Military Review

The use of captured German tanks and self-propelled guns in the initial period of the Great Patriotic War

62

In the initial period of the war, the main striking force of the Panzerwaffe was built at German factories Tanks: Pz.Kpfw.II, Pz.Kpfw.III, Pz.Kpfw.IV, captured Czechoslovakian PzKpfw. 35 (t) and PzKpfw. 38 (t), as well as self-propelled guns StuG.III.


According to information published in the reference book "German Land Army 1933-1945", as of June 22, 1941, on the eve of the attack on the USSR, the total number of tanks and self-propelled guns (excluding flamethrowers) among the Germans in the East was 3332 units. During the first year of the war, for various reasons, about 75% of the original German tank fleet was lost.

German tanks in varying degrees of safety were captured by the Red Army in the first days of the war. But there is very little reliable information about the combat use of captured armored vehicles in June-July 1941.

In conditions of a disruption in communication with higher headquarters, detailed reports on the progress of the battles often did not reach them. Of no less importance was the fact that the front line was unstable, and the battlefield often remained behind the enemy. Nevertheless, several cases of the use of captured armored vehicles by the Red Army in June-August 1941 were documented.

First experience


The first mention of the use of captured German tanks in battles dates back to June 28-29, 1941.

It is known that in the zone of responsibility of the 8th Mechanized Corps on the Southwestern Front, our troops found 12 enemy tanks, which were blown up by mines and put out of action by artillery fire. Subsequently, these vehicles were used as fixed firing points near the villages of Verba and Ptichye. Due to the rapid change in the front line, these captured German tanks as pillboxes were not used for long.

After the initial shock caused by the sudden attack of the enemy passed, and our troops gained combat experience, the intelligent use of captured armored vehicles began.

So on July 7, 1941, during a counterattack by the 18th Panzer Division of the 7th Mechanized Corps of the Western Front, military technician of the 1st rank Ryazanov (18th Panzer Division) in the Kotsy area broke through with his T-26 tank into the rear of the enemy, where within 26 hours fought. Then he again went out to his own people, leading out of the encirclement two T-XNUMXs and one captured Pz.Kpfw.III with a damaged gun. It is not known whether the armament of the trophy troika was brought into working order, but ten days later this vehicle was lost.

In a battle on August 5, 1941, on the outskirts of Leningrad, the combined tank regiment of the Leningrad armored training courses for command personnel captured two tanks of Czechoslovak production, which were blown up by mines. Apparently, we are talking about light tanks PzKpfw. 35 (t), which belonged to the 6th such division of the Wehrmacht. After repairs, these machines were used against their former owners.

The use of captured German tanks and self-propelled guns in the initial period of the Great Patriotic War
Light tank PzKpfw. 35 (t)

The first German self-propelled guns StuG.III were captured by the Red Army in August 1941 during the defense of Kiev. In total, our troops had two serviceable vehicles at their disposal. One of them, after being shown to the residents of the city and staffing with a Soviet crew, went to the front, the other was evacuated to the East.


Servicemen of the Red Army on the captured Stug.III self-propelled gun.

During the Smolensk defensive battle in September 1941, the tank crew of Junior Lieutenant Klimov, having lost their own tank, moved to the captured StuG.III. And during the fighting he knocked out two enemy tanks, an armored personnel carrier and two trucks.

October 8, 1941 Lieutenant Klimov, commanding a platoon of three captured StuG III,

"Performed a daring operation behind enemy lines"

for which he was nominated for the award of the Order of the Battle Red Banner.

On December 2, 1941, Lieutenant Klimov's self-propelled gun was destroyed by German artillery, and he himself was killed.

In 1941, the Red Army, conducting heavy defensive battles, used captured armored vehicles sporadically. Tanks and self-propelled guns repulsed from the enemy appeared in noticeable numbers in the Red Army in the spring of 1942. These were mainly vehicles that were knocked out or abandoned by the enemy, which remained on the battlefields after the end of the battle for Moscow, as well as successful counterattacks at Rostov and Tikhvin. In total, at the end of 1941, our troops managed to capture more than 120 units of tanks and self-propelled guns, suitable for further use after carrying out refurbishment.


A captured Pz.Kpfw.III tank is towed to the rear for refurbishment.

Trophy department


For the organized collection of trophies, at the end of 1941 in the Armored Directorate of the Red Army, an evacuation and trophy collection department was created, and on March 23, 1942, the People's Commissar of Defense of the USSR signed an order "On accelerating the evacuation of captured and domestic armored vehicles from the battlefield."


Loading captured tanks onto railway platforms to be sent for repairs.

Several enterprises were involved in the restoration and repair of captured armored vehicles. The first repair base, which began to bring the captured enemy tanks into working order, was the repair base No. 82 in Moscow. This enterprise, created in December 1941, was originally intended to repair British tanks that arrived under Lend-Lease. However, already in March 1942 captured tanks began to be delivered to Rembaza No. 82.


Another Moscow repair company engaged in the restoration of German armored vehicles was a branch of Plant No. 37, created on the site of the production evacuated to Sverdlovsk. The branch was engaged in the repair of light Soviet T-60 tanks and trucks, the restoration of light tanks PzKpfw.I, PzKpfw.II and PzKpfw. 38 (t), as well as armored vehicles.

Since 1941, 32 bases of central subordination have been repairing captured weapons and equipment. Engines and transmissions were repaired using parts removed from vehicles that could not be restored, and damage to the chassis was repaired. Twelve heavy industry factories were involved in the case, which were managed by different people's commissariats. In total, in 1942, about 100 copies of captured tanks and self-propelled guns were repaired at the repair depots.

After the encirclement and defeat of the 6th German Army at Stalingrad, a significant amount of armored vehicles fell into the hands of the Red Army.


Part of it was restored and used in subsequent battles. So, at the restored plant number 264 in Stalingrad from June to December 1943, 83 German Pz tanks were repaired. Kpfw.III and Pz. Kpfw.IV.

During wartime, Soviet factories repaired at least 800 captured tanks and self-propelled guns, some of them were transferred to the active army, some to military schools and reserve units, and some were converted into ACS SG-122 and SU-76I, equipping them with Soviet-made guns ...

In addition to the rembases located in the deep rear, mobile technical brigades were formed in the frontline zone, which, if possible, repaired captured equipment on the spot.


Repair of ACS Stug.III in the frontal zone.

To facilitate the development and operation of captured tanks by the Red Army tankers in 1942, specialized memos were published on the use of the most massive samples of captured German combat vehicles.

Considering the use of captured tanks, it is worth describing in more detail the equipment on which Soviet crews most often fought. In the first year of the war, our troops captured PzKpfw.I and PzKpfw.II light tanks.

Light tanks PzKpfw.I and PzKpfw.II



Light tank PzKpfw.I

The light tank Pz.Kpfw.I (with machine-gun armament and a crew of two) was considered from the very beginning as a transitional model on the way to building more advanced tanks.

By the time of the attack on the USSR, the PzKpfw.I, armed with two rifle-caliber machine guns and protected by bulletproof armor, was frankly outdated and therefore mainly used in rear units, for training purposes and for patrolling front-line roads. Tanks of this type were converted into ammunition carriers and artillery observer vehicles. A number of captured PzKpfw.Is were rebuilt at reman bases, but there is no information about their combat use.

The Red Army captured several tank destroyers 4,7cm Pak (t) Sfl. auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B, which are also known as Panzerjäger I. This was the first serial German anti-tank self-propelled gun, created on the chassis of the Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B. In total, 202 self-propelled guns were built using the PzKpfw.I chassis.


Soviet tankers next to the captured tank destroyer Panzerjager I.

Instead of the dismantled turret, a wheelhouse was installed on the chassis of a light tank with a 47-mm anti-tank gun of Czechoslovak production 4,7cm PaK (t). Before entering service with the Pak 50 38-mm anti-tank gun, this gun was the most powerful anti-tank weapon of the Wehrmacht, very slightly inferior to the latter in terms of armor penetration. At a distance of 1000 m at a right angle, an armor-piercing projectile pierced 55 mm of armor.

In 1941, to increase the armor penetration of the gun, the Germans introduced the PzGr 40 armor-piercing sub-caliber projectile with a tungsten carbide core into the ammunition load, which, at a distance of up to 400 m, confidently pierced the frontal armor of the Soviet medium tank T-34. However, the share of sub-caliber shells in the ammunition load of German anti-tank guns was small, and they turned out to be effective only at a relatively short distance.

The PzKpfw.II light tank was armed with a 20 mm automatic cannon and a 7,92 mm machine gun.

The armor-piercing shells of the 20-mm automatic cannon easily overcame the protection of Soviet light tanks built in the 1930s, but were powerless against the frontal armor of the T-34 and KV-1 even when fired at pistol-shot distance.

The PzKpfw. II armor provided protection against armor-piercing rifle bullets.


A Red Army soldier inspects a light tank PzKpfw.II.

Weakly armed tanks were not of particular value, and therefore the use of captured PzKpfw.II was episodic, mainly for reconnaissance, patrolling and protecting the rear of objects. Several repaired light "panzers" in 1942 in the Red Army were operated as artillery tractors.

Pz.Kpfw.38


Of much greater interest in terms of combat use was a Czech-made tank (t). Compared to the PzKpfw.II, this vehicle had more powerful armament and better armor protection. In addition (according to the recollections of specialists who participated in the restoration of captured armored vehicles), tanks built in Czechoslovakia were structurally simpler than German-made vehicles. And it was easier to repair them. In most cases, if the damaged Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) did not burn, they turned out to be suitable for restoration or served as a source of spare parts.


The Red Army soldiers inspect the Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t) tank.

After the occupation of Czechoslovakia, the Germans got over 750 light tanks LT vz. 38, which were designated Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) in the Wehrmacht.

By the standards of the late 1930s, it was a decent combat vehicle. With a combat weight of about 11 tons, a 125 hp carburetor engine. from. accelerated the tank on the highway to 40 km / h.

The frontal armor of the modernized tanks was 50 mm thick, and the sides and stern were 15 mm thick.

The Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t) tank was armed with a 37 mm cannon and two 7,92 mm machine guns. A 37-mm gun with a 42-caliber barrel at a distance of 500 m along the normal could penetrate 38 mm armor.

Thus, the Pz.Kpfw.38 (t), surpassing the Soviet light tanks T-26, BT-5 and BT-7 in protection, could confidently hit them at real battle distances.

At the same time, Czech armor was inferior in quality to German. If the 45-mm armor-piercing shells of 50 mm frontal armor confidently held at a distance of more than 400 m, then the hits of 76,2-mm high-explosive fragmentation and armor-piercing shells in most cases were fatal - the Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) armor was too fragile.

Another reason for the increased vulnerability was that the hull and turret of the Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) were assembled with riveted joints. Even in the absence of through penetration, when a projectile hits, the inner part of the rivet often breaks off and turns into a striking element.

Despite the shortcomings, in the German tank divisions that participated in the attack on the USSR, there were 660 Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) units, which was approximately 19% of the total number of tanks involved in the Eastern Front. The Soviet troops managed to capture about 50 Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) fit for restoration, of which about three dozen were brought to combat readiness.

Most likely, the first case of combat use of captured Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) took place in the Crimea. Several of these tanks from the 22nd Panzer Division of the Wehrmacht were captured, and these tanks fought for a short time as part of the Crimean Front.

As for the vehicles repaired at Rembaza # 82, their armament was changed. Instead of 7,92 mm ZB-53 machine guns, the tanks were rearmed with Soviet 7,62 mm DT-29. Also, the issue of replacing the 37-mm turret gun with a 45-mm 20K cannon and a 20-mm TNSh-20 automatic cannon was being considered.


Echelon with repaired and re-equipped captured Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t) tanks.

It is reliably known that the captured Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) were transferred to a separate special tank battalion (OOTB), which was part of the 20th Army of the Western Front.

The battalion was formed in July 1942, its commander was Major F.V. Nebylov. This unit participated in hostilities from August to October 1942, and was often referred to in documents by the name of the commander

"Nebylov's battalion".

To prevent the shelling of the OOTB tanks by their troops, large white stars were applied to the frontal plate of the hull and side of the tower.

During positional battles, a special tank battalion suffered heavy losses. Due to combat damage and malfunctions, shortly before the withdrawal of the battalion for re-formation, the surviving Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) tanks were dug into the ground and used as fixed firing points.

Trophy triplets and fours


In the initial period of the war, the most frequently used captured tank in the Red Army was the medium Pz.Kpfw.III. At the end of 1941 - beginning of 1942, as part of tank units, together with the T-26, BT-5, BT-7, T-34 and KV, trophy troikas often fought.


According to archival sources, by mid-1942, Soviet troops captured more than 300 serviceable or recoverable Pz. Kpfw.III and SPGs based on them. Apparently, these are the vehicles that got into the official reports and were evacuated to collection points of captured armored vehicles. But some of the captured Pz.Kpfw.III tanks and the StuG.III self-propelled guns, captured in good condition or repaired in front-line mobile workshops, were not officially recorded.


Much less often than Pz.Kpfw.III, in the initial period of the war, our fighters managed to capture Pz.Kpfw.IV medium tanks. This was due to the fact that 439 Pz.Kpfw.IV tanks were involved in Operation Barbarossa, which was approximately 13% of all German tanks that participated in the June 1941 attack on the Soviet Union.


Captured PzIV captured from the 22nd Panzer Division of the Wehrmacht. Crimean front

The relative small number of Pz.Kpfw.IV was explained by the fact that the German command initially considered the Pz.Kpfw.III as the main Panzerwaffe tank, and the Pz.Kpfw.IV, armed with a short-barreled 75-mm cannon, was to become an artillery fire support tank.

The main targets for the 75 mm KwK 37 cannon with a barrel length of 24 caliber were light field fortifications, firing points and manpower.

To combat armored targets in the early modifications of the Pz.Kpfw.IV ammunition, there were K.Gr.rot.Pz armor-piercing tracer shells. weighing 6,8 kg. This projectile with an initial speed of 385 m / s at a distance of 100 m along the normal could penetrate 40 mm of armor, which was clearly not enough to defeat tanks with anti-cannon armor. In this regard, shots with cumulative shells were created for the 75-mm KwK 37 cannon, the armor penetration of which, when hit at a right angle, was 70-75 mm. However, due to the low initial speed, the effective firing range against armored vehicles did not exceed 500 m.

A 7,92 mm MG 34 machine gun was paired with the cannon. Another machine gun, mounted in the ball mount of the hull's frontal armor, was at the disposal of the radio operator.

The armor thickness of the early Pz.Kpfw.IV was the same as on the Pz.Kpfw.III. Based on the experience of hostilities in France and Poland, the protection of tanks of the Pz.KpfW.IV Ausf.D modification, produced in the period from October 1939 to May 1941 in the amount of 200 units, was increased by installing an additional 30-mm frontal and 20-mm side armor.

The PzIV Ausf.E tanks, produced from September 1940 to April 1941, had 50 mm frontal armor and 20 mm side armor, reinforced with 20 mm armor plates. The frontal armor of the turret was 35 mm, the side armor of the turret was 20 mm. A total of 206 PzIV Ausf.E tanks were delivered to the customer.

Shielding with additional armor was irrational and was considered only a temporary solution, and the protection of the turret was considered insufficient. This was the reason for the appearance of the next modification - Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf.F. Instead of using hinged armor, the thickness of the frontal upper hull plate, the frontal plate of the turret and the gun mantlet was increased to 50 mm, and the thickness of the hull sides and sides and stern of the turret - up to 30 mm. The composition of the weapons remained the same. From April 1941 to March 1942, 468 PzIV Ausf.F tanks were produced.

The combat weight of the Pz.Kpfw.IV tanks used on the Eastern Front in the first half of the war was 20-22,3 tons. The 300 hp engine. with., running on gasoline, provided the maximum speed on the highway up to 42 km / h.

Trophy SPGs


In the first two years of the war, the German StuG.III self-propelled guns were captured by the Red Army even more often than the Pz.Kpfw.IV medium tanks. This self-propelled gun was created in response to the demand of the Wehrmacht command, who wants to get a mobile artillery mount capable of acting in the interests of the infantry and clearing its way on the battlefield, destroying firing points and making passes through wire obstacles with direct fire.

Unlike tanks for self-propelled guns, direct fire support did not require the placement of weapons in a rotating turret. The priority areas were considered to be firepower, small dimensions, good frontal armor and low production costs. This self-propelled gun was created using the chassis of the Pz.Kpfw.III tank.

In the wheelhouse, protected by 50 mm frontal and 30 mm side armor, a 75 mm StuK 37 cannon with a barrel length of 24 caliber was installed. The mass of the StuG.III self-propelled guns of the first modifications was 19,6-22 tons. The road speed was up to 40 km / h.

Production of the serial StuG.III Ausf.A began in January 1940. The production of assault self-propelled guns with short-barreled 75-mm guns continued until February 1942.

A total of 834 ACS of the Ausf.A / C / D / E modifications were produced. Most of them ended up on the Eastern Front.


Captured self-propelled gun StuG.III with the inscription "Avenger".

In the first year of the war, in the absence of their own self-propelled guns, captured StuG.IIIs were actively used in the Red Army under the designation SU-75.

German "artillery attacks" had good combat and service-operational characteristics, had good protection in the frontal projection, were equipped with excellent optics and a completely satisfactory weapon. In addition to using the StuG.III in its original form, some of the vehicles were converted into 76,2 and 122 mm SPGs using Soviet artillery systems.

By the summer of 1942, the Soviet command had accumulated some experience in the use of captured self-propelled guns and had an idea of ​​what an assault ACS should be, designed for firing at visually observed targets.

Experts came to the conclusion that high-explosive 75-76,2-mm projectiles are suitable for providing fire support to infantry, they have a satisfactory fragmentation effect on the enemy's undeveloped manpower and can be used to destroy light field fortifications. But against capital fortifications and brick buildings turned into long-term firing points, self-propelled guns, equipped with larger caliber guns, were required.

Compared with the "three-inch" projectile, the howitzer 122-mm high-explosive fragmentation projectile had a significantly greater destructive effect. One shot from a 122 mm gun could achieve more than a few shots from a 76,2 mm gun. In this regard, on the basis of the StuG.III, it was decided to create an SPG armed with a 122 mm M-30 howitzer.

However, to accommodate the 122mm M-30 howitzer on the StuG.III chassis, a new, larger wheelhouse had to be redesigned. The Soviet-made fighting compartment, which housed 4 crew members, became significantly higher, its frontal part had anti-cannon armor.

The thickness of the frontal armor of the cabin is 45 mm, the sides are 35 mm, the stern is 25 mm, the roof is 20 mm. Thus, the security of the self-propelled gun in the frontal projection approximately corresponded to the average T-34 tank.


Captured StuG.III assault guns in the courtyard of the Moscow elevator plant. April 1942.

Serial production of 122-mm self-propelled guns on the StuG.III chassis began in late autumn 1942 at the non-evacuated facilities of the Mytishchi Carriage Works No. 592.

In the period from October 1942 to January 1943, 21 SPGs were handed over to military acceptance. The self-propelled gun received the designation SG-122, sometimes there is also SG-122A ("Artshturm").


ACS SG-122

Part of the SG-122 was sent to self-propelled artillery training centers, one machine was intended for testing at the Gorokhovets training ground. In February 1943, the 1435th self-propelled artillery regiment, which had 9 SU-76s and 12 SG-122s, was included in the 9th Panzer Corps of the 10th Army of the Western Front.

There is little information about the combat use of the SG-122. It is known that in the period from March 6 to March 15, the 1435th SAP, participating in battles, lost all its materiel from enemy fire and breakdowns and was sent for reorganization. During the battles, about 400 76,2 mm and more than 700 122 mm shells were used up. The actions of the 1435th SAP contributed to the capture of the villages of Nizhnyaya Akimovka, Verkhnyaya Akimovka and Yasenok. Moreover, in addition to firing points and anti-tank guns, several enemy tanks were destroyed.

In the course of hostilities, it turned out that due to the congestion of the front rollers, the resource and reliability of the chassis are low. In addition to poor personnel training, the results of combat use were affected by the lack of good sights and observation devices. Due to poor ventilation, there was a strong gas pollution in the conning tower, which forced them to fire with open hatches. Due to the tightness of the working conditions of the commander, two gunners and the loader were difficult.

The SU-76I ACS turned out to be much more successful. For the construction of this self-propelled gun, the Pz.Kpfw.III chassis was used. The self-propelled unit had a booking of the frontal part of the hull with a thickness of 30-50 mm, the side of the hull - 30 mm, the front of the cabin - 35 mm, the side of the cabin - 25 mm, the feed - 25 mm, the roof - 16 mm. The deckhouse had the shape of a truncated pyramid with rational angles of inclination of armor plates, which increased armor resistance. The self-propelled gun was armed with a 76,2-mm S-1 gun, which was created on the basis of the F-34 tank specifically for the light experimental self-propelled guns of the Gorky Automobile Plant.


ACS SU-76I with a commander's cupola.

Some of the vehicles intended for use as commanders were equipped with a powerful radio station and a commander's cupola with a Pz. Kpfw III.

When creating the SU-76I, the designers paid special attention to the review from the combat vehicle. In this regard, this self-propelled gun outperformed most of the Soviet tanks and self-propelled guns produced in the same time period. The SU-76I in a number of parameters looked more preferable than the SU-76 and SU-76M. First of all, the SU-76I won in terms of the safety and reliability of the engine-transmission group.

ACS SU-76I officially entered service on March 20, 1943. When forming units equipped with new self-propelled guns, the same regular order was used as for the SU-76, but instead of the commander's T-34s, at first they used captured Pz. Kpfw.III, which were then replaced by the SU-76I in the command version.

The release of self-propelled guns on a trophy chassis continued until November 1943 inclusive. A total of 201 SU-76Is were assembled.

The SU-76I self-propelled guns were popular among the crews who noted higher reliability, ease of control and an abundance of observation devices compared to the SU-76. In addition, in terms of mobility on rough terrain, the self-propelled gun was practically not inferior to the T-34 tanks, surpassing them in speed on good roads. Despite the presence of an armored roof, self-propelled guns liked the relative spaciousness inside the fighting compartment. Compared to other domestic self-propelled guns, the commander, gunner and loader in the conning tower were not too constrained.


Cases of successful use of the SU-76I against German tanks Pz.Kpfw.III and Pz.KpfW.IV have been documented. But in the summer of 1943, when the self-propelled guns first went into battle, their firepower was no longer enough for a confident fight with all the armored vehicles available to the Germans, and the armor did not provide protection against 50 and 75-mm armor-piercing shells. Nevertheless, the SU-76I SPGs fought successfully until the first half of 1944. After that, the few surviving vehicles were decommissioned due to the exhaustion of the running gear, engine and transmission resource.

On trophy materiel


In 1942-1943. on the Soviet-German front, several tank battalions of mixed composition fought, in which, in addition to Soviet-made armored vehicles and those obtained under Lend-Lease, there were captured Pz.Kpfw. 38 (t), Pz. Kpfw.III, Pz.Kpfw.IV and self-propelled guns StuG.III.


So, in the already mentioned "Nebylova battalion" there were 6 Pz.Kpfw.IV, 12 Pz. Kpfw.III, 10 Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) and 2 StuG.III.

Another battalion on captured materiel was also part of the 31st Army of the Western Front. As of August 1, 1942, it consisted of nine Soviet light T-60s and 19 captured German tanks.

The 75th separate tank battalion (from the 56th Army) as of June 23, 1943 had four companies in its composition: 1st and 4th captured tanks (four Pz.Kpfw.IV and eight Pz.Kpfw.III) , 2nd and 3rd - on British Mk.III Valentine (14 vehicles).

The 151st Tank Brigade received 22 German tanks in March (Pz.Kpfw.IV, Pz.Kpfw.III and Pz.Kpfw.II).

On August 28, 1943, units of the 44th Army were assigned a separate tank battalion, in which, in addition to the American M3 Stuart and M3 Lee, there were 3 Pz.Kpfw.IV and 13 Pz.Kpfw.III.


A unique military unit of its kind in the Red Army was the 213rd Tank Brigade, which was almost completely armed with captured armored vehicles.

On October 15, 1943, the brigade had 4 T-34 tanks, 35 Pz.Kpfw.III and 11 Pz.Kpfw.IV. After participating in hostilities (by the time of the withdrawal for reorganization) in early February 1943, 1 T-34 and 11 captured tanks remained in the brigade. There is information that part of the Pz.Kpfw.III and Pz.Kpfw.IV were out of order as a result of breakdowns.

In addition to various units of captured tanks, Soviet units had unreported single vehicles used to guard headquarters and rear facilities.

Some conclusions


Soviet crews who fought in captured tanks and self-propelled guns noted that the living conditions and ease of work in them were better than in Soviet vehicles. Our tankers highly appreciated German sights, observation devices and communications.

At the same time, German armored vehicles required more thorough maintenance and were much more difficult to repair.

In terms of firepower and level of protection, captured tanks captured in 1941–1942 did not surpass the thirty-four, yielding to it in cross-country ability on soft soils and snow.

The difficulty of starting the engine at negative temperatures was noted as a significant drawback.

The carburetor engines of the German tanks were very voracious, as a result of which the cruising range on a country road without refueling for the "triplets" and "fours" was 90-120 km.

Taking into account the difficulties of repairs in the field, the irregular supply of spare parts and ammunition, with the saturation of Soviet tank units with domestically produced armored vehicles in the second half of 1943, interest from the command of the Red Army in captured tanks decreased.

To be continued ...
Author:
Articles from this series:
Use of captured German pistols in the USSR
The use of German captured submachine guns in the USSR
The use of captured German rifles and machine guns in the USSR
The use of captured German machine guns in the USSR
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  1. Toucan
    Toucan 12 January 2021 05: 31
    +6
    Given the difficulties in supplying spare parts and ammunition, the regular use of captured German tanks in combat was problematic. At the same time, if our tankers managed to properly master the armored vehicles of German production, against the background of BT-5/7, T-26 and T-60 trophy troikas, fours and self-propelled guns did not look bad.
    1. Profiler
      Profiler 12 January 2021 06: 01
      +1


      ACS SU-76 " И" , What means - "made on a foreign chassis", in the caustic interpretation of some modern witches in relation to the defeated enemy power, sounds like"imported"Or"foreign car"...
      1. Constanty
        Constanty 12 January 2021 08: 52
        +14
        Two examples of the SU-76I have survived. One on the monument in Sarny (completely original), the other, as it seems to me, rebuilt from several on the StuG III chassis, in the museum on Poklonnaya Gora.

    2. Civil
      Civil 12 January 2021 09: 38
      +6
      A total of 201 SU-76Is were assembled.

      For captured vehicles - a significant amount.
  2. zyablik.olga
    zyablik.olga 12 January 2021 06: 31
    +27
    Considering that the "official position" lol allows me to get acquainted with the articles of the cycle earlier than other readers, I can state that a good series of articles on captured German weapons used in the USSR is being planned. Ahead of us are still publications dedicated to captured panthers and tigers, as well as German artillery. I hope, for this annotation, they will not scold me much in the evening ... repeat
    In general, for me personally, it is much easier and more interesting for me to read publications at the intersection of history and military equipment than Seryozhin's "zaum" on the topic of air defense. But here, for an amateur (suum cuique) ... request
    1. Sling cutter
      Sling cutter 12 January 2021 11: 29
      +11
      Quote: zyablik.olga
      there is a good series of articles on captured German weapons used in the USSR. Ahead of us are still publications dedicated to captured panthers and tigers, as well as German artillery.

      Great, we'll wait for the articles! good
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 12 January 2021 12: 22
      +8
      Olga, good afternoon love and hello to Sergey. hi
      My morning came quite late today, but that pleasure from reading was no less. smile
      Sergei has one question, but about the trophy "armored cars" he does not want to write an article? After all, they also served in the Red Army and made their contribution.

      Here, for example, is such a box under the designation Sd.Kfz.221.
      1. Bongo
        12 January 2021 13: 44
        +12
        Konstantin, hello!
        Olya had a rest this afternoon, and frolic a little in the comments to this article. Now she's making dinner, and two chocolate geeks are watching her closely.

        Quote: Sea Cat
        Sergei has one question, but about the trophy "armored cars" he does not want to write an article? After all, they also served in the Red Army and made their contribution.

        There was such a thought. yes But there is not a lot of reliable information about the use of captured armored vehicles and armored personnel carriers, and I don't want to just list the types.
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 12 January 2021 14: 31
          +4
          It is clear, it is a pity, otherwise it would have been a full cycle about the use of ABSOLUTELY all types of trophy equipment. But here, "the owner is the master", it makes no sense to write an article without desire either.
          And cats are good! smile
    3. LastPS
      LastPS 16 January 2021 23: 00
      +2
      The number of positive responses seems to confirm this. At least Sergei had a period when he complained about the lack of response from users and it just happened to be "crazy". He has the best layout of the material within the portal, so even non-core articles are interesting and easy to read. In addition, the material is reliable - it is not a "run to the top", but also not an incredible deepening into specifics. As for profile articles, I, as a reader, would never be able to see part of the picture in relation to air defense of different countries, for example - this is very cool, there are not many authors on VO who are able to do this, unfortunately. In general, thanks for your work!
  3. Constanty
    Constanty 12 January 2021 08: 43
    +5
    Photo signed as:
    Soviet tankers next to the captured tank destroyer Panzerjager I.



    signed on waralbum.ru more precisely
    Soviet tank crews driver Yakimenko and gunner Protazanov clarify the combat mission near the captured tank destroyer Panzerjäger I (4.7 cm Pak (t) Sfl auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B). Supposedly, the 31st Army of the Western Front. The machine is equipped with a Soviet-made headlamp.
  4. The leader of the Redskins
    The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 08: 46
    +6
    Unfortunately, I don’t have a monograph on Pz1 at hand now, but I remember that it mentioned the repair of two commander tanks in Moscow, in 1941. Armed, if I'm not mistaken, ShVAK, but the drawings and photos have not survived. Only the name of the engineer was mentioned.
    1. Mister X
      Mister X 12 January 2021 19: 04
      +4
      Quote: Leader of the Redskins
      it was mentioned about the repair of re-equipment in Moscow, in 1941, two command tanks. Armed, if I'm not mistaken ShVAK

      You are right.
      In Moscow, trophy tanks were repaired by Rembase No. 82 and a branch of Plant No. 37.

      Found the text of a letter dated July 2, 1942 to the main artillery department
      Author: Deputy Head of BTU GABTU KA Alymov

      I am asking for your order for a vacation for 132 ORVB the following artillery weapons at the expense of the limits allocated by the GAU KA for the GABTU KA for repairs:
      1 mm ShVAK cannons - 20 pc .;
      2. Machine guns DT - 15 pcs .;
      3. Boxes for 20 mm ShVAK - 32;
      4. Disks for diesel fuel - 308;
      5. Spare parts for the ShVAK gun - 4k-ta;
      6. ZIPkDT - 26k-tov;
      7. Sights TMFP-1 - 4;
      8. Bannikov to 37 mm - 13;
      9. Sights TMF - 13,
      10. Spare parts for 37 mm cannon - 1 set;
      11. Spare parts for 76 mm cannon - 1 set;
      12. Sights TOD-6 - 2 pcs.

      Armament is necessary to complete the repaired captured tanks. Reason: the application of ABTU SC of the Western Front from 29.6.42, No. 2/2906.



      Repair of the Pz.38 (t) "Prague" tank at the Rembase No. 82. Moscow, May 1942
  5. Mister X
    Mister X 12 January 2021 09: 23
    +12

    Captured tank Pz.Kpfw. III
    1942 year.
    1. Bongo
      12 January 2021 09: 30
      +10
      Quote: Mister X

      Captured tank Pz.Kpfw. III
      1942 year.

      Hi!
      Who is the lady in the photo next to the tank?
      1. Mister X
        Mister X 12 January 2021 09: 33
        +7
        Quote: Bongo
        Who is the lady in the photo next to the tank?

        Hi!
        I will search and unsubscribe if I find it.
        1. Bongo
          12 January 2021 09: 36
          +7
          Quote: Mister X
          I will search and unsubscribe if I find it.

          New Year's holidays are over, do you have free time?
      2. The leader of the Redskins
        The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 09: 56
        +5
        I do not pretend to anything, but maybe just someone's lady of the heart? I know about women tankers. But the commander's belt and the absence of insignia suggests that the girl was simply "dressed up" for a photo: a belt, a holster, a headset ...
        1. Mister X
          Mister X 12 January 2021 10: 46
          +14
          Quote: Leader of the Redskins
          But the commander's belt and the lack of insignia suggest

          Found data that this is Valentin Nikolaev's officer
          107th separate tank battalion of the Leningrad Front
          https://yuripasholok.livejournal.com/12816578.html
      3. Mister X
        Mister X 12 January 2021 10: 43
        +7
        Quote: Bongo
        Who is the lady in the photo next to the tank?

        Sandruzhinnik of the 107th separate tank battalion of the Leningrad Front Valentina Nikolaeva
        1. The leader of the Redskins
          The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 10: 47
          +4
          So my logic doesn't let me down yet)))
          1. Mister X
            Mister X 12 January 2021 10: 49
            +5
            Quote: Leader of the Redskins
            my logic still does not fail me

            Not so simple.
            Did you see the link?
            1. The leader of the Redskins
              The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 10: 53
              +4
              I saw it, but I can't go over.
              1. Mister X
                Mister X 12 January 2021 11: 01
                +5
                Quote: Leader of the Redskins
                I can't go

                Give search: From vigilantes to tankers
              2. Avior
                Avior 13 January 2021 01: 46
                +3
                try this
                https://sibnarkomat.livejournal.com/29081445.html
            2. Avior
              Avior 13 January 2021 01: 44
              +4
              there is other information
              The battalion technicians restored 10 German PzKpfw III tanks and StuG III self-propelled artillery mounts. Valentina Fedorovna Nikolaeva (born in 1922) served in this trophy company and for some time was a radio operator in a German car.

              https://twitter.com/Iosif08395577/status/1294684619980312578
              perhaps this explains its appearance.

              https://voenhronika.ru/publ/vtoraja_mirovaja_vojna_sssr_khronika/19_letnjaja_devushka_voevala_na_trofejnom_tanke_v_1942_sudba_valentiny_2019/22-1-0-5754
              1. Mister X
                Mister X 13 January 2021 08: 15
                +2
                Quote: Avior
                perhaps this explains its appearance

                hi
                Thanks for the additions.
                I hope, thanks to your info - the topic of "regimental wife" is closed.
                1. Avior
                  Avior 13 January 2021 08: 41
                  +3
                  In general, of course, it does not look completely unusual. The buttonhole is not visible to us. A question arises about the signature of a military officer or a medical instructor. Were there Sandruzhina at the front? The medical instructor should have a red cross armband. Let's just say that she looks really unusual for a medical instructor. They write that the photo was on the day her medal was awarded, although the presentation was for the order.
                  Unfortunately, little is known, including fate.
                  hi
                  1. Mister X
                    Mister X 13 January 2021 09: 13
                    +2
                    Quote: Avior
                    she looks not entirely unusual

                    Agree that German tanks with stars also look unusual. wink

                    A company of tanks "Panther" of the guard of Lieutenant Sotnikov east of Warsaw.
                    Poland, August 1944
                    1. Avior
                      Avior 13 January 2021 09: 42
                      +3
                      This is nothing unusual. There are also a lot of photos of T-34s with German crosses, I don’t want to give them, but nothing very unique.
                      The main thing is that there are more stars, so that they would not fire their own, they often identify them by silhouette.
                      But the woman in the photo - who is she at that moment, in the photo? Sandruzhinnik, medical instructor, radio operator or military technician?
                      In any case, questions arise.
                      1. Mister X
                        Mister X 13 January 2021 09: 49
                        +2
                        Quote: Avior
                        In any case, questions arise.

                        Questions always arise.
                        For example: - What do I have for dinner today? laughing

                        Don't forget that the photo was taken in 1942.
                        Lack of everything, wts and uniforms.

                        Quote: Avior
                        the photo was on the day of the award

                        Prepared for the shoot as best I could.
                        Maybe her belt was old, borrowed from an officer.
                        Option?
                        Dresses were borrowed from each other.

                        Quote: Avior
                        Sandruzhinnik, medical instructor, radio operator or military technician?

                        In war, the wounded are dragged, and ammunition is brought.
                        Not to narrow specialization.
                        Do you agree?
                      2. Avior
                        Avior 13 January 2021 10: 09
                        +3
                        At that particular moment?
                        They write about the award, but the medal is not visible. In other photos in an overcoat with which the helmet does not match.
                        No insignia visible
                        Of course, all this can have a variety of explanations. But I would not say that everything is straight with this photo.
                        hi
                      3. Mister X
                        Mister X 13 January 2021 10: 27
                        +2
                        Quote: Avior
                        But I would not say that everything is straight with this photo is clear

                        Is there anything very clear in our life?
                        hi
                      4. Avior
                        Avior 13 January 2021 11: 21
                        +3
                        It is impossible to argue with this
                        hi
    2. hohol95
      hohol95 12 January 2021 11: 11
      +3
      If my memory does not let me down ... then she took part in the repair and evacuation of this "troika" from the front line! Then they were able to take 2-3 knocked out "troikas" to the rear. Then they were patched up and used in battles.
  • EvilLion
    EvilLion 12 January 2021 10: 33
    +2
    The most interesting question regarding German trophies is the very small number of Pz-IVs, especially against the background of Pz-IIIs, of which two hundred SU-76I alone were built. With the declared production of PZ-III in 2 cars, this is approximately 6166% of the total production. And how many captured vehicles simply did not reach the repair depots and were used on the spot until they were destroyed, or transitioned to a state where it is easier to abandon. If there are still the same, it turns out that the Red Army captured about 3% of the total output. If Pz-IVs were captured in the same proportion, then about 6 of them could pass through the Red Army, but in 600 the Red Army had to take more trophies than in the 1944nd, when the troika was in vogue.
    1. Bongo
      12 January 2021 10: 49
      +10
      Quote: EvilLion
      The most interesting question regarding German trophies is the very small number of Pz-IVs, especially against the background of Pz-IIIs, of which two hundred SU-76I alone were built. With the declared production of PZ-III in 2 cars, this is approximately 6166% of the total production. And how many captured vehicles simply did not reach the repair depots and were used on the spot until they were destroyed, or transitioned to a state where it is easier to abandon. If there are still the same, it turns out that the Red Army captured about 3% of the total output. If Pz-IVs were captured in the same proportion, then about 6 of them could pass through the Red Army, but in 600 the Red Army had to take more trophies than in the 1944nd, when the troika was in vogue.

      In the second half of 1943, interest in captured armored vehicles in the Red Army dropped sharply. Due to the high workload, high labor costs and the need to use non-standard spare parts and components, German tanks became not interesting to repair enterprises and front-line workshops engaged in the restoration of armored vehicles.
      Why are there German tanks, in the second half of 1944 they wrote off the surviving, but extremely worn out KV-1S and SU-152, which could well be repaired. But this was not done due to the high labor intensity and in connection with the arrival of new tanks and self-propelled guns.
      Of course, at the final stage of the war, serviceable tanks Pz.Kpfw.IV, PzKpfw V and Pz.Kpfw. VI, as well as the StuG III and StuG IV self-propelled guns with long-barreled 75-mm guns were used, but very limited. This will be discussed in the next part of the cycle. hi
    2. maximghost
      maximghost 12 January 2021 10: 51
      +2
      Pz-III, of which the SU-76I alone built 2 hundred.

      Su-76i was built not only from 3 panzers, but also from pieces. In addition, I saw information that the remaining SG-122s were also converted into su-76i (although this is a penny even against the background of a small series of su-76i).
      1. Bongo
        12 January 2021 11: 05
        +7
        Quote: maximghost
        Su-76i was built not only from 3 panzers, but also from pieces

        Trophy StuG.IIIs were claimed as they were. In the SU-76I, it was the Pz.Kpfw.III that was altered, although several StuG.III chassis with damaged weapons were probably used.
        Quote: maximghost
        I looked for information that the remaining SG-122 was also converted into Su-76i

        It is not. No. All SG-122s, with the exception of a few vehicles sent to the training center, were lost in battle.
        1. maximghost
          maximghost 12 January 2021 13: 06
          0
          This is not true. no All SG-122s, with the exception of a few vehicles sent to the training center, were lost in battle.

          I made a little mistake:
          In March 1943, the release of the first 15 SU-76s was expected at the trophy base, in April it was planned to build 35 vehicles, in May - 40, and in June - 45. The existing backlog of SG-122 was transferred from factory # 40 to factory # 37 ...


          Trophy StuG.IIIs were claimed as they were. In the SU-76I, it was the Pz.Kpfw.III that was altered, although several StuG.III chassis with damaged weapons were probably used.

          This quote is from an article about SG-122, but still:
          In fact, BTRZ # 592 for the entire 1942 could have shipped no more than 19 StuG III and 20 Pz.Kpfw.III.


          This is from the regulation for the production of su-76i

          С
          Talin agreed and on January 18 signed the decree of the State Defense Committee (GKO) No. 2758ss "On the organization of production of SU-76 self-propelled artillery mounts based on captured" Artshturm "and T-3 tanks with the 76-mm F-34 cannon"


          A total of 201 SU-76Is were built - 1 experimental and 200 serial. Already after the production of self-propelled guns on captured chassis ceased, at the end of December 1943, 210 Pz.Kpfw.III and StuG III chassis remained in Moscow, including 91 on the territory of plant # 37. It took more than one month to dismantle these rubble.


          This is from Pasholok's articles about SG-122 and Su-76i. If you want I can throw links in a personal - xs how does the moderation treat links to competing resources.
    3. The leader of the Redskins
      The leader of the Redskins 12 January 2021 10: 51
      +9
      Well, after the war, the Quartet and the Panzerjagers on their base were transferred to Bulgaria in large quantities. Where they were later "chained" on the border with Turkey in the form of a bunker.
      But according to the memoirs of the veterans, the "troika" came to the court of our commanders - high-speed, spacious and with a good radio station. Often they were left in tank units such as a "traveling" vehicle even after 1943.
    4. hohol95
      hohol95 12 January 2021 19: 28
      +2
      Sometimes it all came down to the fact that after the battle there was nothing to take as trophies. Only heaps of broken iron. At the same time, in all the memos on the fight against armored vehicles, it was recommended to shoot at the cannon barrels! Who needs a tank without a gun? Where to get good, who will install it? Who will look for and collect the shells? And they needed high-octane gasoline. And he was not always in abundance for aviation.
    5. Mister X
      Mister X 13 January 2021 10: 41
      +3
      Quote: EvilLion
      very small number of Pz-IV, especially against the background of Pz-III

      hi
      Tanks Pz. IV was quite a lot.
      Some statistics for a single plant:
      For 11 months of 1943, 8 captured vehicles (Pz. II - 356, Pz. III - 88, Pz. IV - 97, Pz. 60 (t) - 38. other types - 102) were delivered to tank repair plant No. 12,
      of which 349 were repaired (Pz. II - 86, Pz. III - 95, Pz. IV - 53, Pz. 38 (t) - 102, other types - 12).
      True, not all of the repaired German tanks were sent to the Army in the field.
      For example, in August 1943, 8 captured German tanks were shipped from plant number 77 to infantry, machine-gun and rifle-mortar schools, 26 to reserve rifle regiments, and 65 to twelve tank schools.


      Quote: EvilLion
      If Pz-IVs were captured in the same proportion, then about 600 of them could pass through the Red Army.

      As you can see, only in the 43rd year, and only through plant No. 8, 60 units of Pz. IV.
      This is about 10% of your figure.
      And there were many factories and re-brigades.
      It's just that not everyone was sent to the front.
  • Alexey RA
    Alexey RA 12 January 2021 11: 19
    +4
    According to information published in the reference book "German Land Army 1933-1945", as of June 22, 1941, on the eve of the attack on the USSR, the total number of tanks and self-propelled guns (excluding flamethrowers) among the Germans in the East was 3332 units.

    3332 tanks - this is data from Müller-Hillebrandt: the number of tanks only in the tank regiments of tank divisions. According to Yenz, the total number of tanks in the East was 3811 units.
    The PzKpfw. II armor provided protection against armor-piercing rifle bullets.

    30 mm against rifle armor-piercing bullets? However... smile
    1. Toucan
      Toucan 12 January 2021 11: 55
      +4
      Quote: Alexey RA
      The PzKpfw. II armor provided protection against armor-piercing rifle bullets.

      30 mm against rifle armor-piercing bullets? However...

      On the first "twos" the armor thickness did not exceed 15 mm, so the author is right.
      1. Alexey RA
        Alexey RA 12 January 2021 12: 11
        0
        Quote: Tucan
        On the first "twos" the armor thickness did not exceed 15 mm, so the author is right.

        Well, the first "deuces" by 1941 remained only in memory - after France, combatant German tanks underwent modernization with reservations.
        1. Toucan
          Toucan 12 January 2021 12: 29
          +2
          Well then, you can remember the two of the latest modification with 80 mm armor. But, as for the 30 mm armor, it was, by and large, bulletproof and did not hold 14,5 anti-tank missiles. No.
          1. Alexey RA
            Alexey RA 12 January 2021 15: 58
            +1
            Quote: Tucan
            Well then, you can remember the two of the latest modification with 80 mm armor.

            What for? I wrote only about those "deuces" that were in the Panzerwaffe at the beginning of the War in the East. Their frontal armor was 30-35 mm.
            Quote: Tucan
            But, as for the 30 mm armor, it was, by and large, bulletproof and no longer held 14,5 anti-tank missiles. No.

            At the beginning of the war, she kept it. PTRs were able to penetrate more than 22 mm of armor only when the industry gave the BS-41.
        2. hohol95
          hohol95 12 January 2021 19: 29
          +1
          And not after Poland?
    2. maximghost
      maximghost 12 January 2021 13: 09
      +1
      3332 tanks - this is data from Müller-Hillebrandt: the number of tanks only in the tank regiments of tank divisions. According to Yenz, the total number of tanks in the East was 3811 units.

      And if you scrape the number of self-propelled guns, armored vehicles and all sorts of sapper PZ-1 and all sorts of homemade products, as well as the armor of Germany's allies, then another thousand - one and a half armored units will be found.
    3. Bongo
      12 January 2021 13: 47
      +3
      Quote: Alexey RA
      The PzKpfw. II armor provided protection against armor-piercing rifle bullets.

      30 mm against rifle armor-piercing bullets? However..

      Didn't she? The 25-30 mm armor was actually bulletproof.
      1. maximghost
        maximghost 12 January 2021 14: 15
        +1
        Didn't she? The 25-30 mm armor was actually bulletproof.

        Kmk, it is better to avoid the characteristics of "bulletproof" and "anti-projectile".
        Firstly, they are very arbitrary in themselves and strongly depend on a bunch of nuances, the main of which is who is fighting whom and in what year.
        Secondly, everyone puts their own meaning in them.

        For example - you say that 30mm armor is bulletproof, implying that in 41 years on the Eastern Front, such armor will be penetrated by anti-tank and tank guns at real combat distances.
        But for example, armor-piercing shells of regimental guns at 100m penetrate (according to tabular data) only 34mm at a right angle. Taking into account the fact that these data were obtained on a homogeneous cast plate, and the PZ-2 armor was rolled, and the fact that it is very unlikely that the tank will be located directly in front of the gun - the penetration of the 30mm frontal armor is extremely unlikely.
        But the fact that regimental guns will be used against tanks - on the contrary - is extremely likely, because There were often not enough guns, but it is still possible to knock out a tank from a regimental gun.
  • Catfish
    Catfish 12 January 2021 12: 17
    +7
    Thanks to Sergey for a new interesting article. hi
    Found here a funny photo - "overwhelmed" smile German self-propelled gun.
    1. EvilLion
      EvilLion 12 January 2021 12: 58
      +1
      I came across a description of a case when a unit on a T-70 acquired a T-34-85 from the defeated Germans.
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 13 January 2021 10: 52
        +1
        This is not the same brigade in which there were only T-70s and Hungarian Toldi?
  • A. Privalov
    A. Privalov 12 January 2021 12: 57
    +8
    According to the stories of his grandfather, from the very beginning of the war in the Red Army, with great pleasure they used not only captured self-propelled guns and tanks, but also a number of engineering equipment, ranging from trucks independently adapted by the Germans in repair shops on an assorted track, to quite industrial mine minesweepers, bridge-laying machines, lifting wheeled and crawler cranes, etc. And almost at the end of the war, he even got his hands on some very convenient engineering device based on the T-34, which served them in the unit, almost until the beginning of the 50s.
  • ccsr
    ccsr 12 January 2021 13: 23
    +4
    Excellent article, a lot of interesting and useful information. I would very much like the author, as a specialist, to speak separately about the use of captured armored personnel carriers, tractors and vehicles in our troops, if, of course, he has the material for this.
    1. Bongo
      12 January 2021 13: 51
      +6
      Quote: ccsr
      Excellent article, a lot of interesting and useful information. I would very much like the author, as a specialist, to speak separately about the use of captured armored personnel carriers, tractors and vehicles in our troops, if, of course, he has the material for this.

      You flatter me, I am an expert in almost the same field as you. soldier
      And writing is fun.
      Unfortunately, there is not a lot of reliable information about the use of captured armored personnel carriers and armored vehicles, and a separate cycle should be done about German cars and trucks in the Red Army. So for now I will refrain. hi
      1. ccsr
        ccsr 13 January 2021 11: 36
        +2
        Quote: Bongo
        Unfortunately, there is not a lot of reliable information on the use of captured armored personnel carriers and armored vehicles, and a separate cycle should be done about German cars and trucks in the Red Army.

        This is a very interesting question, because unscrupulous historians always poke us with Lend-Lease, but for some reason they never point out how we used trophy equipment even before the main deliveries of Americans went in 1944-1945. After all, only near Moscow in 1941, several thousand different heavy weapons and equipment were captured, and this continued throughout the war. There is a known case of a report to Stalin about arming a heavy artillery regiment with captured German howitzers of large caliber, and these are far from isolated cases. That is why I was very interested in the article, and I hope that you will find time to continue it, including with automotive technology.
  • Paragraph Epitafievich Y.
    Paragraph Epitafievich Y. 12 January 2021 14: 16
    +6
    And here this hybrid is already twice a trophy)
  • faiver
    faiver 16 January 2021 18: 01
    0
    As always, excellent material ... BUT, Sergei, you pretty much messed up with Czech tanks - the fact is that the serial production of the Pz-38t began after the German occupation of the Czech Republic, therefore, they could not capture 750 of these tanks
    After the occupation of Czechoslovakia, the Germans got over 750 light tanks LT vz. 38, which were designated Pz.Kpfw.38 (t) in the Wehrmacht.

    the Germans captured only Pz-35t in much smaller numbers, since a little more than four hundred of them were produced hi
  • Ile ham
    Ile ham 13 March 2021 22: 43
    0
    Author! Please clarify the dates:
    - 15 October 1943 gode in the brigade there were 4 T-34 tanks, 35 Pz.Kpfw.III and 11 Pz.Kpfw.IV.
    - After participating in hostilities (by the time of withdrawal for reorganization) early February 1943 1 T-34 and 11 captured tanks remained in the brigade.