Military Review

Indian military orders rapid-firing guns for the Navy

20

State engineering company Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd (BHEL) said yesterday that the Indian military has ordered rapid-fire gun mounts (SRGM) for the Navy. They will be made according to the standard adopted for the main weapons of the military fleet country.


The publication Indian Defense News tells about it.

BHEL said it has already specifically set up sophisticated manufacturing facilities at its heavy electrical equipment plant in Haridwar to manufacture, install, commission and support the lifecycle of these guns. The standardization of these guns by the Indian Navy for all large warships led to cost optimization.

BHEL is also working on an upgraded version of these guns with increased firing range to meet the future needs of the Navy for armament of warships.

The state-owned engineering firm BHEL has been providing mission-critical equipment and services to the Indian defense and space sector for over three decades. In addition, it offers a wide range of equipment for the thermal power industry and other major industries in the Indian economy.
Photos used:
https://twitter.com/bhel_india
20 comments
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  1. Sahalinets
    Sahalinets 12 February 2021 10: 00
    +3
    I take it this is a local clone of Melara's 76mm OTO?
  2. prior
    prior 12 February 2021 10: 13
    +1
    Question for competent comrades:
    To the extent possible and can be justified, for example, the installation of an automatic artillery gun mounted on ships on a land platform?
    Or does it make no sense?
    1. Avior
      Avior 12 February 2021 10: 22
      +6
      Automatic weapons on the ship are assembled together with the ammunition storage. Such a land platform as high as a multi-storey building will look strange.
      The second question is range. At sea, the surface is perfectly flat, so a long range from the gun is required. On land, such a range is needed only when firing from closed positions, since ideally flat terrain is a rare exception, and in such cases the howitzer is more convenient.
      1. Jacket in stock
        Jacket in stock 12 February 2021 11: 02
        0
        Quote: Avior
        Such a land platform as high as a multi-storey building will look strange.

        Well, perhaps, arrange a coastal battery like those that were built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. There, in the armored towers, the naval guns were placed.
        True, mobile artillery is now in vogue.
        And range, even at sea, at least on land, is always needed.
        1. Avior
          Avior 12 February 2021 13: 57
          +2
          The coastal battery is designed for firing at naval targets, so it is close to naval systems
      2. abrakadabre
        abrakadabre 12 February 2021 11: 07
        +2
        Or does it make no sense?
        The gun on the ship is rigidly fixed to the hull. Plus, very powerful recoil damping systems. Can you imagine what the total recoil gives any AK-130 at the peak rate of fire? Even if the land mobile version does not fall apart from this, the accuracy will be such that you can confidently say that you hit the sky and approximately in the direction of the target.
        Well, the bulkiness of the greatly increased ammunition plus the ammunition supply system.
        The next point is the firing distances and the mutual mobility of the ship and the enemy. All this requires an increase in the density of fire. On land, shelling is hardly often used at a target speed of 80-110 km / h. This is common for ship battles. That's 43-60 knots for both, or 20-30 knots for each. At a distance of 10-15 km, the duration of the projectile flight allows the target to escape from the defeat. So you need a high rate of fire. To cover the square with a cloud of shells and hit at least partly.
        The same as for cannon air defense. There it is clearer, because the targets are smaller and their speed is much higher. Therefore, the rate of fire is generally extreme.
        1. Intruder
          Intruder 12 February 2021 11: 44
          +1
          Well, the bulkiness of the greatly increased ammunition plus the ammunition supply system.
          I will also add cooling, somehow many people forget about it, you will have to put an additional trailer next to the tank and the hydraulic pump, (plus your own diesel generator to power all this ...), especially with an intensive firing mode ... wink
          1. abrakadabre
            abrakadabre 12 February 2021 11: 59
            +1
            I will also add cooling
            This is yes. And also the power supply. In the same place, all the mechanisms do not work from the holy spirit or powder gases.
            Take the same AK-130 as the limiting option - 89 tons. This includes a mechanized cellar (40 tons), and an MSA, and everything else. In addition to providing electricity.
            Single-barrel A-192 of the same caliber - 25 tons without ammunition. Rate of fire - 30 high / min. against 86-90 high / min. from AK-130.
            Single-barrel A-190 with a smaller caliber (100 mm) - 15 tons (possibly excluding ammunition) with a rate of fire of 80 high / min.

            In general, the direct transfer of monstrous ship installations to land, and even in a mobile version, does not make sense. Overland versions are always simpler and thinner. For example "Msta" or "Coalition". These are actually land analogues and are.
            1. Intruder
              Intruder 12 February 2021 14: 33
              +1
              In general, the direct transfer of monstrous ship installations to land, and even in a mobile version, does not make sense.
              more precisely, if we generalize for the comrades, with the emphasis of a couple of points: sea and land weapons are different systems. But the difference in ballistics is caused not only (and not so much) by the physical characteristics of the gun carriage, but by the tactical purpose.
              The main target for a land gun is a low-mobility areal target (with the exception of anti-tank weapons, but this is a relatively new area, and the guns are specific there), located on a terrain that:
              - does not allow observing the target directly from the firing one (shooting in areas)
              - very often does not allow direct fire,
              - forces even at small distances to fire along steep trajectories.
              For a naval gun, the main target is a ship, a point target, quickly maneuvering and often well protected. Besides - no relief, visibility is determined by the horizon and meteorology - that's all. In addition, the level of mechanization is much higher on the ship, energy sources are at hand.
              So it turns out that what is a necessity for a ship gun (large caliber, high relative elongation of the barrel, high muzzle velocity, providing high range, accuracy and armor penetration) is only a little useful bow for a land gun. For him, a high rate of fire with manual loading, mobility (which for a marine installation is a ship, then for a land installation a tractor, or self-propelled gun), the ability to fire along mounted trajectories is important.
              That is, for example, ship 4.7 ", put it on" land thrust ", it will be heavy, clumsy, and excessively long-range. That is, it will have its own niche, but much more will require a much less powerful and long-range 4.8" howitzer.
              By the way, for the M-30 a "three-legged" gun carriage is an anti-tank counter, providing circular fire without manipulating the gun carriage. And the recoil on the much more powerful 125 and 130 mm. guns are also extinguished with a "classic" carriage with two frames. And for ground guns and cannons BM and OM with caliber 6 and 8 "this problem is solved.
              The use of higher calibers on a dry track is also limited not by the mechanical characteristics of the gun carriage and the ground (the Germans also fired from 800 mm cannons from the ground), but by the transportability of the system (the same Germans built a whole railway station for a single gun and did not help them much in combat use)!
        2. Stepan S
          Stepan S 13 February 2021 19: 34
          0
          At a distance of 10-15 km, the duration of the projectile flight allows the target to escape from the defeat.

          For this, there are firing radars and a fire control system, each next shot is automatically adjusted.
          1. abrakadabre
            abrakadabre 13 February 2021 19: 56
            +1
            For this, there are firing radars and a fire control system, each next shot is automatically adjusted.
            I know. I just spoke to the person in the first approximation.
    2. loki565
      loki565 12 February 2021 11: 31
      +3
      You can install, but making it mobile is very problematic)))
    3. APASUS
      APASUS 12 February 2021 13: 27
      +1
      Quote: prior
      Question for competent comrades:
      To the extent possible and can be justified, for example, the installation of an automatic artillery gun mounted on ships on a land platform?
      Or does it make no sense?

      What tasks are you going to solve with a rapid-fire naval gun on land? Feasibility of this alteration
      1. prior
        prior 12 February 2021 14: 38
        0
        I was not familiar with the specifics of naval artillery, the rate of fire from one barrel seemed interesting.
        1. APASUS
          APASUS 12 February 2021 15: 11
          +1
          The Barmaley in Syria and Libya have a similar experience, installing an AK-230 on a cargo platform, but this is certainly not an AK-130.


    4. daemon
      daemon 13 February 2021 13: 46
      +1
      We have a somewhat similar hybrid A-222 Coast Complex, 130 mm gun.
    5. Thomas N.
      Thomas N. 13 February 2021 16: 11
      0
      Quote: prior
      Question for competent comrades:
      To the extent possible and can be justified, for example, the installation of an automatic artillery gun mounted on ships on a land platform?
      Or does it make no sense?

      76-mm SPAAG Otomatic SPAAG:
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otomatic
      http://pvo.guns.ru/other/italie/otomatic/index.htm
      http://www.dogswar.ru/oryjeinaia-ekzotika/bronetehnika/1282-opytnaia-samohodnaia.html
    6. Sergey Sfiedu
      Sergey Sfiedu 13 February 2021 16: 59
      0
      In the 70s or 80s, the Italians made a 76mm anti-helicopter self-propelled gun based on the ship's OTO Melara Compact. In light of the current all-out offensive of attack drones, it would be relevant in our time.
  3. Antokha
    Antokha 12 February 2021 11: 14
    +1
    It seems to me, or the Indians have begun to itch over the issue of weapons and military equipment? They have been with China for a long time, but it is the last few weeks that such news has been coming.
  4. LAWNER
    LAWNER 12 February 2021 17: 56
    0
    Standardization ... Good ... Or bad? If the enemy knows all the performance characteristics of the main caliber .. I beg your pardon, I am not a sailor ...