Military Review

Pistols from Dong

79
Pistols from Dong

A typical Dunsk pistol


We have become English more than once
In the battles they dulled
But gold in us
Bought on the market.
Robert Burns. Scottish glory


Weapon from museums. This article was born like this: one of the readers of "VO", having read an article about Scottish broadswords, took and wrote to me that, in addition to very peculiar broadswords, the Highlanders also had very interesting pistols, one might say, unique, more not met with anyone. "Write about them, interesting!" And yes, indeed, this is a very interesting sample of weapons, and it was possible to write about it for a long time, but there were no interesting photographs and illustrations. And then suddenly all the "stars converged", and at the same time both were found. Well, if so, then writing about these Scottish pistols was only a matter of technique.

These pistols are called by the British and the Scots call the Highland Pistol or Scottish Pistol, which translates as "highland pistol" or "Scottish pistol". Although they also have another interesting name indicating the place of their appearance: pistols from Dong.


Please note that, in addition to photographs, the article uses beautiful illustrations in which we see the Scottish Highlanders in their national costumes with characteristic weapons in their hands. They were painted by Kenneth MacLay Jr. (1802-1878), a wonderful miniaturist who painted people and their clothes with photographic accuracy. He painted portraits in oil, but was also a recognized master of watercolors. As one of the earliest members of the Scottish Academy of Painting, he exhibited at least five works a year, usually in series. And the most famous series of color drawings in watercolors were images of the Highlanders of Scotland, executed by him for the collection of Queen Victoria, which were then reproduced in the form of lithographs and painted by hand. These include portraits in highland costume of the late Prince Consort, Duke of Edinburgh, as well as illustrations depicting representatives of thirty-five major Scottish clans. Work of stunning volume and quality. Maclay lived in Edinburgh, where he died. In this illustration, we see XNUMXth century clanmen, one of whom is armed with a claymore sword. This is the power of tradition in Scotland

Now a little general, so to speak stories pistols in Scotland.

Records of pistol use in Scotland first appear around the middle of the 1566th century. For example, it is reported that a wheel-lock pistol was used in the murder of the Italian secretary of Queen Mary of Scots Mary David Rizzio in 1570. It was followed by the famous assassination of James Stuart I, Earl of Moray, in XNUMX. He, too, was shot with a wheeled pistol. Then all pistols were produced either in England or in continental Europe. This is not to say that there were no Scottish gunsmiths in the XNUMXth century, but there were definitely few of them, and they most likely did not deal with firearms. Well, maybe they could fix it.

However, in the early XNUMXth century in Scotland, wheeled pistols with a fishtail grip became widespread. They can often be seen in pairs with locks on both the left and right, suggesting that they were intended to be fired with two hands. And it was at this point in Scottish history that such pistols became a common part of the armament of the high nobility, often along with a broadsword and a shield (or "target" as the Scots called the shield, and it was often richly decorated and covered with leather), as well as various daggers.


In this illustration, we see two Scottish pistols at the highlander on the right. That's how it was customary to wear them! Kenney McLay Jr.

Then the wheel lock was replaced by a flint percussion lock, and with it, at the end of the XNUMXth century, a new style of design of such pistols appeared. And it existed until about the end of the XNUMXth century, although by the end of this period, pistols designed in this way became simply a decorative part of traditional mountain clothing. In addition, pistols of this type were later adopted by the mountain regiments of the British army, and officers usually carried them under the left hand.

Their main difference from all others: the all-metal construction of the pistol, the absence of a fence around the trigger and the unique shape of the handle.


Twin pistols from Dong. Right view. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

It is believed that pistols of this type originated in the area of ​​the village of Doone in Stirlingshire, which became the center of pistol production in Scotland. Doone was originally a small village near Stirling, which was once the capital of Scotland. Back then, Dun was at a crossroads where pastoralists used to ferry their livestock from Highland to Sterling and other major cities, and many highlanders did their shopping in Dun on their way home. And since they returned, selling cattle, with money, they bought pistols there to protect themselves from robbers and raise their authority. At first it was a weapon produced in Europe.


These are the same pistols. Left view. Note that the flat handle allowed a medallion to be placed on it, which could have been inlaid with mother-of-pearl or a strange gem. It was possible to insert a decent-sized gem or just a piece of cut rock crystal with colored paper under it! Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

But in 1647, a Flemish refugee blacksmith named Thomas Caddell settled in the Dune and found a second home there. He was a blacksmith by profession, but he soon began making pistols, and his art reached such a level of skill that he became famous throughout Scotland. These pistols used flintlock percussion mechanisms similar to those used by other manufacturers of the time. However, these weapons had certain characteristics that completely distinguished them from weapons made elsewhere.


Lock one of the same pistols. Signature says they were made by Master Campbell

Caddell used steel welding methods that the Vikings used 700 years ago. This meant that his steel was of a higher quality than many of his competitors. Due to a shortage of suitable wood in Scotland to make grips for his pistols, Caddell began to make his weapons entirely from steel. In addition, his pistols had neither a trigger guard nor a safety catch, which made them quicker to fire.


A pair of pistols by John Campbell. Photo from one of the auctions

A long and again steel ramrod was kept under the barrel. But the main and most noticeable feature of the Dong pistols was the handle with curls at the end in the form of ram's horns or a slotted heart. Usually an "apple" (a spherical top) was placed here, which often served as a pencil case. The same pistols had a similar part between the horns, but of a smaller size, which could also be unscrewed and had a thin needle at the end, which could be used to clean the ignition hole of the barrel.


A pair of pistols by Master Murdoch. Photo from one of the auctions

Despite the fact that Caddell's pistols were more expensive than those of his competitors, their quality and reputation for highly reliable weapons were so high that the Highlanders specially saved money just to buy his pistols! And the weapons of foreign manufacturers were ignored.


Another pistol by Murdoch. Christie's auction, 1972

The factory, founded by Thomas Caddell, became a family business, run by five generations of this family (interestingly, the founder's son, grandson and great-grandson was also named Thomas Caddell!). Other pistol factories were opened in the area, many of which were founded by people who worked as apprentices at the Caddell factory: Murdoch, Christie, Campbell, Macleod, etc.


The muzzle of the pistol is made by Murdoch. Photo from one of the auctions

Some of the pistols produced in these factories were richly decorated with intricate engraving, and gold and silver inlays cost more than 50 guineas. Nobility wore such pistols with pride. But the real "caddell" remained unrivaled.


Two more clanmen, one of whom is armed with just a terrible ax and a pair of Dun pistols! Kenneth McLay Jr.

Pistols like this were in high demand, especially among Highlander officers, in the 1730s and 1740s. Later, pistols were made from other materials: brass and bronze. Well, the "golden age" of Scottish armourers fell on the period between 1625 and 1775.


Even when the Scottish-style pistols did not have a distinctive grip, they were still all-metal. Pistol by Master Joe Christie of Stirling, 1754

Presumably, it was the pistol made in Dun that became the first weapon from which the first shot was fired in the American War of Independence, and it was fired by Major Pitcairn, a British officer. George Washington also received from his officers two pistols made in Dun, which he bequeathed to give to Major General Lafayette after his death.


A purely army pistol by Isaac Bissell - a master from Birmingham

The popularity of pistols from Dong was so high that they soon began to be produced in England. Many of the pistols used by the 42nd Highlander Regiment (the famous Black Watch Regiment) during the wars with France and India were actually manufactured by a Birmingham manufacturer named John Blisset.


A richly engraved silver-grip pistol made by John Blisset

By about 1795, many Highland regiments had largely abandoned pistols. Due to competition from other European manufacturers, the factories in Dun were also closed, since it was no longer profitable to produce them there. The buildings of the Caddell and Murdoch factories have survived to our time, but they are preserved in the Dun as historic buildings. However, high quality replicas of Highland pistols are still produced in other countries, such as ... India! In fact, today India is one of the main manufacturers of replica pistols from the Dong.


Capsule pistol made by Master Campbell

In 1810, the Reverend Alexander Forsyth invented a new method of ignition using "explosive mercury." By 1825, "explosive mercury" began to be placed in a copper cap, on which the trigger was hit, and the flame from its charge was transmitted through a special hole to the gunpowder in the barrel. This is how the capsule weapon appeared. In 1822, King George IV visited Scotland for the first time in 200 years. One of the organizers of the visit was Sir Walter Scott, who by this time had already become famous in Great Britain. This visit drew public attention to everything related to Scotland, sparked an explosion of interest in wearing tartan and aroused interest in Scottish weapons. London and Birmingham pistol manufacturers quickly took advantage of this and began producing excellent pistols made in the Scottish style. Among them were primers, otherwise identical to pistols from the Highland.


Capsule Scottish pistol. Right view. It is believed that this pistol may have been manufactured by Edward or William Bond in London. The metals used are steel and silver. Its handle is silver plated and delicately engraved with foliage and ropes. The barrel is round in the center and polygonal on the breech and muzzle. The round part is engraved with foliage. The trigger is engraved with foliage, repeated on the lock plate with the manufacturer's name. All steel parts are blued, which contrasts perfectly with the silver



The same gun. Left view. The iron article for the belt is clearly visible and the engraving inside the medallion on the handle, which depicts shields with the image of the Union Jack flag, cannon, cannonballs, drum and flags
Author:
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North and South: smooth-bore and rifled guns
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The most popular caliber of the North and South
Cannons of Tredegar and the Noble Brothers
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  1. zxc15682
    zxc15682 22 October 2020 18: 13 New
    -3
    Interestingly, after the shot, the shooter threw a pistol at the enemy?
    1. garri-lin
      garri-lin 22 October 2020 20: 21 New
      +1
      I think we need to wait for Boris Razor. He is aware.
    2. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 22 October 2020 21: 12 New
      +8
      Quote: zxc15682
      Interestingly, after the shot, the shooter threw a pistol at the enemy?

      No running away! laughing
      Vyacheslav Olegovich, thank you!
      Regards, Vlad!
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 22 October 2020 22: 52 New
        +4
        On occasion, you can throw it, since a weapon is just a tool in your hands ...
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 23 October 2020 05: 35 New
          +4
          Quote: Sea Cat
          On occasion, you can throw it, since a weapon is just a tool in your hands ...

          Good morning Uncle Kostya, if you throw it better with bricks and in no case with hats !!!
          laughing
          There is a pneumatic at home, converted from the PPSh 1945. Surkus, heavy with a birch butt and a metal barrel cover. Even the receiver has wood details. There is no need to throw him, he took the barrel and the finished club. In this regard, the graceful Tomigan and the AK-74 with impact-resistant plastic cannot be compared! Talking about personal verbal sensations.
          1. Catfish
            Catfish 23 October 2020 06: 46 New
            +5
            Good morning, Vladislav. smile
            In our department there was a gift PPSh of Rokossovsky, so he had a bed of red derevre, everything is chrome-nickel-plated, a disc and a casing of black polish, such a weapon is a sin to use as a KuvadLoy. wink
            1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
              Kote Pan Kokhanka 23 October 2020 07: 16 New
              +6
              I do not think that if the "Stars" were formed and the marshal faced the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, he would be ashamed to "count the teeth" with his name PPSh! Although, as far as I remember, Rokossovsky was a cavalryman, so - a personal saber, our everything !!!
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 23 October 2020 08: 09 New
                +4
                Cavalrymen are also different, here Syoma Budyonny, as he considered the tachanka the best weapon, and began to fight the Germans, and Rokossovsky immediately understood what a tank was and competently used tanks with whole armies.
                1. Pane Kohanku
                  Pane Kohanku 23 October 2020 14: 05 New
                  +5
                  Syoma Budyonny, as he considered the cart the best weapon, and began to fight the Germans

                  Budyonny is a very peculiar person. This is a real nugget, a man with a popular mind, with common sense. He had the ability to quickly grasp the situation. He himself did not propose solutions, he himself did not understand the situation in such a way as to propose a solution, but when they reported to him, offered certain solutions, a program, one or another, actions, he, firstly, quickly grasped the situation and, secondly , as a rule, supported the most rational decisions. And he did it with sufficient determination.
                  In particular, we must pay tribute to him that when the situation in the Kiev sack was reported to him, and when he figured it out, assessed it, the proposal that was made to him by the headquarters in order to raise the question before Headquarters about withdrawing from the Kiev sack, he immediately accepted and wrote a corresponding telegram to Stalin. He did it decisively, although the consequences of such an act could be dangerous and formidable for him.

                  From a conversation between Simonov and General Pokrovsky, http://www.hrono.info/dokum/194_dok/1944simonov.php
                  Unfortunately, at the beginning of the war, marshals of "a different warehouse" (besides Timoshenko), we did not have ... hi Blackening is not worth it, but fantasizing about genius - too. What Semyon Mikhailovich was, he was. I did what I could. soldier
    3. Icelord
      Icelord 24 October 2020 20: 47 New
      +2
      Well, you are the Scots, poor and tight-fisted. Who is the gun for which a couple of weighty pounds will cry
    4. Storm Uesugi
      Storm Uesugi 25 October 2020 05: 22 New
      0
      as you can see in the photo they were worn at least two.)
  2. polpot
    polpot 22 October 2020 18: 20 New
    +6
    Thanks for the great article and illustrations.
  3. Hunter 2
    Hunter 2 22 October 2020 18: 22 New
    +6
    As always, a very interesting article and the photos are just great! Thanks to the author! hi
  4. The leader of the Redskins
    The leader of the Redskins 22 October 2020 18: 28 New
    +4
    Well. Now not only Vyacheslav Olegovich needs to be thanked, but also the reader who threw a good topic for the article!)))
  5. maktub
    maktub 22 October 2020 18: 33 New
    +6
    You can say - "deadly" beauty
    Respect to the author as always!
  6. bubalik
    bubalik 22 October 2020 18: 36 New
    10
    Write about them,
    ,,, Vyacheslav O., write about testers hi
    1. kalibr
      22 October 2020 19: 11 New
      +8
      Sergey, and I would be glad to fulfill your request, but ... I'm not interested.
      1. bubalik
        bubalik 22 October 2020 19: 32 New
        10
        ,, no and no trial crying
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 22 October 2020 22: 43 New
          +6
          What can you do...

          Hello, Sergey! hi smile
  7. Undecim
    Undecim 22 October 2020 19: 01 New
    +8
    This is not to say that there were no Scottish gunsmiths in the XNUMXth century, but there were definitely few of them, and they most likely did not deal with firearms. Well, maybe they could fix it.
    Here you, Vyacheslav Olegovich, were misled, probably by someone Brian Beck.

    These are shotgun barrels made in Scotland and dated 1589 and 1595, with the names of the customers engraved on them.
    Agree that the level of workmanship is clearly not amateurish.
    And this is a pair of the oldest known to date Scottish pistols, made by master John F. Kennedy of Edinburgh, 1598.
    The pistols are on display in the Historical Museum of Dresden. The level of workmanship allows us to conclude that this is clearly not a debut for the master.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 22 October 2020 19: 03 New
      +8
      The second picture was not inserted, I am correcting it.

      Their locks, as you can see, are percussion locks, all the signs of typical Scottish pistols are present.
      1. kalibr
        22 October 2020 19: 10 New
        +5
        Yes indeed. But you can't see behind everything ...
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 22 October 2020 19: 16 New
          +7
          You have no problems with English, see Claude Blair's article SCOTI'ISH FIREARMS
          (https://electricscotland.com/history/scotreg/scottishfirearms.pdf). Perhaps it will come in handy.
          1. kalibr
            22 October 2020 19: 29 New
            +5
            Thanks! My favourite author...
            1. Undecim
              Undecim 22 October 2020 19: 38 New
              +7
              More details on Scottish weapons in the period under review here.
          2. kalibr
            22 October 2020 19: 55 New
            +5
            Found, looked, read a little, downloaded. Indeed, the beginning in a serious way makes up for problems in my knowledge of the early history of Scottish firearms. The problem is volume. In work 95 pages, although not all of them are text. It is downloaded into PDF and the text is arranged in a column on the left. I tried to translate it into a format more convenient for work, but so far unsuccessfully ... And raise it manually line by line ... you will go crazy and I feel sorry for my time.
            1. Undecim
              Undecim 22 October 2020 20: 00 New
              +6
              This link downloads the first and second parts in full without any problems.
              https://www.medievalists.net/2015/11/guns-in-scotland-the-manufacture-and-use-of-guns-and-their-influence-on-warfare-from-the-fourteenth-century-to-c-1625/
              1. kalibr
                22 October 2020 20: 07 New
                +6
                I read Cadwell a little different, but thanks anyway. This is his doctoral dissertation, by the way - PhD
              2. kalibr
                22 October 2020 20: 45 New
                +5
                Unfortunately, they contain 457 pages together. It is unthinkable even to read this in real conditions. Alas.
      2. kalibr
        22 October 2020 21: 11 New
        +4
        The Historical Museum of Dresden is the Military History Museum and the Bundeswehr Museum. Their site is disgusting, there is simply nothing on it, and apparently working with them is absolutely futile!
    2. Icelord
      Icelord 24 October 2020 21: 05 New
      +1
      Well, actually, Viktor Nikolaevich, it was not good with the production of firearms in the 16th century in Scotland. Maybe at the very end in Edinburgh there were several masters, but I'm sure it was possible to read them on the fingers, and without taking off their shoes)))
  8. Catfish
    Catfish 22 October 2020 19: 50 New
    +8
    Thank you, Vyacheslav! smile An interesting and very beautiful article. good
    Came across here on a "gift set" of the Scots, but I'm not sure if it is an original or a replica.
    1. kalibr
      22 October 2020 20: 11 New
      +5
      Well, there's also a dirk with two knives attached ... yeah. But I'm also not sure what such suitcases were made then. Although ... who knows. Viktor Nikolaevich threw me a problem over there - an article of 95 pages with a photo of poor quality, and very interesting examples - the Historical Museum of Dresden. And I would like to find high quality photos of them. And try to find, and most importantly - scrape. I asked a year ago in the Armory - why the thorns on the pole of the tournament spear, what they have in the exposition. He explained that VO readers are interested ... And they didn't even answer!
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 22 October 2020 20: 38 New
        +6
        And they didn't even answer!

        We rested on our laurels, before other people worked there, everything has changed and further changes not for the better.
      2. Liam
        Liam 22 October 2020 20: 59 New
        +3
        Quote: kalibr
        why are there thorns on the pole of the tournament spear, what do they have on display.

        There are photos? In which part of the shaft are they located?
        1. kalibr
          22 October 2020 21: 07 New
          +3
          I had articles here about tournament armor with photos from the Dresden Armory. There is a photo ... a few ...
      3. Undecim
        Undecim 22 October 2020 21: 07 New
        +4
        article in 95 pages with a photo of poor quality, and very interesting examples - Historical Museum of Dresden.
        By the way, I just started reading calmly and wondered if I was in a hurry with "Master John Kennedy from Edinburgh." There is no doubt that the pistols are Scottish, but it was in those years that John F. Kennedy, the fifth Earl of Cassilis, a Scottish peer, lived in Edinburgh. Perhaps you mean that these are his pistols?
    2. Undecim
      Undecim 22 October 2020 20: 58 New
      +5
      Where is the photo from?
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 22 October 2020 21: 05 New
        +4
        Good evening, Victor. hi
        In the network "picked", where else. I have something in the library, but I still can't register the scanner. request
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 22 October 2020 21: 11 New
          +4
          So discard the site address.
          1. Catfish
            Catfish 22 October 2020 21: 15 New
            +4
            http://historypistols.ru/blog/kremnevye-pistolety/shotlandskij-kremnevyj-pistolet-s-zavitkovym-prikladom/
            I don't know if it worked or not, for the first time I give a link, write down how it went.
            1. Undecim
              Undecim 22 October 2020 21: 17 New
              +6
              Everything is fine, but what are the doubts, there is a caption under the photo.
              A pair of Scottish flintlock pistols, made around 1795-1819 by Samuel Brun (gunsmith of the Prince of Wales, and later Prince Regent and King George IV), packed in a gun case, with a set of accessories, a bone powder flask and a Scottish dagger at one of the German auctions valued at over $ 12000.
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 22 October 2020 21: 31 New
                +4
                Strange, but I overlooked this signature, as always carried away by the appearance. smile
        2. Simargl
          Simargl 23 October 2020 20: 06 New
          +1
          Now it is better to take pictures: faster and the book does not break. You need a V-shaped turntable and a tripod with a camera.
  9. Avior
    Avior 22 October 2020 21: 10 New
    +4
    Interesting. The Scotsman in the illustration with claymore and without ricasso, we note, has a shield with him.
    How was he going to act with them in battle if both hands are occupied with a sword?
    Or is it a purely ceremonial option?
    1. kalibr
      22 October 2020 21: 32 New
      +3
      It wasn't written there ... So I can't say anything.
    2. Simargl
      Simargl 23 October 2020 20: 35 New
      0
      Quote: Avior
      How was he going to act with them in battle if both hands are occupied with a sword?
      This shield looks like a rondash.
    3. Icelord
      Icelord 24 October 2020 20: 54 New
      +2
      Claymore from poverty and greed, and it seems like it's time to throw it out, but it's a pity. National flavor however
    4. Icelord
      Icelord 24 October 2020 21: 10 New
      +2
      And by the way, the ricasso did not have claymore, this is not a spadon, it was not supposed to take the blade there, and of course to hang the shield on the elbow, otherwise you will not wave with one hand
      1. Avior
        Avior 24 October 2020 21: 53 New
        +2
        I do not insist, but the mention of ricasso can be found in some claymores.
        https://good-claymore.ru/about_claymore
        1. Icelord
          Icelord 24 October 2020 22: 02 New
          0
          Perhaps, but the classic claymore has no ricasso, at least it is not pronounced, this is still the smallest two-handed. An ordinary zweichander is much longer, and the spadon of landsknechts sometimes of completely unrealistic sizes is 3.5 kg in weight, and somewhere I read about four, although I can hardly imagine, not a ceremonial, but a battle sword of this weight
  10. Aleks2000
    Aleks2000 22 October 2020 21: 42 New
    +3
    Oh cool was Kenneth McLay Jr., oh cool ...
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 22 October 2020 22: 04 New
      +6
      The man whose creativity was killed by photography.
      1. Catfish
        Catfish 22 October 2020 22: 39 New
        +4
        But she could not kill his work. smile
        1. Undecim
          Undecim 22 October 2020 22: 50 New
          +5
          However, he stopped painting miniatures.
          1. Catfish
            Catfish 22 October 2020 22: 53 New
            +3
            Well, there may have been other reasons besides the camera. You never know ...
            1. Undecim
              Undecim 22 October 2020 23: 02 New
              +5
              He was a miniaturist with extensive practice in Edinburgh. In those years, miniature served as a portrait photography.
              With the advent of a photo studio, the practice came to naught and the artist took up landscape, watercolors. it was then that portraits of the Scottish Highlanders appeared.
              1. Catfish
                Catfish 22 October 2020 23: 34 New
                +6
                I'm just judging by myself, after a stroke a tremor appeared and I can no longer do easel graphics with ink and feathers, now I am stuck in Photoshop, and this is not the same.
                Yes, Vic, if not difficult, take a look at the article about the German "Stan", there is a question about the real cost of the "Sturmgewer" in comparison with the same Mauser rifle.
                1. Undecim
                  Undecim 23 October 2020 00: 14 New
                  +7
                  I saw this article, everyone is confused by the figure of 1800 marks, as I understand it. It is also found in foreign language literature, even among the Czechs. Taking into account the fact that Herat Potsdam was produced in two batches of 5000 per month - count the piece weapons, maybe that's why the price is. Now they are being auctioned by collectors for 17 euros.
                  The price of an assault gun is 70 marks. You understand that in order to check this figure, you have to seriously delve into and it is not a fact that the result will be positive.
                  1. Catfish
                    Catfish 23 October 2020 01: 11 New
                    +3
                    Clear. Thank you, Victor Nikolaevich.
                2. Icelord
                  Icelord 26 October 2020 09: 10 New
                  +1
                  Well, it seems that they were specially made as a particularly cheap weapon for Volkssturm, so they should not be expensive
                  1. Catfish
                    Catfish 26 October 2020 21: 43 New
                    0
                    If about "Sturmgever", then it was made for the army.
                    1. Icelord
                      Icelord 26 October 2020 21: 54 New
                      +1
                      No, about Potsdam, they are for Volkssturm, it's even more primitive than Stan, well, I think you've seen
                      1. Catfish
                        Catfish 26 October 2020 22: 02 New
                        +1
                        Saw a water pipe with a store. laughing
                      2. Icelord
                        Icelord 26 October 2020 22: 04 New
                        +1
                        Oh yes, something like that, and the butt is very strange
                      3. Catfish
                        Catfish 26 October 2020 22: 08 New
                        +1
                        Well, here is the well-known principle - "If you want to live, you will not be so hot." smile
                      4. Icelord
                        Icelord 26 October 2020 22: 13 New
                        +1
                        ... Here he is handsome wassat... Crooked like my life
                      5. Catfish
                        Catfish 26 October 2020 22: 19 New
                        +1
                        Well, you, my friend, life goes on, and he ended before he could really start. drinks
  • Sergey M. Karasev
    Sergey M. Karasev 25 October 2020 17: 40 New
    0
    MacLay Jr. had one important advantage over photographers - his miniatures were in color.
  • YOUR
    YOUR 23 October 2020 04: 30 New
    +1
    I read the article with pleasure. Thanks.
  • Stormsdruttin
    Stormsdruttin 23 October 2020 11: 56 New
    +1
    one of which is armed with just a creepy ax
    This is a lohaber ax (Lohaberaxt). Some researchers of edged weapons believe that the halberd arose as an evolution of the Lohaber ax.
    1. kalibr
      23 October 2020 15: 25 New
      0
      Thanks for the addition. I didn't know about it ...
      1. Yurahip
        Yurahip 23 October 2020 23: 21 New
        +1
        Interesting handles, it is convenient to open bottles with beer, periodonte, with ale ...
    2. Icelord
      Icelord 24 October 2020 21: 47 New
      +2
      Well, from the lohaber, it is unlikely, the godendag is usually considered the prototype of the halberd
  • Icelord
    Icelord 24 October 2020 20: 51 New
    +2
    Many thanks to Vyacheslav Olegovich, very interesting
  • Icelord
    Icelord 24 October 2020 20: 59 New
    +2
    By the way, these pistols had one more feature, when everyone had been using the French battery lock for a long time, the Duns had the most primitive lock what current can be imagined, why it is completely incomprehensible, it seems just, so that not like everyone else
  • Storm Uesugi
    Storm Uesugi 25 October 2020 05: 24 New
    +1
    they not only had fashionable skirts but also socks)
    and who really knows why only the Scots kept men's skirts and why all the others felt ashamed to wear it?
    I understand the women were taken away, but in the middle, women wore long dresses until the 20th century and not skirts
    secondly, women had no rights before what to do
    I smell the Illuminati conspiracy)
    1. Sergey_G_M
      Sergey_G_M 25 October 2020 19: 24 New
      +1
      Yes, no, most likely because of the high status of the cavalry, it has become fashionable to wear pants, and in a skirt it is not very comfortable on horseback.
      1. Icelord
        Icelord 26 October 2020 07: 51 New
        +1
        Yes, the Scots are different from the Caucasian highlanders, they are not cavalrymen even once, but about the kilt, it’s simple, they were poor, but the kilt and pants, and a cloak, and a blanket. Not only the highlanders wore, the poor peasants from the plain also wore, and who is richer already have pants