Military Review

Use of captured "Panthers" and "Tigers" at the final stage of the Great Patriotic War

55

The peak of the use of captured German armored vehicles in the Red Army came in early 1942 - mid-1943.


In the second half of the war, domestic industry was able to satisfy the demands of the active army in tanks and self-propelled artillery installations. Although not all was well with the quality of the products, in terms of numbers, medium and heavy tanks, as well as self-propelled guns, were quite enough to form new units and make up for losses.

In conditions of saturation of the Red Army units with Soviet armored vehicles, the value of captured tanks and self-propelled guns sharply decreased. A certain role was played by the fact that by the middle of 1943 there was a very serious qualitative strengthening of the German anti-tank artillery.

New and modernized Panzerwaffe tanks received long-barreled 75-88-mm guns with increased armor penetration and thicker armor. This is despite the fact that among the captured armored vehicles there was a high proportion of tanks and self-propelled guns captured by the Red Army in a damaged form in 1941-1942. And subsequently restored at repair enterprises located deep in the rear. The combat value of vehicles protected by 50-mm frontal armor and armed with 50-mm or 75-mm short-barreled guns decreased by the summer of 1943.

Taking into account the fact that after the summer battles of 1943, Germany on the Eastern Front switched to strategic defense, and the battlefield increasingly remained behind the Red Army, the number of captured German armored vehicles increased. According to archival documents, the trophy teams collected 24 German tanks and self-propelled artillery units.

It is clear that a significant part of them were exposed to flames or were destroyed as a result of an internal explosion of ammunition. But even German tanks to be restored were in most cases scrapped.

After the Red Army began large-scale offensive operations, the attitude towards captured tanks and self-propelled guns changed.


Since mid-1943, our repair units and enterprises in the rear were primarily aimed at restoring domestic armored vehicles. And captured vehicles requiring a lot of labor and the use of non-standard spare parts and components were of much less interest.

However, if our troops managed to capture serviceable or requiring minimal repairs armored vehicles, they were often put into operation.

In order to streamline the use of captured tanks on October 24, 1944, the head of the Main Armored Directorate of the Red Army (GBTU SC), Marshal Ya.N. Fedorenko issued an order:

"On the use of serviceable trophy and obsolete light tanks for security service at railway stations, front headquarters and large settlements."

However, even before the release of this instruction, captured armored vehicles were very often used to provide cover in the frontline zone of the headquarters of regiments and divisions, warehouses, hospitals, bridges and pontoon crossings. Sometimes captured German tanks were attached to the commandant's offices.

Use of captured Pz.Kpfw.II and Pz.Kpfw.III tanks at the final stage of hostilities


Oddly enough, at the final stage of the war with Nazi Germany, the seemingly hopelessly outdated PzII and Pz.Kpfw.III captured tanks continued to be used in the Red Army.

In the case of the "twos", they were mainly Pz.Kpfw.II Ausf. C and Pz.Kpfw.II Ausf. F. Light tanks of these modifications in a combat position weighed about 9,5 tons. The thickness of the frontal armor of the hull and turret was 29–35 mm, and the side armor was 15 mm. There is information that part of the "twos" were rearmed with 20-mm automatic cannons TNSh-20 and machine guns DT-29.

Although in 1944-1945. "Twos" could not withstand medium and heavy tanks, their armament was capable of successfully operating against infantry, trucks and armored personnel carriers not hiding in the trenches, and the armor reliably protected against small arms weapons... Considering that the captured Pz.Kpfw.II tanks had no chance of surviving on the battlefield, they were mainly used to guard objects in the rear and to escort convoys. Light tanks could fight sabotage groups and enemy infantry breaking through from the encirclement.

For the most part, trophy "troikas" in the second half of the war were used in the same way as "twos". However, given that the Red Army captured much more Pz.Kpfw.III medium tanks than Pz.Kpfw.II, the range of their use was much wider.

Although the firepower and protection of the latest modifications of the Pz.Kpfw.III at the final stage of hostilities could no longer be considered satisfactory, in addition to guarding functions in the rear, captured Pz.Kpfw.IIIs sometimes operated on the front lines. Due to the presence of a commander's cupola, good optical instruments and a radio station, the "troikas" were often used as command tanks and vehicles of forward artillery observers.

Even after the surrender of Germany, a certain number of Pz.Kpfw.II and Pz.Kpfw.III remained in the Red Army. So, in the units of the Trans-Baikal Front that participated in hostilities against Japan in August 1945, there were Pz. Kpfw.II and Pz.Kpfw.III.

Use of captured Pz.Kpfw.IV tanks of later modifications


Taking into account the fact that by the second half of 1942 the modernization potential of the Pz.Kpfw.III was almost exhausted, the Pz.Kpfw.IV became the main medium German tank. The consistent increase in firepower and protection allowed the "four" to remain operational until the end of hostilities and on an equal footing withstand the most advanced medium Soviet and American tanks.

Many historians specializing in armored vehicles of the Second World War believe that the Pz.Kpfw.IV of late modifications with a long-barreled 75-mm gun is the most successful type of German tank in terms of cost-effectiveness. Since 1943, the Quartet has become the Panzerwaffe's workhorse. Until April 1945, 8575 tanks of this type were built at the enterprises of the Third Reich.

In March 1942, production of the Pz.KpfW.IV Ausf.F2 tank began, armed with a 75 mm 7,5 cm Kw.K.40 L / 43 cannon and protected in frontal projection with 50 mm armor.

The Pzgr.39 armor-piercing projectile weighing 6,8 kg, leaving the barrel with an initial velocity of 750 m / s, at a distance of 1000 m along the normal could penetrate 78-mm armor, which made it possible to confidently fight the thirty-fours. A medium tank of the Pz.KpfW.IV Ausf.G modification, with 80-mm frontal armor, was armed with the Kw.K.1943 L / 40 cannon in the spring of 48. The armor-piercing 75-mm projectile of this gun with an initial speed of 790 m / s, at a distance of 1000 m, pierced through and through with an 85-mm armor plate.

Sufficiently thick frontal armor and high armor penetration of the gun, combined with good sights and observation devices, made the "four" a very serious enemy.

Soviet 76,2-mm guns F-32, F-34 and ZIS-5, mounted on KV and T-34 tanks, when firing with an armor-piercing blunt-headed projectile BR-350B had a chance to penetrate the frontal armor of the German "Quartet" built in 1943 , at a distance of no more than 400 m.

In part, the fight against the later versions of the Pz.Kpfw.IV was facilitated by the fact that the increase in firepower and protection was accompanied by an increase in combat mass, and, as a result, a decrease in mobility and passability on soft soils. The Pz.KpfW.IV Ausf.F1 tank, which weighed 22,3 tons and armed with a short-barreled 75 mm KwK.37 cannon, had a specific power of 13,5 liters. sec. / t and specific ground pressure of 0,79 kg / cm².

In turn, the Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf.H with a 75-mm 48-caliber cannon, launched in series in April 1943, weighed 25,7 tons. Its power density was 11,7 liters. sec / t, and the ground pressure is 0,89 kg / cm².

In addition, the thickness of the side and frontal armor of the turret of later modifications remained the same as on the Pz.KpfW.IV Ausf.F1, which was easily penetrated by a 45 mm armor-piercing projectile at real combat distances.

Use of captured "Panthers" and "Tigers" at the final stage of the Great Patriotic War
Tank Pz.lV Ausf N, captured by Soviet troops west of Orel. June 1943

Before the appearance of the T-34-85 medium tanks and the IS-1/2 heavy tanks, German Pz.Kpfw.IV tanks, armed with 75 mm guns with 43 and 48 caliber barrels, were a very coveted trophy. The trophy "four", mastered by an experienced crew, could successfully fight the same type of vehicles at a distance almost twice as long as domestic tanks armed with 76,2-mm cannons.


Even after during the offensive operations of 1944-1945. Soviet troops began to quite often capture German heavy tanks and self-propelled guns with long-barreled 75 and 88-mm guns, Pz.KpfW.IV tanks continued to be used in the Red Army. This was largely due to the fact that the "four" was easier to repair than, for example, "Panthers" and "Tigers". Due to its high prevalence, it was easier to find spare parts and shots for the 75mm cannon for it.

The use of the Pz.Kpfw.V Panther tanks in the Red Army


The combat debut of the Pz.Kpfw.V Panther on the Eastern Front took place in July 1943 near Kursk. The first experience of combat use of tanks "Panther" revealed both the advantages and disadvantages of the tank.

Among the advantages of the new tank, German tankers noted reliable protection of the frontal projection of the hull, a powerful cannon, which made it possible to hit all Soviet tanks and self-propelled guns head-on beyond the range of their effective fire, and good sighting devices.

However, the tank's side armor was vulnerable to 76,2 mm and 45 mm armor-piercing shells at the main battle distances. The combat value of the tank was largely reduced by its low technical reliability. The chassis and transmission were often out of order, and the Panther engines of the first modifications were prone to overheating and sometimes ignited spontaneously.

Although the mass of the tank was about 45 tons, according to the German classification, it was considered average. Armor protection "Panther" was differentiated and had large angles of inclination. The upper frontal armor plate 80 mm thick was located at an angle of 57 ° from the vertical. The lower frontal plate 60 mm thick had an inclination angle of 53 °.

The upper side plates of the hull 40 mm thick (on later modifications - 50 mm) are inclined to the vertical at an angle of 42 °. The lower side plates were installed vertically and had a thickness of 40 mm. The welded tower in the frontal projection was protected by a 100 mm thick mask. Stern and side armor of the tower - 45 mm, inclination 25 °.

The first serial "Panthers" were equipped with a 650 hp carburetor engine. sec., providing speed on the highway up to 45 km / h. Since May 1943, it was replaced by a 700 hp engine. from. The maximum speed of the tank remained almost unchanged, but the increase in power density made it possible to feel more confident off-road.

The undercarriage of the tank with a staggered arrangement of road wheels provided a good ride, which made it easier to aim the gun in motion. But at the same time, such a chassis design was difficult to manufacture and repair, and also had a large mass.

The Pz.Kpfw.V tank had very powerful weapons. The 75-mm KwK 42 tank gun with a barrel length of 70 calibers, the Pzgr 39/42 armor-piercing projectile, accelerated to 925 m / s, at a distance of 1000 m at a 60 ° meeting angle, penetrated 110-mm armor. The Pzgr 40/42 sub-caliber projectile, which left the barrel with an initial speed of 1120 m / s, pierced 150 mm armor under the same conditions.

Taking into account the fact that a well-trained crew could fire 8 aimed shots per minute, the gunner had very good sighting devices at his disposal, and the gun itself had high accuracy - all this made the Panther deadly for any tank of the Second World War. In addition to the 75 mm gun, the tank was armed with two 7,92 mm MG.34 machine guns.

The appearance of the Pz.Kpfw.V tank, which was formally considered average, was largely due to the comprehension of the experience of collisions with new types of Soviet tanks in the initial period of the war.

In many ways, "Panther" corresponded to the ideas of the Wehrmacht command about the ideal "anti-tank tank". And it fit well into the defensive military doctrine of Germany, adopted in the second half of 1943.

Strong frontal armor, very high penetration and accuracy of a moderate caliber gun that used expensive rounds, and a small turret with a thick mask - all these are characteristic features of a defensive tank.

Best of all, "Panthers" showed themselves in active defense in the form of ambushes, shelling of advancing enemy tanks from long distances and counterattacks, when the influence of weakness of the side armor is minimized. Serial production of Pz.Kpfw.V tanks lasted from January 1943 to April 1945. A total of 5995 copies were built.

Possessing good anti-armored capabilities, the Pz.Kpfw.V tanks were very expensive and difficult to manufacture and maintain. The use of a staggered layout of the road wheels, which ensured a smooth ride, adversely affected the reliability and maintainability of the chassis. Replacing the internal road wheels damaged by mine explosions or artillery fire was a laborious operation. The liquid mud that had accumulated between the road wheels often froze in winter and completely immobilized the tank.

Often there was a situation when the crews of "Panthers", having won a fire duel with Soviet tanks, were forced to abandon them, due to breakdowns or the inability to refuel. Quite often, immobilized German tanks were dug into the ground along the tower and used as fixed firing points.


In the last year of the war, our troops captured a significant number of serviceable and damaged, but suitable for restoration, Pz.Kpfw.V tanks.

At the same time, Soviet troops exploited captured Panthers very limitedly. By the middle of 1943, the Red Army already had experience in operating the Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t), PzKpfw. II, Pz. Kpfw.III and Pz. Kpfw.IV, as well as self-propelled guns based on them. However, the use of the Pz.Kpfw.V was a very difficult task, requiring appropriate crew training and a repair base.

Soviet tank crews, who did not have the necessary experience in operating complex and specifically designed equipment, often put Panthers out of action, having driven 15–20 km, and could not then repair them due to the lack of the necessary spare parts, tools and experience in repairing such vehicles.

Here is what the headquarters of the 4th Guards Tank Army reported to the GBTU KA:

“These tanks (Pz.Kpfw.V) are difficult to operate and repair. There are no spare parts for them, which does not allow their scheduled maintenance.

To power the tanks, it is necessary to provide for an uninterrupted supply of high quality aviation gasoline.

In addition, there are big problems with ammunition for the German 75-mm tank gun mod. 1942 (Kw.K. 42), since the ammunition from the gun mod. 1940 (Kw.K.40) unsuitable for use in the Panther tank.

We believe that a German tank of the Pz.Kpfw.IV type is more suitable for conducting covert offensive operations, which has a simpler device, is easy to operate and repair, and is also widespread in the German army. "

However, given that the Pz.Kpfw.V tank was armed with a weapon with very high ballistic characteristics, this made it possible to fight enemy armored vehicles at distances exceeding the effective firing range of Soviet 76,2-85-mm tank guns.

In the first half of 1944, the GBTU SC considered the use of serviceable captured Panthers as tank destroyers. In March 1944,

"A quick guide to using a captured TV (Panther) tank".

The commissioning and successful operation of captured Pz.Kpfw.V tanks largely depended on the personal position of the commanders of Soviet tank formations.

So, in January 1944, by order of the deputy commander of the 3rd Guards Tank Army, Major General Yu. Solovyov, in the 41st and 148th separate repair and restoration battalions, one platoon of the most experienced repairmen was created, who were involved in the repair and maintenance of the Panther ".

In a number of cases, captured "Panthers" very successfully played the role of tank destroyers. Soon after the commissioning of the crew of the Soviet "Panther" during the hostilities in the north-west of Ukraine near the village of Zherebki knocked out a tank "Tiger".


A captured Panther tank next to a British-made Churchill heavy tank.

Most of all in the "Panther" our tankers were attracted by the armament: the ballistic data of the 75-mm KwK.42 gun made it possible to knock out German tanks at distances inaccessible to any Soviet tank (and anti-tank) gun.

In addition, an excellent radio station and guidance devices by the standards of that time made the Panther a good command vehicle.

So, for example, the 991st SAP (46th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front) had 16 SU-76M and 3 Panthers, which were used as command vehicles.

In the spring of 1945, the 366th GSAP, which fought as part of the 3rd Ukrainian Front, besides heavy self-propelled guns ISU-152, several captured SU-150 (Hummel) and SU-88 (Nashorn), had 5 Pz.Kpfw. V and one Pz.KpfW.IV.

However, it was difficult to use captured tanks in the same battle formations with Soviet-made tanks and self-propelled guns. The Pz.Kpfw.V drivers had to choose the route very carefully. Where the light ACS SU-76M passed freely, the heavy Panther could get stuck.

Big problems also arose with overcoming water barriers. Not all bridges could withstand a tank weighing 45 tons, and when fording the river, there were almost always difficulties with the Pz.Kpfw.V reaching the steep bank.

In addition, there was a risk of shelling the captured Panthers with their tanks and artillery. And the big stars painted on the towers didn't always help.


The photographs of the "Panthers" of the tank company commanded by the guard senior lieutenant M.N. Sotnikov.

Three captured Pz.Kpfw.V tanks were included in the 62nd Guards Tank Regiment of the breakthrough of the 8th Guards Tank Corps.


These Pz.Kpfw.V tanks were previously part of the 5th SS Panzer Division Viking, and were captured in battle on August 18, 1944 near the town of Yasenitsa.

Unfortunately, it was not possible to find information about the combat use of Panthers by Sotnikov's company. Apparently, these vehicles were used as an anti-tank reserve.

It was difficult to use captured Pz.Kpfw.Vs together with thirty-fours.

The Panther's passability was much worse, and the speed of movement on the march was lower. In addition, the Maybach gasoline engines were gluttonous. At one gas station along the Panther highway, it could cover about 200 km, and the cruising range of the Soviet medium tank T-34-85 was 350 km.


Due to the low reliability of the engine, transmission and chassis, breakdowns often occurred, and the Panthers had to be towed to the place of repair.

But, despite operational problems, difficulties with repairs, supply of ammunition and fuel and lubricants, captured Pz.Kpfw.V tanks continued to remain in service with the Red Army until the surrender of Germany.

Use of Pz.Kpfw.VI Tiger tanks in the Red Army


The first case of combat use of the heavy tank Pz.Kpfw.VI occurred in September 1942 near Leningrad. Several "Tigers" tried to attack off-road under the fire of Soviet artillery. In this case, one tank was captured by the Red Army.


The enemy used the heavy tanks much more successfully during Operation Citadel.

The Tigers were used to break through the Soviet defenses, often leading groups of other tanks. The powerful armament of the Pz.Kpfw.VI made it possible to hit any Soviet tank, and the armor protected from 45-76,2 mm armor-piercing shells.

The 88 mm Kw.K.36 tank gun was created on the basis of the FlaK 18/36 anti-aircraft gun. This gun accelerated the Pzgr. 39/43 with a mass of 10,2 kg to 810 m / s, which at a distance of 1000 m ensured penetration of 135 mm armor. A 7,92 mm MG.34 machine gun was paired with the gun, and another machine gun was at the disposal of the radio operator.

The thickness of the frontal armor of the hull was 100 mm, the side and rear of the hull were 80 mm. The forehead of the tower is 100 mm, the side and rear of the tower are 80 mm. The first 250 early-production tanks were fitted with a 650 hp gasoline engine. with., and on the rest - 700 hp. The individual torsion bar suspension with a staggered arrangement of rollers ensured a high smoothness of the ride, but it was very vulnerable to combat damage and difficult to repair.

In 1942-1943. in terms of the aggregate fighting qualities "Tiger" was the strongest tank in the world. The advantages of the machine include powerful armament and armor, well-thought-out ergonomics, high-quality observation and communication devices.

However, the price that had to be paid for the powerful weapons and thick armor was very high. The tank with a combat weight of 57 tons had a specific power of about 12 liters. sec / t and specific ground pressure of 1,09 kg / cm², which did not allow you to feel confident in deep snow and on wet ground.

High combat performance was largely discounted by the high complexity and cost of production, and low maintainability. Due to its large mass, the damaged tank was difficult to evacuate from the battlefield.

Due to the fact that 1347 Pz.Kpfw.VI tanks were built, Soviet troops captured them much less frequently than Panthers. The first documented case of the Soviet crew mastering the captured Tiger took place at the end of December 1943.

On December 27, during the attack of the 501st heavy tank battalion of the Wehrmacht, one of the vehicles got stuck in a crater and was abandoned. Tankers of the 28th Guards Tank Brigade (39th Army, Belorussian Front) managed to pull out the Tiger and tow it to their location.

The tank was quickly put into operation, and the brigade command decided to use it in battles. The Journal of Combat of the 28th Guards Tank Brigade says the following about this:

"28.12.43/XNUMX/XNUMX The captured Tiger tank is brought from the battlefield in full serviceability.

The crew of the T-6 tank was appointed commander of the brigade, consisting of: the commander of the tank three times Order-bearer of the Guard Lieutenant Revyakin, the driver-mechanic of the Guard Sergeant Major Kilevnik, the commander of the gun of the Guard Sergeant Major Ilashevsky, the commander of the tower of the Guard Sergeant Major Kodikov, the gunner-radio operator of the Guard Sergeant Akulov.

The crew mastered the tank within two days.

The crosses were painted over, instead of them two stars were painted on the tower and "Tiger" was written.

Later, another German heavy tank was captured by the 28th Guards Tank Brigade.

As of July 27, 1944, the brigade had 47 tanks: 32 T-34, 13 T-70, 4 SU-122, 4 SU-76 and 2 Pz.Kpfw.VI. "



The 713th self-propelled artillery regiment of the 48th Army of the 1st Belorussian Front and the 5th Separate Guards Tank Brigade of the 38th Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front also had one captured Tiger each.

However, due to the small number and operational problems, the captured Pz.Kpfw.VIs had practically no effect on the course of hostilities.

This was largely due to poor maintainability. If on Soviet tanks many malfunctions could be eliminated by the crew, then repairing the Tiger in most cases required the involvement of well-trained specialists and special equipment.


Replacing damaged rollers in the inner row could take more than 12 hours. And to access the faulty transmission, it was required to dismantle the tower, which was impossible without the use of crane equipment with a lifting capacity of at least 12 tons.

As a result, such disadvantages as the complexity of the repair, multiplied by operational problems, the need to refuel with scarce fuels and lubricants and the use of non-standard 88-mm shots with an electric igniter, outweighed the advantages of the German heavy tank.

At the final stage of the war, the Red Army received sufficient numbers of medium and heavy tanks armed with 85-122-mm guns, and self-propelled guns with 100-152-mm guns, which at real battle distances could successfully hit any enemy armored vehicles. And captured "Tigers" in the role of tank destroyers have lost their significance.

Talking about heavy German tanks in the Red Army, it will be correct to mention another vehicle captured by Soviet troops at the end of the war. Serial production of the heavy tank Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf. B Tiger II ("Royal Tiger") began in November 1943 and continued until March 1945. A total of 490 copies were built.

Despite the designation similar to the first "Tiger", in fact it was a new car.

The main purpose of the Tiger II was to combat enemy tanks at the maximum possible distance. For this, the tank was armed with an unprecedentedly powerful 88-mm Kw.K.43 cannon with a barrel length of 71 caliber (the same gun was installed on the Ferdinand tank destroyer).

In terms of firing range and armor penetration, the 8.8 Kw.K.43 L / 71 gun was superior to most of the tank guns at the disposal of the anti-Hitler coalition. The armor-piercing 88 mm Pzgr. 39/43 left the barrel at a speed of 1000 m / s. At a distance of 1500 m at a meeting angle of 30 ° from the normal, it could penetrate 175 mm armor.

The thickness of the upper frontal plate of the "Royal Tiger", set at an angle of 50 °, was 150 mm. The lower frontal plate with an inclination of 50 ° had a thickness of 120 mm. The side armor of the hull and stern is 80 mm. The gun mask is 65–100 mm. Side and rear of the tower - 80 mm.

The first production machines were equipped with a 700 hp engine. from. Some late-production tanks had 960 hp diesel engines. from. On trials, a 68-ton tank was accelerated to 41 km / h on the highway. However, in real conditions, even on a good road, the speed did not exceed 20 km / h.

In fact, the Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf. The B Tiger II was a tank destroyer designed for use in defensive combat. In this role, the "Royal Tiger" was extremely dangerous for all, without exception, Soviet tanks and self-propelled guns.

Although the protection and power of the Royal Tiger's weapons have increased significantly, in terms of the balance of combat characteristics, it was inferior to the previous model.

Due to the excess weight, the cross-country ability and maneuverability of the vehicle were unsatisfactory. This greatly reduced the tactical capabilities of the heavy tank and at the same time made it an easy target for the more mobile Soviet tanks and self-propelled guns.

Overloading the undercarriage has a negative impact on reliability. For this reason, about a third of the vehicles broke down on the march. The gasoline engine and final drives, originally designed for a much lighter tank, could not withstand the loads when driving on soggy ground.

As a result, the "King Tiger" did not justify itself. It is one of the most disastrous projects of the tank industry of the Third Reich.

From the point of view of rational use of resources, it would be much more justified to direct them to increase the production volumes of PzIV medium tanks and self-propelled guns based on them.

Small numbers, low operational reliability and unsatisfactory mobility - became the reasons that the "King Tiger" could not have a significant impact on the course of the war.

Soviet tankers successfully destroyed these vehicles from ambushes. In a direct collision, much more mobile thirty-fours, controlled by experienced crews, successfully maneuvering, approaching, taking an advantageous position for firing and hitting German heavy tanks in the side and stern.


Heavy tank Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf. B, captured by the Red Army.

It is known that in August-September 1944, during the hostilities in Poland, tankers of the 53rd Guards Tank Brigade of the 6th Guards Tank Corps and the 1st Guards Tank Brigade of the 8th Guards Mechanized Corps captured several serviceable and recoverable tanks. "Tiger II".

A number of sources say that Soviet crews were formed for at least three vehicles.

But no reliable details of the use of these tanks in the Red Army were found.

To be continued ...
Author:
Articles from this series:
Use of captured German pistols in the USSR
The use of German captured submachine guns in the USSR
The use of captured German rifles and machine guns in the USSR
The use of captured German machine guns in the USSR
The use of captured German tanks and self-propelled guns in the initial period of the Great Patriotic War
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  1. svp67
    svp67 21 January 2021 05: 45
    +16
    We now somehow overlook another area where captured tanks were very widely used, they were used as evacuation tractors. Due to the acute shortage of such equipment in our country and the strict requirements for the restoration of domestic tanks and putting them into operation, captured equipment began to be used as such tractors, after having removed the towers from them. One of the big advantages, when using it, was also the fact that the equipment was freelance and in case of a serious breakdown it was simply thrown away, choosing a new one from the trophies
    1. voronin
      voronin 21 January 2021 06: 58
      +35
      I remember reading a story. There our tank stalled during the battle and the crew hid inside. After the battle, the Germans conceived of taking him away for themselves, hooked and dragged him. Well, ours from the pusher started up, and having a high-torque diesel engine against the gasoline engine, they dragged the German to us.
      Thanks to the author. We look forward to continuing.
      1. mr.ZinGer
        mr.ZinGer 21 January 2021 08: 41
        +4
        Probably it's not the diesel engine, but the engine power.
        1. Eroma
          Eroma 1 February 2021 23: 56
          0
          This is a story about KV1, it could not be knocked out and the tank entered the counter attack went deep into the German defense. As a result, a howitzer hit him, everyone was concussed, the tank stopped. The Germans tried to get in, but the hatches were closed from the inside. The Germans decided that the crew had died and took him in tow. Trying to pull him from his place, the Soviet crew was pushed aside. Our soldiers looked around, a German was attached to them, they started the engine and took the German tank to the location of the Soviet troops laughing soldier
      2. vladcub
        vladcub 21 January 2021 14: 18
        +14
        Thank you for reminding me of my childhood: in the 5-6 grade I wrote a presentation on this episode.
        It seems that this incident happened in late 1941 early 1942, somewhere in the south. At least I wrote in my notebook that it was in the south. For some reason, I remember that on the word: "south" I planted a blot. I had an open nib fountain pen.
        More than 50 years have passed, but I remember this blot. I can't say why I remember
        1. vladcub
          vladcub 21 January 2021 15: 20
          +8
          "somewhere in the south" comrades, now I remember. This incident occurred during the defense of Odessa. Our tank got stuck somewhere, and the Romanians wanted to capture it
          1. Romka47
            Romka47 22 January 2021 10: 59
            +2
            German proverb "Romanians are worse than partisans" laughing
      3. vladcub
        vladcub 21 January 2021 14: 26
        +3
        In fact, according to the story, it turned out that they tried to pull him out with a light tank, but his "strength" was not enough and they drove another one. In my opinion, ours stole 1 tank, and the other escaped.
        Probably, he was hooked on the rear tow hook, when 34 ka started up and pulled to their own, they quickly threw off the tug and the move
      4. Sergey M. Karasev
        Sergey M. Karasev 21 January 2021 17: 37
        +2
        I read it too. EMNIP, it was near Moscow at the end of 1941. Ours were on the T-34, the Germans on the PzIII.
    2. hohol95
      hohol95 21 January 2021 08: 32
      +4
      There was information that after 1945, some of the Japanese tanks were asked to be converted into tractors for the needs of loggers.
      1. Mister X
        Mister X 21 January 2021 19: 17
        +4
        Quote: hohol95
        some of the Japanese tanks were asked to be converted into tractors for the needs of loggers.

        hi
        I remember a post-war newsreel: a peaceful tank (without a tower) on a collective farm carries cans of milk
    3. Alien From
      Alien From 21 January 2021 23: 31
      +5
      I agree with you completely, my grandmother used tanks in the form of tractors and tractors on the collective farm immediately after the war.
  2. Vladimir_2U
    Vladimir_2U 21 January 2021 06: 10
    -4
    The chassis and transmission were often out of order, and the Panther engines of the first modifications were prone to overheating and sometimes ignited spontaneously.

    Probably one of the myths about the "self-igniting" motors of the early "Panthers". The noticeably heavier "Tigers" did not have the same engines burning, why? There is a completely logical version: the heavy losses of the "Panthers" on marches and in the areas of concentration were from the Il-2 raids with the strategically sudden massive use of PTABs. But this version contradicts the official German version of the air superiority conquered by the Germans over Kursk and therefore is not particularly covered.
    1. Toucan
      Toucan 21 January 2021 07: 08
      +9
      Probably one of the myths about the "self-igniting" motors of the early "Panthers".

      Here is what he writes about this "myth"
      military historian Markus Pöhlmann in his work Tank and the Mechanization of War:
      The engine, which had been boosted from 21 liters to 23 liters, would often ignite spontaneously, and the gearbox and transmission were too weak for such an engine.

      Ferdinand Maria von Senger und Etterlin recalled the first battles with the participation of the new "Panthers":
      «Most of the tanks delivered by the railway to Orel and reaching Belgorod on their own stopped en route. Basically, they had spontaneous combustion of motors; many had transmission failures.
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 21 January 2021 07: 15
        -5
        Once again, the Panthers and Tigers had the SAME engines, something about the Tigers is not written about any spontaneous combustion.
        1. Toucan
          Toucan 21 January 2021 07: 28
          +13
          I beg your pardon, but I trust the historian and the participant of the battles more. hi It is strange that you deny the documented facts. request
          The panther was created in a great hurry by the time of sending to the front, it was brought worse than the Tiger. In addition, these are different machines, although they used the same engines, but their placement in the MTO could be different. The Tiger was much wider than the Panther.
          1. Vladimir_2U
            Vladimir_2U 21 January 2021 08: 42
            -4
            Quote: Tucan
            I apologize, but I believe in the historian and the participant of the battles more
            Of course, these are German historians, and they will not lie.
            Quote: Tucan
            but their placement in the MTO could be different. The Tiger was much wider than the Panther.
            But no, and the layout of the MTO was approximately the same and the width of the body is approximately equal, I found only the CT and the Panther, but the width of the Tiger is even slightly less than that of the CT:
        2. PilotS37
          PilotS37 21 January 2021 08: 07
          +12
          Quote: Vladimir_2U
          Once again, the Panthers and Tigers had the SAME engines, something about the Tigers is not written about any spontaneous combustion.

          Well, the problem could not be in the engine as such, but in its operating conditions: a tighter engine compartment, poor engine cooling, fuel leaks from pipeline fittings ...
          1. Vladimir_2U
            Vladimir_2U 21 January 2021 08: 49
            -1
            Quote: PilotS37
            but in the conditions of its operation: a tighter engine compartment, poor engine cooling, fuel leaks from pipeline fittings ...
            The Tiger is 7 or how many tons heavier than the Panther, but at the same time the width of the hull is about the same as on the Panther. Just compare the photos of MTO Tiger and Panther on the net.
            1. strelokmira
              strelokmira 21 January 2021 18: 22
              -11%
              The Tiger is 7 or how many tons heavier than the Panther, but the width of the hull is about the same as on the Panther

              Not there you are looking for the truth, my friend, on the hurray "patriotic" site you will be showered with minuses and finished. And if you understand it, it turns out that the engines themselves did not burn and the chess suspension did not stop from dirt. Too many myths about bad German equipment our urashkas have invented, well, we must somehow devalue the victory of the USSR in the Second World War
        3. Mister X
          Mister X 21 January 2021 21: 34
          +5
          Quote: Vladimir_2U
          something about the Tigers about any spontaneous combustion do not write.

          hi
          Why then? They write.
          For example, Otto Carius writes in his book "Tigers in the Mud"

          January 9 1943 years
          Losses
          ... 1 tank "T-VI" as a result of a fire in the engine; the flame was extinguished with an automatic fire extinguisher;

          24 1944 June
          In the evening, the second tank caught fire while trying to move back on its own. This happened as a result of damage to the fuel line. However, the fire was extinguished by the crew.


          From the same book
          TECHNICAL REPORT ON THE COMPLETION OF COMBAT ACTIONS
          Repair platoon
          502nd Heavy Tank Battalion
          Inspector Kenker
          Shop manager Neubert
          In the field
          January 29 1943 years

          Vi. Engine damage (fire in the carburetor)
          Vii. Fire in the engine
          VIII. Inadequate fire extinguishing system
          1. Vladimir_2U
            Vladimir_2U 22 January 2021 03: 13
            -4
            I agree that there were, but how many?
            1. Mister X
              Mister X 22 January 2021 08: 51
              +5
              Quote: Vladimir_2U
              I agree that there were

              Stop wagging like that politician.
              Before my comment, you denied the fact of spontaneous combustion, and gave your reasons.
              What do you think?

              Quote: Vladimir_2U
              The noticeably heavier "Tigers" did not have the same engines burning, why?

              Quote: Vladimir_2U
              the layout of the MTO was approximately the same and the width of the hull is approximately equal, I found only the CT and the Panther, but the width of the Tiger is even slightly less

              Quote: Vladimir_2U
              the Panthers and Tigers had the SAME engines, something about the Tigers does not write about any spontaneous combustion.
              1. Vladimir_2U
                Vladimir_2U 22 January 2021 10: 20
                -3
                Quote: Mister X
                Stop wagging like that politician.
                Before my comment, you denied the fact of spontaneous combustion, and gave your reasons.
                What do you think?
                Oh oh, masked whistleblower, give up, give up
      2. Dmitry V.
        Dmitry V. 21 January 2021 10: 42
        +8
        Quote: Tucan
        Here is what he writes about this "myth"
        military historian Markus Pöhlmann in his work Tank and the Mechanization of War:
        The engine, which had been boosted from 21 liters to 23 liters, would often ignite spontaneously, and the gearbox and transmission were too weak for such an engine.


        For starters, the Panthers were simply late for the start of the attack. The 39th regiment arrived in the concentration area near the village of Moshennoye late in the evening on June 4, having lost two Panthers on the way from the unloading station, which had been burnt down by a fire in the engine compartment. Several more cars were out of order due to technical problems. As a result, when the Panthers finally finished refueling and began to move out, the clock was already 08.15, and von Laukert had 184 combat-ready tanks.

        https://warspot.ru/3055-debyut-panter
        Preparing to repel the German offensive, Chistyakov's soldiers additionally dug an anti-tank ditch, connecting it with the already existing ravine so that the brook turned the bottom of the ditch into a swamp. It was in this ditch that von Strachwitz's tank regiment rested at dawn on July 5. An attempt to force the obstacle on their own led only to the fact that several tanks remained at the bottom of the ditch and on the approaches to it - having been blown up by mines or simply stuck.

        Panzer regiment "Panthers" is still located south of heights. 229.8. Forcing the beam will take significantly longer than previously thought. On the equipment and tanks of the division stuck in front of the beam, intensive and very powerful raids by enemy aircraft were made, which led to high losses, especially in the officer corps.

        In a book by the American historian Robert Forczyk, the episode is described as follows:
        By the time the Panthers arrived, the sappers had already recognized this part of the ditch as impassable for tanks and were looking for other ways to bypass them. After a brief confusion, one of the commanders - von Lauckert or the commander of the 51st Battalion, Meyer - decided to try to cross the ravine. Several "panthers" of the 1st and 2nd companies moved along a narrow strip, cleared of mines by sappers, but quickly got bogged down in the thick mud at the bottom of the ravine.

        Seeing this embarrassment, Chief Lieutenant Helmut Langhammer tried to lead his trailing 4th Company westward in order to cross the ravine elsewhere. But the path he had chosen very quickly ended in a minefield. The commander himself was wounded, and his tank was out of order.

        Very soon, about 25 "Panthers" from the 51st Tank Battalion and the brigade headquarters were immobilized by a combination of mud, mines and technical malfunctions. The Panthers could not maneuver on slippery slopes - when trying to get out of the load, the teeth of sloths at the driving wheels began to crumble... Soviet artillery began shelling a huge mass of stationary tanks in their affected area. Although the armor of the "panthers" was supposed to reliably protect against shelling, Langhammer's tank # 401 was destroyed by a successful ricochet into the lower armor plate. Many other tanks were damaged and at least six tankers were killed.


        So from the first day of the fighting it is clear that only 2 panthers out of 200 burned out due to overheating of the engines on the march, several failed transmissions, 184 panthers went on the attack in the morning of July 5, 1943, 25 of them were hit by aircraft, artillery or received technical damage due to being stuck in an anti-tank ditch.
        Von Laukert's "Panthers" got lost, moving forward through unfamiliar terrain with no landmarks. The regiment was deployed in a double column, with the exception of the leading company, which was moving in a wedge formation. Since the Panthers were going without infantry, they did not notice any signs of the enemy until, two kilometers east of Cherkasskoye, they drove straight into a minefield. How many tanks were instantly immobilized. The leading battalion of Major Gerhard Tebbe stood in the affected area, and the Soviet artillery began shelling the trapped German unit.

        The number of combat-ready tanks continued to decline, by the evening of July 6, about 40 of them remained in service, and by the evening of July 7 - only 10. And although in the future, due to the prompt commissioning of tanks blown up by mines and faulty tanks, German repairmen managed to maintain the number of Panthers "At the level of 20-40 cars,


        Description of hostilities - does not indicate spontaneous combustion of tanks (1% of the total).
        So the fact took place, but did not have any decisive impact.

        Overloaded transmission - crumbling gear final drives, yes - quite a massive phenomenon for new panthers (due to the heavy weight of the tank and the action on rough terrain).
    2. svp67
      svp67 21 January 2021 10: 15
      +8
      Quote: Vladimir_2U
      Probably one of the myths about the "self-igniting" motors of the early "Panthers".

      No, in one of the German reports on the first results of the operation of these tanks, it was noted that the fuel line was depressurized from vibration, which led to ignition. The military demanded to eliminate this deficiency
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 22 January 2021 03: 09
        -1
        Quote: Dmitry Vladimirovich
        Description of hostilities - does not indicate spontaneous combustion of tanks (1% of the total).
        So the fact took place, but did not have any decisive impact.
      2. Lynnot
        Lynnot 22 January 2021 22: 49
        +1
        I read that the British Panther engine spontaneously ignited and burned during testing. And there was an interesting article about this engine with a description of its diseases - https://topwar.ru/171818-tankovyj-motor-maybach-hl-230-sovetskie-otzyvy-i-remont-na-zile.html
    3. Romka47
      Romka47 22 January 2021 11: 10
      +2
      The engines of the much heavier "Tigers" did not burn

      Let me disagree

      The first case of combat use of the heavy tank Pz.Kpfw.VI occurred in September 1942 near Leningrad. Several "Tigers" tried to attack off-road under the fire of Soviet artillery. In this case, one tank was captured by the Red Army.

      Right in this moment, one of the TIGERS caught fire itself. that is, in the very first battle, the same motors and caught fire.
      1. Vladimir_2U
        Vladimir_2U 22 January 2021 11: 39
        -2
        Quote: Romka47
        In this case, one tank was captured by the Red Army.

        Right in this moment, one of the TIGERS caught fire itself. that is, in the very first battle, the same motors caught fire.
        Where is it from? Here is it:
        According to the report of the command of the German heavy tank battalion sPzAbt 502 of January 31, 1943, to the headquarters of the 26th Army Corps with a list of tanks irretrievably lost in January battles, two vehicles participated in this combat episode. The first with the serial number 250005 burned out after an anti-tank gun shell hit the engine compartment; the second with the factory number 250009 got stuck in a swamp and was abandoned by the crew
        1. Romka47
          Romka47 22 January 2021 14: 24
          +1
          Right in this moment, one of the TIGERS caught fire itself. that is, in the very first battle, the same motors caught fire. Here, forgive me, I wrote a "moment" but in fact there are several episodes connected.
          Now I will try to find material, I have already read it for a long time, one caught fire even before the battle, almost immediately after unloading at the station, what you described does not even refer to the first battle. They unloaded at the end of August, and did not go on the attack, or rather, they went but the transmission of 2 cars flew off and one caught fire (as I understand it is not critical), they rolled back, spare parts were delivered by transport workers, and 5 cars went "into battle" only on September 16 , snatched out several direct hits without tangible damage, and fired themselves. it is unknown whether they were hit. And they suffered losses already on September 21, there were just episodes with getting into the MTO and getting stuck, most likely what you described applies to this. Again, they describe both ours and the Germans differently, but the middle is something like this.
  3. Ingvar 72
    Ingvar 72 21 January 2021 07: 33
    +4
    Sergey, as always, is on top! good
    To power the tanks, it is necessary to provide for an uninterrupted supply of high quality aviation gasoline.
    I think this was the main reason for the limited use of captured tanks. our tanks worked exclusively on diesel fuel, and delivering gasoline to the units for only two or three captured tanks is about the same as delivering caviar to starving Leningrad. hi
    1. hohol95
      hohol95 21 January 2021 08: 30
      +9
      Su-76 together with T40 / 60/70 means they ate "black caviar" of the B70 type?
      1. Ingvar 72
        Ingvar 72 21 January 2021 08: 37
        0
        Yes, because the saturation of the troops with these machines was small, and pointwise. request
        1. The leader of the Redskins
          The leader of the Redskins 21 January 2021 09: 01
          +11
          Do not play sports, comrades. Yes, in our tank units there were both purely "diesel" and "mixed" units. But, in any case, they were serviced by cars that we had, as you know, carbureted. So the supply of gasoline is not a problem.
          It is another matter that our equipment used low-octane fuel, while trophy and Lend-Lease vehicles required a different gasoline ...
          1. hohol95
            hohol95 21 January 2021 19: 38
            +2
            Gasoline gasoline strife.
            And we had purely diesel only units completely consisting of KV-1; MK2 "Matilda"; MK3 "Valentine"; MK4 "Churchill"; M4 "Sherman". Until mid-1943, the T-70 tank was the second tank in the tank brigades. Together with the T-34.
          2. Alf
            Alf 21 January 2021 19: 53
            +2
            Quote: Leader of the Redskins
            that our equipment used low-octane fuel, and the trophy and Lend-Lease vehicles required a different gasoline ...

            Our tanks and cars ran on 66-70 gasoline, the Germans used at least 74.
            If Threes and Fours are still here and there, then the Tiger and Panther ate gasoline as if not into themselves.
        2. Bormanxnumx
          Bormanxnumx 21 January 2021 12: 32
          +7
          Quote: Ingvar 72
          Yes, because the saturation of the troops with these machines was small, and the

          Are you talking about the SU-76 which produced 43 pieces in 45-14000, or about the T-60,70 with a total circulation of more than 14000 pieces?
          1. Ingvar 72
            Ingvar 72 21 January 2021 12: 37
            +1
            Against 60.000 T-34s, not counting the KV.
            1. Bormanxnumx
              Bormanxnumx 21 January 2021 12: 57
              +6
              Quote: Ingvar 72
              Against 60.000 T-34s, not counting the KV.

              Until May 45, 48000 units of t-34,34-85 were produced. Let's add all the KVs, ISs and heavy ISUs - about 15000 more are coming up. A total of 63000 pieces of medium and heavy armored vehicles and 24000 of light vehicles is not so "small and point-like"
              1. Ingvar 72
                Ingvar 72 21 January 2021 13: 06
                -1
                Well, okay, they cling to you, I just said that the vast majority of equipment was diesel. If we count all types of self-propelled guns, tractors, the percentage of gasoline will be really small.
  4. Constanty
    Constanty 21 January 2021 08: 01
    +9
    Photo signed as:
    Captured tank "Panther" next to the heavy tank of British production "Churchill"



    depicts the Panther tank along with the Churchill south of Venlo, captured and used by British rather than Soviet troops. ...



    This was the early Pzkpfw V Aus. G from Panzer-Abteiling 2, Panzer Brigade 107, captured by British 6th Tank Brigade, 4th Armored Battalion near Overloon village.
    The captured tank received its own name "Cuckoo"
  5. cobalt
    cobalt 21 January 2021 08: 12
    +7
    Thank you Sergey for your work, an interesting article, rare photos, I saw it for the first time.
  6. Dmitry V.
    Dmitry V. 21 January 2021 09: 56
    +2
    The use of captured equipment of the Red Army, or rather the first armament, began with the SG-122 - an unsuccessful attempt to establish the production of self-propelled guns on the chassis of the troika.

    After the appearance of the GKO decree on the termination of the production of SG-122 at plant No. 40, GBTU proposed to use the reserve of captured chassis, first intended for the installation of M-30 howitzers, to be used as a base for a self-propelled gun with a 76-mm cannon.
    On January 18, 1943, GKO decree No. 2758ss "On the organization at plant No. 37 of the production of self-propelled artillery installations SU-76 based on captured" Artshturm "and T-III tanks with the 76-mm F-34 cannon was signed

    For the manufacture of such a vehicle with a crew of four, it was supposed to use the standard swinging part of the 76-mm F-34 tank gun and the chassis of the German captured T-3 (Pz III) tank or the Artshturm self-propelled gun (StuG III).
    So the subsequent use of fours, fives and sixes is a logical continuation of this practice: the enemy left you a weapon - turn against him ...
    1. Toucan
      Toucan 21 January 2021 10: 06
      +8
      The author talked about SPGs based on "triplets" in the previous part of the cycle.
  7. Krasnoyarsk
    Krasnoyarsk 21 January 2021 09: 56
    0
    The article is good, interesting, but a lot of repetitions.
  8. Paragraph Epitafievich Y.
    Paragraph Epitafievich Y. 21 January 2021 12: 12
    +6
    Sorry, but this is the photo:

    has nothing to do with the Red Army. This trophy panther with its own name "Cuckoo" from the British 4th Battalion of the Coldstream Guard shells Geisteren Castle on November 25, 1944. Previously belonged to the 107th TB of the Wehrmacht (tactical number 222). Captured from Overlon after being defeated by PIAT
    1. DWG1905
      DWG1905 21 January 2021 12: 47
      +2
      The article is not very informative, except for a few photos of which I have not seen before. Questions to the author. Where is the information on the use of captured German tanks in the Far East. There were a lot of cars, I hear about tanks for the first time.
      Where is the information on the capture of the Tiger in September 1942. The first one was captured in January 1943, or I don’t know something. According to the photo of the Panther with Churchill, it looks like this is the western front, a star in a circle, has already been commented. Regarding PTABs (response to comment) on the Kursk Bulge. Their effectiveness was equal to "0", because due to an unsuccessful design, the container did not open, the bombs did not disperse. Then they switched to another design. After the Battle of Kursk, ours climbed all the broken tanks and determined how each was disabled. There is a report in Podolsk. The effectiveness of aviation against tanks was not very good. I recommend the author to read the reports of Kubinka on tests of captured tanks.
      1. vladcub
        vladcub 21 January 2021 15: 00
        +3
        "On the capture of the 'tiger' in September 1942" I agree: 'the author was mistaken. I don't remember exactly, it seems that it was on the Volkhov front. The tanks were damaged, the crews leaving the cars damaged the engine. The sappers who arrived were hidden, one machine was completely destroyed, and the other did not have time. A couple of years ago, there was a mention on TV that the remains of a destroyed tank were found.
        I hope that V.N. will clarify this episode
      2. vch62388
        vch62388 21 January 2021 17: 37
        0
        I agree about the Far East, very interesting. As far as I know, tank units arrived from the west, leaving the equipment in the same place, and upon arrival they received new tanks from the factories. The tank units available in the Far East also received new T-34s (in the 1st battalions, the rest remained on the T-26 and BT). There is no reason to drag vehicles across the country for which neither spare parts nor trophy ammunition can be found in the Far East.
  9. voyaka uh
    voyaka uh 21 January 2021 18: 33
    +6
    "captured Pz.Kpfw.IIIs sometimes operated on the front lines. Due to the presence of a commander's cupola, good optical instruments and a radio station, troikas were often used as command tanks and vehicles of forward artillery observers." ///
    ---
    "Pz.Kpfw.III sometimes ...." not only on the front line, but also behind enemy lines. It was perfect
    tank for discreet infiltration through enemy defenses. It had a quiet engine
    and excellent visibility for the commander.
    This is exactly how the Germans used it in blitzkriegs.
    They did not break through their defenses, but went around it imperceptibly.
    The Red Army even had special field factories for the restoration of "Cs".
    1. Romka47
      Romka47 22 January 2021 11: 14
      +2
      In general, a good T-3 machine, not for the spearhead of the attack, of course, but the business has done a lot.
  10. dgonni
    dgonni 22 January 2021 13: 28
    0
    Website I remember! There are memories of a tanker who used groove 4. According to him, the perfect tank for the crew! Front transmission! Even a breakdown in the forehead did not lead to death or injury to the crew. The mask held EVERYTHING that came. He was a mechanic and was very offended by the gearbox. In terms of noise and stench. For runs on the roads, he was not very happy. Although, according to him, the question of gasoline was in the first place!
    Those who do not believe in the site! Nobody rubbed his memories!
  11. maximghost
    maximghost 22 January 2021 15: 48
    0
    And there will be an article about Hungarian trophy equipment in the Red Army?
  12. NF68
    NF68 22 January 2021 18: 30
    0
    The 88 mm Kw.K.36 tank gun was created on the basis of the FlaK 18/36 anti-aircraft gun. This gun accelerated the Pzgr. 39/43 weighing 10,2 kg up to 810 m / s,


    German sources for this projectile indicate an initial speed of 773 m / s.

    Some late-production tanks had 960 hp diesel engines. from.


    Are there more detailed data on this option and especially on the engine?