Military Review

Revolvers from Texas: real and not so

56

A still from the film "Bandits" (2006). The film is, of course, so-so. For children and adolescents, and not advanced. But weapon it shows well. And this girl is just shooting a Texas Colt. In any case, it is very similar. And then it happens in Mexico, and Texas is there.


Speed ​​is good, but accuracy is everything.
White Earp
(American guardian of law and gambler in Kansas and Arizona).

Shoot first and never miss.
Bat Masterson
(a person as legendary as White Earp, besides his friend).


Weapons and firms. We continue our story about the Confederate revolvers, which they either bought in Europe, or obtained in battles, or made in their “country of Dixie” at more or less equipped enterprises. Some did, others only pretended to do. In any case, the Confederation happened to write in history American weapons have a whole series of pretty interesting pages.

It has already been said that the bulk of the Confederate Civil War revolver manufacturers were either in Georgia or Texas. And it just so happened that much more is known and written about manufacturers from Georgia in America than about those who then lived in Texas.

Meanwhile, there were two manufacturers who also played a role in the armament of the Confederation, although in different ways. These were JH Dance and Brothers and the Lancaster pistol factory. The last of these two produced the revolvers we've already covered: Tucker and Sherrard and Clark and Sherrard.

Today we will talk about revolvers of the company "Dance and Brothers". And it is worthwhile to immediately make a reservation: it was previously believed that this company did not have a contract for the production of weapons either with the government of the Confederation or with the Military Council of the State of Texas. It was also said that although the Lancaster firm had a contract with the Texas War Council, it never produced revolvers during the war. But the revolvers of the company "Dance" are known, but it seems that they were not produced.

If you consider that Texas was a place where cattle were herded, and where thugs of all stripes (card cheaters and crooks) fled, it is downright surprising that there anyone could produce at least something more complicated than a toothpick. However, this was the case.

Revolvers from Texas: real and not so
Revolver "Dance" is a desirable object for auctions and collectors. Even if the state is not very good. This one, for example, in 2018 at the auction house "Paul Fraser Collectibles", the starting price was $ 37. Photo from the site "Paul Fraser Collectibles".

Well, the beginning of such an outstanding family was laid by Thomas Dance from Virginia, from where members of his family reached Texas through North Carolina and Alabama. The four Danes brothers settled in Brasoria County in 1853. Where they became well, just the outstanding gunsmiths in Texas history and a renowned family among the Confederate gunsmiths. Their names were James Henry, George Perry, David Ethelred and Isaac Claudius Dance. Harrison's cousin Perry Dance was also involved in their business, which the brothers set up in Columbia, on the banks of the Brazos River near Houston and Galveston.

And they had a modern factory


Today their enterprise would be called a mechanical workshop. But at that time it was a modern factory with its own steam engine. When the Civil War broke out, the brothers decided that they should start producing revolvers for the Confederation. This decision was probably made at the end of 1861 or at the beginning of the next. But here it should be noted that the Danes brothers never received financial assistance from the Confederate government or the Texas War Council to start production. And the whole business was organized at your own peril and risk.

It is also interesting to note that all four brothers enlisted in the Confederate Army, enrolling in the 35th Texas Cavalry (Brown's). American historians of weapons and collectors today argue about how these revolvers are best called: about "Dance" or "Dance and Parks"? Since there were two more Park brothers who also worked at this plant and seemed to take an active part in the production of revolvers, that is, they were partners of the Danes brothers.

In any case, records from the National Archives show that in all business correspondence the firm is referred to as Dance and Park, and not as Dance and Brothers. This indicates that there must have been some form of business relationship between them. And also that the Danes brothers were very scrupulous people about business. Although only his ... "southern"!


Revolver "Dance" .44 caliber, steel, weight 3,5 lbs. Bullock Museum - Texas State History Museum.

The Danes brothers achieved significantly greater success than many other Confederate revolver manufacturers, and were able to organize efficient production in their factory. In a letter from my sister to one of the brothers on July 5, 1862, we read:

"The boys think that they will soon finish three or four pistols."

On February 25, 1863, she wrote:

“Colombia has launched a fundraising campaign for disabled veterans of the Confederation. The boys gave them a very nice pistol, which they sold. "

What if all workers are drafted into the army?


A big problem was the lack of skilled workers due to the Confederate Conscription Act. According to which they called all white men between the ages of 18 and 35, without exception. The only recourse was to persuade the army to send blacksmiths and mechanics to work in the factories, although few firms were successful along the way.

The Danes brothers, however, were also able to convince the military here that experienced workers would be more useful in their factory than in the trenches. More than 35 soldiers were sent to the plant. And at least 23 of them from the 35th Texas Cavalry Regiment (Brown's Regiment) were experienced metalworkers. Although, why be surprised? James Henry Dance, was one of the officers of this regiment. So there is a direct abuse of official position, albeit in the interests of the common cause.

However, the command of Brown's regiment did not object to such an initiative of their officer. The prospect of getting more revolvers was undoubtedly a strong incentive to send soldiers to the factory. In a letter from George Duff to Matty dated August 29, 1863, he writes:

“I have the opportunity to send you a letter from George Westervelt, who is traveling to Colombia today to work in a pistol factory. Jim Henry has people who are sent there to work with the promise of General Magruder that our battalion will have all the pistols it produces until we arm ourselves properly. "

It was always believed that the Danes brothers never entered into contracts with the state of Texas or the government of the Confederation. Now it can be shown that this is not the case. In a letter from Edmund P. Turner to Dance and Park on June 26, 1863, Turner states:

"I have been verbally informed by Major Maclean, the chief artillery officer of the area, that the contract with Messrs. Dance and Park to make pistols has been rejected in Richmond."

However, on November 16, 1863, the Confederate State Army issued Order # 312 in Texas County:

“The Board of Officers is hereby appointed to convene today at Captain Good's office. State. Office. District ES. For check. Report the number of pistols received from Dance & Park by Captain Good "under contract."

So there was a contract? Otherwise, the official document would not have referred to him.

The factory was then relocated to Anderson, away from the state line. Production did not start immediately, but it did. And already in 1864 the brothers' firm created revolvers in calibers and .44 and .36. In total, about 135 first-caliber revolvers were produced and, possibly, another 135 second-caliber revolvers. Some of the weapons were issued to army officers, and some of them went on the free sale.


Revolver "Dance" close-up. Bullock Museum - Texas State History Museum.

The Dance revolvers were modeled after the Colt revolvers. At the same time, .44 and .36 caliber revolvers were similar in appearance, except for the size. Basically, they had a round barrel, like the Dragoon Colt, although in some instances the barrel is completely octagonal. "Dance" .44 caliber is comparable in length to a Colt, but weighs less. The barrel has seven grooves with clockwise rotation and constant curvature. The trigger guard is square, thick and heavy, and its thickness increased as production continued.

The Tucker and Sherrard revolvers, manufactured in Lancaster, and also in Texas, were described in one of the past materials. These revolvers were most likely manufactured during the war and sold to individual soldiers. The .36 caliber revolver was similar in size to the 1850 Navy Colt, but had a round barrel.

Tucker & Sherrard: When Firms Promise Much But Do Nothing


As for the history of the Tucker & Sherrard pistol factory, it began with an announcement in the Dallas Herald on February 19, 1862:

“Messrs. Sherrar, Killen and Bruni of Lancaster have teamed up to produce Colt revolving pistols and other revolving pistols. They immediately began to implement the agreements ... the necessary equipment ... And, if justified by large subscriptions, they will be able to produce these weapons in any desired quantities ... at $ 40 for pistols for the Navy and $ 50 for army pistols. "

On March 6, 1862, the War Council wrote to John M. Crockett of Dallas, Lieutenant Governor of Texas, to

“Immediately met with the gentlemen from your city who make revolving pistols. And I found out if the Council could help them in any way? And can they produce the weapons the army needs? (We) further ask you to inquire whether the company or contractor will contract with the Board of Directors to manufacture weapons for the protection of the state? And if so, at what price can they make it? "

Crockett answered. And so that it can be understood in two ways:

“I have made every effort to establish the facts you want to know. But there is no such establishment in this county. But there are blacksmiths, some of whom are first class. I convinced some of them to start a business ... And they say that with the tools and materials available, they can make about thirty Colt revolvers a week. The people who undertake this are in all respects worthy of the trust of the Council. But they have no funds. And they could not have started production if not for my assurances. "


Already on April 11, the Military Council offered "Messrs. Tucker, Sherrod (sic) and Co." $ 5 in advance upon signing the contract with a performance guarantee. The contract promised the Board of Directors a purchase at $ 000 per revolver. Moreover, the Council also promised

"Take ... all the pistols they make within one year, but no more than three thousand."

That is, 100 pistols for every month after May. The document also stipulated:

“These pistols must be of the same type and quality as the Colt revolver. But the exact shape and style don't matter. If these pistols are good and durable weapons of the same size and performance as Colt's revolver. "

The Lancaster entrepreneurs who signed this contract were Laban E. Tucker, Joseph H. Sherrard, W.L. Killen, A.W. Tucker, Pleasant Taylor and John Crockett.

How the Lieutenant Governor took matters into his own hands


On June 30, 1862, that is, by the final delivery date of the first batch, Crockett was forced to write to the council of war:

"We are not ready to supply 100 pistols."

On July 21, another letter followed, in which many objective reasons were named. Why revolvers were never there. By August 5, they were still gone. On October 2, Sherrard, Taylor & Co. (new name as of mid-August) was never able to deliver any weapons.

But the Military Council nevertheless gave the firm another $ 5. The $ 000 bond was signed by Sherrard, Keellen, Taylor, Crockett, G.V. Record and R.M. Hope. New reason for the delay, which Crockett complains about this time, is that factory workers are being drafted into the army.

"Contrary to the law exempting men employed in production from military service."

Then a new letter followed:

“Could you cheer us up a bit by increasing the cost of our pistols by $ 10 each and allowing us to make a little more money? We are told here that we can sell them for $ 100 apiece. "

Finally, in January, Crockett traveled to Austin, Texas, where the State Legislature opened. And he took with him two ready-made revolvers, presumably produced at the plant in Lancaster. He later reported that the pistols had been tested

"By Governor Lubbock, Ed Fannin, and others in the presence of the Legislature, and were found to be loyal and reliable."

On February 28, the Texas Almanac Gazeta noted:

“The other day we were shown a fine example of a six-shot pistol made in Dallas (sic) by Colonel Crockett, who has a large weapons depot that is successfully operating. The pistol seems in every way to be equal to Colt's famous six-shot pistol. We know that Colonel Crockett now has 400 of these pistols on hand, which he made over the past six months and which he offered the Governor at very low prices - one third of what they would have been sold at retail.

Isn't it all very similar to what our own media report to us today with enviable regularity? That is, nothing has changed in people's lives, in principle. Is that now we are talking not only about pistols, but also about missiles, tanks and ships. And not only in the USA, but also here. However, the market is the market.

Well, it all ended with the fact that (with the exception of "pilot pistols") none of the infamous 400 revolvers was never delivered to the state.

Months dragged on, and Crockett kept finding the reasons for the delay: lack of materials, recruiting workers for military service, lack of coal, etc. As a result, it all ended with the termination of the contract and the withdrawal of all funds. However, what was returned under the contract has become much cheaper due to inflation. But the Confederate Bank had to "swallow" it, since the terms of the contract did not stipulate inflation. Withdrawal of the contract ended the firm of Sherrard, Taylor & Co., but by no means the commercial activities of the factory itself.

In general, after reading materials from the Texas archives, American historians argue that it is quite conclusively possible to conclude that Colonel Crockett, together with his companions, really produced revolvers, but they sold them on the market at a higher price than the state military council allowed. Texas. The military authorities of the state simply fooled, and simply put all the profits in their pocket. That was such an interesting story with "revolvers from Texas" that took place during the Civil War of the North and South.


.36 caliber Spiller and Drill revolvers from Atlanta, Georgia. North Carolina State History Museum.

However, the rarest Texas revolvers, of which there were only six pieces, were the Sisterdale. And all of them were made by a group of Texans of German origin, who were soldiers of Company F, 36th Cavalry Regiment of Texas.

Eight Germans made six revolvers


And it so happened that in August 1862 Alfred Kapp (possibly the only experienced gunsmith who worked at the Colt factory in Connecticut), as well as Rudolph Coret, Charles "Karl" Coret, Johann Koret (all brothers), Adolf Munzenberger, August Schimmelpfennig, Herman Cammerling and a blacksmith named Schmidt or Willem were sent to Sisterdale (a small town northwest of San Antonio) to produce a six-shooter revolver. Their goal was to negotiate a contract with the Confederation, which faced a critical shortage of firearms. And the Texas government has decided to encourage the production of firearms, so to speak, at home.


Revolver "Sisterdale".

It was these Germans who made a revolver there, which was somewhat larger than its counterpart (all the same Colt revolver) and, moreover, weighed four pounds. But he could shoot. And it could be produced even in a more or less equipped workshop.

Ernst Kapp himself was a German immigrant, born in Minden, Germany. He arrived in Galveston, Texas with his family in December 1849. In early 1850, he bought a farm with a small plot of land near Sisterdale (a small settlement about 40 miles north of New Braunsfeld on the Guadalupe River), where many German immigrants had already settled before him. In about 1860, Kapp was elected magistrate in a small community. When the Civil War broke out, he was appointed a senior officer under the command of Enl Robert Beecham, who commanded the 31st Texas Guards Brigade, and was ordered to form a volunteer company in Sisterdale. His eldest son Alfred Kapp became the captain of this company.


The Sisterdale revolver, as you can see, had a closed frame.

A number of American historians believe that before the war, Alfred worked for some time at the Colt factory in Hartford. This experience undoubtedly gave him the skills needed to manufacture revolvers for the Confederation. A total of six revolvers were made, of which only one has survived to this day.

Originally it belonged to Miss Otto Coret, and for a long time it was exhibited in the Sofinburg Museum near New Braunsfeld, of which this lady was the caretaker. Today it is in the famous collection of Charles Schreiner III of Kerrville, Texas.


Revolver "Sisterdale" and holster to it.

The revolver resembles both the Colt Navy and the very first examples of Remington's pocket revolvers. It is a single-action .36 caliber five-shot capsule revolver. The main highlight of the design was the drum pusher lever, which was openly installed on the frame of the revolver on the left, which is clearly visible in the photo. This, of course, is not a very good solution in technical terms, but it was quite workable.

Although the production of only six revolvers had no impact on the war, Sisterdale is unique in that it was made by a group of disabled soldiers in a workshop that had been converted to a simple farm shop. This gives us today an idea of ​​how much these people were devoted to their work and what skillful hands they had.
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  1. The leader of the Redskins
    The leader of the Redskins 22 December 2020 18: 44
    +10
    100 pistols were considered a profitable and large order ...
    Lord, how progress has made a century and a half! And now in China they would be stamped in a day!
    Thanks for the article, Vyacheslav Olegovich!
    1. Hunter 2
      Hunter 2 22 December 2020 19: 02
      +10
      Solidarity with the Leader! The article, as always, is valid, the illustrations are excellent! I will translate to favorites as always! Vyacheslav Olegovich - Respect!
      ps Voted for Shpakovsky and Ryzhov - as the Best Authors! wink
      1. kalibr
        22 December 2020 19: 21
        +11
        Quote: Hunter 2
        Voted for Shpakovsky

        Oh, thanks! A kind word is pleasant to the cat, and even more so to me.
        1. Hunter 2
          Hunter 2 22 December 2020 19: 26
          +5
          Completely Deserved hi ! Please us more often with Good and Informative articles!
          I recently re-read the Knights at the table ... do you plan to return to this cycle? Well, the "menu" of our and not our ancestors is very interesting repeat
          1. kalibr
            22 December 2020 19: 55
            +8
            Alexei! The topic is interesting. And it's interesting to me - I like to eat. But ... very little material. Again, I might have found the text, but the drawings ... well, they were not very fond of Wed. century to paint it. Feasts - yes, but you can't go to feasts alone. But I will keep your interest in mind, and if I come across something, I will try to make a continuation.
            1. Hunter 2
              Hunter 2 22 December 2020 21: 37
              +3
              Vyacheslav Olegovich ... And about the most peculiar revolver of the Confederate LeMat - Will there be an article? Revolver and Shotgun in one "bottle" - a Pirate's Dream! good
    2. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 22 December 2020 20: 38
      +9
      Quote: Leader of the Redskins
      100 pistols were considered a profitable and large order ...
      Lord, how progress has made a century and a half! And now in China they would be stamped in a day!
      Thanks for the article, Vyacheslav Olegovich!

      Nazariy, they told me three months ago that 900 MS-1 tanks are not a series !!!
      Hello everyone, Vyacheslav Olegovich, thanks for the rare zest !!!
      I confess that I personally did not know any of the above models of revolvers to this day!
      Regards, Kote!
      1. kalibr
        22 December 2020 21: 06
        +5
        Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
        Hello everyone, Vyacheslav Olegovich, thanks for the rare zest !!!

        I like raisins too. The problem is ... the photos. Is there anyone from Tula, for example?
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 22 December 2020 21: 22
          +4
          Quote: kalibr
          Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
          Hello everyone, Vyacheslav Olegovich, thanks for the rare zest !!!

          I like raisins too. The problem is ... the photos. Is there anyone from Tula, for example?

          From under Tula, it seems Vladimir (Mordvin-3).
  2. Undecim
    Undecim 22 December 2020 18: 57
    +13
    Without being shy in the comments in the choice of illustrations, I will add a little.

    36 caliber Dance revolvers are extremely rare. The photo shows a revolver of caliber 36 with serial number 135. Revolvers of this caliber with numbers higher than 135 have never been seen.
    Today there are three known Dance revolvers in .36 caliber - with serial numbers 48, 50 and 51.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 22 December 2020 19: 09
      +9
      And this is an example of a small "blooper" made by the famous American photographer William E. Irwin, who photographed Indians.

      This is the Apache leader Geronimo, about whom there was an article on the site and who for 25 years led the fight against the US invasion of his tribe's land. In 1886 he was forced to surrender to the American army.
      The photo, taken in the early 1900s, shows Geronimo with a Dance revolver, which is tucked into his belt - a bandolier. But during the Civil War, there were no such bandoliers.
    2. Hunter 2
      Hunter 2 22 December 2020 19: 16
      +10
      So there are only 36 of them in caliber and 135 pieces were produced. And another 350 pieces in 44 caliber. Really very rare thing !!! I think in private collections (which are not disclosed or exhibited) there are several more “living” specimens. But in any case, the price of such a Revolver is from several Hundred Thousand $ ... to fellow
    3. Dimide
      Dimide 22 December 2020 20: 35
      +5
      Immediately you can see people "immersed in the topic", unlike me, an amateur hi
  3. Dimide
    Dimide 22 December 2020 19: 02
    +4
    I understand that reloading these revolvers was a rather dreary process?
    1. kalibr
      22 December 2020 19: 26
      +10
      Not just dreary, but VERY dreary. At first, measured doses of gunpowder were poured into the drum, then wads were inserted, then bullets were put on them (it was possible without a wad, but it was dangerous!). All this was zapzhivatel lever to the stop. Then, the space around the bullets was covered with a mixture of bacon and paraffin - "cannon fat". Then capsules were put on the back of the brand tubes - fu ... I'm tired of writing.
      1. Dimide
        Dimide 22 December 2020 19: 49
        +8
        Damn, the creator of the metal unitary cartridge from all "militarists" needs to be erected laughing
        Vyacheslav Olegovich, thank you for the detailed answer!
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 22 December 2020 20: 05
          +9
          This video shows the whole procedure well.

          A professional does everything faster, of course, but the essence does not change.
          1. Dimide
            Dimide 22 December 2020 20: 41
            +3
            You also need almost musical fingers for charging! wassat
      2. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 19: 59
        +7
        Quote: kalibr
        then wads were inserted, then bullets were put on them (it could have been without wads, but it was dangerous!). All this was zapzhivatel lever to the stop. Then, the space around the bullets was covered with a mixture of bacon and paraffin - "cannon fat".

        If, when charging, the chamber was puffed up, then "cannon fat", like. as it was not required! The use of lard was mandatory (!) When there was no wad, and the bullet was packed on gunpowder! No, of course ... nobody forbade 150% reinsure ... and you can eat butter porridge with butter ...! But it must be What a bore (!), so that in the heat of battle, besides the wad, you can coat with fat! I think that even xoxles would have murmured!
        1. kalibr
          22 December 2020 20: 57
          +5
          You are right, of course, but there have always been safety people and they believed that it is better to over ... than not ...
          1. Nikolaevich I
            Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 21: 40
            +4
            Quote: kalibr
            safety people have always been and they believed that it is better to over ... than not ...

            So, when did the "safety people" feel safer ... when, having gotten excited (!) The chamber, they began to coat the chamber with fat, while the Indian approached the "fifth point" with "vile" intentions ... or But when, having filled up the gunpowder, having gotten excited, having laid down the bullet, used the lever-detonator, threw up the revolver, ready for use? what
            1. kalibr
              22 December 2020 21: 41
              +3
              And in this case there was a SECOND REVOLVER!
              1. Nikolaevich I
                Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 21: 48
                +2
                Quote: kalibr
                in this case was the SECOND REVOLVER!

                And why then reload a revolver in battle if you have a "second" at hand? what
                1. Constanty
                  Constanty 23 December 2020 14: 11
                  0
                  So that you don't get caught with your pants down - that is, with two empty revolvers.
                  You fire one revolver and reload right away, always having the second on hand - a very good habit that increases the average lifespan :-)
            2. Sling cutter
              Sling cutter 22 December 2020 21: 46
              +3
              Quote: Nikolaevich I
              with "vile" intentions ... or when, having filled up the gunpowder, having gotten drunk, having laid down the bullet, took advantage of the pusher lever, threw up the revolver, ready for use?
              Reply
              Cit

              I would also remind the caliber that the "redskins" also had a bow and arrows yes
    2. Bormanxnumx
      Bormanxnumx 22 December 2020 19: 58
      +7
      Quote: Dimid
      I understand that reloading these revolvers was a rather dreary process?


      Loading and firing the original capsule revolver.
      1. Dimide
        Dimide 22 December 2020 20: 10
        +1
        Great video, thank you! hi
      2. Avior
        Avior 22 December 2020 21: 29
        +4
        The decision suggests itself - a couple of replaceable drums with you and a quick-change mechanism.
        1. kalibr
          22 December 2020 21: 44
          +3
          You should have bought the Starr ...
          1. Avior
            Avior 22 December 2020 22: 44
            +5
            For kaasyulnooo ideal fast recharge option
            The spare drum is not very heavy and not very expensive. The idea suggested itself.
            1. cat Rusich
              cat Rusich 22 December 2020 23: 52
              +4
              Quote: Avior
              For kaasyulnooo ideal fast recharge option
              The spare drum is not very heavy and not very expensive. The idea suggested itself.

              Colt Paterson
              colt paterson
              The first serial revolver Colt produced in 1836-1842 was already equipped with a spare drum for quick reloading ... This method of reloading (change the empty drum to a pre-loaded one) was used by the Texan Rangers in the Texas-Indian Wars.
              1. Avior
                Avior 23 December 2020 00: 40
                +2
                ready-made tool for fast recharging.
                to provide only a hard case for storing the drum so that there are no accidental blows to the primer - and a completely normal solution, not much worse than a unitary cartridge for revolvers.
      3. kalibr
        23 December 2020 07: 21
        +2
        By the way, he has good English. He speaks very clearly! The shooter of their revolver with the video is meant.
  4. Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 20: 26
    +4
    I'm still waiting for the article on Kofer revolvers! Yes ... revolvers "from Texas" are interesting in their own way, but these are "standard" ghans ... without a "zest"! And in "coffees" there is a zest (!), Although sometimes they are called "a dead-end branch of weapon evolution" !
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 22 December 2020 20: 46
      +4
      So let's mark Nikolaevich does not eat, does not drink and does not sleep - wants "Kofer"! Dot!!! laughing

      We were spoiled by Vyacheslav Olegovich, but I also wanted to read about the coffer, to know who Cofer is? And what a grand piano he made! I am a little naughty, do not be offended!
      1. Nikolaevich I
        Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 21: 13
        +5
        Quote: Kote pane Kohanka
        Nikolaevich does not eat, drink and sleep - he wants "Kofer"

        This is not entirely true, Vlad! I come home and eat ... in the process of eating I can taste 1-2- (stop! stop ) stacks of "tasty booze" (as the popular on YouTube alcoholist Azat Sergeevich puts it ...) then I go to bed ... and only after waking up, I start to want about Kofer revolvers! yes
      2. Undecim
        Undecim 22 December 2020 21: 15
        +6
        Thomas W. Cofer, a gunsmith from Portsmouth, Virginia. Holder of the only Confederate weapons patent. He designed a revolver that could use special unitary cartridges, and could be used as a primer, thus bypassing White's patent.
        A very rare thing. Very few of them were made.
        It looked like this.
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 22 December 2020 21: 30
          +5
          Thank you Victor Nikolaevich, but Nikolaevich again all the raspberries! So, having read our comments, Vyacheslav Olegovich was filled with pity for you and issued an article about Mr. Cofers.
          And then, after reading that you can safely sleep without them, drink and eat !!! He will think twice more, write about our Wishlist or even support on an intellectual diet !!! laughing
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 22 December 2020 21: 33
            +6
            He fits into the cycle about Confederate revolvers, why not write.
        2. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 21: 54
          +2
          Add also that there were 3 "types" ... type I, II, III ...
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 22 December 2020 21: 59
            +5
            I will not get ahead of the events. Once the author has agreed, we are waiting for the article.
            1. Nikolaevich I
              Nikolaevich I 22 December 2020 22: 14
              +3
              Quote: Undecim
              I will not get ahead of the events. Once the author has agreed, we are waiting for the article.

              I agree! Therefore, I will not post a video with "Kofer" ...
    2. kalibr
      22 December 2020 21: 35
      +4
      It means this: I found a book on Kofer, now I need to translate PDF into JPGE and translate into Russian. But now the photo ... I only found one auction house that sells such a revolver. There is a photo ... But you will have to contact them. And that's not a problem ... The problem is whether they will answer and give permission. There is another very large arms company in the USA ... I don't know if they have one. But I already downloaded them in full! You also need to have a conscience ... This is the situation with the wardrobe trunk ...
      1. Undecim
        Undecim 22 December 2020 21: 39
        +5
        Why translate PDF into Jpeg?
        1. kalibr
          22 December 2020 21: 41
          +4
          It's more convenient for me to work ... The text is small!
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 22 December 2020 21: 45
            +4
            So you throw it through the Finreader in Word and read it to your health. And easier and faster.
            1. kalibr
              22 December 2020 21: 45
              +3
              And so it will be!
            2. Avior
              Avior 22 December 2020 22: 52
              +7
              Through a file reader is not necessary
              There are enough network resources that PDF translates directly into the Word, including picture pages.
              1. Undecim
                Undecim 22 December 2020 22: 58
                +6
                I used to rely on my own resources in such matters.
      2. ycuce234-san
        ycuce234-san 23 December 2020 03: 11
        +6
        The scheme of the revolver is in the patent - on August 12, 1861, the Patent Office of the Confederation granted Kofer patent No. 9. For him, for a patent, as a document, all rights must expire and the illustration can be taken from there.
        Alternatively, you can use inkscape to simplify your own diagrams and drawings, and import them from wind to bitmap. inkscape can work with a tablet and it is convenient to draw many small and simple schemes on a graphics tablet (https://habr.com/ru/post/168697/).
        The same principle can be applied more universally - for example, illustrate the theme of knights with diagrams and simple drawings.
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 23 December 2020 04: 05
          +1
          Quote: ycuce234-san
          universally - for example, to illustrate the theme of knights with diagrams and simple drawings.

          Thanks for the kind advice, I must try.
        2. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I 23 December 2020 07: 33
          +2
          Quote: ycuce234-san
          you can use inkscape

          Thanks for the advice ! Very timely for me! I'm going to "bungle" a couple of articles (one of them is about revolvers ...) ... and the material, in general, is available ... but the problem is to deal with the copyright holders of illustrations, photos ... I was going to apply a method like the one that you suggested and already intended to look for it, and then your message appeared! I will search the Internet and, if it fits, master it! hi
        3. kalibr
          23 December 2020 07: 35
          +2
          All this is good. But ... I just don't have time to do this. Writing an article is not easy at all. And you also need to find material for it, read it, or even translate it. And then there is also drawing? When to sleep? Yes nafig!
          1. ycuce234-san
            ycuce234-san 23 December 2020 12: 10
            +1
            Nobody draws sketches and schematic diagrams for a long time and sadly (the main thing is to convey the essence there - for example, the path with hourly timestamps of the alleged trapper-killer between the lakes on a scan of an old map of the area, if we are talking about an old unsolved murder) - neither on the tablet nor with the mouse.
            The editor is opened in the next window and, in the process of reading, they throw in a drawing for 10-15 seconds and correct as they work. They switch between windows with the Alt + Tab keys and are saved by Ctrl + S before switching. You can also quickly draw with a mouse so schematically, but after a period of getting used to the tablet, you will not return to the mouse.
  5. samurai_klim
    samurai_klim 23 December 2020 16: 16
    +1
    As always, gorgeous. But the whole lack of proofreading spoils a little, for example, non-closed parentheses, large spaces, etc.
  6. Mikhail3
    Mikhail3 8 March 2021 13: 17
    0
    Examined old pistols and revolvers in museums. What is most striking is the amount of purely handmade work in them! As you hardly realize, reading about the "industrial production of weapons", that this very industrial production of 70-80 percent consisted of a man with a file. Who received a piece of plate on the workbench, with holes roughly cut with a chisel, not at all similar to the desired result. The man roughly leveled the plate with a hammer (it’s not worth poking under the press yet, the press will harden the surfaces), clamped the plate in a vice and creaked with files, creaked, creaked ... Then the press, final finishing, and the next plate. How many of them did a metalhead make a day? Three? Five? Hardly more ...
    Small parts of a complex shape, such as fuses, were usually cut out with a file from a single piece of metal. Horror ... Yes, a hundred revolvers is a very, very serious order, if you do not have at least fifty skilled workers who scrape with a file and scrape, and a good blacksmith with a dozen assistants who all the time cut fresh files from the old hewn, and make new.
    The machines were! In single copies. Terribly inaccurate. Requiring constant service by the most qualified specialists, and better generally by their author. Doing one operation, but still not the fact that it is generally needed in this model of the revolver. The childhood of technology ...