Military Review

How the British captured the Fokke-Wulf-190 fighter

89

Many experts rightly consider the Focke-Wulf Fw-190 single-engine fighter to be the best German fighter during the Second World War. The famous Me-109 was a more massive machine, but the Messer was inferior in many respects to the Fw-190, which could be used at the front in a variety of roles. In addition to the fighter itself, the Fokke-Wulfs-190 was actively used by the Germans as interceptors, night fighters, attack aircraft and escort fighters. In many ways, this fighting vehicle became the real "workhorse" of the Luftwaffe, especially at the final stage of the war.


Features of the best German fighter of World War II


The Fokke-Wulf-190 fighter began to be actively operated in August 1941, while over the entire production period in Germany more than 20 thousand Fw-190 fighters in various modifications were produced. According to established tradition, Focke-Wulf engineers gave their aircraft additional bird names, for example, the Fw-190 became known as “Würger” (“Shrike”; shrike is a small bird of prey).

The development of a new fighter in Germany began in the fall of 1937. The use of the new combat vehicle was planned in conjunction with the Messerschmitt Bf.109 fighter. Focke-Wulf also took part in the competition for the creation of a new aircraft. A team of designers led by Kurt led the work on creating a new machine. Tank. All tank fighter variants were equipped with air-cooled engines. At the same time, special interest in projects by the Imperial Ministry aviation there was not until the appearance of the aircraft with the new 12-cylinder 1550-horsepower air-cooled engine BMW-139. The installation of a powerful engine on a plane promised great dividends in the form of an increase in flight performance.

The first flight of the new fighter took place before the start of World War II. The first Fw-190 took to the sky on July 1, 1939. In the first flight, the new combat vehicle demonstrated its capabilities by developing a speed of 595 km / h, which was 30 km / h faster than the maximum speed of the Messerschmitt models already in production. The flight characteristics of the Fw-190 were at their best. Test pilots noted a good view from the cockpit to the sides and back, excellent controllability at all flight speeds, as well as high speed. Also, the advantage was the wide-placed chassis, which simplified the take-off / landing procedure for pilots. In this regard, the fighter was safer than its direct competitor Messerschmitt Bf.109.


Over time, the aircraft was continuously improved, receiving new more powerful engines, along with which its speed grew, as well as various configurations of weapons. At the same time, the first series of fighters were armed with two automatic cannons and machine guns. Over time, the number of 20-mm automatic guns grew to four, and two large-caliber 13-mm machine guns supplemented the weight of the side salvo. Even multi-engine allied bombers could not withstand such a flurry of fire.

It was distinguished by the Fw-190 and increased survivability, which later made it possible to widely use an aircraft with powerful artillery weapons as an attack aircraft and a fighter-bomber. This was primarily achieved through the use of an air-cooled engine, which could withstand a large number of hits and reliably protected the pilot from fire from the front hemisphere. The second important feature of the fighter was the fuel tanks, which the designers installed only in the fuselage. This was an important decision, because when fired from the ground, a large number of shells and bullets hit the wing, which has a large area. Therefore, the probability of hitting the fuselage tanks is less than that of the wing, and getting into the Fokke-Wulf wing did not lead to a fuel leak or fire.

The first acquaintance of the British with the Focke-Wulf Fw-190


The very first acquaintance of the British with the new German fighter made a painful impression on the Allies. The full combat debut of the Fw-190 took place on the Western Front. Aircraft appeared in France in the summer of 1941. On August 14 of the same year, the first British Spitfire was shot down by a Focke-Wulf Fw-190 fighter. For several months, the British military believed that they had encountered the Curtiss P-36 Hawk aircraft captured by the Germans, which the United States managed to deliver to France.

However, it soon became clear that the new fighter with a star-shaped engine, which increasingly took part in air battles, is a new German aircraft, and not a Luftwaffe trophy. At the same time, the veil finally fell off the eyes of the English pilots when they realized that the new air enemy in all respects, except for the radius of the bend, was superior to the Royal Air Force’s most advanced fighter “Supermarine Spitfire Mk V” at that time. Sky superiority over the English Channel again passed to Germany.

How the British captured the Fokke-Wulf-190 fighter

The two major successes of the Fw-190 fighters on the Western Front were Operation Cerberus and the reflection of the Allied landings in the Dieppe area in February and August 1942, respectively. The first operation involved the deployment of large German surface ships from Brest to the naval bases of Germany and took place on February 11-13, 1942. Under the nose of the Royal fleet the Germans returned to Germany the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, as well as the heavy cruiser Prince Eugen. Ensuring the passage of ships through the English Channel, German aviation initially reported on 43 allied aircraft shot down, later increasing the number of downed aircraft to 60 units: fighters, bombers, torpedo bombers. At the same time, the Luftwaffe lost only 17 aircraft and 11 pilots, including only two Fw-190 fighters. It is noteworthy that most of the lost German fighters crashed while landing in bad weather.

The second major success of the Fokke-Wulfs came in August 1942. Reflecting the Allied landing in the Dieppe area, fighters from the 2nd and 26th squadrons, which then had 115 combat aircraft (mainly FW-190A-3), carried out successful battles against the Allied aviation group of about 300 aircraft, mainly Spitfire Mk V fighters. Both squadrons lost about 25 aircraft in battle, claiming 106 victories, including 88 Spitfires shot down. In the battles in the Dieppe region, the Allies lost 81 pilots killed and captured, the Germans only 14 pilots.

This state of affairs did not suit the command of the British Air Force. Among other things, even the option of conducting a special operation to hijack one FW-190 fighter from French airfields for the subsequent comprehensive study of a combat vehicle was considered. However, as often happens, His Majesty's case intervened in the situation. The plane, which the British were ready to hunt with the commandos, flew to the UK safe and sound. The British took possession of the fully operational FW-190A-3 at the end of June 1942.

Armin Faber "gave" the British a working Fw-190


While the Royal Air Force was seriously considering the various possibilities of getting a new German fighter in its hands for a comprehensive study and study of the aircraft, the case intervened. On June 23, 1942, Luftwaffe Chief Lieutenant Armin Faber from the 2nd Richtofen Fighter Squadron, which was based in the Breton Morla, took to the sky as part of the 7th Squadron. German fighters flew to intercept the Boston bombers, escorted by Spitfire fighters, which were controlled by Czechoslovak pilots. In the ensuing aerial battle, the FW-190 fighters again proved their superiority. Although the Germans were unable to get to the bombers, they were able to shoot down 7 Allied fighters at the cost of losing two cars.


The same FW-190 A-3, which the British accidentally got in June 1942

During the battle, which took place over the English Channel, Lieutenant Faber lost his link when he was detached from the Allied fighters, and incorrectly determined his own location. During the reconnaissance, the pilot mixed up the direction and flew north instead of south. At the same time, Faber took Bristol Bay for the English Channel. Having quietly flown over the Bristol Bay, Lieutenant Faber landed at the first airport that turned up. At this time, the pilot was still confident that he had sat down somewhere in France. In fact, Armin Faber landed at the Royal Air Force base in South Wales.

So, by a lucky coincidence, a completely whole and operational FW-190 A-3 fighter fell into the hands of the British. It was the first Focke-Wulf-190 that the Allies managed to capture. Amin Faber was captured, and his fighter was the subject of a comprehensive study. Royal Air Force specialists studied in detail the new German aircraft in order to identify the existing strengths and weaknesses. Subsequently, the information received was used by the British command to develop recommendations and methodology for conducting air battles against this German fighter. At the same time, both Faber and his plane survived the war. Today, parts of the same Focke-Wulf FW-190 A-3 are still stored in the UK at the Shoreham Aviation Museum.
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  1. The leader of the Redskins
    The leader of the Redskins 18 June 2020 06: 13 New
    +8
    Thank. I did not know about this case. An unfortunate pilot error for the Luftwaffe.
    1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
      Kote Pan Kokhanka 18 June 2020 06: 35 New
      +4
      I will join! Sergey - thanks!
      So I want to add - learn geography !!!
      Yours!
      1. The leader of the Redskins
        The leader of the Redskins 18 June 2020 06: 35 New
        10
        The pilot could not find the moss on the tree!)))
        1. Kote Pan Kokhanka
          Kote Pan Kokhanka 18 June 2020 06: 52 New
          +3
          There was a similar impression!
          1. Undecim
            Undecim 18 June 2020 07: 40 New
            15
            The pilot could not find the moss on the tree!)))
            The fact is that Faber was the Gruppen-Adjutant commander of the III fighter Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 2. His functions included paperwork and all paper work. And for this flight he received special permission. So I flew for the awards.
            By the way, the British seriously considered the command raid option to capture the Fw 190, so he got them.
      2. not main
        not main 18 June 2020 22: 38 New
        0
        Quote: Kote Pan Kokhanka
        I will join! Sergey - thanks!
        So I want to add - learn geography !!!
        Yours!

        That's just not geography, but navigation, orientation on the ground, knowledge of the area of ​​flight, and much more, which is included in the concept of the CSF.
    2. Civil
      Civil 18 June 2020 08: 29 New
      +2
      Great article, well done author, write more!
    3. Fitter65
      Fitter65 18 June 2020 13: 46 New
      +8
      Quote: Leader of the Redskins
      I did not know about this case. An unfortunate pilot error for the Luftwaffe.

      This is a very well-known story, almost any more or less intelligible article about the FW-190 mentions this case. For example, I like a more interesting combat episode from the life of the FW-190, although the modification of the FW-190 from the Jagdgeschwader 54, which took place on January 9, 1943. Did not hear? Well, in short, a pair of FW-190A4 was shot down by a pilot of the 4GIAP Air Force KBF I-16 type 29 (according to other sources, type 18) Golubev Vasily Fedorovich. True, according to other sources VF Golubev forces one "Fokker", and the second. which crashed during landing was knocked out by his wingman, but the fact itself speaks volumes. Including about the skill of our pilots. soldier good
      1. Nehist
        Nehist 18 June 2020 14: 43 New
        -16
        Yes, four donkeys for a couple of fokkers ... where is the skill? commonplace numerical superiority
        1. Fitter65
          Fitter65 18 June 2020 14: 58 New
          11
          Quote: Nehist
          Yes, four donkeys for a couple of fokkers

          Well, yes. The crowd kicked the "suckers" on the FW-190. You just forgot to say what kind of "fuckers" they were and how they were filled up. They then thought that they went for wool, and they were cut. We decided that the I-16 was an easy prey for a couple of seasoned "writers", but then pardon me ... Let's just compare the performance characteristics of the I-16 type 29 and the FW-190-A4, but on such an airplane the Germans were simply OBLIGED to shut down all 4 (four) " Ishak ". And only Golubev and his wingman attacked (ATTACKED) a pair of FW-190s on the I-16. They were not attacked, but they. Not the FW-190, which is superior in everything, but the I-16. Well what can I say ...
      2. bubalik
        bubalik 18 June 2020 15: 40 New
        +1
        Fitter65 (Alexander.) Today, 14: 46

        Good afternoon! hi
        Recently there was an article about I. Kozhedub, it was discussed there that they shot down American planes.
        So I decided to see how you wrote about Golubev. Interestingly, he has a Spitfire downed. It turns out that the British pilots were also shot down? request

        1. Astra wild
          Astra wild 18 June 2020 16: 51 New
          +1
          "1 X1 1941 during the raid of 5 Spitfire on the Hanko base" colleagues, I DON'T DO ANYTHING: Did the British fight both the Germans and us? If this is so, how should one understand Stalin's meetings with Churchill?
          1. Fitter65
            Fitter65 18 June 2020 17: 59 New
            +3
            Quote: Astra wild
            1 X1 1941 during the 5 Spitfire raid on the Hanko base, colleagues, I DON'T DO ANYTHING: the British fought both with the Germans and with us? If this is so, then how to understand Stalin's meetings with Churchill?

            And what is hard to think. Or just look for material here you can read the footnote from under the bed https://slon-76.livejournal.com/149703.html for general development, at the same time there were rumors that the British and Spitfires were sold to them, but the Finns also received French MS in December 1939 -406, by the way in 1941 the Vichy government sold them an additional 30 aircraft, plus the Italians also sold them the Fiat G.50 Freccia. Therefore, most likely just a mistake in identifying the aircraft ...
        2. Fitter65
          Fitter65 18 June 2020 17: 48 New
          +8
          Quote: bubalik
          So I decided to see how you wrote about Golubev. Interestingly, he has a Spitfire downed. It turns out that the British pilots were also shot down?

          By the way, I wrote about VF Golubev. Others wrote about him, I only used this information. This is the first. British pilots were not shot down near Leningrad, due to the fact that they were not in that area — from the word, they are two. There were rumors that during the Finnish war the British agreed to deliver a certain number of Spitfires to the Finns. And while reading that not all the pilots of the Red Army Air Force knew their silhouettes, A.I. Pokryshkin and Su-2 for example, it is not surprising that such a record could appear. On November 2, 1941, he fought alone with four Finnish Spitfires from LeLv.32 and chalked up one victory (according to other sources, it was either Hurricanes or MS-406.). By the way, this could be the Fiat G.50 Freccia.
          For example, the cool Finnish ace Ilmari Utilainen has notes and abruptly, for example, R-38 Lightning, the Americans didn’t fly over Finland at all, the Red Army Air Force didn’t have such aircraft, and also with two Mustangs shot down by them, but the Americans gave us about 10 R-51 of various modifications, which did not fly further than Zhukovsky. Also in the autumn of 1942 he recorded a couple of Spitfires, although the first Spbfires Vb began to arrive in the USSR in the spring of 1943. By the way, in October 1942, the Soviet Spitfire shot down the comasco of this pilot. so no one doubts their victories, they say - but onnn justoo made a mistake in identifying the shot down tippa sammolletta, therefore it is necessary to entrust the emma - and the fact that the Soviet pilot shot down an airplane that was mistakenly (the only) identified as Finnish Spitfire - you can’t believe everything was Soviet documents. But did he hit the plane? Shot down !. Is there a confirmation? There is!
          1. bubalik
            bubalik 18 June 2020 17: 50 New
            +2
            Thanks for such a detailed answer yes
            1. Fitter65
              Fitter65 19 June 2020 00: 33 New
              +1
              Quote: bubalik
              Thanks for such a detailed answer yes

              It would be for that, it’s just that all this can be found without problems on the network, it was in the good old days that one had to look for various books, memoirs and others.
          2. Serg koma
            Serg koma 20 July 2020 14: 32 New
            -1
            Quote: Fitter65
            And reading that not all pilots of the Red Army Air Force knew the silhouettes

            Perfectly to the point. Another "Englishman" - Bristol "Bulldog", are you surprised?
            Finland
            In the winter of 1934-1935, 17 Mk.IVa aircraft were delivered. In 1939, 2 planes from Sweden were added to them. The 1st victory of the Finnish Air Force was won on this aircraft. Used until early 1944.

            And complement
            Quote: Fitter65
            in December 1939 they received the French MS-406, by the way, in 1941 the Vichy government sold them an additional 30 aircraft, plus the Italians also sold them Fiat G. 50 Freccia

            Also English, Dutch, Soviet ...
            Hawker Hurricane Mk.I.
            Fokker D.XXI
            1. Fitter65
              Fitter65 20 July 2020 17: 18 New
              0
              Quote: Serg Koma
              Another "Englishman" - Bristol "Bulldog", are you surprised?

              How was he supposed to surprise me? If the Finns had Brewster F2A "Buffalo" (eng. Brewster F2A Buffalo - Buffalo) - carrier-based fighter of the US Navy. Designed as a carrier-based fighter, he gained main fame in the land version in service with the Finnish Air Force. A batch of 44 American-made Brewster fighters (the export version had a factory index B-239) was purchased by Finland during the Winter War, but before it ended, only six of them had time to take part in it. The main part of the aircraft entered service after the conclusion of the armistice Dutch (now supposed to speak Dutch) Foker D.XXI was generally produced in Finland under a license, like Bristol Blenheim ...
              1. Serg koma
                Serg koma 20 July 2020 19: 28 New
                -1
                On the list of victories. before Spitfire it appears, 24.10.41/XNUMX/XNUMX
                1. Fitter65
                  Fitter65 21 July 2020 00: 34 New
                  0
                  Quote: Serg Koma
                  On the list of victories. before Spitfire it appears, 24.10.41/XNUMX/XNUMX

                  AND? Considering that in the Finnish Air Force, these aircraft were in service until 1944, then why is it strange that one of these aircraft was shot down on October 24, 1941? In the list of some pilots there are more exotic planes, so what?
    4. Looking for
      Looking for 18 June 2020 15: 43 New
      0
      and incredible luck for RAF.
  2. Undecim
    Undecim 18 June 2020 06: 20 New
    +6
    The first flight of the new fighter took place before the start of World War II. The first Fw-190 took to the sky on July 1, 1939.

    The author was mistaken, the Fw 190 V1 with a BMW 139 engine - made its first flight on June 1, 1939.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 18 June 2020 06: 31 New
      +8
      At the same time, the first series of fighters were armed with two automatic cannons and machine guns.

      The aircraft of the first series - Fw 190 A-0 were armed with six 7,92 mm MG-17 machine guns. Two synchronized mounted above the engine, two - in the wing, two more - outside the swept area of ​​the propeller.
  3. Undecim
    Undecim 18 June 2020 06: 48 New
    +9
    Royal Air Force specialists studied in detail the new German aircraft in order to identify the existing strengths and weaknesses. Subsequently, the information received was used by the British command to develop recommendations and methodology for conducting air battles against this German fighter.
    The British were not limited to recommendations. Two specifications have been developed, F.2 / 43 and N7 / 43.
    In accordance with them, the Hawker Fury fighter was created, which was produced in various versions until 1955.
    1. Undecim
      Undecim 18 June 2020 07: 32 New
      15
      There is another interesting point related to this aircraft.
      Since 1997, the small German company Flug + Werk GmbH began producing replicas of the Fw 190. Aircraft were produced in strict accordance with the drawings and using the remaining equipment. Even numbering continued.

      But the engines of the BMW 801, alas, did not survive. However, the company found a way out by putting ASH-82FN engines on the plane, which the Fw 190 opponents, Soviet fighters La-5 and La-7 were equipped with.
      True, the engine was used not by the Soviet, but by the Chinese licensed copy, Dongan HS7, produced by the Harbin Motor Plant.
      1. Crimea26
        Crimea26 18 June 2020 09: 29 New
        0
        And what, to produce engines "in full compliance" - there are no drawings?
        1. Free wind
          Free wind 18 June 2020 10: 12 New
          +6
          Well, imagine restoring all forms for the manufacture of parts. The engine is made of castings, it is quite difficult to make all this, forge the crankshaft and process it. Then everything is processed, restore the factory for the manufacture of a pair of aircraft? It's easier to rivet from what is, you can pick up the sound. There are certainly fans of the exact match, but I don’t understand this. It is incredibly expensive. Of course you can make it, but it will cost as an SDI program.
        2. irontom
          irontom 18 June 2020 10: 22 New
          +3
          There is no economic sense.
          In the Internet there is a video of restoration to the flight state of native engines, and flights with these engines of the 190s to the show.
        3. volodimer
          volodimer 18 June 2020 10: 52 New
          +5
          Obviously, to restore the production of engines, so as not only to guarantee reliability, but also to carry out their certification to permit their use in aircraft, this is not a cheap task and can put an end to the whole idea of ​​production.
          By the way, in "Popular Mechanics" there was an article about the restoration of the MiG-3, they also restored a lot, they made something anew according to the drawings, and the engine was installed by Alisson, which were a lot of them on the P-40 and there is a supply, because at home the engine, albeit restored to ideal, no one will allow to rise into the sky.
          I know that tank dviguns are restored to working condition, but this is a tank, the dvigun is not scared stalled, it will not budge, and the plane will fall
        4. Alf
          Alf 18 June 2020 19: 23 New
          +1
          Quote: Crimea26
          And what, to produce engines "in full compliance" - there are no drawings?

          Have you ever dealt with production?
      2. iouris
        iouris 18 June 2020 16: 45 New
        0
        Chinese FW-190, oh yeah!
    2. andrey-ivanov
      andrey-ivanov 21 June 2020 12: 48 New
      0
      In the photo "Sea Fury". Which became the fastest English carrier-based fighter with a piston engine. The land variant of the RAF did not go particularly well, since the era of jet vehicles had already begun. But the aircraft came in handy for the Navy. And his legs, or rather wings, grow out of the Tempest Mk II, with the Centaurus air-cooled engine.
  4. Free wind
    Free wind 18 June 2020 07: 42 New
    0
    I can’t understand the stories about the good survivability of airmen. If a bullet enters the cylinder, a blow will occur, the piston will begin to imprint the bullet, the projectile into the cylinder head, in most cases this leads to bending or breaking of the connecting rods, the engine will jam immediately. Somehow this is not clear. Maybe the fuel systems are located behind the engine, and this gives some advantages. Aircraft rarely converged on the forehead, usually it would seem to fall from somewhere. Well, or catch a bullet in the forehead, of course there are chances for the pilot to survive. Although the cobras flew and won. The Rudel from Fock-Wulf fell off, either didn’t like the plane, or didn’t want to fly without a shooter after the laptinger.
    1. Octopus
      Octopus 18 June 2020 08: 08 New
      +3
      Quote: Free Wind
      breakage of rods, the engine will instantly jam.

      And why does a star necessarily wedge when a connecting rod of one of the 14 cylinders breaks?
      1. Free wind
        Free wind 18 June 2020 08: 43 New
        -2
        And where the connecting rod will go, it will surely break the crankcase, it may bend or burst the crankshaft. The oil will fly out, and most likely the lamp will flood into the cockpit or the lantern will be flooded, and hit on the exhaust pipes, the same is not a fountain. The engine with water cooling is also able to work without water for a couple of minutes.
    2. Avior
      Avior 18 June 2020 08: 12 New
      +7
      On a liquid, any hit in the cylinder block jacket will result in loss of coolant and a motor wedge.
      And with an air vent, only to damage the cooling plates of the shirt, they do not always fall exactly into the cylinder.
    3. hohol95
      hohol95 18 June 2020 08: 16 New
      +2
      The memoir literature writes about the possibility of an air-cooled engine to withstand the loss of several cylinders and at the same time remain operational. But hits should be from bullets and shells not the largest 23 mm. The engine could not stand the only hit of a 37 mm shell!
    4. Viktor Sergeev
      Viktor Sergeev 18 June 2020 08: 48 New
      +1
      Well, why did they rarely meet forehead? Having 4 -6 points, Foker walked forehead with pleasure until he ran into Yak 9. Plus, when defending attack aircraft and bombers, the fighter of the cover actually has one defense option: when you see the attacker and in the forehead, since the defender has low speed and height.
      1. Cowbra
        Cowbra 18 June 2020 09: 41 New
        0
        "When Focke-Wulf flies at you, it sparkles like a Christmas tree" - Johnny Johnson EXACTLY about the fact that the Fokkers loved to walk head-on. Which is logical. In front you get either into the engine or into the pilot, and from the tail you can only into the armored back)
        1. irontom
          irontom 18 June 2020 10: 25 New
          +1
          They just forget that in 190, there was a ring oil tank with decorative armor protection in the nose and a cooling fan that was easily damaged and wedged.
          1. Cowbra
            Cowbra 18 June 2020 10: 30 New
            +2
            Well, there are 6 points of armament, despite the fact that the British, especially at first they have armaments, have rifle caliber spit-guns and cannons that do not fire, in principle, for which reason part of the same Johnny Johnson stupidly sat in northern Scotland right up to 1942. Because there have been situations repeatedly, take off - took off, and you can knock down the Germans only with your fists - the guns are not ale)
    5. Alf
      Alf 18 June 2020 19: 45 New
      +3
      Quote: Free Wind
      The Rudel from Fock-Wulf fell off, either didn’t like the plane, or didn’t want to fly without a shooter after the laptinger.

      I didn’t know how to fly, so I was breaking off.
      1. KERMET
        KERMET 19 June 2020 06: 48 New
        0
        He knew how to fly, but he was primarily an attack aircraft, and on the Rapporteur, unlike the 190th, he could more accurately work on ground targets
        1. Alf
          Alf 19 June 2020 18: 20 New
          +1
          Quote: KERMET
          He knew how to fly, but he was primarily an attack aircraft, and on the Rapporteur, unlike the 190th, he could more accurately work on ground targets

          I wonder if there was even a pilot in any of the air forces in the world who refused to comply with the order to re-equip the unit?
          1. KERMET
            KERMET 20 June 2020 10: 50 New
            -2
            Well, there would be an order, in the end at the end of the war Rudel seems to have moved to 190.
            Our Pokryshkin, for example, also unlocked the shop until the end.
            1. Alf
              Alf 20 June 2020 21: 31 New
              +3
              Quote: KERMET
              Our Pokryshkin, for example, also unlocked the shop until the end.

              ALL of its parts did not come down with Cobra, and ONE rudel remained on the thing.
              1. KERMET
                KERMET 20 June 2020 22: 08 New
                -1
                Well, several La-7s were transferred to Pokryshkin in part, and Rudel continued to fly on the anti-tank version of the 87th because Fock was not good against the tanks, but besides him, who else could fly like that in this miracle-yud?
                1. Alf
                  Alf 20 June 2020 22: 17 New
                  0
                  Quote: KERMET
                  and Rudel continued to fly on the anti-tank version of the 87th because Fok’s tanks were no good

                  All of his parts were good, but he personally wasn’t. Not funny.
                  1. KERMET
                    KERMET 21 June 2020 06: 58 New
                    -1
                    Tell me then the anti-tank version of the FW-190? And then I don’t remember that one. If Rudel was one of the first to fly around the FW-190 just received by him
            2. Oleg Bykov
              Oleg Bykov 23 July 2020 09: 59 New
              0
              Not the best source, but the gist is conveyed - https://zen.yandex.ru/media/aspeed_ne_soglasen/pochemu-pokryshkin-otkazalsia-ot-la7-chast-1-mify-5d665511394b2a00afb8abfc
    6. KERMET
      KERMET 19 June 2020 06: 57 New
      0
      Regarding the survivability of the engine - a banal lumbago cylinder right through not considered?
  5. CommanderDIVA
    CommanderDIVA 18 June 2020 07: 47 New
    +1
    Our GSS pilots Vorozheikin and Skomorokhov noted in their memoirs that the Fokker was heavy on dives and turns, the appearance of the FV-190 on the Soviet-German front did not cause panic among our pilots, they continued to shoot down the Germans as before
    1. Cowbra
      Cowbra 18 June 2020 09: 45 New
      +1
      Height on that. The Western Front - fighting at height, and mass formations converged - climb and armament are important. The eastern front — aviation of the battlefield — went over the heads of the infantry, just a bit — a turn. you don’t really dive down, but you don’t really need to go up. There Foke did not shine anything against sagging Soviet fighters
      1. CommanderDIVA
        CommanderDIVA 18 June 2020 20: 33 New
        0
        That's right, fights up to 3000 meters mostly, our fighters were strong on bends, especially Yaki
    2. Free wind
      Free wind 18 June 2020 10: 35 New
      +1
      At the dive, Foker accelerated to almost 800 km, Foker is certainly not right, but ours called him that. But he became uncontrollable. As a matter of fact, like any aircraft of that time. The Japanese taught pilots, with a ram, to aim planes at a target in advance, like a shell. At a speed of more than 500-600 kilometers, the aircraft is almost uncontrollable. Memories of a Yap pilot, Zero. But this uncle flew many planes.
      1. Engineer
        Engineer 18 June 2020 10: 54 New
        +1
        http://www.wwiiaircraftperformance.org/fw190/fw190-0022-dive.html
        912 km taking into account errors in air pressure and the effect of compression. Mach effects are not taken into account.
  6. CommanderDIVA
    CommanderDIVA 18 June 2020 08: 20 New
    +1
    The Germans also often used the FV-190 in mixed with ME-109 air groups over the battlefield, to strengthen the latter, with the advent of the six-gun version of the FV-190, it was used as an attack aircraft, since the Germans had no analogue of our IL-2
    1. Train
      Train 18 June 2020 09: 51 New
      0
      And what is better than IL2 assault FV 190? Il 2 took 400 kg of bombs and FV with an overload of up to a ton. Despite the fact that after the reset he could engage in maneuverable combat. And he had a higher speed and armor too. From IL-2 the Air Force was already banned by the year 42 because in all respects he they did not suit.
      1. irontom
        irontom 18 June 2020 10: 27 New
        +1
        storytellers from aviation are such storytellers, see real bomb loads. especially about one ton bomb.
        1. Train
          Train 18 June 2020 10: 41 New
          +2
          Yes, we didn’t take two-engined PE-2 tons. With overloads in reality up to 800 kg and that’s the question. 600 kg is his maximum. Do not even write about a ton on TTX, it’s heresy. And FV-190 took up to a ton of bombs in overload. And this is a single-engine attack fighter! And once again, after the reset, he could also conduct an air maneuver battle!
          1. Alf
            Alf 18 June 2020 19: 50 New
            +2
            Quote: Zug
            Yes, we didn’t take two-engined PE-2 tons. With overload in reality up to 800 kg, and then the question is. 600 kg has a maximum.

            1200 Pawn raised with a good pilot and new engines. True, it worked only from the horizon.
            1. Train
              Train 20 June 2020 08: 51 New
              0
              They took a ton, which was exceptional in the words of the pilots, from good airfields and what you said above. That’s 600 kg, no more. I wanted to live. I re-read the pilots Peshek. Nobody almost ever took a ton from diving on it. It didn’t work. The shots were not the same. And the plane was difficult even for piloting, not like for diving.
              1. Alf
                Alf 20 June 2020 21: 34 New
                0
                Quote: Zug
                And the plane was difficult even for piloting, not like bombing from a dive.

                Repeatedly here, Punev cited to this phrase answered, so one must be able to fly. Those. who was a Pilot with a capital letter, miracles worked on Pawn.
                1. Train
                  Train 20 June 2020 23: 30 New
                  0
                  I agree with you completely, but there were few of them. Unfortunately
        2. Undecim
          Undecim 18 June 2020 13: 28 New
          +5
          storytellers from aviation are such storytellers, see real bomb loads. especially about one ton bomb.
          We're watching.

          This is the Fw 190 G-1.
          Had three load options. The one in the photo is a 250 kg or 500 kg bomb under the fuselage and two 300-liter drop tanks. The second option is a tank under the fuselage and two 250 kg bombs under the wings. The third bomb is 500 kg under the fuselage and two 250 kg under the wings.
          1. andrey-ivanov
            andrey-ivanov 21 June 2020 12: 28 New
            +1
            With a load of 500 kg or more, the 190th turned into a direct-flying target. This was the main reason that when Soviet fighters appeared, the Germans instantly got rid of such a "payload". Often on their own battle formations. Pokryshkin, Kozhedub and other domestic aces noted this.
      2. CommanderDIVA
        CommanderDIVA 18 June 2020 20: 27 New
        +5
        "The Air Force was already disowning the IL-2 by the year 42, because in all respects it did not suit them" - give a link to the source, for the first time I hear about it
        1. Train
          Train 20 June 2020 08: 54 New
          0
          Look at Su 6 for information.
          The cycle of the transfers of the historian Rasterin on IL-2. From creation to perfection with all the consequences
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPdTkOAogYQ
          1. Alf
            Alf 20 June 2020 21: 45 New
            +2
            Quote: Zug
            Look at Su 6 for information.

            What about the Su-6? With the M-88 engine, if it was superior to IL-2, it is insignificant. Not so he was UH !, to transfer the plant to its release.
            1. Train
              Train 20 June 2020 23: 29 New
              0
              Well, the heads of the Air Force had a different opinion, thanks for understanding
              1. Alf
                Alf 20 June 2020 23: 36 New
                +1
                Quote: Zug
                Well, the heads of the Air Force had a different opinion, thanks for understanding

                He had a different opinion about the SU-6 with the M-71. It is necessary to compare the same planes. So you can compare the P-51A with the P-51D.
                The SU-6 must be compared with the IL-10, they are of the same age, and the motors are about the same power, but they did not dance against the Dozens of SU-6 ...
    2. andrey-ivanov
      andrey-ivanov 21 June 2020 12: 37 New
      +1
      There was not so much reinforcement as distribution of duties. Messers started a battle with escort fighters, and Foki, thanks to more powerful weapons and better protection, dealt with bombers. Six-gun FW-190 A-6 / R1 was released in an amount of just over 50 pieces. The flight data of a heavy machine was so unimportant that they decided to limit it.
  7. VicktorVR
    VicktorVR 18 June 2020 08: 34 New
    0
    Interestingly, they shared information with the USSR?
    It seems - hardly.
    1. Train
      Train 18 June 2020 09: 52 New
      +1
      And how would she help us. We could not even copy a turbine from the BF, nor AVISH. Not a commando-geret.
      1. andrey-ivanov
        andrey-ivanov 21 June 2020 12: 22 New
        +1
        Well, until the end of the war, no one had set up a mechanism for automatic control of a propeller-motor group (commandorate) on production vehicles except for a decent one.
        1. Train
          Train 25 June 2020 22: 49 New
          0
          Well, yes, but the Americans and the British have other "goodies" on the engines of the AVISH acre.
  8. Train
    Train 18 June 2020 09: 44 New
    +1
    Great plane. Kommando-Gaeret and all that.
  9. Threaded screw
    Threaded screw 18 June 2020 11: 20 New
    0
    FW-190 with two hanging containers with a pair of guns MG 151 was a beautifully flying battery, with huge firepower, without competitors.
    1. andrey-ivanov
      andrey-ivanov 21 June 2020 12: 17 New
      +1
      That's just NOT a beautifully flying battery, which is why it did not go into the series.
  10. NF68
    NF68 18 June 2020 17: 00 New
    +1
    BMW engines from the very beginning markedly reduced the performance characteristics of all FW-190 A. In 801, the take-off power of this engine was brought to 2 hp. But to force this engine was possible only at heights of up to 1942 meters. And developed in 1700 and released in the amount of 1943 units, the BMW-2060 E engine on take-off developed already 1000 hp. and it was possible to force it to the second limit of the engine altitude, and all due to the fact that, in this embodiment, the air intake for the supercharger was carried out not from the engine compartment, but from the outside and this made it possible to fully utilize all the advantages that the oncoming one gave, or whatever it was ,airflow. And the altitude in combat mode increased by about 1942 km.
  11. Astra wild
    Astra wild 18 June 2020 17: 07 New
    0
    An interesting story, but on the Eastern Front, when did the FV-190 appear?
    I read: "The Story of a Real Man" and thought that this plane appeared by the summer of 1943?
    1. BAI
      BAI 18 June 2020 17: 59 New
      +2
      They appeared in Norway in July 1942. But they were not active, there were no reports from the North about a meeting with them.
      Their activity has been actively manifested since November 1942, reports immediately went.
      Because the British shared information with the USSR, then FW-190, waited so much that on September 9 near Stalingrad the downed Italian Macchi MC.200 or the Romanian IAR-80 were mistaken for the FW-190 and accounted for 2 downed Fokkers.
      Under Leningrad, the FW-190 appeared on September 6, 1942.
      There are allegations that he appeared on the Eastern Front in March 1942.
      Obviously, the difference between "appeared" and "fought actively" is evident.
    2. Undecim
      Undecim 18 June 2020 18: 09 New
      0
      In November 1942, the Jagdgeschwader 51 „Mölders“ received the first Fw 190 A-3s.
      1. Undecim
        Undecim 18 June 2020 22: 49 New
        -1
        Yes, right, the first - in September. By November, completely refitted.
    3. Train
      Train 20 June 2020 08: 55 New
      0
      In 42 already 4 version flew
  12. certero
    certero 19 June 2020 09: 45 New
    0
    The whole story is much more like a British intelligence special operation, about which documents have not yet been declassified.
  13. unknown
    unknown 20 June 2020 08: 32 New
    +2
    According to English data, the maximum flight speed of the FW190A-4, in emergency mode, at an altitude of 6400 meters, was 668 km / h.
    La-5 (five-barrel) serial had a maximum speed at an altitude of 6250 meters at 580 km / h.
    La-5 (three-barrel) serial had a maximum speed at an altitude of 6300 meters at 600 km / h.
    La-5FN serial at an altitude of 6250 meters developed a maximum of 634 km / h.
    La-7 serial at an altitude of 6000 meters developed 656 km / h.
  14. otto9966
    otto9966 23 June 2020 16: 23 New
    0
    German pilot 42g - ignoramus? Believe with difficulty ... after the 44th I agree ... But not at the beginning of the war. The usual traitor. Fritz Faber did not bother much, invented a fairy tale, the British pretended to believe
  15. Andvigor
    Andvigor 1 July 2020 02: 37 New
    0
    Good article!