How the word "latrine" is translated and where to run: young from the history of naval terms




Even those who are far from the maritime profession, the term "latrine" is known. Moreover, not every person who knows the meaning of this word has information about where it came from and what it originally meant. Today, "Military Review" has prepared a little material about this.

So, the generally accepted meaning of the term “latrine” today is a ship (ship) toilet. In Russian dictionaries and encyclopedias, it began to flicker from the very moment that they themselves began to be published in our country. So, in the 4-volume book of the Brockhaus and Efron encyclopedia from 1905-1907, a description of latrine is found. This word came to the fleet, as, by the way, and many other naval terms, from Holland. It represents the Dutch "galjoen", which literally means "the bow of the ship."

In this context, the meaning of the word should not be confused with another interpretation, which corresponds to the fish Dichistius capensis or black bream - the national symbol of South Africa. Its name also sounds like galjoen, but only in this context should it be read like a galleon. By the way, the very “ship” concept of “galjoen” often refers precisely to the galleon - a Spanish sailing ship of the 16-17th centuries.

What do Dutch dictionaries say about “latrine”?


In particular, it is noted that we are talking about a special platform on the bow of the ship, where the toilets for the crew were located. It is added that toilets were called toilets on the Frisian (Watt) islands until the XNUMXth century. The Frisian Islands - a group of islands in the North Sea, which is separated from it by the so-called watts - shallow sea zones off the coast of the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany.

On sailing ships, latrines were located on the sides of the ship in the bow - where the prince diget was located. What kind of "beast"? Knyavdiget - the upper part of the water cutter, which could be “crowned” by a carved figure. On the bow of the Swedish ship of the XNUMXth century “Vasa” (“Vase”), this part is decorated with carvings on the outside of the sides (first photo).

Any ship's young man knew perfectly well that the bow of the ship was the location of the latrines. It is there that we must escape in the case of the urge of the body ...

Storm latches could be several seats, which were, in fact, wooden boxes. Through these “boxes”, the contents fell into a wooden tank and eventually went to the open sea.

At the same time, there was a system of fines and other punishments for captains and ship owners who, for one reason or another, poured the contents of a latrine tank near the ports, violating the “sanitary zone”. But the fact is that a latrine tank was not on every ship. There were also cases of direct outboard "withdrawal" of latrine.

So that when sailing on a latrine, the sailor would not be washed overboard, there were various devices, including a special net. Another option is wooden handles on the sides that you can hold on to. As they say, you can’t sit on such a latrine if it’s not about calm.

Thus, the very word “latrine” initially had no relation to the “restroom” in the current sense of the word. It designated a platform in the bow of the ship: both military and commercial.


Submarine Latrine


On more ancient vessels, including galleys, with a toilet it was, as is customary to say for some time, not so simple. For example, slaves who were seated on rowing oars could send natural necessities directly on the spot in the event that a “change” was not possible. In the end, everything was washed with overboard water. However, for obvious reasons, the complete removal of waste products was not always possible in the short term, which led to the emergence of additional risks for outbreaks of infections.
Photos used:
Flickr / Jorge Láscar, https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/ Vera Kratohvil
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  1. The leader of the Redskins 27 May 2020 16: 49 New
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    Interestingly, but somehow it’s small ... request
    1. cniza 27 May 2020 16: 56 New
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      The incompleteness of the text is felt, the thread abruptly breaks ...
      1. Crowe 27 May 2020 17: 01 New
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        I join! Very interesting and very few! I demand the continuation of the subject of marine terms!
      2. Polite Moose 27 May 2020 18: 24 New
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        Quote: cniza
        The incompleteness of the text is felt, the thread abruptly breaks ...

        The Polish Institute for Incomplete Studies found that in 8 cases out of ten!
        1. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 41 New
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          A good analogue ... lol
      3. Marconi41 27 May 2020 19: 38 New
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        Quote: cniza
        The incompleteness of the text is felt, the thread abruptly breaks ...

        Really. But I heard an earlier version. On triremes there was a ram on the bow of the ship. It was called "gel" (hence the gelatin). It was there, on special beams, that the sailors descended to fulfill their natural needs. Everything else is in the text.
        I do not pretend to be truthful. hi
        1. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 42 New
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          I also read it, but the topic was raised, but there’s no way to master it ...
        2. bk0010 27 May 2020 22: 21 New
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          Quote: Marconi41
          (hence the gelatin)
          The guillotine is named after Dr. Guillotin, a prominent humanist of the late 18th century, who intensively promoted its use.
          1. Marconi41 28 May 2020 00: 23 New
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            Quote: bk0010
            The guillotine is named in honor of Dr. Guillotin, a prominent humanist of the late 18th century, who intensively promoted her

            Perhaps my version and bike, which I immediately warned.
          2. Glory1974 28 May 2020 09: 12 New
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            Guillotine is named after Dr. Guillotin

            And the surname of the doctor could come from "gel". Thus the circle closes.
        3. val43 29 May 2020 10: 53 New
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          Looks like it ... And I thought that GIlOTin was named after Dr. Joseph Guillotin, although in fact he was not its inventor.
    2. Andrey NM 27 May 2020 17: 55 New
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      Blowing out a latrine on a boat is a skill, especially if there is a problem with pressure gauges. They’ll leave a little excess pressure in the cylinder ... And now you, young and green, did the thing, pressed the pedal ... And you go out all in white laughing
      1. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 44 New
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        Many went through this ... lol
      2. Serg65 28 May 2020 09: 49 New
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        Quote: Andrew NM
        Blowing on a latrine boat - this is a skill

        smile Skill is needed everywhere! In the Republic of Kazakhstan, the 205th project didn’t have any latrine at all and it was necessary to dodge to hold onto the rail ... and all this on the go! Or, for example, a latrine in a floating dock, a circus compared to it is an empty pastime! But the most perverted latrine observed on the floating crane 771 project ... laughing that's where the ambush is !!!
      3. val43 29 May 2020 10: 54 New
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        We had it on K-447 in the 10th ...
  2. Doccor18 27 May 2020 16: 50 New
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    There are so many beautiful marine terms: galley, cockpit, frame, bollard and others .... And here about latrine ..
    1. Angel_and_Demon 27 May 2020 16: 53 New
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      Quote: Doccor18
      There are so many beautiful marine terms: galley, cockpit, frame, bollard and others .... And here about latrine ..

      Who thinks about what he writes about laughing
      1. novel66 27 May 2020 16: 57 New
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        Who is thinking what

        sooner or later everyone thinks about it
        1. geoan 27 May 2020 19: 28 New
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          better sooner than late wassat
          1. novel66 27 May 2020 19: 57 New
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            meticulously noticed! hi
            1. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 45 New
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              And most importantly in the topic of sartira ...
              1. novel66 27 May 2020 20: 51 New
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                and this is our favorite !!! VITYA! hi
                1. cniza 27 May 2020 21: 03 New
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                  Roma hi

                  Yes, it would be boring without this, thanks V.O. amuses and gives food to stagnant humor ...
                  1. novel66 27 May 2020 21: 07 New
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                    and mind !! mind the food!
                    1. cniza 28 May 2020 08: 38 New
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                      For those who have yes, definitely ...
              2. Serg65 28 May 2020 09: 56 New
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                laughing Well, the toilet is the most important room everywhere and in everything!
                1. val43 29 May 2020 10: 56 New
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                  When construction begins, the first thing they build is the toilet! wink
        2. Serg65 28 May 2020 09: 54 New
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          Quote: novel xnumx
          sooner or later everyone thinks about it

          Sometimes even earlier than later ... laughing
          1. novel66 28 May 2020 09: 56 New
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            and run away on a ship ..
            1. Serg65 28 May 2020 10: 13 New
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              If you know where, it’s not far wink
              1. novel66 28 May 2020 10: 16 New
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                overboard?? shame !!! lol
                1. Serg65 28 May 2020 10: 21 New
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                  Quote: novel xnumx
                  overboard??

                  You’ll fly overboard ... from the boatswain kick !!!
      2. 4ekist 27 May 2020 16: 59 New
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        It turns out that the sailors cast from the bow of the boat directly into the ocean? Uncultured, however. But I prefer the words "galley" and "cabin, cabin."
        1. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 56 New
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          Not only cast, but also laid, and to small boats to this day so ...
          1. Rzzz 28 May 2020 10: 22 New
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            At all so. In any case, fecal is pumped overboard, it is allowed. There are only some rules. It is necessary to pump out on the go, not exceeding a certain pumping intensity. Unprocessed feces should be pumped out no closer than 12 miles from the shore, treated at bio-treatment stations no closer than 3 miles from the shore.
            Why are there steamboats. Many coastal settlements merge into the sea, in depth.
        2. Simargl 27 May 2020 21: 08 New
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          Quote: 4ekist
          Uncultured, however.
          And so megalodon died out!
        3. Andrey NM 28 May 2020 08: 35 New
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          Quote: cniza
          Yes, it would be boring without this, thanks V.O. amuses and gives food to stagnant humor ...

          And how many sayings!
          "Quietly the water murmurs in the latrine, I like the underwater service ..."
          Or - if you want to live in comfort, always sleep in someone else's cabin. "
          1. Rzzz 28 May 2020 10: 23 New
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            Quote: Andrew NM
            always sleep in someone else's cabin. "

            ... Drink Votka in someone else's cabin !!! drinks
        4. Serg65 28 May 2020 09: 57 New
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          Quote: 4ekist
          Sailors cast from the bow of the boat directly into the ocean?

          And so on until the second half of the 20th century! wink
          1. novel66 28 May 2020 10: 16 New
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            But in battle, how ??
            1. Serg65 28 May 2020 10: 20 New
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              the battle, Roma, it is the same for everyone ... as it is in the "9th company" ... at least piss, but destroy the tank! wink
      3. AUL
        AUL 27 May 2020 17: 21 New
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        Quote: Angel_and_Demon
        Who thinks about what he writes about

        And Malysheva on TV teaches you how to fart and poop ... laughing
        1. Alf
          Alf 27 May 2020 18: 31 New
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          Quote: AUL
          Quote: Angel_and_Demon
          Who thinks about what he writes about

          And Malysheva on TV teaches you how to fart and poop ... laughing

      4. Alf
        Alf 27 May 2020 18: 30 New
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        Quote: Angel_and_Demon
        Quote: Doccor18
        There are so many beautiful marine terms: galley, cockpit, frame, bollard and others .... And here about latrine ..

        Who thinks about what he writes about laughing

        The article is not signed, but in terms of the tone and content of the article, the author is clearly Mr. Shpakovsky, only he has such a painful predisposition to such topics.
    2. novel66 27 May 2020 16: 56 New
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      galley, cockpit, frame, bollard and others

      they cannot reach, it is important!
    3. knn54 27 May 2020 17: 04 New
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      The Crocodile magazine remembered something. They liked the team to solve humorous crosswords. They thought about the word “Sea battle” of 4 letters for a long time.
      It turned out ... young.
    4. Piramidon 27 May 2020 18: 53 New
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      Quote: Doccor18
      There are so many beautiful marine terms.

      I don’t remember in which book a certain navigator was mentioned. "Of all the instruments, he liked the sextant most, especially the first part of the word." laughing
    5. cniza 27 May 2020 20: 44 New
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      Quote: Doccor18
      There are so many beautiful marine terms: galley, cockpit, frame, bollard and others .... And here about latrine ..

      And my nickname is Knitsa, also from this series ...
      1. for
        for 28 May 2020 00: 46 New
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        Quote: cniza
        And my nickname is Knitz

        I apologize in what language
        1. cniza 28 May 2020 08: 41 New
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          Here please study:
          1. for
            for 28 May 2020 11: 17 New
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            Quote: cniza
            Here please study:

            I asked you not what it is, but in what language your nickname is written. A set of housing I know without you.
            1. cniza 28 May 2020 12: 40 New
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              In Russian, but in Latin ...
              1. for
                for 28 May 2020 15: 33 New
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                Quote: cniza
                In Russian, but in Latin ...

                Knitz
                1. cniza 28 May 2020 16: 16 New
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                  To be precise, it's not me and not you:

                  Transliteration according to ISO 9: 1995 - KNICA

                  Transliteration according to GOST 7.79-2000 System B - KNITSA

                  hi
        2. Serg65 28 May 2020 10: 09 New
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          Quote: for
          I apologize in what language

          Why did you put a flag on the naval avatar? I apologize.
          1. novel66 28 May 2020 10: 18 New
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            and what does your "apologize" disguise?
            1. Serg65 28 May 2020 11: 34 New
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              you will not believe ... only intelligence wink
            2. for
              for 28 May 2020 12: 17 New
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              Quote: novel xnumx
              "sorry"?

              The orchid!
              1. novel66 28 May 2020 12: 18 New
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                he can, he admiral
              2. Serg65 28 May 2020 12: 20 New
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                Quote: for
                The orchid!

                Not at all! The purity of the emotional impulse, as I understand it, is now not quoted?
          2. for
            for 28 May 2020 11: 23 New
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            Quote: Serg65

            And why did you put a flag on the naval avatar

            I hang and wear only what I deserve.
            1. Serg65 28 May 2020 11: 33 New
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              Quote: for
              I hang and wear only what I deserve.

              In this regard, they should know that the word KNITSA has no Russian roots!
              1. for
                for 28 May 2020 12: 13 New
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                Quote: Serg65
                must know that the word KNITSA has no Russian roots!

                What does the Russian roots have to do with it. Written in Latin, I ask in what language. For example, in Dutch (Dutch, I think from there origin) Knitz - knitz. And cniza in what.
    6. bk0010 27 May 2020 22: 28 New
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      The cadet didn’t put on the guis for dismissal. A patrol (land) caught him and asked: why without a collar? Without a bollard or something? I forgot! They wrote in the remark: he was fired without a bunker. The commander was laughing so hard that he did not punish.
      1. Serg65 28 May 2020 10: 10 New
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        Quote: bk0010
        The commander was laughing so hard that he did not punish.

        In my situation, the foreman of the training company was in the place of the commander laughing
    7. naburkin 28 May 2020 13: 39 New
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      .... pillers, stringer, biting, afterpeak, kilson ... in general, if all the terms are described like that, then I'm afraid a big book will turn out laughing
  3. parusnik 27 May 2020 16: 56 New
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    Type, naval theme laughing
  4. Mountain shooter 27 May 2020 16: 57 New
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    Unappetizing like that. But what was, was. It smelled bad on ships, and especially on galleys ... So in the cities in those days it was not cleaner. The wide-brimmed hats of the musketeers helped not to get the contents of the night pot, which was easily emptied onto the pavement from the second floor. For the same purpose served high heels with over the knee boots. One can only imagine what was happening on the streets of medieval cities, if for a long time there was no rain ... washing away these "products" into a nearby river ...
    1. Gato 27 May 2020 17: 16 New
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      For the same purpose served high heels with over the knee boots.

      laughing
      It is believed that high heels styled undersized kings. In addition, the heel allowed the foot to stay better in stirrups, and the nobles of that time, even in the bakery, preferred to ride.
      1. Alf
        Alf 27 May 2020 18: 32 New
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        Quote: Gato
        and the nobles of that time, even in the bakery preferred to ride.

        In order not to drown on the road in "substance"?
        1. Gato 28 May 2020 00: 55 New
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          In order not to drown on the road in "substance"?

          And not only. Ponty is our everything. For example, for a Russian boyar to go outside the gates of the estate on foot was a complete loss of face. Only in a cart, sleigh, carriage or, in extreme cases, on horseback.
  5. voyaka uh 27 May 2020 17: 00 New
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    There were special people on rowing galleys who
    scrubbed sewage with water overboard from under the benches of rowers.
  6. Gato 27 May 2020 17: 03 New
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    The location of the latrine on the sailing ship is understandable - on the move the amber will not be carried to the deck, especially to the shkants.
    Interestingly, the officers also ran to tell fortunes from utah to the tank?
    Imagine a kind of dandy, hanging the stern overboard with the halyards flying in the wind lol
    1. Avior 27 May 2020 18: 17 New
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      Imagine a kind of dandy, hanging the stern overboard with flying forks in the wind lol

      Specifically, this dandy was called Admiral Nelson.
      In this very uniform he was killed during the Battle of Trafalgar. smile
      1. Gato 28 May 2020 01: 02 New
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        this dandy was called Admiral Nelson

        Yes, this is his clift. Unfortunately, I did not find reliable images of the French admirals of the XVII-XVIII centuries, where they are all in feathers, lace and ruffles - mermaids drown with envy laughing
  7. Catfish 27 May 2020 17: 09 New
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    The author forgot to mention that on the sailboat everything that did not plop into the water was washed off by the oncoming wave, but in the calm, it’s clear that you could sit right on the net.
    About varieties of decoration of latches: laughing
    1. Gato 27 May 2020 17: 27 New
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      hi
      Gee, the British already differed mnee ... a variety of addictions:
  8. Avior 27 May 2020 17: 34 New
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    The title of the article is a photograph of a Swedish Vase (or Vase? smile ), but the latrine from this angle is poorly visible.

    so the boxes can be seen better. smile
    The place was dangerous, however, in fresh weather they didn’t stay too long, and could wash off with a wave.
    smile
    As for the officers, then
    The senior ranks of the ship's crew did not use sailor latrine. The living conditions of the officers in the fleet were naturally better than those of ordinary navigators. They stayed in a spacious cabin company (and, from the middle of the XNUMXth century onwards, in separate cabins), ate better, had a personal servant. So the toilet at the ship's command was much safer than the sailor latrines.

    In the aft part of the wooden sailing ship stood the shtuls - round overhangs on the sides at the stern of the ship. In one of them navigational instruments and sea charts were stored, in another the closed cabin of an officer toilet was located. (On the larger ships in the shtulza there was a two-story building, in which there was a latrine and a washstand below, and a real captain’s bath was on top). One can argue about the convenience of this cramped closet, however, in any case, the person in it at least did not risk being left overboard. So with all the advantages of the officers ’life on a sailing ship, perhaps one of the most significant privileges was safe latrine.

    hi
    1. Avior 27 May 2020 18: 12 New
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      By the way, about the Shultz

      somehow it looked like inside
  9. syndicalist 27 May 2020 17: 39 New
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    We got to the photo of the submarine latrine - and that’s it!
    1. Peter is not the first 27 May 2020 18: 27 New
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      We got to the photo of the submarine latrine - and that’s it!

      Exactly! drinks And stopped!
      And where is the story of the sinking of an American submarine through a faulty latrine? am
      1. Revolver 28 May 2020 06: 44 New
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        Quote: Peter is not the first
        And where is the story of the sinking of an American submarine through a faulty latrine?

        Not American, but German.
        https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-1206
    2. Catfish 27 May 2020 18: 38 New
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      "And from the audience they shout to me: Details!" (with)
  10. AllBiBek 27 May 2020 17: 49 New
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    The story broke off so abruptly, as if the author urgently urged the subject of the story ... (
  11. Undecim 27 May 2020 18: 26 New
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    Quote: Avior
    The senior ranks of the ship's crew did not use sailor latrine. The living conditions of the officers in the fleet were naturally better than those of ordinary navigators. They stayed in a spacious cabin company (and, from the middle of the XNUMXth century onwards, in separate cabins), ate better, had a personal servant. So the toilet at the ship's command was much safer than the sailor latrines.

    In the aft part of the wooden sailing ship stood the shtuls - round overhangs on the sides at the stern of the ship. In one of them navigational instruments and sea charts were stored, in another the closed cabin of an officer toilet was located. (On the larger ships in the shtulza there was a two-story building, in which there was a latrine and a washstand below, and a real captain’s bath was on top). One can argue about the convenience of this cramped closet, however, in any case, the person in it at least did not risk being left overboard. So with all the advantages of the officers ’life on a sailing ship, perhaps one of the most significant privileges was safe latrine.

    To understand the illustrations to the above - the English designation of the subjects in question.
    Latrine in English - head, shtuls - quarter gallery.
    These are the very shtuls.
    1. Undecim 27 May 2020 18: 27 New
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      And this is captain latrine.
      1. Undecim 27 May 2020 18: 29 New
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        But this is captain latrine. Other officers often had simpler amenities.
        1. Undecim 27 May 2020 18: 36 New
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          The sailors had almost the same amenities, only privacy was absent.
          1. Undecim 27 May 2020 18: 44 New
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            But it could be so.
      2. Catfish 27 May 2020 18: 35 New
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        Here are the dragons, and they drove the sailors to the tank, with the risk of flying down after the village. laughing
  12. Brylevsky 27 May 2020 19: 35 New
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    In his first swimming practice he fell on the frigate "Pallas" (built in Poland, such as "Peace"). I was painted on the fore mast according to sailing rummages, and since it was a stone's throw from the bowsprit, I had to raise and remove the sails located on the bowsprit together with the rest of the boys. During the cleaning of the sails on the bowsprit, I had to climb under it and descend just to the place where the latrine was on the wooden sailing ships. I don’t know how they “did” their business “without consequences” ... in the sea, almost always a wave, a pitching; in the oncoming wave there it splashes heavily, and it sometimes happens that the wave hits ... and this is immediately wet from head to toe. And there is an icy, strong wind ... as I recall, I will tremble. By the way, without insurance, the boatswain forbade us to work there. But it was considered special chic - to get out on the bowsprit without a safety belt ... If the boatswain caught someone behind this business, then he sent immediately to wash the deck in the latrine ... only in the most ordinary: with a toilet bowl and a vacuum system ...
    1. Andrey NM 28 May 2020 08: 44 New
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      Quote: Brylevsky
      I don’t know how they “did” their business “without consequences” ... in the sea, almost always a wave, a pitching; in the oncoming wave there it splashes heavily, and it sometimes happens that the wave hits ... and this is immediately wet from head to toe.

      But you don’t need to wipe anything ...
  13. A. Privalov 27 May 2020 19: 36 New
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    About latrine in the "News" section? However! fellow
  14. Crimean partisan 1974 27 May 2020 20: 47 New
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    currently latrine is a latrine with separate closets, where they directly spoil the Duchki
  15. Kushka 27 May 2020 21: 49 New
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    Well, how did ALL manage to miss it
    our katernikov on shopping mall? (and I'm not talking about
    40-50s, I'm about 70-80s!) That's where the exotic
    on this topic!
  16. kig
    kig 29 May 2020 06: 22 New
    • 2
    • 0
    +2
    But the Anglo-Americans have decided to call the toilet john, that is, almost a proper name. This is connected with a certain John Harrington, who at the beginning of the 17th century came up with the first flush toilet. It is interesting that he himself called his Ajax device, but the grateful descendants did not forget to whom exactly they owe such an advanced novelty.

    As for the marine English theme, then “they have” our latrine without any fancy called head - that is, something that is on the tank of the vessel. There were no differences in the device.

    One may ask: why was such an important, but not very pleasant thing for smelling thing, located on the tank? It seems to be the place in the stern, away from the eyes and noses. Everything is very simple: the smells were carried away by the wind (which is probably why sailors did not like the calm weather), and the wave lifted by the nasal tip washed the heads and carried away everything that was there.

    Why did I think about such things - because I happened to visit the American sailing frigate Constitution, which is now based in the port of Boston in the form of a historical monument. So, the crew of the frigate, with the size of the ship 65h13 meters, was more than 400 people. And heads there were only 4 pieces.

    Truly, iron men sailed on wooden ships.