morning was in full swing, the sun was rising in the north! And what will happen on the days of the solstice - will it stop setting completely?
                    9. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 April 30 2021 06: 49
                      +2
                      Yes. But everyone has their own way. And there is something to remember.

                      We will not have time to look back, as "Peter - Paul has an hour with shoe covers."
                      This year from Easter to Peter and Paul - a stone's throw.
                    10. depressant
                      depressant April 30 2021 07: 36
                      +2
                      Ah, that means how ... We decided to shine a light, otherwise it’s not clear that
                      this year from Easter to Peter and Paul - a stone's throw. ...

                      Lord ... How inconvenient it is to type with a hand with a smoking cigarette! lol
                    11. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 April 30 2021 19: 22
                      +2
                      But the picture is picturesque.
                    12. depressant
                      depressant April 30 2021 19: 28
                      +2
                      Especially from the ash sweeping past the ashtray and covering the floor with various patterns. Imagine my state of concern. And now the hand that has just gripped a cigarette reaches for the mop - a common ritual, repeated over and over again with curses)))
                    13. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 April 30 2021 19: 32
                      +2
                      Headquarters.

                      "Chapay thinks" (c).
                    14. depressant
                      depressant April 30 2021 20: 06
                      +2
                      Auguste Rodin.

                      "Thinker".
                      Modestly so, right? wassat
                    15. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 April 30 2021 20: 13
                      +2
                      Not in the wonders of the world - they did not go beyond modesty.
                    16. depressant
                      depressant April 30 2021 20: 17
                      +2
                      The main thing is that the level of a person's modesty does not go beyond the limit, after which modesty does not decorate, but ruins)))
                    17. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 1 May 2021 10: 53
                      +1
                      Yes. Classics: humiliation more than pride.
                    18. depressant
                      depressant 1 May 2021 11: 10
                      +2
                      The proud state of an internally, not an externally proud person, manifests itself only in moments of choice - to do meanness to another in order to survive, or to give oneself to the slaughter so as not to break your inner core. This is how it happens, being yourself, you sink to the bottom of well-being. You look around, and around you there are almost homeless people.
                      Something is not added to the pride.
                    19. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 1 May 2021 13: 16
                      +1
                      Sometimes there are different choices.
                      I like the song “Being yourself is almost an art”.
                    20. depressant
                      depressant 1 May 2021 13: 24
                      +1
                      To be bad yourself - oh, how bad it happens later. It's easy, and even mentally justifying yourself to someone you can't see. And in front of you? Face your nasty muzzle? So, whoever does not know how, it is better not to take it. But then it is not art, it is laziness. Art is developed by trial and error.
                    21. Korsar4
                      Korsar4 1 May 2021 13: 35
                      +1
                      Craft first. Then it can become art.
                    22. depressant
                      depressant 1 May 2021 14: 02
                      +1
                      I wonder if the tips help? Or until you smash your forehead with sides and knees in addition.
  • vladcub
    vladcub April 28 2021 19: 02
    +3
    Vic Nick, from harm: "or Guatemala" there the official language is Spanish + a bunch of different places of dialects. So Lyudmila Yakovlevna needs to learn at least a little Spanish from Wright
  • depressant
    depressant April 28 2021 19: 30
    +2
    Oh, Svyatoslav ... I can't be cut off from Russia. I drank a lot of life in foreign lands. For a Russian person, there is nothing more lovable than this disgusting climate and strainedly polite, but in general deeply depressed and quietly embittered people with signs of insanity in some of them.
  • Korsar4
    Korsar4 April 28 2021 19: 35
    +1
    For some reason, I really like that in Bulgarian “the most” is “nai”.
    1. depressant
      depressant April 28 2021 19: 46
      +1
      And immediately some old song popped up in my memory. The chorus was there, as I am now, after your explanation, Sergei, I understand - "Nai-nai-nai-nai!" And then everyone understood him as "Give-give-give!" So they sang))))
      1. Korsar4
        Korsar4 April 28 2021 20: 09
        0
        Nai Tours from Bulgakov is recalled.
        1. depressant
          depressant April 28 2021 20: 17
          0
          Felix Nye Tours, Colonel. I do not like the "White Guard", did not lie on my soul. Maybe because there were no people like Nai Tours in reality.
  • Richard
    Richard April 27 2021 19: 32
    +8
    So Austerlitz killed this, the most stubborn, consistent and talented opponent of Napoleon.

    Is William Pitt the most stubborn, consistent and talented opponent of Napoleon? lol
    Don't tell my hat, Vyacheslav Olegovich
    He was remembered in history not by his struggle with Napolen, but by his stupid tax on men's hats.
    1. kalibr
      April 27 2021 19: 35
      +6
      Quote: Richard
      Don't tell my hat, Vladtislav Olegovich

      You have your own opinion, others have something else!
  • Undecim
    Undecim April 27 2021 19: 49
    +12
    I tried to present the events described in the article in graphic form, clearly.
    This is how the situation looked on December 2, 1805, at about nine o'clock in the morning.

    And this is how the situation looked on the same day at two o'clock in the afternoon.
  • Undecim
    Undecim April 27 2021 20: 05
    +11
    The allies began to retreat, with many running straight across Lake Zachan, while others, and above all the artillerymen with their cannons, moved through the dam, which was half under water and ice. It is clear that the ice could not bear the weight of the guns and horses, and they began to fall through.

    Watercolor by the Austrian battle painter Felician Mirbach.
    1. depressant
      depressant April 27 2021 21: 43
      +7
      The allies fled through Zachan, floundering in the icy water among the ice, and the main ones - the culprits of the defeat - fled earlier, long before the end of the battle, and on dry land.
      Many historians agree that the most guilty of the defeat of the Russian-Austrian army in the Battle of Austerlitz is the Emperor of Russia Alexander I, and the Emperor Franz II is, as it were, on the side of guilt.
      The following was unexpected for me:
      In his fundamental work "Emperor Alexander I, His Life and Reign" (1904), Russian historian, Lieutenant General Nikolai Karlovich Schilder gives the following testimony about the behavior of the Russian Tsar during the Battle of Austerlitz: The victorious intoxication of the Russian Emperor was replaced by complete despair. “The confusion that gripped the allied Olympus was so great that the entire retinue of Alexander I scattered in different directions and joined him only at night and even in the morning. -hussars, and when the life-hussar remained with him, the king, according to the hussar, got off his horse, sat down under a tree and wept. "
      1. Undecim
        Undecim April 27 2021 22: 14
        +8
        The following was unexpected for me:

        In general, historical experience shows that the presence of the All-Russian autocrats as commanders-in-chief did not contribute to victories.
        1. ee2100
          ee2100 April 27 2021 22: 36
          +5
          Good evening.
          An interesting passage. Alexander has an emotional shock. And everything was done right! But Austrians are greedy!
          Maybe the presence of the Emperor in the troops somehow "fetters" the initiatives of the military leaders.
          1. Undecim
            Undecim April 27 2021 22: 39
            +5
            Rather, it influences the choice of plans.
            1. ee2100
              ee2100 April 28 2021 00: 28
              +3
              This is the same, only a side view
        2. Korsar4
          Korsar4 April 27 2021 22: 53
          +5
          If the frustration of hopes can be in a football match or a chess game, how great is the sorrow of the commander or the sovereign.

          Only experience and hardening can lead to peace of mind.
          But the price is too high.
        3. vladcub
          vladcub April 27 2021 23: 08
          +6
          Vic. Nick, out of contradiction, each case is individual: the first Azov campaign with the participation of Peter 1 is a defeat.
          The second campaign, again with the participation of Peter and Victory.
          The capture of Narva, the Battle of Poltava, and there and there participated Peter1. So not always
          1. Undecim
            Undecim April 27 2021 23: 13
            +3
            Taking Narva,

            At first, Narva was denied.
            1. vladcub
              vladcub April 27 2021 23: 28
              +5
              Actually, at the last moment, Peter handed over the command to Ogilvy. So formally, Peter is not with "galoshes"
              1. Undecim
                Undecim April 27 2021 23: 32
                +3
                I put it a little wrong. It meant the presence of the emperor in the army, not necessarily in the role of commander-in-chief.
                1. vladcub
                  vladcub April 28 2021 16: 36
                  +1
                  Actually, I don't remember: in what capacity was Peter 1 near Azov?
          2. depressant
            depressant April 27 2021 23: 25
            +4
            Rather, it influences the choice of plans.

            Kutuzov's plan consisted in a slow retreat of the allied forces, without engaging in battle with the French. It was assumed that in the search for the enemy and attempts to catch up with him, already exhausted by high-speed transitions, Napoleon's troops would inevitably stretch and thin out, and it would be possible, by conducting flank attacks, to destroy them. Not being a professional, Alexander the First categorically disagreed. But here the question is: could Kutuzov's plan have worked? Napoleon was a sickly strategist and shrewd tactician.
            1. Undecim
              Undecim April 27 2021 23: 35
              +6
              Kutuzov's plan consisted in a slow retreat of the allied forces, without engaging in battle with the French. It was assumed that in the search for the enemy and attempts to catch up with him, already exhausted by high-speed transitions, Napoleon's troops would inevitably stretch and thin out, and it would be possible, by conducting flank attacks, to destroy them.
              Correct plan. Kutuzov understood that this was the only way to level the "difference in class".
              1. Liam
                Liam April 27 2021 23: 46
                +2
                Quote: Undecim
                Correct plan

                Who is the primary source of information about the existence of such a plan?
                1. Undecim
                  Undecim April 27 2021 23: 54
                  +3
                  Perhaps it did not exist. But the idea itself is correct.
                  1. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 00: 16
                    +3
                    Of course not.
                    I don’t see anything correct. Aggregate fights and maneuvers are the most difficult type of DB and there the effect of the difference in class only grows. Retreat in winter, without supplies, in a foreign land is 100% defeat. This was confirmed by Napoleon in 12. class
                    1. Undecim
                      Undecim April 28 2021 06: 29
                      +5
                      Controversial statement.
                      1. Liam
                        Liam April 28 2021 08: 02
                        +1
                        Naturally, like any altistory.
                        But it is indisputable that 6 years earlier and 6 years later, in similar circumstances, 2 much more talented military commanders (Suvorov and Napoleon) brought matters to the rapid collapse of their own armies in Switzerland and Russia. And They were overwhelmingly gifted Kutuzov, especially in terms of improvisation and organization of quick marches and maneuvers, their enemy was not Napoleon, they had any kind of plan of action and one-man command in the army. However, in some month, both retreating armies turned into almost uncontrollable crowds of people.
                      2. Undecim
                        Undecim April 28 2021 10: 30
                        +1
                        in similar circumstances

                        The only similarity in these campaigns was that one army advanced and the other retreated.
                      3. Liam
                        Liam April 28 2021 11: 03
                        0
                        Well yes, plus the period of the year, the lack of supplies, an impromptu retreat due to a violation of campaign plans and a few more minor factors
                      4. Undecim
                        Undecim April 28 2021 11: 38
                        +2
                        and 6 years later

                        Just six years later, the retreat of the Russian armies into the interior of Russia was carried out.
                        What prevented the Austrian army from using the same tactics at home?
                      5. Ulrih
                        Ulrih April 28 2021 12: 01
                        +1
                        Hello ... Where were the Austrians to retreat? They do not have the vastness of Russia. Also, the region is not as poor as in Russia, which is why the French troops could easily forage, etc. are engaged.
                      6. Undecim
                        Undecim April 28 2021 12: 14
                        +2
                        Where were the Austrians to retreat?

                        At that time, the area of ​​the Austrian Empire was about 700 square kilometers. This is exactly the area of ​​the modern Central Federal District of Russia and a bit of Belarus, where the main events of 000 took place.
                      7. Ulrih
                        Ulrih April 28 2021 15: 44
                        0
                        That is, the only factor is the area and that's it? Doesn't the loss of the densely populated and economically developed provinces themselves count? Loss of military depots, Vienna. Threats to the communications of the Italian army, which could lead to another Ulm ...
                  2. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 13: 01
                    +2
                    Quote: Undecim
                    What was in the way

                    Perhaps the defeat of the main Austrian armies at Ulm a few days before Austerlitz, the fall of Vienna and the loss of all supply depots.
                    By the way, what kind of military campaigns Kutuzov became famous for before Austerlitz, what successful plans he developed before, what wars he won and what makes you think that he was able to develop and implement such a filigree strategy.
                  3. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 13: 15
                    +3
                    what makes you think

                    Habit, I guess.
                    We are discussing a purely hypothetical scenario and whether it had a chance of success.
                  4. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 13: 42
                    +4
                    As far as I remember, Kutuzov did not lead any independent campaigns as a commander until Austerlitz. The same 12-year "plan" - Barclay's development. And doom the country to destruction by retreats to Moscow (or the Volga) in the hope that it will somehow resolve itself - so-so plan ... Armies are usually created and maintained to prevent this from happening. By the way, the Russian army of 1812, despite such "successful" tactics, was still defeated, scraps remained from the regular army and losses were no less than French ones. In the spring of 13, the Russian army was essentially a people's militia with the appropriate training. In the Czech Republic, this method of replenishment was hardly possible.

                    Hypothetics still should be based on realities. And they are such that Kutuzov is not even close to the level of Napoleon, the French army is recognized masters of mobile warfare, about the speed of its movement has already been discussed here, too. Well, how things were with the most important moment - supply , have already mentioned in passing.
                    The balance of probabilities is clearly not on your side in this case.
                  5. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 14: 04
                    +5
                    Why are we fixated on Kutuzov? Are all the steel dead?
                  6. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 22: 33
                    0
                    Quote: Undecim
                    Why are we fixated on Kutuzov?

                    Duc .. original post

                    Kutuzov's plan consisted in a slow retreat of the allied forces, without engaging in battle with the French. It was assumed that in the search for the enemy and attempts to catch up with him, already exhausted by high-speed transitions, Napoleon's troops would inevitably stretch and thin out, and it would be possible, by conducting flank attacks, to destroy them.
                    Correct plan. Kutuzov understood that this was the only way to level the "difference in class".


                    Quote: Undecim
                    All steel

                    And what else strategists were in the Russian army then?
                  7. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 22: 38
                    +1
                    What other strategists were there in the Russian army then?
                    After football I'll try to find it.
                  8. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 22: 41
                    +1
                    Quote: Undecim
                    football

                    Champions League Epic Losers semi-final)
                    There weren't many strategists ... so the search will drag on easily and until the final
                  9. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 23: 04
                    +1
                    Why isn't Barclay de Tolly a strategist? And Bagration is a performer.
                  10. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 23: 20
                    +2
                    Quote: Undecim
                    Why is Barclay de Tolly not a strategist?

                    When the war with France began in 1805, Barclay de Tolly commanded a brigade in the army of General Bennigsen and did not have time to battle at Austerlitz.
                    Quote: Undecim
                    And Bagration

                    There is ample detailed evidence of how performer Bagration was in the same year 12 ... Let's just say, he did not shine. All his efforts were directed to spoil Barclay and not fight Napoleon)
                  11. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 23: 25
                    +1
                    To address these issues, in theory, there is a king who must be able to use the generals at the right time in the right place and in the frame.
                  12. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 23: 32
                    +2
                    Quote: Undecim
                    king

                    There is nothing better than hearing his opinion on all three. strategistsAnd the opinion is sincere, in a letter to my sister with whom I was always very frank.

                    ...I am destined, perhaps, to lose even the friends on whom I most counted on. All this, unfortunately, is in the order of things in this world! <...>
                    What is better, how to be guided by your beliefs? I only followed them, appointing Barclay commander-in-chief of the 1st Army for his services in past wars against the French and Swedes. They tell me that he surpasses Bagration in knowledge. The grave mistakes made by the latter in this campaign, and which were partly the cause of our failures, only reinforced my conviction, in which, less than ever, I could consider him capable of being at the head of both armies united at Smolensk. <...>
                    In Petersburg I found everyone for the appointment of old Kutuzov as commander-in-chief; it was a unanimous desire. Since I know Kutuzov, at first I opposed his appointment, but when Rostopchin, in his letter of August 5, informed me that in Moscow everyone was for Kutuzov, not counting Barclay and Bagration, fit for the main command, and when, as on purpose, Barclay did stupidity after stupidity near Smolensk, I had no choice but to yield to the common desire - and I appointed Kutuzov. Even now I think that under the circumstances in which we were, it was impossible not to choose their three generals, equally poorly suited to the commander-in-chief, the one for whom everyone was. <...>
                    After what I sacrificed for the good of my pride, leaving the army, where they believed that I was doing harm, removing from the generals any responsibility that I did not inspire any confidence in the troops, and the defeats blamed on me, I make them more regrettable than those, who would count as generals - judge, dear friend, how painful it must be for me to hear that my honor is being attacked. After all, I did what they wanted, leaving the army, while I myself only wanted to be with the army. Before the appointment of Kutuzov, I firmly decided to return to her, but I gave up this intention only after this appointment, partly from the memory of what happened under Austerlitz because of Kutuzov's deceitful nature, partly according to your own advice and the advice of many others, the same opinion ... <...>
                  13. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 23: 34
                    +2
                    And this tsar himself is at least a little strategist to give estimates?
                  14. Liam
                    Liam April 28 2021 23: 44
                    +2
                    The Tsar is an honest person who adequately evaluates himself and his abilities. Therefore, you can trust his assessment of his subordinates. He knew them in reality, and not from someone else's more or less objective memories.


                    On the contrary, my intention was to take advantage of the first minute of the real advantage of our army over the enemy, which would have forced him to retreat in order to really come to Moscow. Even after the news of the battle on the 26th, I would have left immediately if Kutuzov had not written me in the same report that he had decided to retreat 6 versts to give the troops a rest. These fatal 6 versts, which poisoned my joy of victory, forced me to wait for the next report; from it I saw clearly only disasters. <...>
                    As for me, dear friend, I can only vouch that my heart, all my intentions and my zeal will incline towards what, in my opinion, can serve the good and the good of the fatherland. Regarding talent, maybe I don't have enough of it, but talents are not acquired, they are a gift of nature. In fairness, I must admit that there is nothing surprising in my failures, when I do not have good helpers, when I suffer a shortage of leaders in all parts, I am called to drive such a huge machine, in such a terrible time and against a hellishly treacherous, but also highly talented enemy, which is supported by the united forces of all of Europe and many gifted people who have appeared during 20 years of war and revolution. Remember how often in our conversations with you we foresaw these setbacks, even admitted the possibility of losing both capitals, and that the only remedy against the calamities of this terrible time, we recognized firmness. I am far from being discouraged under the weight of the blows falling on me. On the contrary, more than ever, I have decided to persevere in the struggle and all my worries are directed towards this goal. <...>

                    The battle on the 26th is Borodino by the way.Kutuzov, out of habit and confirming the characteristics of the tsar given to him for Austelitz, wrote above to the tsar that he had won and defeated the foe ... after which he was forced to write a second letter ... which departs 6 versts)
                  15. Undecim
                    Undecim April 28 2021 23: 48
                    +2
                    It was necessary, since the prophet was not found in his own homeland, to look for the allies. Was it possible that they also had all the worthless generals?
                  16. Liam
                    Liam April 29 2021 00: 04
                    +1
                    Well, von Weyrother, patriots explain all the defeats from the Swiss campaign to the Russian-Japanese war. Everywhere he managed to inherit a scoundrel.
                    The Austrians are generally unlucky in this plan. All the defeats are thanks to them, and victories are in spite of. Got caught today in one local opus ... Coburg did not prevent Suvorov (even helped a little) to defeat the Turks in one battle. The truth is that it was Coburg who commanded and the Austrians were 40 thousand, and the Russian-8 tactfully kept silent.
                    In general, as one revered historical character said here, I have no other Wellingtons for you
        4. Igor Ushakov
          Igor Ushakov 7 May 2021 21: 55
          0
          Frankly speaking, he did not shine.
          can you get more details about the "evidence"? As far as I know, Bagration in 1812 constantly commanded rearguard battles, not allowing himself to be surrounded and defeated by the superior forces of the French. The battle of Borodino put the final point in his career and life, but he managed to hold out with a smaller part of his forces in a bad position, with the overwhelming superiority of French artillery.
          shit on Barclay
          - so why didn't Barclay complete the plan when Bagration was already dead? As far as I know, in the endgame of the campaign he planned a complete defeat and capture of the emperor of France, and not let him go along with the core of the guaria.
  • Igor Ushakov
    Igor Ushakov 7 May 2021 22: 12
    0
    By the way, the Russian army of 1812, despite such "successful" tactics, was still defeated, scraps remained from the regular army and the losses were no less than the French ones. In the spring of 13 the French.
    As far as we know, losses "no less than French" are impossible, because the Russian army in the old was several times smaller in size than the Great, and the latter faded to 20 thousand, if I am not mistaken. But in the end, from the same frost and hunger, the Russian regiments thinned more than from the battle of Borodino.
    In the spring of 13, the Russian army was essentially a people's militia with appropriate training.
    it is hardly possible to take European cities with the militia, some backbone of regular units could not but survive.
    And they are such that Kutuzov is not even close to the level of Napoleon
    right here to the point. In the Russian army there were regiments who won Napoleon, the same Bennigsen, all clashes with Bonaparte for Kutuzov ended in defeats.
  • depressant
    depressant April 28 2021 11: 43
    +6
    Historians attribute a significant role in the failures that took place in the campaign of Suvorov and in the battle of Austerlitz to such a figure as the Austrian general Franz von Weyrother (1755 - 1806). A general who has not won a single battle on his own! But Weyrother was widely known primarily for two facts of his biography: the fact that he made an unsuccessful route for the Swiss campaign of A.V. Suvorov, and the fact that he developed the disposition of the location of the Russian-Austrian army near Austerlitz. Shortly before the Battle of Austerlitz, Weyrother was promoted to major general, and then appointed chief of staff of Kutuzov, "since Alexander I, who considered himself not only a great commander, but also a great diplomat, did not want to offend his ally, the Austrian Emperor Franz II."
  • Liam
    Liam April 28 2021 13: 48
    +2
    Quote: depressant
    Essential to failure

    A bad dancer, as you know, is always some von Weyrother interferes.
  • depressant
    depressant April 28 2021 14: 37
    +3
    Introduced hmm ... a weyrother interfering with a bad dancer wassat )))
    Well ballet tech has somehow dealt with it laughing ))))
  • Igor Ushakov
    Igor Ushakov 7 May 2021 21: 43
    +1
    What is right here? I will not say about the "class difference", but the better trained and supplied troops of the French probably had an advantage in speed, skill of maneuver and endurance.
  • Igor Ushakov
    Igor Ushakov 7 May 2021 21: 40
    +1
    Kutuzov's plan consisted in a slow retreat of the allied forces, without engaging in battle with the French. It was assumed that in the search for the enemy and attempts to catch up with him, already exhausted by high-speed transitions, Napoleon's troops would inevitably stretch and thin out, and it would be possible, by conducting flank attacks, to destroy them.
    this "plan" would only work if Napoleon decided to pursue and the Allied army had the advantage of mobility. I wonder how Kutuzov was going to wear down the enemy with a slow retreat? In practice, this would mean either an imposed general engagement or heavy retreat battles.
  • Kote Pan Kokhanka
    Kote Pan Kokhanka April 28 2021 04: 28
    +3
    Quote: Undecim
    In general, historical experience shows that the presence of the All-Russian autocrats as commanders-in-chief did not contribute to victories.

    Controversial statement.
    At least the participation of Peter I in the Battle of Poltava.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim April 28 2021 06: 33
      +5
      Of course, there can be no one hundred percent "coincidence".
  • Pane Kohanku
    Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 10: 22
    +4
    In general, historical experience shows that the presence of the All-Russian autocrats as commanders-in-chief did not contribute to victories.

    Viktor Nikolaevich, what is this book? It turns out that Pikul did not lie at all about the Austrians greedy for wine ... drinks
    The second question: what diplomatic actions did Alexander take after that? Or were we then at war with Napoleon until Tilsit? hi
    1. Undecim
      Undecim April 28 2021 10: 27
      +5
      what is this book?

      "Emperor Alexander I, His Life and Reign" by NK Schilder.
      1. Undecim
        Undecim April 28 2021 10: 34
        +4
        what diplomatic actions did Alexander take after that?

        Created the next anti-French coalition.
        1. Pane Kohanku
          Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 10: 40
          +3
          Created the next anti-French coalition.

          With whom? With the Swedes and the Prussians? When did the heroic blue-eyed Louise become a symbol of war frenzy?
          Did Bernadotte release the prisoners then?
          Schilder - sketched. drinks I have his "Pavel". good
          1. Undecim
            Undecim April 28 2021 10: 40
            +3
            Russia, Prussia, Great Britain
            1. Pane Kohanku
              Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 11: 59
              +1
              Russia, Prussia, Great Britain

              When did Sweden participate?
              1. Undecim
                Undecim April 28 2021 12: 29
                +3
                When did Sweden participate?

                Sweden has participated in the sixth and seventh coalitions since 1812.
                1. Pane Kohanku
                  Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 12: 35
                  +2
                  Sweden has participated in the sixth and seventh coalitions since 1812.

                  And how did the Swedes find themselves among the prisoners who fell to him in 1806?
                2. Undecim
                  Undecim April 28 2021 12: 36
                  +2
                  Yes, the fourth too. The Swedes missed the fifth.
                3. Pane Kohanku
                  Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 12: 43
                  +1
                  Yes, the fourth too. The Swedes missed the fifth.

                  They were then busy with the last war with us. request It turned out badly ... And then Bernadotte was invited!
  • Senior seaman
    Senior seaman April 27 2021 21: 24
    +6
    but saved by him Russian asked to serve in the French army. And then he met him already in the regiment of Polish lancers

    It seems to me that he was not "Russian". It is unlikely that the Poles would have received a Muscovite in their environment.
    1. 3x3zsave
      3x3zsave April 27 2021 21: 31
      +4
      It is unlikely that the Poles would have received a Muscovite in their midst.
      "And what a Muscovite doesn’t get away with a ride!"
      1. ee2100
        ee2100 April 27 2021 21: 56
        +3
        Good evening! Ukrainians can correct me, but the word "kohae" refers to a person, and so probably "love" (love)
        1. 3x3zsave
          3x3zsave April 27 2021 22: 06
          +4
          Alexander! hi
          That's right, the verb "kokhat" rather refers to carnal love.
          1. ee2100
            ee2100 April 27 2021 22: 10
            +5
            I think so too.
        2. vladcub
          vladcub April 27 2021 22: 55
          +4
          In Ukrainian kokhany-favorite.
          Cooking can be ambiguous: care, love, pamper. It all depends on the context
      2. Pane Kohanku
        Pane Kohanku April 28 2021 10: 37
        +5
        "And what a Muscovite doesn’t get away with a ride!"

        In general, an interesting fact ... I remember that Thaddeus Bulgarin first served ours (had an order!), Then Napoleon, then became a "herald of reaction", for which he received from Pushkin apt nickname - "Figlyarin". He claimed that Bonaparte had awarded him the Order of the Legion of Honor, but for some reason he could not show the trick itself to those around him ... lol But after the period of the Napoleonic wars, there was a man who proudly wore both French and Russian awards - Auguste Montferrand. He fought for the French, then built the Alexander Column - a kind of "symbol of victory" over them! He also built St. Isaac's Cathedral. drinks
        On his bust in the cathedral we can see the orders of St. Anne, St. Vladimir ... and the Legion of Honor!

        Well, and of the "allies from the French side" we can mention Jomini, Moreau (even though he quarreled with Bonaparte and up to Austerlitz), Bernadotte - in general, he settled down gorgeous! good
        1. depressant
          depressant April 28 2021 17: 45
          +3
          Eh, they've wiped out Bulgarin ...
          Meanwhile, this man was a truly capable writer, in many ways ahead of his time - it is he who is considered the founder of the fantastic genre in Russian literature and the author of the first Russian bestseller.

          Needs rehabilitation! wassat
          1. Pane Kohanku
            Pane Kohanku April 29 2021 09: 52
            +1
            Needs rehabilitation!

            Lyudmila Yakovlevna, I suspect, he knew how to lie very well - hence such a passion for writing plots! wink
            1. depressant
              depressant April 29 2021 10: 42
              +2
              Maybe. However, subconsciously, he hardly felt completely Russian, as evidenced by the well-known facts of his biography. Hence its adaptability. In our time - he is the Cat Manul, he is Golovan Jack, who spoiled a lot of my blood.
              On the one hand, Bulgarin is one of his own in the free-thinking environment of Russian writers, he likes her! He bravely rescues Griboyedov and others, hiding Ryleev's archive full of compromising evidence. Whenever possible, he helps the Decembrists.
              And on the other hand ...
              As a smart enough person, but, I repeat, subconsciously detached from what has never become his own, at a certain moment, realizing that you cannot break a butt with a whip, he makes a choice in favor of a butt and becomes an ardent reactionary, further depicting loyalty to to the emperor. And when, after the uprising of the Decembrists, Nicholas I established the Third Department, Bulgarin was among the first to join the ranks of his agents. It was this inner detachment from Russian life, combined with a desire to comfortably take root in it, since there was nowhere else, and led him to such an ending. I would like to condemn him, but somehow it doesn't work out. Apparently, according to his feelings, he stood above everyone and chose the best option for himself where he is forever a stranger.
              Are our kings children of German women?
              1. Pane Kohanku
                Pane Kohanku April 29 2021 11: 14
                +1
                It was this inner detachment from Russian life, combined with a desire to comfortably take root in it, since there was nowhere else, and led him to such an ending.

                Are you suggesting that he was alien to our culture? Quite possible. A kind of "man of the world", he spun around as best he could ... True, he spun very cunningly!
                I would like to condemn him, but somehow it does not work out.

                You can be an excellent family man, erudite, creative genius, but at the same time a person - "the contents of a cesspool", in fact. He is unpleasant to me! hi
                And when, after the uprising of the Decembrists, Nicholas I established the Third Department

                It is very difficult not to establish it when they wanted to kill you on the very first day of the reign ... wink Still from my favorite movie:
                1. depressant
                  depressant April 29 2021 11: 41
                  +3
                  By the way, it is suggestive. I, as always, combine with modernity. But we may have something else. No underground currents are visible.
                  1. Pane Kohanku
                    Pane Kohanku April 29 2021 12: 05
                    +4
                    No underground currents are visible.

                    Lyudmila Yakovlevna, deeply! love
                    Want to laugh? the most eternal is dumplings! good

                    I thought this photo on the internet was a joke.
                    Mine yesterday walked around the center, went to the store with books on art.
                    Says: “You were interested in Japan? I bought you a book. " Well, how not to be interested if there are a lot of books about samurai at home, and the cat's name is Mikado ?!
                    So, the book is called "Butterflies and Chrysanthemums" - a collection of Japanese poems by different authors. And I recognized the familiar pages .. and leafed through the book .. and found there this very spread - with this verse! good
                    1. depressant
                      depressant April 29 2021 12: 51
                      +3
                      I don't have a book of Japanese poetry. But there is an album of medieval Japanese painting, very relaxed, by the way, albeit from Soviet times. But when I read "The Tale of Prince Genji" by Murasaki, I became deeply interested in Japanese poetry - the master, I was impressed.
                      1. Pane Kohanku
                        Pane Kohanku April 29 2021 14: 01
                        +2
                        But there is an album of medieval Japanese painting, very relaxed, by the way, albeit from Soviet times.

                        Previously, the Artillery Museum hosted an exhibition of samurai (it was held in other cities as well). A separate room (behind a screen - no-no-children!) Was dedicated not to armor and weapons, but actually to "frivolous art" on the topic of inter-sex human relationships. It looked funny and unusual ... lol
                        And on painting, I have a book on Hokusai. Yet, how original the shape of the image is! winked
                      2. depressant
                        depressant April 29 2021 14: 51
                        +1
                        In general, I am a big fan of Japanese and Chinese painting. Refined minimalism combined with the depth of displaying the essence of the phenomenon. Both did not follow the path of primitive copying. Feature - the expression of thought with the least amount of visual means - thought! And "Wave" - ​​yes, it is something. You can look at it for a long time: what will such power do to the people in the boat? Fate cannot be resisted, but ... it is necessary! And far, far away on the horizon - little Fuji as a constant of being, a pivot point. In fact, "Wave" is one of the paintings in the "Views of Fujiyama" series.
      3. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I April 29 2021 00: 34
        +1
        Quote: Pane Kohanku
        we can mention Jomini, Moro

        "Jomini, yes Jomini ...! And not a word about vodka!" (D. Davydov?)
        1. Pane Kohanku
          Pane Kohanku April 29 2021 09: 53
          +2
          "Jomini, yes Jomini ...! And not a word about vodka!" (D. Davydov?)

          Yes. yes And all that was necessary was to quarrel with Berthier in order to become ... in fact, a traitor! request
  • Richard
    Richard April 27 2021 22: 40
    +10
    Little-known fact - under the command of Napoleon in 1812, there were about 8 thousand people from the Russian Empire. A separate Russian legion was even created from them, which, together with the main army, participated in the capture of Moscow.
    The Russian legion in Napoleon's army consisted of two categories. The first are prisoners of war who have remained on the territory of Europe since the wars in 1798-1807. And the second - fugitive serfs who went "over the hill" in search of a better life. It is interesting that neither the first nor the second was forced by anyone to get up under arms and go to war against their former fellow citizens, because they did it exclusively on a voluntary basis. And the casket, as they say, just opened. That the former prisoners of war, that the former serfs simply tasted free (if we compare with the Russian Empire) life. And therefore the campaign of the French emperor against Russia was perceived ... with enthusiasm. After all, they ceased to be serfs. And in the head of many "clicked" - they wanted to free their relatives from serf slavery. And Napoleon, just acted in the role of a kind of ruler-liberator.
    The emperor was also afraid of a possible "revolution" in the country. After all, the power of the French army was known, and therefore the outcome of the confrontation could be decided in someone's favor because of the slightest "trifle". The peasants freed by Napoleon, who, having received freedom, would certainly have stood under his banner, could become such a "trifle". It is clear that Alexander I could solve this problem in only two ways. The first is to inflict a defeat on Napoleon outside the territory of the Russian Empire, so that the French, with their ideas of "freedom", would not even have time to step on Russian soil. And the second is to decide on the abolition of serfdom yourself. And then guess what will happen in the country with the ruined nobles. But all of these options were too weird.
    The famous entry made by General Nikolai Raevsky in his diary, a few days after the start of the war:
    "I am afraid of proclamations, I am afraid that Napoleon will not give liberties to the people, I am afraid there is anxiety in our land."

    And in April 1812, identical inscriptions began to appear on the walls of several Moscow houses. Someone painted just one word - "Liberty!" The police got down to business and soon found the culprit. They turned out to be two courtyard peasants who knew the letter, Peter Ivanov and Afanasy Medvedev. During interrogation, they declared in unison that they would soon find Moscow in the hands of the French, the common people would receive freedom, and the landowners would be "put on a salary."
    1. Ulrih
      Ulrih April 27 2021 22: 45
      0
      Where did the "fireballs" come from? In which corps was the Russian Legion, what is the combat path?
      1. kalibr
        April 28 2021 06: 24
        +2
        Quote: Ulrih
        Where did the "fireballs" come from? In which corps was the Russian Legion, what is the combat path?

        Get on the Internet and you will have information.
        1. Senior seaman
          Senior seaman April 28 2021 09: 26
          +3
          For example, here:
          Russian military formations in the service of Napoleon in 1812 are not mentioned not only in the works of historians who could be influenced by Soviet ideology, such as Eugene Tarle and Albert Manfred. Neither the modern French researcher of the Napoleonic era, Jean Tulard, nor the author of numerous books on the war of 1812, Nikolai Troitsky, say anything about them, whom there is no reason to suspect of hushing up such a fact, if he were. About the Russians in the army of Napoleon was not at all known to those close to the French emperor, who left a memoir about the campaign in Russia - Armand de Caulaincourt and Philip Paul de Segur.

          https://news.myseldon.com/ru/news/index/230470788
        2. depressant
          depressant April 28 2021 17: 55
          +2
          Aha laughing
          There is a lot of everything - and the firewood has been broken, and there are stacks of firewood, chopped and even bundles of brushwood. Come in, take it! They give out to everyone - so far, by the way, for free. I remember that at one time I was very indignant who did not want to go in and take, demanding that I do it for them, prove something to them.
      2. Senior seaman
        Senior seaman April 28 2021 09: 25
        +4
        The usual liberal legend of the 21st century.
        1. kalibr
          April 28 2021 15: 46
          +2
          You see how good it is to be able to use the Internet.
    2. Richard
      Richard April 27 2021 22: 45
      +8
      It is interesting that Napoleon himself perfectly understood all the power of his position. His Russian legion was constantly replenished with new people, and here he could acquire a whole Russian army instead of one legion. Already on the island of Saint Helena, in 1817, Napoleon confessed to his physician O'Mear:
      “I would proclaim the freedom of all serfs in Russia and abolish the privileges of the nobility. It would create a lot of adherents for me. "

      As O'Mear recalls, Napoleon told him the following:
      “I could arm the largest part of the population of Russia against herself by proclaiming the freedom of enslaved slaves. But when I learned the rudeness of the customs of the Russian people, I resolutely refused this measure, which would have put many respectable noble families to death, plunder and the most terrible torments. "

      Subsequently, the peasants who joined the Russian Legion began to defect en masse. They realized that there would be no promised abolition of serfdom, and the French are not liberators, but ordinary conquerors who only want to destroy their native land. Therefore, they nailed themselves to numerous partisan detachments and with all their hearts wished the death of the deceiving French emperor.
      1. Richard
        Richard April 27 2021 23: 13
        +6
        Where are the "firewoods" from?

        The internet is full of materials on this topic.
        Let's try to figure it out.
        For a start, about the prisoners. In that era, concentration camps were not built, captured officers were usually ransomed by relatives for money, while soldiers were often simply put into the ranks of their own army. There are a lot of examples, for example, during the Seven Years War, Frederick the Great forced the entire surrendered Saxon army to fight on his side. Napoleon also formed many units from prisoners, but since he estimated their fighting qualities too low, the phenomenon was not very common. But there was. Moreover, from the prisoners, separate units were formed, by the way, they were really usually called legions .. There were, for example, Portuguese regiments, which were correctly called "infantry regiments of the Portuguese legion", there was the Legion of Vilna, attached to the Young Guard. And not only ethnic Poles served in it, but also Russians and Lithuanians living there ..
        On June 16, 1812, Napoleon occupied the city of Vilna. Lithuanian nobles greeted the French even more enthusiastically than the Poles in their time. And the peasants were, rather, on the side of the conquerors. Bonaparte kindly received the delegation of the gentry, promising to protect them from the "tyranny" of Alexander I. Many participants in the 1794 war for the independence of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth returned to Vilna with the French. On the territory of the former Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Napoleon ordered the establishment of two general governorships, but postponed the question of re-creating the principality itself. Say, we will decide "after the war." The French officers received clear instructions: on the territory of the Minsk, Vilna, Grodno, Kovno and Bialystok districts they are not on the occupied land, but on a visit to the allies. Marshal Davout, whose corps was distinguished by the ability to plunder the local population with taste, was able to force subordinates to observe discipline, and severely punished those who did not obey. For example, 13 soldiers who were captured while robbing a store were publicly shot. Such measures led to the full support of Napoleon throughout Lithuania. In return, Bonaparte demanded not only beautiful speeches, but also actions. Such as the supply of troops, the provision of apartments and the organization of hospitals. He also agreed with the “provisional government” of Lithuania on the formation of a small national army, for which he allocated half a million francs. The armed contingent of the still non-existent Grand Duchy of Lithuania included five infantry and four cavalry regiments, six batteries and several separate squadrons of light cavalry. In many ways, these units were formed from Russian subjects, including those who deserted from the Russian army.
        As part of the legion, 4850 people crossed the border, but if you count another regiment, which did not have time to start the company, then about 6 thousand are already recruited. And if you count the marching replenishment, or just round up a lot, then the required 8 thousand is also typed.
        1. Richard
          Richard April 27 2021 23: 24
          +6
          However, historians have another point of view.
          Interestingly, in many sources, especially German, a certain Russian legion is indeed mentioned. By the way, its number in 1812 is 8733 people, of which 50 are officers. Something similar, right?
          But only in fact it was called the Russian-German Legion, and was formed in the ... Russian army at the expense of defectors from the French army, in which, as you know, there were a lot of Germans. In German sources, the legion was often referred to as "Russian" rather than "Russian-German".
          So this topic is extremely confusing.
          And I raised her, answering Senior sailor (Ivan Ochenkov) to his comment:
          It seems to me that he was not "Russian". It is unlikely that the Poles would have received a Muscovite in their environment.

          For example, the same Legion of Vilna would have been accepted if he was from these places.
          Something like that
          1. ee2100
            ee2100 April 28 2021 00: 37
            +4
            Good night, Dmitry!
            An interesting addition. Although, if you think about it, everything is logical.
        2. Ulrih
          Ulrih April 27 2021 23: 24
          +1
          Some kind of confusion ...
          What does the Lithuanians and the Russian Legion have to do with it? Throw at least one link and not "the Internet is full."

          By the way, few units were formed from prisoners in the Napoleonic Wars. They were often released on parole even during hostilities, not to mention the end of the war.

          And with Lithuania it was just the opposite. Napoleon complained that the enthusiasm of the "Lithuanian Poles" was clearly less than in the Duchy of Warsaw. And by the way, Davout's corps was famous for its iron discipline. The Marshal personally signed orders for execution in the event of looting without delay. This is not some sort of Saint-Cyr.

          Py.Sy. What is the Legion of Vilna? Vistula Legion or what?
          1. Catfish
            Catfish April 28 2021 16: 53
            +1
            Yes, about the Lithuanians, I agree with you, it was not in their tradition to serve in foreign armies, even during the Second World War, the Germans could not form a single full-blooded SS division from the Lithuanians, only police battalions that operated on the territory of Lithuania. And this is in contrast to Estonia and Latvia, although it would seem ...
            1. Ulrih
              Ulrih April 28 2021 20: 30
              -2
              In 1812. Lithuanians meant primarily the Polish nobility of Lithuania and not ethnic Lithuanians.
              During the Second World War, the situation was such that the Lithuanians immediately after the start of the war announced the re-establishment of the Republic of Lithuania and created a government. This was not part of the plans of the Reich and the new government was arrested and until the end of the war the Germans did not particularly trust the Lithuanians. We would like to create divisions, we would. The same Latvian both divisions on paper were considered "volunteer", in fact, more than half of the soldiers were mobilized. So, little depended on the local people I want / don't want.
        3. Senior seaman
          Senior seaman April 28 2021 09: 28
          +3
          Quote: Richard
          The internet is full of materials on this topic.

          Uh-huh. The Internet has long turned into that garbage heap.
          But
          Russian military formations in the service of Napoleon in 1812 are not mentioned not only in the works of historians who could be influenced by Soviet ideology, such as Eugene Tarle and Albert Manfred. Neither the modern French researcher of the Napoleonic era, Jean Tulard, nor the author of numerous books on the war of 1812, Nikolai Troitsky, say anything about them, whom there is no reason to suspect of hushing up such a fact, if he were. About the Russians in the army of Napoleon was not at all known to those close to the French emperor, who left a memoir about the campaign in Russia - Armand de Caulaincourt and Philip Paul de Segur.

          https://news.myseldon.com/ru/news/index/230470788
    3. depressant
      depressant April 27 2021 23: 34
      +6
      It happened to be read in "Secrets of the XX century" that by the beginning of the campaign against Russia Napoleon ordered to print a huge edition of a proclamation calling on the Russian peasants to help him free them from serf slavery, destroy the landlords, burn the estates and join the ranks of his army. He did not take into account that the peasants were illiterate. But the landowners' estates were still burned - on their own initiative, out of revenge laughing
      1. Tavrik
        Tavrik April 28 2021 22: 10
        +1
        Napoleon did not have to undermine the economy, free the peasants and, in general, conquer RI in every possible way. Campaign Challenge: Fast Invasion, Fast General Battle and Fast Peace. Another lesson to the stupid king that it is better to be friends than to fight for some unknown reason. But in reality, everything turned out differently ...
    4. Nikolaevich I
      Nikolaevich I April 28 2021 00: 13
      +7
      Quote: Richard
      Little-known fact - under the command of Napoleon in 1812, there were about 8 thousand people from the Russian Empire.

      Indeed, little-known! So little known that there is no documented evidence at all! I had to read an article on the Internet where the author clearly explained that it was a "fake"!
      Let's say right away that there was never any "Russian Legion" in Napoleon's army. He is not mentioned in any documents, memoirs, etc.

      The composition of the Napoleonic army has been studied in great detail. The ethnic composition has also been studied many times, including not explicit: many French regiments, in fact, were completed by the Dutch, Hanoverians, Oldenburgers, Tuscan, Piedmontese, but not a single Russian was among them.

      And the composition of the French army at Borodino, which then proceeded to Moscow, is known almost by name. In any case, the officers are known for sure. So anyone can look for Russian surnames among them.
      Interestingly, in many sources, especially German, a certain Russian legion is indeed mentioned. By the way, its number in 1812 is 8733 people, of which 50 are officers. Something similar, right?

      But only in reality it was called the Russian-German Legion, and was formed in the Russian army at the expense of defectors from the French army, in which, as you know, there were a lot of Germans. In German sources, the legion was often referred to as "Russian" rather than "Russian-German".
      Now about the subjects of the Russian Empire who fled to Europe, of whom a whole legion was formed. In fact, there were such, and indeed a legion was formed of them, and more than one. The speech, as maybe someone already guessed, is about the Poles. They, too, were among the subjects of our empire, although they lived the same way in Prussia, and in Austria, and, not by chance I mentioned, Saxony. Moreover, it was not considered shameful for the Germans to be serfs, but the Poles hated Russia, and were ready to fight against it. This is what Napoleon used, and the Poles fought not only in Russia, but also in Spain.
      (Kirill Shishkin)
      1. Korsar4
        Korsar4 April 28 2021 01: 14
        +4
        To be honest, I did not study it deeply.
        But, of course, an annoying thought about the Poles arose.

        However, the Poles were clearly perceived as part of the "twelve languages".
      2. Astra wild2
        Astra wild2 April 28 2021 09: 51
        +1
        "to look for Russian surnames among them" Nikolaevich, purely theoretically, it can be assumed that the command staff there was Russian-speaking, but not Russian
        1. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I April 28 2021 11: 25
          +3
          Quote: Astra wild2
          purely theoretically, it can be assumed that the command staff there was Russian-speaking, but not Russian

          And Davydov, Platov, Ermolov, Tuchkov, Dokhturov, Volkonsky ... also Russian speakers, not Russians? belay Even take the surname Raevsky ... yes, the surname is of Polish origin, but the Raevskys have lived and served Russia since the time of Vasily III ... before Ivan the Terrible! There are hundreds of noble family names in Russia! Here is a list of the most famous Russian noble families:




          - Aksenovs, Anichkovs, Arakcheevs, Bestuzhevs, Velyaminovs, Vorontsovs, Golenishchevs, Demidovs, Derzhavins, Dolgorukiy, Durovs, Kurbatovs, Kutuzovs, Nekrasovs, Pozharskys, Razumovskys, Saburovs, Saltykovs, Shchrubatovsks, Uvarbovs, Uvarbovs.
          I read somewhere that there were 30 percent of officers with "overseas" surnames in the Russian army!
          And if we talk about "Russian-speaking, but not Russian," then there were probably much more Russian officers who loved to "flaunt" French speech!
    5. Senior seaman
      Senior seaman April 28 2021 09: 23
      +4
      As far as I know, the "Russian legion" is a myth.
      But about the fears in connection with the possible release of the Russian peasants were not groundless, but ... in 1812, we fought not with the republican general and not even with the first consul, but with the "emperor of the French". Nobody was going to free anyone request
    6. Astra wild2
      Astra wild2 April 28 2021 09: 46
      +1
      Quote: Richard
      Little-known fact - under the command of Napoleon in 1812, there were about 8 thousand people from the Russian Empire. A separate Russian legion was even created from them, which, together with the main army, participated in the capture of Moscow.
      The Russian legion in Napoleon's army consisted of two categories. The first are prisoners of war who have remained on the territory of Europe since the wars in 1798-1807. And the second - fugitive serfs who went "over the hill" in search of a better life. It is interesting that neither the first nor the second was forced by anyone to get up under arms and go to war against their former fellow citizens, because they did it exclusively on a voluntary basis. And the casket, as they say, just opened. That the former prisoners of war, that the former serfs simply tasted free (if we compare with the Russian Empire) life. And therefore the campaign of the French emperor against Russia was perceived ... with enthusiasm. After all, they ceased to be serfs. And in the head of many "clicked" - they wanted to free their relatives from serf slavery. And Napoleon, just acted in the role of a kind of ruler-liberator.
      The emperor was also afraid of a possible "revolution" in the country. After all, the power of the French army was known, and therefore the outcome of the confrontation could be decided in someone's favor because of the slightest "trifle". The peasants freed by Napoleon, who, having received freedom, would certainly have stood under his banner, could become such a "trifle". It is clear that Alexander I could solve this problem in only two ways. The first is to inflict a defeat on Napoleon outside the territory of the Russian Empire, so that the French, with their ideas of "freedom", would not even have time to step on Russian soil. And the second is to decide on the abolition of serfdom yourself. And then guess what will happen in the country with the ruined nobles. But all of these options were too weird.
      The famous entry made by General Nikolai Raevsky in his diary, a few days after the start of the war:
      "I am afraid of proclamations, I am afraid that Napoleon will not give liberties to the people, I am afraid there is anxiety in our land."

      And in April 1812, identical inscriptions began to appear on the walls of several Moscow houses. Someone painted just one word - "Liberty!" The police got down to business and soon found the culprit. They turned out to be two courtyard peasants who knew the letter, Peter Ivanov and Afanasy Medvedev. During interrogation, they declared in unison that they would soon find Moscow in the hands of the French, the common people would receive freedom, and the landowners would be "put on a salary."

      Forgive me, but this is something from the realm of fantasy: Napoleon crossed the Russian border on June 24, 1812, and in April 1812 Pyotr Ivanov and Afanasy Medvedev already KNEW that Napoleon would take Moscow.
      Once on TV I heard that the adjutant wing of Alexander1, Chernyshov, in May 1812, had stolen the plans of Napoleon's "Eastern Company". Perhaps Napoleon, what is called: "on the knee" altered plans?
      How could the peasants know about this in APRIL ?!
      Explain to me, otherwise I DO NOT UNDERSTAND ANYTHING.
    7. Undecim
      Undecim April 29 2021 19: 38
      +1
      Little-known fact - under the command of Napoleon in 1812, there were about 8 thousand people from the Russian Empire. A separate Russian legion was even created from them, which, together with the main army, participated in the capture of Moscow.
      There was no such legion. Not a word about him in any serious sources, including foreign languages.
      But the Russian-German legion, which was in the Russian army, is described in great detail.
  • Trilobite Master
    Trilobite Master April 27 2021 21: 38
    +10
    And now it's not like that at all ...

    This is a modern view from the Prazen Heights on the battlefield. The road almost exactly points to Telnitsa. It was from here and in this direction that the decisive attack of the French on the left flank of the Allied forces began.

    And these are, in fact, the very ponds as they look now. In the background - Telnitsa, roofs of houses are visible. Where there is now arable land, there was water. The camera looks west-northwest.
  • vladcub
    vladcub April 27 2021 22: 47
    +4
    "I thought about pursuing the defeated enemy only on December 3" and this is the great Napoleon. He could really plump with joy. Be that as it may, but Napoleon missed the chance to defeat the enemy.
    The retreating units are mostly de-paralyzed and cannot offer serious resistance.
  • Ulrih
    Ulrih April 27 2021 22: 56
    +1
    On the 4th image is an episode of the battle at Aspern-Essling, or rather the behavior of General Dorsenn, and not the grenadiers at Austerlitz. As if it is immediately visible because it depicts the warm season. Image 7 is also not Austerlitz. This is a shot of the Battle of Schöngraben.
  • Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I April 28 2021 02: 02
    +2

    Fight of cavalry guards and horse rangers (chasseurs) at Austerlitz ...

    Horse rangers of Napoleon, with whom the Russian cavalry guards fought at Austerlitz, had a "special" history by that time! This video "tells" about it ...
  • Tavrik
    Tavrik April 28 2021 13: 36
    +1
    Quote: Richard
    In that era, concentration camps were not built, captured officers were usually ransomed by relatives for money, while soldiers were often simply put into the ranks of their own army. There are a lot of examples, for example, during the Seven Years War, Frederick the Great forced the entire surrendered Saxon army to fight on his side. Napoleon also formed many units from prisoners, but since he estimated their fighting qualities too low, the phenomenon was not very common. But there was. Moreover, from the prisoners, separate units were formed, by the way, they were really usually called legions .. There were, for example, Portuguese regiments, which were correctly called “infantry regiments of the Portuguese legion”, there was the Legion of Vilna, attached to the Young Guard. And not only ethnic Poles served in it, but also Russians and Lithuanians living there.

    Well, in the Thirty Years' War, recruitment was all the time ... There, in general, mercenaries fought to a large extent. And I strongly doubt that Napoleon recruited prisoners into legions ... Any Portuguese and Vistula legions were formed from ideological patriots, not prisoners.
  • Tavrik
    Tavrik April 28 2021 22: 04
    0
    Napoleon, noticing this movement, ordered to hit the ice with cannonballs.

    Well, yes, "bloody tyrant", "Corsican monster" what to take from him ... wink
    Napoleon himself was so intoxicated with his victory - after all, everything turned out as he had foreseen, as planned,

    Well, he conceived everything differently, but still it turned out well ...
  • Tavrik
    Tavrik April 28 2021 22: 07
    0
    Quote: Astra wild2
    Once on TV I heard that the adjutant wing of Alexander1, Chernyshov, in May 1812, had stolen the plans: "Eastern Company" of Napoleon

    Something very doubtful. If I am not mistaken, Chernyshov left Paris much earlier ...