Military Review

Finnish PPSh. Suomi submachine gun

58

Finnish soldier firing from a Suomi KP-31 submachine gun, photo: waralbum.ru


It was a great success for Finland that in the 1920s, designer Aimo Lahti became interested in the design of submachine guns. Over time, the designer managed to create a series of small arms weapons. And his 1931 Suomi submachine gun became a truly successful weapon, turning into a serious threat to the Red Army during the years of the Winter War of 1939-1940. At the same time, an unprepared person can easily confuse the Finnish submachine gun with a drum magazine with the Soviet Shpagin submachine gun of the 1941 model, so these weapons of the two warring countries turned out to be similar in appearance.

Aimo Lahti. Creator of finnish automatic weapons


The creator of the Finnish automatic weapons was self-taught and had no special education, so Finland was very lucky in this regard. Aimo Lahti came from an ordinary peasant family. The future designer of small arms and major general of the Finnish army was born in the village of Viyala in 1896, today it is the territory of the small city of Akaa. Aimo Lahti was the eldest of five brothers. Perhaps that is why, after graduating from the 6th grade of the school, he went to work at a glass factory. So he could help his family.

It is believed that it was at this time, having bought a rifle of the Berdan system with the money earned at the glass factory, the future designer was seriously interested in small arms. After serving in the army and not having worked for a long time on the railway, Lahti became the armourer of the Finnish army. In 1922, he substantively became acquainted with automatic weapons, having studied the German MP-18 submachine gun, which was difficult to attribute to successful models. Based on the experience gained, the self-taught designer designed his own Suomi M-22 submachine gun, which, after refinement in the 1920s, turned into the serial Suomi Konepistooli M / 31, or KP-31. It is noteworthy that the weapon received the name of the country, the self-name of Finland - Suomi.

In addition to submachine guns, Lahti created a successful modernization of the Mosin M-27 rifle system, nicknamed "Spitz" due to the characteristic front sight. Aimo Lahti also created and secured the launch of the M-26 light machine gun, which also had a drum magazine for 75 rounds. He created the designer and the Finnish Lahti L-20 39 mm anti-tank rifle, which could effectively deal with all types of Soviet light tanks. But still, the Suomi submachine gun remained a truly successful and massive weapon of the designer.

Finnish PPSh. Suomi submachine gun
Small Arms Designer Aimo Johannes Lahti

Until 1953, the total production of Suomi KP-31 submachine guns amounted to almost 80 thousand units, for small Finland these are very large numbers. At the same time, the Finnish military and police directly received almost 57 thousand Suomi submachine guns, and the rest were exported. Weapons were bought in large quantities by Switzerland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, and Germany acquired it during the war years. Serial production under license over the years has been deployed in Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland.

Design Features of the Suomi Submachine Gun


In general, the device of the Finnish submachine gun can be called typical of the first generation of such weapons, which were developed on the basis of the German MP-18 and other early PP models. As the main cartridge, Lahti initially chose the 9x19 mm Parabellum pistol cartridge, widely distributed by then in the world. Despite the abundance of common places, the Finnish model differed from its predecessors and competitors in its own features that could not be found in weapons of other countries of the world.

A distinctive feature of the Finnish submachine guns was the high quality of production, when creating weapons, metal cutting machines were widely used. Good production is noted by many modern researchers. True, this approach had a drawback. For example, the receiver was fully milled, which led to an increase in the mass of the product. With a drum store, Suomi weighed nearly 6,5 kg. Also, weapons could not be called technological in the sense that it was difficult to launch them into mass production in a total war. The cost of the submachine gun was also quite large, which left its mark on the production of weapons.

Structurally, the Suomi submachine gun consisted of a fully milled round-shaped receiver, a solid wooden box, a barrel, a removable casing on the barrel and a trigger. Aimo Lahti placed a fuse in the front of the trigger guard, resembling a L-shaped part. The fuse also served as a translator of fire modes.


Submachine gun Suomi KP-31

The automatic reloading of weapons worked due to the recoil of the free shutter from recoil during firing. Shooting from a submachine gun was conducted from the open bolt, while the firing pin is fixed in the cup of the bolt, the barrel of the weapon does not lock when firing. To slow down the rate of fire necessary to increase the accuracy of the fire, a model of a vacuum shutter brake was implemented in the model. The receiver, the cover of the receiver and the shutter were so tightly fitted that the shutter moved like a piston in a cylinder, air breakthrough between the shutter and the walls of the receiver was almost completely absent. And directly in the back plate of the receiver, the designer placed a valve that released air only from the inside out.

Due to the system implemented by Lahti with a slower shutter speed, it was possible to reduce the mass of the shutter itself, as well as to increase the accuracy of fire from a submachine gun, especially with single shots. In this case, the weapon was equipped with a sector sight, which was adjusted to fire up to 500 meters. Obviously, such values ​​were redundant. Like most of the submachine guns of the Second World War, the weapons turned out to be really effective at a distance of no more than 200 meters, especially in the automatic firing mode.

An important feature of the Finnish submachine gun, which distinguished it from competitors from other countries, was a removable barrel casing and the barrel itself. This design feature of the weapon gave Finnish soldiers an advantage in battle, when it was easy to change and change the barrel itself. With the availability of spare barrels, this allowed the soldiers not to be afraid of a possible overheating and failure of the weapon. The overheated barrel and casing could be easily changed directly during the clash. The relatively long quick-detachable barrel (314 mm) also provided the weapon with good ballistics. For comparison: in PPSh, the barrel length was 269 mm.

It is important to emphasize here that some of the design decisions that related Suomi with light machine guns were dictated by the fact that the Finnish army lacked automatic weapons. At the initial stage of its creation, the new submachine gun was seriously considered as a manual ersatz submachine gun and weapons of fire support of the squad in short-range combat.


Finnish soldiers with a Suomi submachine gun and panzerfausts against a blown up tank

The store’s receiver with a Suomi submachine gun had an unusual “open” design at that time, which made it possible to use various large-capacity stores. Especially for this model in Finland, several types of stores were created, among which the most famous was the drum magazine for 70 rounds of the Koskinen design, adopted for service in 1936. Also, the weapon could be equipped with a 40-round disk magazine and a 20-round box magazine. Without a magazine and cartridges, the submachine gun weighed about 4,5 kg, with an equipped drum magazine for 70 rounds, the weight of the weapon was already approaching 6,5 kg.

Suomi submachine gun impacted the Red Army


The Suomi KP-31 submachine gun turned out to be an ideal weapon for a war in winter conditions, the weapon was unpretentious and reliable. This model was used by the Finnish military during the years of the Winter War of 1939-1940, and then more massively - during the Second World War. At the same time, at the end of World War II, the Finns managed to use their submachine guns against their recent allies during short-lived military operations against German troops in the Lapland War.

The Finnish Suomi submachine gun made a great impression on the Red Army men and commanders of the Red Army, although at that time in the Finnish army there were no more than four thousand KP-31s. Despite their small numbers, the Finns defended themselves quite skillfully, demonstrating a good level of training and education of personnel. Against this background, they used their few submachine guns quite skillfully, so the Red Army paid attention to this automatic weapon. In the Soviet divisions that participated in the war, initially there were no submachine guns at all, which, however, was offset by the proliferation of semi-automatic and automatic rifles and the limited use of Fedorov assault rifles. Already during the conflict, Degtyarev submachine guns (PDP) began to arrive in units. This was an example of feedback between the howling army on the one hand and the high command and the military-industrial complex on the other.


PPSH-41

Familiarity with Finnish tactics and feedback on the use of the Suomi submachine gun by the Finns became a real impetus for the intensification of the development of such weapons in the USSR, as well as the deployment of mass production and supplying the army with new weapons. At the same time, plans to establish mass production of submachine guns existed in the Soviet Union even before the Soviet-Finnish War, but this military conflict became a catalyst for this process, clearly confirming and proving the effectiveness of such weapons in combat conditions.

Also on the model of the Finnish submachine gun KP-31 in the USSR, in the short term, an own drum shop was created for the later versions of the PPD and PPSh-41, designed for 71 rounds. This drum store for many years will be the hallmark of Soviet automatic weapons during the Second World War.
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  1. svp67
    svp67 15 July 2020 18: 13 New
    24
    Finnish PPSh. Suomi submachine gun
    Why PCA? More likely PPD, on complexity of production and quality of furnish.

    1. Pavel57
      Pavel57 15 July 2020 19: 30 New
      +8
      The author in the title wrote PCA, thinking that PPD is not everyone knows.
      1. svp67
        svp67 15 July 2020 19: 38 New
        10
        Quote: Pavel57
        The author in the title wrote PCA, thinking that PPD is not everyone knows.

        And everyone knows at Suomi ...
  2. Zeev zeev
    Zeev zeev 15 July 2020 18: 14 New
    +5

    Already during the conflict, Degtyarev submachine guns (PDP) began to arrive in units. This was an example of feedback between the howling army on the one hand and the high command and the military-industrial complex on the other.

    This is an example of the connection between the army and the NKVD. The Soviet industry could not expand the quick release of the PPD, so the submachine guns were assembled in parts of the NKVD (mainly border guards, if memory serves), where the PDP was in service and were transferred to the front from all over the country by airplanes. In the same way, Fedorov’s assault rifles were pulled out of the stores of the People’s Commissariat of Defense and Japanese 6.5mm cartridges for the Arisak rifle from Khalkhin-Gol trophies were urgently transferred from the Far East.
    1. Astra wild
      Astra wild 16 July 2020 14: 18 New
      0
      Colleague Zeev, I don't know about Fedorov's assault rifle, but I read about PPD that it was discontinued. At the initiative of someone from the border troops, they again began to produce it in a small batch for border guards
      1. LastPS
        LastPS 16 July 2020 18: 02 New
        +1
        PDP was very expensive. Actually, the PCA appeared as a response to the high cost of the PCA.
  3. ssergey1978
    ssergey1978 15 July 2020 18: 20 New
    0
    excellent PP, one of the best at the time. Successful cartridge. In the taiga, a very formidable and powerful weapon. The Finns used Russian weapons here, on the contrary, the USSR scooped up for the RPM from Suomi.
    1. Potter
      Potter 15 July 2020 19: 43 New
      +6
      So PPD by the time of the winter war for 5 years already existed and it was released more than Suomi. They got a disk store, and then their development. And not the fact that this is the best borrowing - during the war horns for 30 rounds appeared.
      1. AllBiBek
        AllBiBek 15 July 2020 22: 16 New
        +2
        He is at 35.
        And usually charged 32.
        In a tambourine, 65 pieces were usually charged.
        For at full load - well, feed problems, and the spring grumbles.
        The Finns had the same trouble, all 70 were rarely equipped.

        And here is the fact that the tambourine is a little more capacious than that of the Finns - oh, how it came out sideways! Until the end of the 42nd year - manual adjustment of two pieces for a specific barrel, and no interchangeability.
      2. ssergey1978
        ssergey1978 16 July 2020 06: 33 New
        +2
        So suomi existed for five years when the PPD appeared.
      3. Constanty
        Constanty 16 July 2020 13: 46 New
        0
        In fact, the PPD was built 5-6 years before the Winter War, however, Suomi was mass-produced since 1931, and construction began in 1922-25.

        In 1933, the Finnish officer Vilko Pentikäinen handed over to the Soviet Union the drawings of the Suomi assault rifle Contrary to popular belief, its design with a vacuum moderator, and most importantly, weight (more than 7 kg) did not find its followers among the Soviet gunsmiths. The only thing is that the wooden box was greatly shortened, completely revealing the trunk in the casing and the neck of the store.


        Thus, it is impossible to exclude the influence of Suomi on PPD, - another fact is that the “ancestor” was the mentioned Bergman MP-18/28
        1. LastPS
          LastPS 16 July 2020 18: 36 New
          +1
          The exterior certainly has a similarity. On the other hand, the drum magazine could have spied on Thompson, which was still in the NKVD, and the barrel casing is typical for German PPs, like a wooden stock (although there were not many alternatives to a wooden stock then). The PCA received the store from Suomi, apparently, as a more successful solution than from the PPD, which definitely speaks in favor of the fact that the Finnish PP was studied, but only what was really worth attention was copied. You can argue for a long time that the drum magazine was a mistake, but then it was generally ambiguous.
  4. Undecim
    Undecim 15 July 2020 18: 52 New
    +5
    Based on the experience gained, the self-taught designer designed his own Suomi M-22 submachine gun, which, after refinement in the 1920s, turned into the serial Suomi Konepistooli M / 31, or KP-31.
    The Suomi Konepistooli M / 31 turned after refinement of 7,65 mm Suomi M / 26.
  5. Bashkirkhan
    Bashkirkhan 15 July 2020 19: 06 New
    +4
    Suomi submachine gun with box magazine
    1. Zeev zeev
      Zeev zeev 15 July 2020 19: 24 New
      +7
      Four-row magazine for 50 rounds.
      1. Train
        Train 15 July 2020 19: 52 New
        +3
        Bratello found such a thick and heavy in the forest. The Swedes developed such a four-row
  6. Wildgoose
    Wildgoose 15 July 2020 19: 32 New
    +4
    Dear Sergey!
    I dare to comment on your words At the same time, at the end of World War II, the Finns managed to use their submachine guns against their recent allies during short-lived military operations against German troops in the Lapland War.
    The offensive of the 19th Army in the Kandalaksha direction and the ousting of the German troops showed that the September offensive of the Soviet troops of 1944, although thought out to the smallest detail, was not supplied with resources to perform the tasks that changed 3 times in September 1944. This is probably due to the negotiations with the Finns, and their participation in the Lapland War (they probably wanted to jump off the steam locomotive), but the Germans note (the former 6th and 7th SS infantry regiments, later reorganized into a division) that during the Lapland War they had losses were approximately 1 killed and 2 wounded near Rovaniemi. There is no need to talk about any real participation of Finnish troops in this Lapland War, because Both the Finns and ours did not want unnecessary losses on this site of WW2. The situation was as follows - the Germans pulled back their equipment and artillery. surplus ammunition fired and quietly retreated. Let me explain - the 19th army had an ideal plan for the encirclement of the Germans, but a situation developed that by 06.09.1944 the troops approached NOT provided with ammunition and property. The 420th Rifle Division 122nd Rifle Division fed the horses with trophy fodder, because it was not possible to drag one of his own under these conditions. Cartridges 1 b / c, fuels and lubricants - 1 refueling, shells 0,3-1 b / c (the Germans had a railway at their side). The supply situation for the 104th rifle division was no better. And the plans of the 19th army changed as follows: first, ours decided to attack head-on and outflank the flanks (head-on attacks were completed in the very first 2 days, and the flank detours were almost ideal for those conditions), then we decided to expand and attack all the way to Rovaniemi, then the Germans came to their senses and managed to drag artillery (for example, Onkamo had 3 artillery batteries on the company of the Germans' screen). And at that moment ours ran out of ammunition, food and fodder, and the Germans decided not to drag ammunition with them back to Norway, and that's it, the phase of "displacement" of the Germans began, when ours sat and watched the Germans as they calmly leave, burn Finnish villages and their fortifications.
    I host the docs of our troops so that anyone can read them, and compare the conclusions of any authors https://cont.ws/@wildgoose/1711410
    Thank you for the article about this machine.
    1. John22
      John22 16 July 2020 19: 05 New
      0
      The article about the machine contains only general words. Neither specifically for the device, nor the scheme, nor the features are shown. There is more information in the comments.
      1. Keldysh Mstislav
        Keldysh Mstislav 22 July 2020 14: 22 New
        +1
        Yes. Features of the device, the author did not cover. And the main feature and highlight was the shutter cocking system. The handle of which in the above photos is located on the right, under the rear union nut of the receiver. When firing, this handle was motionless. That is, there was no cutout in the receiver for the shutter cocking handle.
  7. Train
    Train 15 July 2020 19: 50 New
    +4
    Where was the MP-18 unsuccessful?
    1. AllBiBek
      AllBiBek 15 July 2020 22: 11 New
      0
      Shop.
      A snail is a song of reason in everything.
      1. Train
        Train 16 July 2020 07: 24 New
        +3
        This is a store and not a weapon.
  8. Avior
    Avior 15 July 2020 20: 06 New
    +4
    The author did not mention an important feature
    The pneumatic shutter retarder did not allow the use of a cocking handle rigidly connected to the shutter, a characteristic feature of the PC of that time and the associated slot in the shutter box.
    Suomi doesn't have one.
    The shutter cocking rod is located below, under the box, and significantly complicates the design.

    At that time, the PP was not considered a mass form of Army weapons, the experience of the Chuck war became known later, therefore, neither Tommy Gun nor Suomi pursued manufacturability, continuous milling.
    On the other hand, for extreme operation, a completely closed shutter box increased reliability, dirt and moisture did not fall, which was not superfluous in Finland.
    The Americans in their mass M3 tried to attach a meat grinder for this, but in the end they simply refused, leaving the cocking shutter finger smile
    1. Catfish
      Catfish 15 July 2020 21: 16 New
      +8
      With regard to the receiver "Suomi" everything is correct, the weapon did not suffer from pollution as much as, for example, the same PPSh.
      And, yes, in the American M3A1, the shutter cockes with your finger and without any tension, regardless of two powerful return springs. And the lid that covers the window for ejecting cartridges, at the same time serves as a fuse, locking the shutter in the front or rear position. This is clearly visible in the photo. In general, the machine is as simple as felt boots, with a surprisingly small return on such a solid caliber.
  9. xomaNN
    xomaNN 15 July 2020 21: 18 New
    +2
    I remember reading in my memoirs that from the filing of Marshal Kulik (he is also a smart strategist crying ) in the upper echelons of both the Central Committee and Stalin, before the war, the opinion was formed that submachine guns were purely "police weapons". Shoot with gangsters ... Before the war, time was lost on the creation of PPD and PPSh. Made up already during the war.
    1. Grossvater
      Grossvater 15 July 2020 21: 28 New
      +4
      Nuuu ... Like a "strategist". The artillery that won the war in the main and was created under Kulik. He really fought without much success, and the administrator and organizer was not bad at all.
      1. Black Colonel
        Black Colonel 10 August 2020 12: 49 New
        0
        At the suggestion of Kulik, the release of the ZiS-2 was slowed down at the beginning of the war. The shortage of this weapon came back to haunt in the 43rd with the appearance of the T-V and T-VI on the front.
        1. Murrr 27
          Murrr 27 15 August 2020 00: 02 New
          0
          And this is for sure ??? There are so many things they do not hang on Kulik - but I saw and what was removed according to Ustinov (after the death of Steel on Grabin and "ate", by the way), and Govorov, it seems. But for the first time I hear about Kulik. By the way - in the book of Vasily Gavrilovich for the first time I read kind words about Kulik - but there was no blasphemy there. About the fact that they swore at first - it was, but there was no abuse, there was no. "Weapon of Victory" Grabin.
    2. Schur
      Schur 16 July 2020 03: 53 New
      +1
      In principle, you correctly said.
      ABC even changed the design, turning it into a regular self-loading rifle in order to reduce the consumption of cartridges from the Red Army.
    3. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 16 July 2020 09: 27 New
      +2
      Quote: xomaNN
      I remember that I read in my memoirs that at the suggestion of Marshal Kulik (still a smart strategist) at the top of both the Central Committee and Stalin, before the war, the opinion was formed that submachine guns are purely "police weapons." Shoot with gangsters ...

      And what else could the army have about the weapon with an effective firing range of 200 m and at the same time standing almost like two light machine guns? wink Especially in a situation where designers offer self-loading and an automatic rifle under a rifle cartridge.

      It’s just that the early PPD-34 is very often evaluated on the basis of data on the PPD-40 and PPSh - they say, an excellent mass cheap weapon that was destroyed by stupid commanders of the civilian era. At the same time, forgetting that the development of stamping and welding, which made PP massive and cheap, in the Soviet military-industrial complex occurred only at the very end of the 30s (Bolotin wrote about this). And before that - we sharpen and mill, sharpen and mill. smile
  10. DeKo
    DeKo 15 July 2020 21: 29 New
    +1
    The author, I will give advice. (no offense) if you do not know, then do not write. The Finns themselves admitted that their PP was not successful. Especially against the background of PPD and PPSh. You will find the source in the Helsinki War Museum
    1. Yaik Cossack
      Yaik Cossack 15 July 2020 22: 19 New
      0
      What kind of military museum is the arena in Sveaborg or something? Another museum has long been closed. So why go to the museum when there is a detailed history of this submachine gun in Finnish and English?
      1. DeKo
        DeKo 16 July 2020 07: 37 New
        -2
        Go to the Mannerheim Museum. On the site they do not have everything
        1. Yaik Cossack
          Yaik Cossack 16 July 2020 09: 19 New
          +1
          I thought you were serious about the topic, and you were just grimacing.

          For others, I inform you that at the Mannerheim Museum, the Suomi submachine gun is in the closet where his collection of weapons is stored. There is no more information. But there is an interesting exposition at the Tampere Espionage Museum about how Soviet intelligence got his blueprints.
  11. Grossvater
    Grossvater 15 July 2020 21: 30 New
    0
    But it’s interesting how this cuckoo clock would show itself anywhere in the Trans-Volga steppes in the summer of 42?
    How would pneumatics with sand torn out work?
  12. Revolver
    Revolver 15 July 2020 21: 46 New
    11
    The author in the list of creativity Aimo Lahti forgot to mention Lahti L-35. But a very good gun, the Swedes bought a license for its release, and kept in service until the 1980s.
  13. Disorder
    Disorder 15 July 2020 22: 05 New
    +5
    Finnish PPSh. Suomi submachine gun

    wassat wassat wassat
    In what year Suomi was adopted, and in which PCA.
    Also on the model of the Finnish submachine gun KP-31 in the USSR, in the short term, an own drum shop was created for the later versions of the PPD and PPSh-41, designed for 71 rounds.

    A drum store was created for PPD-34/38.
    1. Zeev zeev
      Zeev zeev 15 July 2020 22: 55 New
      +5
      The drum magazine for the PPD-34/38 was with a neck. And the "tambourine" for PPD-40, from which the PPSh store was later made, was taken from the Finns.
      1. Disorder
        Disorder 16 July 2020 05: 01 New
        0
        Well, the drum for PPD-34/38 was also developed on the basis of Finnish. Shops PPD-34/38 and PPD-40 differ only in the unit of accession to the PP.
  14. KSVK
    KSVK 15 July 2020 23: 03 New
    +2
    Quote: ssergey1978
    excellent PP, one of the best at the time. Successful cartridge. In the taiga, a very formidable and powerful weapon. The Finns used Russian weapons here, on the contrary, the USSR scooped up for the RPM from Suomi.

    7,62x25 is much more suitable for PP than 9x19. It is in the army performance.
    For all guardsmen shooting at point blank range, 9x19 with its high stopping effect is preferable. And for farther and more accurate shooting, 7,62x25 is better.
    And yes, the milled gearbox and the IMHO pneumatic retarder cannot be attributed to the advantages of this software. And the pollution in the PC usually gets through the ejection window of the cartridges, and not through the back of the receiver, so given that the device shot from an open shutter, the “sealed” back did not help from pollution. But the interchangeable barrel, not bad, in the absence of "normal" machine guns. smile
    1. Train
      Train 16 July 2020 07: 28 New
      +1
      Nothing 7.62 is better than 9 mm. Where is 7.62 now and where is 9 mm.
      1. SARANCHA1976
        SARANCHA1976 16 July 2020 08: 43 New
        +4
        7.62x25 began to die at the time of the appearance of the intermediate cartridge. And his + best flatness + penetration ability
        1. Train
          Train 16 July 2020 11: 57 New
          +1
          There is no better flatness or penetration. See the tables for shooting cartridges. 7.62 bullet is light. It quickly loses its initial velocity. All submachine guns are now being made in version 9 of the lugger. And who makes 7.62? Nobody. Maybe because the cartridge does not have those characteristics that 9 a pair? Even a fellow 7.63 - 9 mm did not go to the "masses" even though the cartridge is powerful
          1. John22
            John22 16 July 2020 19: 18 New
            0
            Now the PP is used by the police for firing at a maximum of 50 m. At this distance, the 9 mm Luger cartridge is at a level. If you do not use body armor.
          2. SARANCHA1976
            SARANCHA1976 17 July 2020 07: 25 New
            0
            And I imagined that flawed .. this is why TT breaks through the armor which your Luger is not able to master? Start shaking tables
            1. Train
              Train 17 July 2020 07: 56 New
              0
              And I thought that the weapon corporations around the world use Luger cartridge and Mauser is not. And they are Dumb! Oh how! Use Luger while 7.62 armor will penetrate! And our commission is stupid that even in the 20 years when choosing a cartridge recognized Luger the best. But you opened my eyes! Dumb everyone! Right now I'll sit down to write a letter to Zig-Sauer. Let this very minute begin to release the barrel under this ammunition.
              1. SARANCHA1976
                SARANCHA1976 17 July 2020 20: 38 New
                0
                Good luck, only registered .. urgent need
  15. militarist63
    militarist63 16 July 2020 00: 01 New
    +3
    Familiarity with Finnish tactics and feedback on the use of Suomi submachine gun by the Finns became a real impetus for the intensification of the development of such weapons in the USSR, as well as the deployment of mass production and supplying the army with new weapons

    In fact, our PDP was developed and put into production at about the same time as Suomi! ...
    In the Soviet divisions that participated in the war, initially there were no submachine guns at all ....
    If the author is not in the know, then the Soviet-Finnish war lasted only a little more than 3 months !!! However, somehow, the Finns were armed with almost 2 hundred of our captured PPDs, which they registered under the name "7,63 mm kp M / venäl". It should be noted that the Finns received trophies literally in the first month of the outbreak of hostilities, against the background of the failures of the Red Army in the initial period (when the Red Army units, just, had weapons and equipment as "originally") ...!
    1. AllBiBek
      AllBiBek 16 July 2020 00: 59 New
      +2
      Well, what else way?
      The fighting was initially carried out by the troops of the LVO, and the RPM just in Leningrad was carried out.

      So their saturation took place almost by the state.

      Here and on the Nevsky nickel there is a whole layer of marines, characterized by the presence of PPD-38. Thus, which has a tambourine with a throat.
      1. Alexey RA
        Alexey RA 16 July 2020 09: 34 New
        0
        Quote: AllBiBek
        The fighting was initially carried out by the troops of the LVO, and the RPM just in Leningrad was carried out.

        Isn't it in Kovrov?
        Production of PPD in Leningrad, EMNIMS, was established only after the beginning of the Second World War. The plant was engaged in this. Kulakov (profile - communication equipment and ZAS, as well as SUAO and other "precision electromechanics" for the Navy) and the plant. Voskov (formerly the Sestroretsk Arms Factory).
  16. bbss
    bbss 16 July 2020 08: 10 New
    +3
    Weakly and very very servile ...
  17. Private SA
    Private SA 16 July 2020 22: 58 New
    0
    Quote: Grossvater
    Nuuu ... Like a "strategist". The artillery that won the war in the main and was created under Kulik. He really fought without much success, and the administrator and organizer was not bad at all.
    Although not quite in the subject, but also in Voronov’s memoirs and in Grabin’s good memoirs
    Head of GAU did not show himself. Yes, and actions at command posts during the Second World War
    positive memories really did not cause.
  18. The comment was deleted.
  19. John22
    John22 17 July 2020 10: 20 New
    -2
    At the beginning of the article it was said: "It was a great success for Finland that back in the 1920s the designer Aimo Lahti got carried away with the design of submachine guns."
    1. The question arises - in Finland no one else has developed small arms?
    Judging by the fact that Lahti developed the PP, pistol, RP, PTR and modernized the rifle arr. 1891 - there were no more gunsmiths in Finland.
    2. Self-taught Lahti developed a number of weapons systems for the state and the state did not put him in jail! Unlike the USSR, where citizens were forbidden to develop anything like that.
    3. Which state has benefited from giving citizens the opportunity to think about state security.
    1. mat-vey
      mat-vey 17 July 2020 17: 47 New
      +1
      Quote: John22
      . Self-taught Lahti developed a number of weapons systems for the state and the state did not put him in jail! Unlike the USSR, where citizens were forbidden to develop anything like that.

      I’m embarrassed to ask, but I’ll ask - are you aware of the self-taught MT Kalashnikov who developed a number of weapons systems for the state that did not put him in jail?
      1. Mordred79
        Mordred79 18 July 2020 01: 09 New
        0
        Do you know that the self-taught Kalashnikov at the time of the creation of his samples was a military man?
        1. mat-vey
          mat-vey 21 July 2020 17: 08 New
          +1
          Then again I hesitate to ask - do you know that Lahti was a master gunsmith of the Finnish army since 1921? And that he designed his first barrel in 1922?
  20. Shadow041
    Shadow041 18 July 2020 23: 51 New
    +2
    Finnish Suomi had a tendency to spontaneously open fire, with shaking, which made him a rather unsafe weapon. The Soviet PPD-34 was safer and more powerful due to the more powerful cartridge 7,62 by 25. At the time of the outbreak of war with Finland, there were 50000 PPD-34 in the Soviet border troops, which is comparable to all the Finnish PPs. PPSh weapons of a different class, it is assembled from stamped parts, which made it possible to produce them in mass quantities, making it simple to manufacture and cheap. In terms of power, the PPSh was not inferior to its opponents, due to the more powerful cartridge 7,62 by 25. For example, the Fulmar submachine gun, MP-38/40 models using a 9 by 19 cartridge, was designed to fire at a distance of up to 200 meters. PPSh had an aim for firing at a distance of up to 500 meters, surpassing the German, due to a more powerful cartridge.
  21. Shishiga
    Shishiga 24 September 2020 20: 45 New
    +1
    it is that the new joke has gone.
    The dummy with Kalashnikov & Schmeiser as the creators of the AK-47 did not work, now they are trying to sniff us that Shpagin PPSh molded in the image of Suomi ???
    And they are trying to do this on the website about weapons ???
    And nothing that by the beginning of the war in 1939, we had adopted the troops of the NKVD - PPD.

    "In the same year 1929, an experienced 7,62-mm Degtyarev submachine gun appeared." (from)

    author - you are a stupid person ????