Military Review

Mass character under the German patron: About the Czechoslovakian light machine gun ZB vz. 26

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Market weapons in the period between the two world wars was very extensive. Small arms were created in a number of European countries. The list of countries producing small arms in 1920-1930 included Britain, Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union, France and more.


In the mid-1920s, the Czech gunsmith Vaclav Holek developed a machine gun chambered for the German 7,92 × 57 mm cartridge. This weapon received the nomenclature designation ZB vz. 26. Weapons, as it turned out, have become truly massive. In Czechoslovakia alone (and factories were later opened outside its borders), about 140 thousand of such machine guns were fired before the start of World War II. The weapon turned out to be so in demand that its production even reached China and Argentina.

These machine guns were used in various armed conflicts, including the war in Spain, as well as the war between China and Japan.

Production of light machine guns ZB vz. 26 was discontinued in 1945. Although, according to some reports, in South America, Holek machine guns were produced after the Second World War.

The Kalashnikov channel's plot tells about the Czechoslovakian light machine gun ZB vz. 26 and Bren variant.

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  1. svp67
    svp67 18 August 2020 10: 58 New
    +8



    War in Afghanistan, trophies
    1. Insurgent
      Insurgent 18 August 2020 11: 05 New
      +3
      Mass character under the German patron: About the Czechoslovakian light machine gun ZB vz. 26
      Judging by the history of use, it is clear that the machine gun is successful. And for its time, not very bad. Here are just a store in capacity, too small for a machine gun ...

      And I was struck by the presence of a folding bracket-shoulder rest on the butt, almost the same as on the PC (M) ...
      1. svp67
        svp67 18 August 2020 11: 23 New
        +1
        Quote: Insurgent
        Here are just a store in capacity, too small for a machine gun ...

        At the time of the creation of the machine gun, this issue was generally the weak point of all machine guns, until the difficulties with the creation of durable workable springs were solved ...
  2. The leader of the Redskins
    The leader of the Redskins 18 August 2020 11: 00 New
    0
    In its own way, an outstanding machine gun. I just never found the answer to the question of why the Czechs abandoned the first option with a "drum" on the bottom for 50 rounds, and moved on to the horn, and even on top!
    1. Insurgent
      Insurgent 18 August 2020 11: 29 New
      0
      Quote: Leader of the Redskins
      why did the Czechs abandon the first option with a "drum" on the bottom for 50 rounds, and switched to the horn, and even on top!

      Quote: svp67
      Quote: Insurgent
      Here are just a store in capacity, too small for a machine gun ...

      At the time of the creation of the machine gun, this issue was generally the weak point of all machine guns, until the difficulties with the creation of durable workable springs were solved ...

      The location of the store on top of the body of the machine gun (with its small capacity) resolved the issue of a stable supply of ammunition due to the characteristics of the feed spring.
      The variant with a "tambourine" with its lower location, and could not finish up to a stable working ...
      1. svp67
        svp67 18 August 2020 11: 52 New
        +1
        Quote: Insurgent
        The location of the store on top of the body of the machine gun (with its small capacity) resolved the issue of a stable supply of ammunition due to the characteristics of the feed spring.

        It is, but such a scheme has size limitations ...
      2. Undecim
        Undecim 18 August 2020 14: 22 New
        +5
        Quote: Insurgent
        The variant with a "tambourine" with its lower location, and could not finish up to a stable working ...

        The variant with the tape feed was "finished". And he showed excellent results. It was called Praha II and was developed at the Česka Zbrojovka Praha factory by the Holek brothers.

        The round box at the bottom is not a store, there is a tape inside.
        However, due to the low capacity of the Česka Zbrojovka Praha plant, it was decided to transfer production to the newly built Zbrojovka Brno plant. A lengthy series of royalties litigation followed between the design owners (ČZ) and the manufacturer (ZB). During this time, Holek and his comrades managed to develop another model, with store food - Praha I-23, which was chosen by the military and which was produced under the name ZB vz. 26.
  3. Constanty
    Constanty 18 August 2020 11: 34 New
    +4
    As a curiosity, I want to add that the Bren was not the only machine gun from Czechoslovakia produced in the UK. In addition to the Bren, a derivative of the ZB-26, it was widely produced and used during World War II as a weapon for British tanks and armored vehicles, the Besa machine gun is a variant of the Czechoslovak ZB-53 (Model 37) (also chambered for 7,92x57).
    1. hohol95
      hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 12 New
      0
      And the proud sons of the Misty Albin had to adopt one more cartridge! The patron of your potential enemy!
      The ammunition of British tanks used the following cartridges -
      7,7 × 56 mm R, 7,92x57 (British-made tanks), 7,62 × 63 mm (Canadian-made tanks).
      1. Constanty
        Constanty 18 August 2020 22: 18 New
        0
        On the one hand, it was the complexity, on the other hand, the possibility of using captured ammunition - in Africa it was just useful :-)
        cartridges 7,62 × 63 mm .30-06 Springfield, in turn, could receive from their allies - an inventive nation, these British
        1. hohol95
          hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 26 New
          0
          cartridges 7,62 × 63 mm .30-06 Springfield, in turn, could receive from their allies - an inventive nation, these British

          The Canadian infantry used the Browning M1919A4.
          So it was decided to use the weapon of which there are many.
        2. hohol95
          hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 30 New
          +1
          The Soviet side had to purchase a similar cartridge variety. To provide British tanks with Lend-Lease! Except cartridges 7,92x57.
          Tanks with BESA machine guns were not supplied to the USSR in large quantities.
        3. hohol95
          hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 46 New
          0
          Eh wrong! The Valentine X had a BESA machine gun.
          1. Constanty
            Constanty 18 August 2020 22: 49 New
            +1
            I got the impression that it was easier to get Mauser ammunition on the Eastern Front than the British 7,7 ;-)
            1. hohol95
              hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 56 New
              0
              So then it is so ...
              And for the Browning cartridges were required. We got a lot of them with American tanks and armored vehicles.
  4. Bolo
    Bolo 18 August 2020 12: 03 New
    -1
    "Thank you," hardworking and diligent Czechs for your labor heroism! And thank you for Russophobia! It's a pity that you yourself weren't killed from this wonderful product, but more and more Soviet people ...
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 18 August 2020 14: 28 New
      +3
      Yes, as Daniel Zatochnik said, "they are neither shouted nor sowed, but they are born themselves."
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 18 August 2020 18: 01 New
      +2
      Cuba, the Playa Giron Museum, ZB-53 have worked here too, but for a just cause.

      These machine guns were also in service with the coast guard boats of the republic, in my youth I saw a photo of them on the deck, but now I could not find it.
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 18 August 2020 22: 05 New
        +1
        They are "hearty" and sold a lot of their "Czech" T-34s!
        Only Egypt sold 600 thirty-fours!
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 18 August 2020 23: 12 New
          0
          Hi Aleksey. hi
          Once upon a time I read that it was through the Czechs that the Israelis sold a bunch of captured Arab tanks they did not need (our production, of course, and maybe Czech).
          1. hohol95
            hohol95 18 August 2020 23: 27 New
            +1
            To whom is war, and to whom is mother dear ...
            They write that in the army of Saddam Hussein, the bulk of the T-72s were of Polish production!
            1. Catfish
              Catfish 18 August 2020 23: 36 New
              0
              Why, the Poles are not people, they also have their own piece of bread. laughing And all in fact at our expense, MEMBERS, damn it, Warsaw Pact.
              1. hohol95
                hohol95 19 August 2020 07: 59 New
                +1
                They beat out fuel and lubricants and foodstuffs from the "Kremlin elders"!
                And the KGB then reported that fuels and lubricants were being resold to the west.
                Food is sold in private shops and markets !!!
  5. Yellow bubble
    Yellow bubble 20 August 2020 20: 40 New
    0
    A good machine gun for its time.