Military Review

Horse latniks back in service

50
Horse latniks back in service

Life Guards Cavalry Regiment, one of the units of the Royal Guard of Great Britain


And he prepared for them Uzziah, for the whole army, shields and spears, and helmets and armor, and bows and sling stones.
2nd book Chronicles 26:14


Military affairs at the turn of the eras. We again return to the theme of equestrian armored men, and all because in 1700 their история far from over. It just became a milestone in the history of military affairs. Changes, of course, began long before this date, but accumulated gradually. And here all appeared at once, and at once in many countries. Moreover, this year marked the beginning of the Northern War, which lasted 21 years, while the last big war in Europe, Thirty Years, lasted 30 years.


The cuirasses of Ancient Greece were mostly anatomical in shape and demonstrated not only security, but also the physical strength of their owner. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


The helmets to such cuirasses very often had face masks! Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

To begin with, we recall that already in Tudor England, the traditional armament of the armor was the bourguignot helmet, cuirass with leggings, and plate "pipes" on the hands. The armor covered the horseman's body to the knees, so they were called "three-quarter armor!" Similarly, the Dutch cuirassiers, the black Reitars, the armor of Emperor Maximilian I were armed, and, in fact, almost all of Europe’s heavy cavalry.


British cavalryman “demi-lancer” (“half-dope”) 1550. Helmet of the bourgeois, armor for hands, cuirass, short gaiters. Armor jewelry - strips of polished metal on a black background burnished or painted background. Fig. from the book: V.Vuksic, Z. Grbasic. Cavalry. The history of fighting elite 650BC - AD1914. L .: Cassell, 1994. P.105


Full equipment of the plate British cavalryman of 1588. Such armor was considered the average version of the horsewear vestment worn by light horsemen (!). They had chain mail sleeves and could also be used in infantry. The breastplate of the cuirass is double, that is, spaced armor was already used then! Together with the bourguignot, the “folding-buff”, or “folding buff”, is used, which folds down the forehead. The length of some pistols reached half a meter, and their firepower was simply amazing. On the other hand, they also armed themselves with short pistols, which they had to shoot at point blank range, seeing the whites of the enemy’s eyes. Fig. Graham Turner

The middle of the next, XVII century was marked by a sharp relief of heavy cavalry. The “sweat” helmet (pot) now no longer covered the whole face, although it had a “visor” of three rods. We used felt hats with a metal frame, a cuirass on a torus and a metal wristband on the left hand. The most heavily armed riders of this era were the Polish winged hussars, especially distinguished themselves near Vienna in 1683.


Cuirassier 1618. Thumbnail from Vinkhuijzen collection of military uniforms. New York Public Library

Meanwhile, their time was nearing sunset. The fact is that all this horseman armor was designed for a battle with two types of infantry: musketeers and pikemen. But the bayonet bayonet that appeared in the middle of the 1689th century made this division unnecessary. Now the musketeers could already defend themselves from cavalry attacks. The French army was equipped with bayonets in 1690, Brandenburg-Prussia in the same year followed the example of France, and Denmark armed the infantry with bayonets in 1694. In Russia, baguettes inserted into the trunk appeared in 1702, and French-style bayonets with a nozzle in the guard in 1709, and by the whole army by XNUMX.


Cuirassiers of Pappenheim 1632. Miniature from the Vinkhuijzen collection of military uniforms. New York Public Library

Now the infantry met the attacking cavalry both with fire and bayonets, so the tactics of its action changed in the most serious way. Shooting a horse from pistols was replaced by a cold blow weaponsand the pistols, although they were left to the cavalry, were more used for self-defense than for the extermination of enemy infantry on the battlefield. About any karakolirovanie now and there was no question. The attack, as a rule, was carried out by a two-line formation, knee to knee (due to which high stiff over the knee boots became a mandatory element of uniform for heavy cavalry) and at full gallop to reduce the time spent under fire. Again, a helmet on his head was now needed not so much to protect against enemy weapons, but to protect it from horseshoes flying from their hooves! In the horse lava, the horseshoes also flew and were mortally dangerous for the riders, but ... immediately the riders raced in rows one after another, and the risk of getting a horseshoe on the head increased many times.


Lithuanian army of Janusz Radziwill, circa 1650 Angus McBride

The rate of fire of new guns, from which they were firing without a stand, also increased and reached two rounds per minute. An interesting test was carried out in Austria with weapons from museum collections manufactured between 1571 and 1700. The goal was a mannequin of a human figure of medium height. The mannequin was shot at distances of 30 and 100 m. About 20 smoothbore arquebuses, wheel and flintlock guns were tested. The results showed that the probability of hitting at a distance of 100 m from the gun attached to the test table ranged from 40 to 50 percent. At the same time, a 17 mm caliber bullet at a distance of 30 m could penetrate 3-4 mm thick armor, and 100-1 mm thick at 2 m (for comparison: the Belgian FN assault rifle can penetrate 12 mm of armor at a distance of 100 m). Moreover, the only difference between weapons of the XVII and XVIII centuries. consisted only in the fact that later models were lighter and had a greater rate of fire. Three pistols were also tested, one of which was manufactured in 1620, and the other two in 1700. Their accuracy at a distance of 30 m (also attached to the test bench) was much higher: from 85 to 95 percent. All three pistols were able to break through a 2 mm sheet of armor.


British cavalryman of the middle of the XVII century. Fig. Graham Turner

For some time, the armored cavalry tried to repel the infantry, using armor to protect against muskets, and armor to protect against pistols, but together they weighed more than 15 kg, and this defense did not justify their high price or significant inconvenience. As a result, already at the beginning of the 1698th century, France, Bavaria, Austria, Saxony, Brandenburg, Denmark and the Netherlands left their cuirassiers with only cuirasses and hats under which they wore steel comforters. In 1707, Britain officially abolished the use of armor in equestrian regiments, but in 1821 it reintroduced the breastplate, worn under a uniform (!) During the war for the Austrian inheritance. The cuirass was not worn until the coronation of George IV (XNUMX), and then was used only in the horse guard.

The weight of the cuirass was about 5 kg and the thickness was about 2-3 mm. That is, such a shell was intended primarily to protect the rider from chopping and piercing weapons, but its effectiveness against firearms depended on the distance from which the shot was fired. Until the middle of the 1755th century, cuirasses were forged from red-hot metal plates on massive castings of a special shape. The first series of cold pressed bibs was only made in Prussia in XNUMX. This new technology has made it possible to produce large batches of standard quality cuirass.


Broadsword of the English cavalry of the XVII century. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

However, we will return to England, where in 1660 Charles II reigned again. He dismissed the existing army and created a new one. In particular, out of the 600 nobles who followed him into exile, three companies were formed: a detachment of His Majesty, a detachment of the Duke of York, and a detachment of the Duke of Albemarl (General Monck, who did much to restore royal power in England. A fourth detachment appeared in Scotland, shortly after Restoration of the monarchy.


This broadsword is a hilt. Due to its characteristic shape, it was called “basket” - “basket”

In 1685, Jacob II succeeded Charles II, but three years later he was overthrown in the so-called bloodless revolution (“Glorious revolution”). During his reign, the English cavalry was the most equipped, most trained, and highest paid regular horse force in Europe. Seven cavalry regiments five were formed in 1685 and two more in 1688.


English Horse Guardsman of the beginning of the 650th century Fig. from the book: V.Vuksic, Z. Grbasic. Cavalry. The history of fighting elite 1914BC - AD1994. L .: Cassell, 159. P.XNUMX

In 1746, for reasons of economy, the 3rd and 4th companies in each regiment were disbanded, and the first three regiments were converted into cheaper dragoons, although they continued to be listed as guards. In 1678, the Guards Horse Grenadier Detachment was also formed, and horse grenadiers appeared in all other units. The second, or Scottish, Detachment of equestrian grenadiers was created in 1702. In 1746, when the horse-riding troops began to be divided not into four, but into two parts, they were respectively given the names of the First and Second detachments.

In 1788, the First Horse Guards and the First Horse Grenadier Detachments became the First and Second Regiments of the Life Guards. Before that, they were called the Horse Guards, but now they have received this official name. They existed as such until 1922, when both of these regiments were combined into one.


Officer of the regiment of the Royal Dragoons in 1685. In the 1670s, cuirasses, which were widely used before in the British cavalry, became obsolete and were not officially used until 1707, when the cavalry of the Duke of Marlborough used them in the Netherlands. They were also used by the British cavalry in Tangier. There are several portraits painted in 1680, in which cavalry (and infantry!) Officers are depicted in cuirasses, so this does not mean anything, since cuirasses in portraits were considered a symbol of masculinity, although it is quite possible that they wore them in parades . In 1751, the name of the regiment was changed to the 1st regiment of royal dragoons. Fig. from the book: V.Vuksic, Z. Grbasic. Cavalry. The history of fighting elite 650BC - AD1914. L .: Cassell, 1994. P.145

The British Life Guards first entered battle in Maastricht in 1673. She played a major role in the defeat of the army of the rebellious Duke of Monmouth at Sedgemur in 1685. At the Battle of Boyne in 1690, she fought against the forces of the former Jacob II, and at the Battle of Lenden in 1695, under the command of William III, she first fought a battle with the French palace cavalry. This was followed by the war for the Austrian inheritance, Dettingen and Fontenoy, as well as participation in the Napoleonic Wars and the famous Battle of Waterloo. In 1882, the combined regiment of the Life Guards and the First Dragoon Regiment fought in Egypt in one of the battles known as the Battle of Cassassin.

But these units did not wear cuirasses for a long time, although they are worn today. True, the cuirass of the current form belongs to the reign of George IV. The second Life Guards was dressed in black varnished cuirasses at the royal show in 1814, but there is no evidence that they were used in battles later than the end of the XNUMXth century. That was the level of distrust of defensive weapons at that time in the British cavalry!

To be continued ...
Author:
Articles from this series:
Cuirassiers in museums
Friends and Enemies of Imperial Cuirassiers
Polish shells, Austrian hussars and Turkish fives
Enemies of the Cuirassiers
With whom the latniks of the emperor Maximilian fought?
“A small discovery in the butt of an arquebus ...”
Horsemen of the Eighty Years War
Horses and saddles of the XVI-XVII centuries
“By people and by horses, not by aer”
Ordonance companies
“It's a miracle if someone is killed with a spear”
Mounted Latniks Sunset
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  1. Free wind
    Free wind 12 July 2020 05: 45 New
    +1
    And what the hell are blacks riding black horses, are they against black?
  2. Flakk88
    Flakk88 12 July 2020 05: 47 New
    +6
    A wonderful series of articles, despite the large number of dates and names of various units, is easy to read and fun. Thanks to the author for the work!
  3. Cowbra
    Cowbra 12 July 2020 05: 50 New
    -9
    Ancient Greece Breastplates

    Already shine. The rest and read not nat. Ugly. sir - absolutely! And here, “sir” through “ё”
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 06: 21 New
      +8
      Quote: Cowbra
      Ancient Greece Breastplates

      Already shine. The rest and read not nat. Ugly. sir - absolutely! And here, “sir” through “ё”

      Interesting? And what do you propose to name the front part of the ancient Greek anatomical armor? laughing
      And if it is full, then there is still a similar one to protect the back! wink
      Already passed - about five years ago, the "bib", "cooper", etc. So continue your "nat not nat" !!! what and that "sir" in the morning in your interpretation, honestly - is not appropriate !!! I don’t like Klava’s teeth and an article about the development of anatomical armor from Hellas to Ancient Rome !!! Sulfur is weak?
      1. Cowbra
        Cowbra 12 July 2020 09: 17 New
        -5
        Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
        And what do you propose to name the front part of the ancient Greek anatomical armor?

        Front or front, or cat and pan and kohanki - talk to me for anatomical armor? Ancient and Greek, not Romance ?! Muscle Lorika ?! Or for what is generally a "cuirass", well, you really say that, for example, Lacedmonia ran IN KIRAS? The site is called - "Military Review" - and crap on the topic
        1. Gato
          Gato 12 July 2020 10: 14 New
          +7
          I agree with you in essence, but not in the style of presentation. I, too, for the correct terminology. If it is written for ancient Greek armor, then call it thorax. Or anatomical - gelothorax. The cuirass has nothing to do with it, even the word itself comes from fr. "boiled skin".
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  4. Kote Pan Kokhanka
    Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 05: 57 New
    +6
    Amazing stuff! I read it in one go! Vyacheslav Olegovich, thank you so much !!!
    From myself, nobody canceled the laws of physics - speed is more effective than mass! So the main thing is to slip the distance of the actual rifle fire of 30-100 meters, than to catch the second salvo! 17-18 mm - this is not a pound of raisins, especially by the 17th century, musketeers everywhere began to charge their muskets and fusees not with shots, but with bullets! I think that even if such a hotel flies into a cuirass at a distance of hundreds of cores, it is unlikely to sit in the saddle.
    Regards, Vlad!
    1. TooL
      TooL 25 July 2020 16: 15 New
      +1
      No, the tactics of the cavalry were completely different. Infantry fire was lured away by flankers, followed by an attack by the bulk of the cavalry. Otherwise, the entire attacking cavalry was swept away by an oncoming volley.
      Buckshot was just the same preferable in the fight against cavalry. What is said in "gentlemen infantry officers on the day of the battle."
  5. Korsar4
    Korsar4 12 July 2020 05: 58 New
    +5
    Really the helmet was necessary only as protection against horseshoes? Somehow fantastically perceived.
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 06: 34 New
      +6
      Quote: Korsar4
      Really the helmet was necessary only as protection against horseshoes? Somehow fantastically perceived.

      In a dense horse formation, from an equal opponent there is a great chance to get “something sharp” in a “cumpole”! Try to strike from the side if your comrades are on the right and on the left “foot to foot”! So either a push kick or from above !!! Therefore, the "cumpol" and defended !!!

      For the sake of interest, he specially went down to the garden and held in his hands an ordinary horseshoe (I have a stash of “wonderful rusty things” - forged nails, staples, a fragment of an old grinding wheel, etc. I figured it was sticking in a dense mounted Kirou at a gallop and flying to you face? Nafig-nafig such happiness, where is my reservation of the fifth-grade protection class and the helmet "Sphere-M" with a visor! soldier
      1. Phil77
        Phil77 12 July 2020 07: 37 New
        +9
        Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
        Did you figure this out sticking in a tight equestrian Kirou at a gallop and flying to your face? Nafig nafig such happiness

        Good morning!
        * There was no nail-
        The horseshoe is gone.
        There was no horseshoe
        the horse limped.
        The horse was lame, the commander was killed.
        The cavalry is defeated, the army is running.
        The enemy enters the city of prisoners
        not sparing.
        Because there was no nail in the forge. * hi
      2. Korsar4
        Korsar4 12 July 2020 09: 11 New
        +6
        That a horseshoe on the head is not worth getting - there is no doubt about it. The question is how often, and at what altitude do they fly? "Low, low?"
        1. Catfish
          Catfish 12 July 2020 18: 52 New
          +6
          In my opinion there is a greater threat to the face, and not to the cumpol. Judging by racing on quadrics, all the dirt from under the "hooves" flies in the face, and the hair on my head is clean. smile
    2. Phil77
      Phil77 12 July 2020 08: 03 New
      +6
      Quote: Korsar4
      Really the helmet was necessary only as protection against horseshoes?

      The head must be protected! From all the vicissitudes of fate. laughing laughing laughing Including from the horseshoes too ... soldier
      1. Korsar4
        Korsar4 12 July 2020 09: 13 New
        +5
        “Don't lose your head,
        Do not rush! ” (from).
  6. Kote Pan Kokhanka
    Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 06: 11 New
    +7
    I looked at the illustrations of the "red uniforms" in the article and drew attention to an interesting aspect. By the 17-18 centuries, the armies of Europe, for identification purposes, "staked out" the basic colors of their uniforms: the British - red, the French - blue, we - green, the Austrians - white, the Swedes - blue! It is clear that once a time is not necessary, but in the cavalry, especially in the fashionable hussar, ulan and cuirassier regiments, there was enough blue, red and white !!! But the exception confirms the rule!
    Good day to all !!!
    1. Phil77
      Phil77 12 July 2020 07: 52 New
      +5
      Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
      "Red uniforms"

      And they still have one unit of the Guards Cavalry - * blues and royals *. Here they have dark blue uniforms. soldier
      1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
        Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 08: 39 New
        +4
        Quote: Phil77
        Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
        "Red uniforms"

        And they still have one unit of the Guards Cavalry - * blues and royals *. Here they have dark blue uniforms. soldier

        Exception confirming rule!
        1. Phil77
          Phil77 12 July 2020 08: 44 New
          +4
          I greet you Vlad! Yes, yes! And it is called the Regiment of the Palace Cavalry. It was created in 1969, but its history certainly began even earlier, from the time of Cromwell. hi
          1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
            Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 09: 02 New
            +7
            Quote: Phil77
            I greet you Vlad! Yes, yes! And it is called the Regiment of the Palace Cavalry. It was created in 1969, but its history certainly began even earlier, from the time of Cromwell. hi

            Sergey, I’m ready to argue here - the guards of Cromwell were abolished during the restoration. I dare to assume that history originates from the reign of Charles II or Jacob.
            And so the British love the magnificent names - "11th Regiment of the Welsh Riflemen of Robert III", etc.
            1. Phil77
              Phil77 12 July 2020 09: 30 New
              +5
              Are right! Almost! Created after restoration, in 1661, but from veterans. Also known as * Tangier horse *. Royal dragoons. hi
            2. Gato
              Gato 12 July 2020 11: 50 New
              +4
              And so the British love the magnificent names - "11th Regiment of the Welsh Riflemen of Robert III", etc.

              This is in which co-operative William Windsor serves as junior corporal? laughing In the photo he is on the left:


              Good tradition. I propose to enlist the bear in the military prosecutor's office as an honorary talisman!
              1. Phil77
                Phil77 12 July 2020 13: 51 New
                +5
                Good day! And he / k.o.z.oz.l.
                1. Gato
                  Gato 12 July 2020 19: 10 New
                  +2
                  Yes exactly. According to legend, he either led the British out of the circle, or led there - the story is dark. But the fable about the cozl of absolution all the same persistently creeps into the head laughing
                  1. Phil77
                    Phil77 12 July 2020 19: 20 New
                    +4
                    Yes, it’s clear that this is a legend. During the battle a wild goat got there / will it pass? / Which * led * to the decisive attack of the English fighters. But the losses there were terrible! General, lieutenant colonel, two majors, seven captains. A total of 226 killed and 828 wounded. Colonists lost half as much. hi
                    1. Gato
                      Gato 12 July 2020 19: 21 New
                      +3
                      hi
                      Oh, I was wrong. The legend of the co-ozl - the provocateur. Very suit.
              2. Catfish
                Catfish 12 July 2020 18: 54 New
                +5
                Sergey, and who in Rosgvardia and the office, who would you suggest? laughing
                1. Gato
                  Gato 12 July 2020 19: 19 New
                  +5
                  in Rosgvardiya and office someone suggest?

                  Service dogs in the Russian Guard and so serve, but in the emblems of dog heads and brooms, I would introduce wassat
                  In the office - moles definitely!
                  But I’m geographically closer to the APU - there are no options at all regarding the totem fellow At the same time, NZ will be .. Unless for the Marine Corps, you can offer guinea pigs lol
                  1. Phil77
                    Phil77 12 July 2020 19: 24 New
                    +4
                    Quote: Gato
                    I would introduce dog head and broomsticks into emblems
                    In the office - moles definitely!

                    Oh !!!! Exactly the same thoughts came to my disagreeable head! laughing laughing laughing
                  2. Catfish
                    Catfish 12 July 2020 19: 54 New
                    +3
                    Oh, not very high you rate the marines. laughing
                    But with the office for sure:
                    "The moves curves digs underground cunning mole,
                    Normal heroes always go around! " good
                    I will not say anything about the gendarmerie, it has already been described in the film "On the Poor Hussar" (if I'm not mistaken). drinks
                    1. Gato
                      Gato 12 July 2020 20: 53 New
                      +3
                      Oh, not high you rate the Marines

                      I didn’t want to offend anyone repeat Well, don’t offer them penguins ... Dolphins and fur seals are already busy with water saboteurs, land experts prefer bats.
                      Speaking of cats! Definitely and traditionally: the Navy. I met cats without ships, but ships without cats - never.
                      And I completely forgot about the General Staff. The symbol is a peacock, so historically. Comrades general stackers are very offended, especially recalling the statement of F. Ranevskaya that a chicken is always hidden under the peacock tail .. laughing
                      1. Catfish
                        Catfish 12 July 2020 21: 02 New
                        +6
                        According to the General Staff, I agree if we exclude one of the departments that uses the bat as its emblem.
                        About the sea cats. smile
                      2. Phil77
                        Phil77 12 July 2020 21: 04 New
                        +2
                        There is! There is such a beast! Crocodile. It is equally dangerous both in water and on land! It’s just like a marines! Of course, it’s not found in our area, but ... Why not? laughing
                      3. 3x3zsave
                        3x3zsave 12 July 2020 21: 21 New
                        +1
                        Something at once "not found"? There we have in St. Petersburg a couple of years ago in the basement of a crocodile found.
                      4. Phil77
                        Phil77 12 July 2020 21: 49 New
                        +1
                        Quote: 3x3zsave
                        basement crocodile discovered

                        * All the master would use jokes for you, but the beast cozodilny beast! * laughing
                    2. 3x3zsave
                      3x3zsave 12 July 2020 21: 18 New
                      +1
                      Well, do not offer them penguins ...
                      Moreover, also already taken. Pittsburgh Penguins.
                    3. Phil77
                      Phil77 13 July 2020 08: 11 New
                      +3
                      Good morning! In the Norwegian Royal Guard, the royal penguin Nils Ulaw is a colonel and a talisman! So it's not just * Penguins *. In this club, Eugene Malkin acts. laughing
        2. Phil77
          Phil77 12 July 2020 13: 41 New
          +2
          Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
          And so the British love lush names

          And how do you like it?
          * Royal Gurkha Rifles Regiment * -Gurkha Rifle Regiment? soldier
          1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
            Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 21: 49 New
            +3
            Quote: Phil77
            Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
            And so the British love lush names

            And how do you like it?
            * Royal Gurkha Rifles Regiment * -Gurkha Rifle Regiment? soldier

            Not just the Gurkha Rifle Regiment, but the Royal !!! good
            We similarly resurrected the Semenovsky and Preobrazhensky Guards regiments, it’s sad only that without historical parallels, at the level of “floor, finger ceiling”!
            1. Phil77
              Phil77 12 July 2020 21: 54 New
              +2
              Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
              Semenovsky and Preobrazhensky Guards regiments,

              And I did not read about it, I ask for details!
              Yes, it’s royal! soldier
              1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
                Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 22: 04 New
                +3
                Three or four years ago, by decree of the President of the Russian Federation, the two military units were given the names of the Semenovsky and Preobrazhensky regiments. Everything is good, only, but it was necessary to suck out from a finger what vanished a century ago?
                Glorious history, glorious regiments, but they have not been in the structure of the army since 1917! At the same time, how many compounds disappeared during the collapse of the union a quarter century ago!
                I don’t know, my opinion is that they hurried. The names of the first Life Guards should have been given to those who are like the first knee-deep in blood at Narva!
                Regards, Vlad!
                1. Ryazan87
                  Ryazan87 12 July 2020 23: 02 New
                  +2
                  By the way, they did not become guards.
                  1. Decree of the President of the Russian Federation dated 05.04.2013 No. 326:
                  "154 separate commandant regiment the honorary name" Preobrazhensky "and continue to refer to it: 154 Separate Commandant Transfiguration Regiment. "
                  2. Decree of the President of the Russian Federation dated 12.04.2013 No. 351:
                  "Assign 1 separate rifle regiment honorary
                  the name "Semenovsky" to continue to refer to it: 1 separate
                  Rifle Semenovsky Regiment
                  . "
                  Of course, the units were chosen very unsuccessfully - neither the guard, nor the military, in all honesty. Yes, the Semenovites were never arrows. The Transfiguration in the coffin turned over, learning that they had also become the 154th number (although the 154th Derbent Regiment in the RIA was in good standing).
                  Well, the revival itself can only be welcomed, of course. Of course, it is necessary, otherwise we seemed to have no army until the 17th.
                  By the way, there is another use case:
                  Decree of the President of the Russian Federation of October 24.10.2018, 594 No. XNUMX:
                  The 15th separate motorized rifle Alexandria brigade is an honorary name in honor of the 5th Hussar Alexandria regiment. It’s also strange, to call motorized rifles in honor of the hussars, peacekeepers in honor of the “Hussar of death", but as it is ...
  • Gato
    Gato 12 July 2020 10: 24 New
    +3
    Generalization too strong. The French flaunted in white uniforms, and the Prussians in blue. The colors of the uniforms often coincided with the heraldry of the ruling monarch. As for the cavalry, yes, color blind there would have been blown away.
  • Free wind
    Free wind 12 July 2020 07: 03 New
    +5
    Recently, I only found out and read later that the ancient Greeks often had armor made from "linothorax". Fabric glued in several layers. In A.F. of Macedon, most of the soldiers were in these armor. The stables of the English are beautiful, And since the suits of the English race are different, and the blacks are quite rare, they have long picked horses. Like something about flying horseshoes, it seems it's still a rarity, everyone carefully monitored the horse’s condition. In the attack, the horses died first, no one aimed at people, the more the rider pressed against the horse, and so he shot there, the horse flies over his head, and the rider flies through the head, and not the fact that he will not be crushed.
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 12 July 2020 08: 51 New
      +5
      On the basis of fabric and wool in the ancient world there were many armor and protective equipment!
      Including from the vine and reeds (shields in ancient Egypt), as well as from horns and hooves (near the Scythians of the Black Sea region. The need for invention is cunning, especially if you are considering that you can catch pilum or acorn from a sling !!!
      1. Phil77
        Phil77 12 July 2020 09: 07 New
        +5
        Oh, why go far? In foggy childhood I did the shields myself. I took a piece of felt, attached longitudinally cut pieces of bamboo / from batin fishing rods / to it and go ahead! laughing
    2. Gato
      Gato 12 July 2020 10: 29 New
      +6
      Recently I only found out and read later that the ancient Greeks often had armor made from "linothorax"

      laughing The armor was not made from linothorax. Linothorax - this is the armor glued from several layers of linen fabric. Bronze - just a thorax, with a bodybuilding relief - gelothorax.
  • kloss
    kloss 12 July 2020 09: 59 New
    +3
    Many thanks to the author for the work!
    As usual - very interesting !!
  • Cowbra
    Cowbra 13 July 2020 18: 54 New
    0
    By the way, Vyachaslav Olegovich - your article is once again excellent ... Well, what I have my opinion is different from you - well, excuse me, we are different people
  • Dmitry Zverev
    Dmitry Zverev 14 July 2020 10: 56 New
    +1
    Thanks for the article and magnificent, rare illustrations, just now I am starting to study the period of history from the end of the 17th to the beginning of the 18th century.