Kabeltov: the origin of the word and its meaning in naval affairs


Sailing as one of the oldest occupations of the human race over the millennia has managed to generate a great many purely specific concepts and terms. A particularly large number of them relates to units of measurement of distance and speed used exclusively by sailors and for people "land", as a rule, obscure. For example - cables. How much it? And what is the origin of such a concept?


The term "cables", which today refers to the naval, originates from the connecting cable, with the help of which the ships were moored to the shore or towed. At the same time, not every rope was meant, which would fall under the arm of the sea wolves. On the navy from time immemorial, all important details of ship equipment were subject to strict unification. And therefore, cables are, first of all, a rope from 6 to 13 inches in circumference (152-330 mm), having a diameter of 50-100 mm. Well, and accordingly, a measure of the distance that could be measured by the length of this very rope.

The etymology of the word is most likely French (cable), dating back to the Latin sarulum (lasso). Directly available pronunciation leads from Dutch kabeltouw - rope for towing.

From, as experts say in comparative terms, the French did not succeed too much in maritime business and borrowed it in the Netherlands. These were sailors even wherever they were famous throughout the world for their travels and geographical discoveries. From them, in the era of Peter the Great, who created the Russian fleet in many respects according to the Dutch model, the term “cables” migrated to the everyday life of Russian sailors.

It should be noted that the use of the term is quite narrow - they are marked with the path not traveled by the ship (for this, as you know, nautical miles are used), but the distance between the vessels when placing them with a certain order, when they are sailing together or placed on a raid. Or the distance from the ship to the nearest shore - that is, segments that are not too long in size.

The concept of “cables” for all its versatility does not always express the same value and needs to be clarified. The most used in the world of international cables, which is a tenth of a nautical mile or 6 arc seconds of the meridian. In the dimensions we are accustomed to, it is 185,2 m. Artillery cables are also recognized, equal to one hundred fathoms or 6 hundred feet. For the “land investigators” the difference between these two cable ones is 3-4 meters.

It would be strange if the "enlightened sailors" from Britain, as well as their overseas heirs and descendants did not have their own separate opinion on this matter. The British and Americans have their own cable. Moreover, the British magnificently call their “admiral”, it differs from the same artillery by 8 feet or a little more than 3 meters. The "Old US Cable" is bigger than all others - it has 120 fathoms and, accordingly, 720 feet or almost 220 meters. However, both of the Anglo-Saxon marine measures of length mentioned above have long been considered obsolete. They belong rather to an exotic archaic and few are used when today.

In conclusion, it is worth briefly dwelling on the question of why all this purely maritime specifics with miles, nodes, cable and so on was needed at all. Most reputable experts are inclined to believe that its relevance is due to the fact that on the waves of the seas and oceans, ships belonging to various countries have met and still are. At the dawn of mastering the sciences, this was especially sensitive - the French measured the distance with leagues and Tuases, the British with miles, feet and yards, the Russians got used to versts and fathoms. With such diversity, it was not far from trouble, since captains and skippers could count the leagues for feet and versts, for yards until their ships ran into reefs or collided without stretching themselves into only seemingly vast expanses of water. A universal system common to seafarers of all states and understandable to all of them, that’s what was required for reliability and understanding.
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  1. Nyrobsky 30 May 2020 01: 26 New
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    Thank you, very informative! Now I will know what kind of beast this is - “cables”. I am in these pounds, inches, and other gallons, I don’t have a sirloin at all, and therefore I am more inclined to measure everything in meters and centimeters, without any tenths or hundredths, separated by commas.
    1. naburkin 30 May 2020 01: 37 New
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      Well, a gallon, it’s still possible to translate it into centimeters, though into cubic meters, and hardly a pound wassat hi
      1. Free wind 30 May 2020 05: 26 New
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        But do not believe it, but it was possible. A pound is not only weight, but also a coin, 20 shillings is a pound, money, 20 shillings in one row is a pound size. They tried to introduce this, at least somehow standardize the sizes, though these were just suggestions.
    2. Revolver 30 May 2020 02: 36 New
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      Quote: Nyrobsky
      I am in these pounds, inches and other gallons, generally I do not petrify

      A gallon is roughly 4 liters, and exactly 3.78541. But for buying milk, the gallon is quite convenient, and the most favorable packaging at a unit price. In general, in America, the unit of measure is what, at first, most of all got, perhaps even more English (or rather, poor knowledge of it). But over time, somehow got used to it.
      1. NIKN 30 May 2020 10: 43 New
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        Quote: Nagan
        A gallon is roughly 4 liters, and exactly 3.78541. But for buying milk, the gallon is quite convenient

        And it’s suitable for beer. wink
        1. really 30 May 2020 17: 58 New
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          For beer, there may be little howl drinks
        2. Revolver 30 May 2020 19: 57 New
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          Quote: NIKNN
          Quote: Nagan
          A gallon is roughly 4 liters, and exactly 3.78541. But for buying milk, the gallon is quite convenient

          And it’s suitable for beer. wink

          But I did not see beer bottled in stores, and especially beer stalls, only in cans and bottles. Of course they pour it in bars, but buying there takeaway is not profitable.
    3. dauria 30 May 2020 06: 02 New
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      and therefore more inclined to measure everything in meters and centimeters, without any tenths or hundredths of a comma.


      The nautical mile is very convenient for navigation. 1 arc minute of the meridian. 60 miles - 1 degree latitude. Or 111 km. Easy to remember. So knowing the latitude (or the angle of the polar star) you can always calculate how much you stomp to the north pole. laughing Well, if necessary.
      1. vostok68 30 May 2020 06: 42 New
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        In principle, I remembered 111 km even at school! And so interestingly, 1 nautical mile is equal to one minute of the meridian
        1. Undecim 30 May 2020 08: 48 New
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          And so interestingly, 1 nautical mile is equal to one minute of the meridian
          Not equal. The modern nautical mile, adopted as international in 1929 at the International Hydrographic Conference in Monaco, is equal to 1852 m. This figure was obtained as follows.
          Since the Earth is not a perfect ball in shape, but a geoid, one minute of the meridian corresponds to approximately 1862 m at the pole and 1843 m at the equator. The arithmetic average of these two quantities is 1852,5 meters. For convenience, rounded to 1852 meters. Accordingly, cables - 1/10 mile - 185,2 meters.
          1. vostok68 31 May 2020 08: 32 New
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            Thanks for the detailed explanation!
      2. Deck 30 May 2020 07: 36 New
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        Well, finally, a reasonable explanation. Everyone who has dealt with navigation and sea charts knows. that the map is a grid. Longitude and latitude. Accordingly, distances could be measured in angular minutes, but this is not convenient. Therefore there is a nautical mile. corresponding to one angular minute on the surface of the Earth. A cable (cable) is just one tenth of it. Without any abstruse theory from Wikipedia

        1. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 35 New
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          a map is not only a grid
          1. Deck 30 May 2020 08: 37 New
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            a map is not only a grid


            What are you! Unbelievable!
        2. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 38 New
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          the diagram shown is incorrect, the Earth is not the right sphere, the shape of the Earth is - a Geoid, in each state the size and shape of the geoid are unique
          1. Deck 30 May 2020 08: 40 New
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            in each state the size and shape of the geoid is unique


            So that's where the "globe of Ukraine"
          2. old_pferd 30 May 2020 09: 53 New
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            With the introduction of GSK-2011 three years ago, the Russian Federation ends the game with reference ellipsoids and goes on to international ones.
          3. Simargl 30 May 2020 19: 23 New
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            Quote: yuri h
            Earth's shape is - Geoid
            By the way, about the tilling of flat-earths: yes, the Earth is flat ... in places ... and in the intermountain and all kinds of "dead seas" - even concave wassat
            ... the cube is also a ball drinks
          4. Rzzz 30 May 2020 22: 01 New
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            In most navigation tasks, for simplicity, the earth is considered the right ball.
            In the "basic" navigation, where it is not necessary to consider crossing the oceans, the earth is generally flat.
            A geoid, as a form of land in marine navigation is not used. The geometry is too complicated and it makes no sense. The concept of "reference ellipsoid" is used, it is such a figure of the correct form, the parameters of which are selected so that as closely as possible corresponds to the real geoid.
            In the world, as an international standard, the reference ellipsoid WGS-84 has been adopted. All modern maps are drawn on it. And on it the GPS system gives coordinates. But GLONASS went its own way - it uses the PZ-90 system (1990 Earth parameters). It is considered a more accurate system, but has not received distribution, and the GLONASS coordinates in all devices are recalculated in WGS-84.
        3. Free wind 30 May 2020 08: 58 New
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          And here it is not, the shape of the earth is an ellipsoid, flattened from the poles, and not a ball. Therefore, the miles do not coincide at the equator and the poles with the coordinate minute. At the equator, a mile is less than a minute, at the pole more. In our latitudes approximately coincide. Always amazed at the sailors, the same Columbus, Magellan. On the trough, the devil knows where to go, from the devices to have only a compass, hourglass and astrolabe. Columbus seems to have no lag. This chronometer is sand, it should always be on duty next to it. From navigation, I can only determine the latitude by the transporter. On the ship, even by moss, I can’t determine north and south. Although if the coast is near, if the trees, it means north, if palm trees, then south. Even Negroes with Chukchi determine north and south.
          1. Deck 30 May 2020 11: 03 New
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            And here it is not, the shape of the earth is an ellipsoid, flattened from the poles


            And here is no:

            1. Simargl 30 May 2020 19: 25 New
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              This is a map. g, kind of.
            2. pmkemcity 1 June 2020 06: 34 New
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              How awful it is after Friday!
          2. Rzzz 30 May 2020 22: 04 New
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            Quote: Free Wind
            Columbus seems to have no lag. This chronometer is sand, it must always be on duty next to it

            So Columbus and the error turned out to be half the globe. By all accounts, he succeeded in India.
          3. mmaxx 31 May 2020 06: 56 New
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            Yes, okay, I don’t know where to put it. So after all, they always sailed wherever they wanted, if they had been there at least once. It is clear that some thread unfortunate island always stood in one and the same place. But on a sailing ship, where you want to go is difficult.
      3. seregatara1969 30 May 2020 09: 52 New
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        Each latitude - has a different length. Maybe the equator is good?
      4. tihonmarine 30 May 2020 10: 03 New
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        Quote: dauria
        The nautical mile is very convenient for navigation. 1 arc minute of the meridian. 60 miles - 1 degree latitude. Or 111 km. Easy to remember. So knowing the latitude (or the angle of the polar star) you can always calculate how much you stomp to the north pole. Well, if necessary.

        Here at least one person correctly and reasonably explained to people that a mile is 1 minute of the meridian, and 0,1 miles of cables. Grids are drawn on nautical charts, the compasser took the distance, put it on the grid and determined the distance, and also back, removed the distance from the grid and put it on the map. At sea, kilometers are not used at all, due to inconvenience. The difference in the length of the minute of the meridian depends on the starting point of the maps, Greenwich is accepted on English maps. Since 1844, in the Russian Empire, the Pulkovo Meridian passing through the center of the Main Building of the Observatory has been used in the Russian Empire in Russia. Depths on maps are indicated in meters, but in England in fathoms, but recently the English map has also switched to the metric system of the INT map (for the metropolis in fathoms) the business has forced. Although the English cards were inferior to the Soviet and now Russian, but now the entire commercial fleet works with the English cards, but there are a number of reasons for this.
      5. We_smart 30 May 2020 10: 41 New
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        Colleague?))
      6. makasan34 31 May 2020 19: 42 New
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        two fingers on algol tongue
    4. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 45 New
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      Dmitry, the article contains a lot of mistakes, get this information out of your head so as not to blush in the future
      A mile and therefore cables have different sizes at different latitudes, this is due to the fact that the shape of the Earth is not an ideal sphere, but on average it is considered to be 1 nautical mile = 1852 m
    5. iouris 30 May 2020 13: 18 New
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      Quote: Nyrobsky
      more inclined to measure everything in meters and centimeters

      Personally, everyone can measure everything even in boas, but for self-driving and ship-boring devices are graduated in the Anglo-Saxon system of measures. Also in trade: no one is outraged about the "price of one barrel of brand Brand." This clearly shows who is the boss in the house.
    6. venik 30 May 2020 14: 41 New
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      Quote: Nyrobsky
      Thank you, very informative! Now I will know what kind of beast this is - “cables”. I am in these pounds, inches and other gallons, generally I do not petrify

      ======
      Well, then would have looked at Wikipedia - the article is torn from there, almost one to one! Only the "respected author" slightly added a bit of himself! I wonder who this is from the editors of the site, this "bullshit" in the "News"stuffed ?? Has nothing to publish at all already? In the world News no? All transferred ??? fool
      1. Nyrobsky 30 May 2020 15: 45 New
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        Quote: venik
        Well, then would have looked at Wikipedia - the article is torn from there, almost one to one!

        stop I didn’t drop in, for the reason that this was not necessary, but here I got acquainted along the way and at ease. And you, as I look, a huge specialist in any topic, have learned Wikipedia and now there are simply no "white spots" for you.
        1. venik 31 May 2020 13: 21 New
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          Quote: Nyrobsky
          And you, as I look, a huge specialist in any topic, have learned Wikipedia and now there are simply no "white spots" for you.

          ========
          What is a nautical mile, a knot and cables I know from early childhood (from my father), but the author’s phrase: "...It should be noted that the use of the term is quite narrow - they note ship's path (for this, as you know, nautical miles are used), and the distance between the vessels when placing them with a certain order, when jointly sailing or being placed on the roadstead. Or the distance from the ship to the nearest shore - that is, segments that are not too long in size. ..... "- somewhat" rumbled "It really hurts a" clumsy definition! "So he looked at Wikipedia - he turned out to be right - from here it was taken (word for word)!
          As for the "white spots" - so for the sake of clarifying them there is the same Internet (and not only with Wikipedia - a lousy way by the way - a lot of bullshit!), And also dictionaries and encyclopedias (I have their damn mountain, including TSB). Recommend! Helps a lot!!! wassat
          1. Nyrobsky 31 May 2020 13: 49 New
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            Quote: venik
            What is a nautical mile, a knot and cables I know from early childhood (from my father),
            My childhood and most of my life was connected with the North and the taiga, where the use of the term “cables” is completely absent, and therefore it was not in demand and interesting. I’m operating with concepts that were closer to me. Dad, too, was far from marine terminology. Well, I don’t need it, what can I do. I didn’t seek out the information specifically, but here I’ve drawn an article I got acquainted with. What's wrong? What has warped you from?
            Quote: venik
            As for the "white spots" - so for the sake of clarifying them there is the same Internet (and not only with Wikipedia - a lousy way by the way - a lot of bullshit!), And also dictionaries and encyclopedias (I have their damn mountain, including TSB). Recommend! Helps a lot!!!
            Yes, in fact, I do not need your recommendations, since my reference material is higher than the roof. If there is a need to figure out something, then how to do it and where to find it, I will figure it out myself. If it doesn’t arise, then let there at least cables, at least a foot grow with moss. Simply, no one person can be an absolute expert in all areas, even Anatoly Wasserman. Well, maybe only you. Well, live with this, I am glad that in the world in addition to some exceptional USA, there is another exceptional you.
  2. Ross xnumx 30 May 2020 05: 03 New
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    I will not hide, entertainingly. good
    Sailing as one of the oldest occupations of the human race over the millennia has managed to generate a great many purely specific concepts and terms.

    But it did not indicate the contrasting boundaries between navigation (sailors) and navigation (sailors). For me, this difference is as follows: in the case of navigation, this is a kind of movement of persons or goods by water (sea); in the second - the art (ability) to maneuver (find ways) between land in the open sea. Comparatively: iceberg and fish. However, this is a purely subjective perception.
    In conclusion, it is worth briefly dwelling on the question of why all this purely maritime specifics with miles, knots, cable and so on was needed at all.

    I do not agree with the conclusions about the demand for some kind of purely “universality”. Most likely, marine terms remained outside of civilian life only to create difficulties in mastering the maritime industry. It was the maritime powers of the Middle Ages that zealously kept secrets so as not to produce “competitors”.
    Saving in everyday life different measures of length, weight, volume, etc. - An anachronism of the world community, which is unable even in these trifles to come to a general agreement. This is akin to the variety in the calibers of small arms, but it sounds the same difference as asking the seller to weigh 100 grams of cheese or "this piece."
    The article is interesting in that it raises more questions than gives answers - it makes you think, think.
    good
    1. Free wind 30 May 2020 06: 14 New
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      All measures are long previously usually correlated with the human body, inch-phalanx of the finger, foot is the size of the foot, the size of a queen was removed or something, I don’t remember. Mile, a thousand double steps. Cable, from the word cable, one tenth of a mile, it was necessary to somehow separate the distance. The British generally lovers bother, in a foot of 12 inches, make 10, and I want them .. We also had a tryndets. The top, the distance between the thumb and forefinger, or middle .. Elbow, of course. Fathom, spread of arms, from tip to tip of middle fingers, but there was a pancake and oblique fathom, from the ground at the left foot, to the finger of a raised right hand. All these are not desires to use standards, it seems from inertia of thinking. And remember the temperature, Kelvin, Celsius, Fahrenheit. It’s also cool with the clock, 24 hours a day. in an hour of 60 minutes. There were proposals to translate everything into a decimal system. Calendar too. A lot of everything where we arrange troubles for ourselves.
      1. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 32 New
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        The British traditionally had a duodecimal system of measures and weights, so there is nothing unusual here, and if there really were proposals for the transition to the decimal system, then this proposal is terrible stupidity
      2. Motorist 30 May 2020 15: 53 New
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        do 10 and I want them

        Decimal is more familiar to us, but the decimal looks more convenient: 12 can be divided without a remainder into a larger number of numbers. But then [logically] it is necessary to transfer the whole bill to a 12-decimal system, and this is another story ... what
        1. Free wind 30 May 2020 16: 06 New
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          Nifiga is not better. I explain how in spirit. There are 10 bottles of vodka, you can divide them into two. Correct? You are 5 and I am 5, equally no one is offended, so that there were five of us, I have not found three more, probably in the field. We take 12 bottles, can be divided: into two, into three, into four, into six. these pulled up from the fields. And which is better, two in five, or six in two ,? The same thing.
          1. Motorist 30 May 2020 16: 52 New
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            There are 10 bottles of vodka, divide them

            Why share them? drinks But then - "on the bulks", and already in the binary system, and then a specialist is needed ... laughing
    2. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 33 New
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      terrible nonsense
    3. tihonmarine 30 May 2020 10: 22 New
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      Quote: ROSS 42
      Most likely, marine terms remained outside of civilian life only to create difficulties in mastering the maritime industry.

      For people not related to the sea, marine terminology seems difficult and in many ways incomprehensible. As they say, “Well, that’s selvah,” all of it came to us from Holland, when Peter the Great cut through to it not “windows, but doors”, but when you begin your life journey connected with the sea, the problem of the sea language disappears almost immediately and imperceptibly but it remains for the rest of my life, as the words from the song "I drink for sheets, guys, for bollards topenants, for taps and knocks, for brackets and blocks, for the whole set of uncomplicated gear. I drink for stagkarnak, for my honesty with ........, which has grown over a shell. " Well, something like this, everything is simple and clear.
    4. mmaxx 31 May 2020 07: 02 New
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      Nobody confused anyone. Everything appeared by itself over time and organically. And to redo all the cards (how is that at all?) Due to the fact that some wise men, in some Paris came up with a meter, no one will. It is now the metric system that is understandable and convenient for us, and then it was generally some kind of fiction.
      It would not be known what happened if Napoleon did not bend all the conquered countries to uniform laws.
  3. tlauicol 30 May 2020 05: 11 New
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    I remember in my childhood I had a "Dictionary of Naval Terms."
  4. asv363 30 May 2020 05: 18 New
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    Dear Alexander, something is not entirely clear:

    And therefore, cables are, first of all, a rope from 6 to 13 inches around (152-330 mm) having diameter in 50-100 mm.
    1. Here I am about the same! I read and I can’t understand ...
    2. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 28 New
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      nonsense, cables - first of all a measure of distance
    3. NIKN 30 May 2020 10: 52 New
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      Quote: asv363
      Dear Alexander, something is not entirely clear:

      And therefore, cables are, first of all, a rope from 6 to 13 inches around (152-330 mm) having diameter in 50-100 mm.

      This refers to the circumference and diameter, respectively .... probably repeat
    4. venik 30 May 2020 14: 48 New
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      Quote: asv363
      Dear Alexander, something is not entirely clear:

      And therefore, cables are, first of all, a rope from 6 to 13 inches around (152-330 mm) having diameter in 50-100 mm.

      ========
      And so it was written on Wikipedia - the author summed up nothing and ripped off: "...Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Kabeltov (niderl. Kabeltouw - "tow rope") - a cable with a circle from 152 to 330 mm (6-13 inches [1], diameter from 47 to 111 mm)
      .... " wassat
      1. asv363 30 May 2020 15: 58 New
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        Vladimir, thanks! I myself would never have guessed.
      2. Alexander Greene 31 May 2020 22: 52 New
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        Quote: venik
        And so it was written on Wikipedia


        KABELTOV (goal. Kabeltouw).
        1. A non-system unit of length used in navigation for measurement
        comparatively small distances, equal to 185,2 m (or 0,1 nautical miles).

        2. Vegetable (hemp) cable cable with a circle length of 150-330 mm,
        used, as a rule, as mooring lines or towing cables.

        (Marine Encyclopedic Reference:
        In two volumes. Volume I / Ed. N. N. Isanina.—
        L .: Shipbuilding, 1987, 512 p.)
    5. Simargl 30 May 2020 19: 33 New
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      Pi * de ... something like that ...
    6. mmaxx 31 May 2020 07: 05 New
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      Let's just say - the ropes were measured around the circumference, and the diameter is to make it clear now.
      Gradually switch to measuring all the cables in diameter.
      The caliper was also invented not so long ago winked
  5. The comment was deleted.
  6. Sergey M. Karasev 30 May 2020 06: 17 New
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    It should be noted that the use of the term is quite narrow - they are marked with the path not traveled by the ship (for this, as you know, nautical miles are used), but the distance between the vessels when placing them with a certain order, when they are sailing together or placed on a raid. Or the distance from the ship to the nearest shore - that is, segments that are not too long in size.

    Also, it was precisely in the cables (not in miles and not in kilometers), at least in the old literature, that the distance of firing at sea was measured.
    1. tihonmarine 30 May 2020 10: 37 New
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      Quote: Sergey Karasev
      Also, it was precisely in the cables (not in miles and not in kilometers), at least in the old literature, that the distance of firing at sea was measured.

      In the seas, as used to determine the distance in miles and cable and still use, cables are the same 0,1 miles. If you go near the shore and or in the canal and the master asks you “Distance to the buoy”, then you answer “Two and a half cable” but not “Zero point twenty five hundredths of a mile”. Although for long distances you will answer “Ten and a half miles” but not 105 cable. ”Although the radiometers reported to the Navy of the USSR the distance in cable, I don’t know how in the Russian Navy.
  7. A. Privalov 30 May 2020 06: 38 New
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    Cables in the news. However! belay
  8. Normal ok 30 May 2020 07: 29 New
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    When I entered the art school it was difficult to rebuild my head to measure in divisions of the goniometer (thousandth). Then, it became by itself.
    1. tihonmarine 30 May 2020 10: 41 New
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      Quote: Normal ok
      When I entered the art school it was difficult to rebuild my head to measure in divisions of the goniometer (thousandth). Then, it became by itself.

      Well, with marine terminology too, the pilots have their own, and the miners and collective farmers have their own specifics and their own language. Well, something like this "Gordeny Mars gitovy, for all that we have drunk, in the arms of girls from all ports."
    2. Free wind 30 May 2020 11: 39 New
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      Probably in ppm. At 1 m, 1 mm slope.
  9. Doccor18 30 May 2020 07: 45 New
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    Most of all I was impressed by the signalmen who, by eye, on the sea surface, without any reference points, should have as accurately as possible indicated the number of cables to the target.
  10. yuri h 30 May 2020 08: 24 New
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    Who is that smart there? What kind of 111 km are we talking about? one nautical mile = 1852 meters, once again I am convinced = sailors are very, very illiterate, I am an ordinary merchant navy captain and I am ashamed of sailors
    1. Simargl 30 May 2020 19: 38 New
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      Quote: yuri h
      I am an ordinary captain of the merchant fleet and I am ashamed of sailors
      Navy men and even a land rat made a face-to-face off illiterate commentary ...
      1852m (mile) multiplied by 60 (arc seconds, i.e. arc minute) is 111,120 km.
      How many years later did he learn the common truth?
  11. Kathernik 30 May 2020 08: 42 New
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    It is written a lot, but there is no main thing. The mile (cable) was introduced primarily because this is not the length of the segment, but the length of the arc! The length of the arc at the zero mark (in Russia at the level of the Kronstadt footstock, i.e. the Baltic Sea) with an angle of 1 degree. This was necessary for navigating the stars in order to take into account the diameter of the Earth. Unfortunately, the author is not familiar with the topic.
  12. AlexVas44 30 May 2020 09: 14 New
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    Quote: yuri h
    Who is that smart there? What kind of 111 km are we talking about? one nautical mile = 1852 meters,

    This is for us, land, it is said that 60 nautical miles are equal to 111 of our km., Well, and another 120m. The basics of fathoms, so to speak. laughing
  13. Undecim 30 May 2020 09: 28 New
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    This is what the propagandist agitator means. Whatever I started to write about, even about cable ones, all the same, agitation turns out.
    It would be strange if the "enlightened sailors" from Britain, as well as their overseas heirs and descendants did not have their own separate opinion on this matter. The British and Americans have their own cable. Moreover, the British magnificently call their “admiral”, it differs from the same artillery by 8 feet or a little more than 3 meters. The "Old US Cable" is bigger than all others - it has 120 fathoms and, accordingly, 720 feet or almost 220 meters. However, both of the Anglo-Saxon marine measures of length mentioned above have long been considered obsolete. They belong rather to an exotic archaic and few are used when today.
    In fact, everything was completely different. The British “have their own opinion” have every right, for they have created a mile in the modern sense.
    Until about 1500, the mile was "approximate" because it was based on a step. There was a Roman step, 11,64 inches, a Saxon step - about 9,3 inches. Accordingly, everyone had their own miles. And cable too.
    In the XVI century, the understanding that the Earth is a sphere was finally entrenched. Naturally, this affected both cartography and navigation. It took scientists about a century to come to the conclusion that for seafarers, the most acceptable unit of distance will be the one in which angular measurements of latitude can be related to the distance traveled. This scientist was an English mathematician Edmund Gunther.
    He suggested using one minute of the meridian equal to a unit of distance. Based on the circumference of the Earth calculated by the Dutch mathematician Snell, Gunter determined that his "nautical mile" was 6080 feet, or one minute of arc at 48 ° latitude. This is how the British nautical mile appeared. And British cables. The French had their own - the length of the arc at 45 ° latitude - 6076 feet. In 1929, at the International Hydrographic Conference in Monaco, the "uniform size" of the international nautical mile and, accordingly, cablet was agreed.
    1. Undecim 30 May 2020 10: 07 New
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      Oh, I see already a hamster some local minus marked. Recently, they have intensified.
      1. Simargl 30 May 2020 19: 45 New
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        Quote: Undecim
        Oh, I see already a hamster some local minus marked. Recently, they have intensified.
        It's a shame, probably, when a relatively small comment broke the article like a Tuzik pants! lol drinks
  14. Black Colonel 30 May 2020 10: 05 New
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    "... therefore, cables are, first of all, a rope from 6 to 13 inches in circumference (152-330 mm), having a diameter of 50-100 mm."
    Here, the DIA is clear, and then what does the CIRCLE show?
    1. Region-25.rus 30 May 2020 11: 22 New
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      as I understand the circumference in the cross section of the rope!
  15. silberwolf88 30 May 2020 10: 07 New
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    This topic once again proves that "every profession is a conspiracy against the uninitiated" ... well, in general, almost a toast ... FOR PROFESSIONALS IN YOUR ACT)
  16. Region-25.rus 30 May 2020 11: 14 New
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    cables is not only a naval term ..))) In the civilian fleet, oddly enough, it is also in use (here's the news!) soldier
  17. sabakina 30 May 2020 11: 26 New
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    But I'm wondering what aliens use when they arrive on Earth? laughing
    1. Flinkfan 30 May 2020 15: 08 New
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      Volume ... The fact that our officials and communal services have not yet thought of skimming citizens for garbage removal only from the size of the living space proves once again that they are not aliens.

      I think very soon they will have the same contact with extraterrestrial intelligence, we will start paying for garbage from the volume of apartments.

      "That official who has not sucked on garbage reform yet is bad!"
      1. Simargl 30 May 2020 20: 21 New
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        Quote: Flinkfan
        let's start paying for the garbage with the volume of apartments.
        Those. flat litter, not a person?
        Rather, asking for packing tax.
  18. Free wind 30 May 2020 12: 00 New
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    So Napoleon introduced the metric system, the British did not really favor the French, maybe that's why they did not accept it ..
  19. Flinkfan 30 May 2020 15: 02 New
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    It doesn’t matter where the North is located, even if the Earth has the shape of a suitcase, the main thing is that they all show in one direction.
    "Emir al bahrov" absolutely does not care about the geoid named after comrade Krasovsky ...
    On the left (right) edge of the sea navigation chart with a compass solution, I measured the distance and .... solved the problem that has arisen, or was posed on the map, plan (tablet) in specific numbers.
  20. acetophenon 30 May 2020 17: 56 New
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    The French at one time acted very wisely: they replaced Leagues, Tuazes and other crap with GHS. And dissatisfied cut off the head. For which many thanks to them. Although they are bloody tyrants and executioners. Whatever Thank you.
  21. The comment was deleted.
  22. Dzafdet 30 May 2020 20: 19 New
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    Types of towing lines



    Towing of one vessel by another is carried out by means of a towing line. The towing line can be homogeneous - a towing cable, and combined (heterogeneous) - a synthetic cable + anchor chain; steel cable + anchor chain; synthetic + steel cable; rope + anchor + anchor chain. In addition, the inhomogeneous line can be symmetric and asymmetric.

    and with the diameters of the cable the author wound it up. I read, read, did not understand ... drinks
  23. Saxahorse 30 May 2020 22: 56 New
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    The article is quite curious, but her place is clearly not in the news :)))

    In general, many thanks to the author for the topic!
  24. cpez-lun 31 May 2020 12: 40 New
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    So how many meters is this cable?
    1. nnz226 31 May 2020 13: 29 New
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      185,2 meters
  25. nnz226 31 May 2020 13: 29 New
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    Kabeltov = 1/10 nautical mile, which is equal to 1852 meters or 1 arc second at the equator, if its length (equator) is divided into 360 degrees, degree divided into 60 minutes, minute divided into 60 seconds ...
  26. corsair 31 May 2020 19: 04 New
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    As for the "exotic archaic" I bet. In 1993, during the transfer of the Avachinsky STR, in Singapore they acquired the missing map for the Yellow Sea section, turned out to be American. Depths in fathoms, etc. I had to count.
  27. Petrol cutter 31 May 2020 20: 12 New
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    Thank. It never hurts to refresh your memory.
    Yes, I have already forgotten something as unnecessary. Frankly speaking.
    Nevertheless ... Useful.