Point Honda, or How to Get Out of the Water

Point Honda, or How to Get Out of the Water

Dear readers, for certain many of you were taught in childhood that doing several things at the same time, and especially after the sleeves, is not very good. This is even harmful, proved by fifth points, in case the head did not think about what the rest of the body does.


Today's story will be about the events of almost a hundred years ago, but here's the thing: there are things that do not have a statute of limitations and can serve as examples in 200 years.

All the sailors and knowledgeable have already realized that we are talking about the incident at Point Honda or, as it is called in America, Point Honda Disaster.

But let's look at this event from a slightly different point of view. So it will be more interesting.

First, a short excursion into history. It was in 1923. World War I ended long ago, countries have already begun to get used to peaceful life.

For the entire World War I fleet that fought ... no, fought, losses fleet made up 438 officers and 6 sailors. And three (!) Warships.

The old (w / and 420 tons) destroyer "Chauncey" was rammed by the British transport "Rose" and went to the bottom with a quarter of the crew, the destroyer "Jacob Jones" (w / and 1 tons) and the ship of the coast guard "Tampa" (w / and 000 tons) were torpedoed by German submarines.

For the year of participation in the war.

And on an absolutely peaceful day on September 9, 1923, the US Navy lost seven new warships at once. And the two ships that were damaged were saved.

In general, one person was more effective than all the German Navy of the First World War.

If you carefully analyze this incident, it turns out that a whole chain of events led to this nightmare. The most interesting thing is that if at least one link had been dropped out of this chain, such an incident would not have happened.

But everything played in such a way that the United States lost not just seven new ships, but seven of the latest destroyers, whose colleagues quite survived, reached the Second World War and took part there, although not in the first roles, but still served.

Guilty of the idea would have to admit the commander of the unit who staged such a show.

Meet Captain First Rank Edward Howe Watson.


Graduate of the United States Naval Academy in June 1895. He served on the cruiser Detroit during the Spanish-American War. After he commanded the supply ship "Celtic", served as a senior officer of the battleship "Utah", after the battleship - the commander of the gunboat "Wheeling".

Watson spent most of the First World War, commanding the Madavasca military transport, then the Alabama battleship, receiving the Naval Cross for "exclusively dedicated service."

Watson was a good sailor. By the age of 46, he became captain of the first rank - this is an indicator. He commanded a large ship (battleship "Alabama"), was a naval attache in Japan.


In general, a good list for a servant who would like to die an admiral. And Watson really wanted, apparently.

However, according to the standards and regulations of the American fleet, the admiral had to be able to command ship formations and have real experience. That is, to be not paper, but a real naval commander.

At the headquarters of the fleet, they decided that Watson was worthy of admiral's stripes and appointed him to command the 11th destroyer fleet. This was the first mistake.

The commander of a destroyer or destroyer formation is really not a simple officer. Based on the type of ship and methods of its use, I somehow allowed myself to call the destroyer "marine consumables." Indeed, the destroyer is a special ship. Fast, maneuverable, but completely unprotected. The armor is more than conditional. Weapon...


In general, this is a ship that must be used not like a battleship or a cruiser. Even against their own kind.

Hence, the commander of the destroyer should not be a simple officer. For him, speed and decisiveness in making decisions, a certain share of adventurism and the ability to take risks are very important. Very useful qualities for the battle, but, as the practice of thousands of examples has shown, in peacetime such qualities of a person can become a source of additional problems.

And so it happened. True, it is not known how Watson was endowed with these qualities, the story is silent about this. But in the list of ships on which Watson served, the destroyer is absent altogether. Military transport, battleship, gunboat - these are ships of a slightly different nature.

Nevertheless, in July 1922, Watson was appointed to command the formation of destroyers ... In general, they themselves are to blame.

In the summer of 1923, the fleet began large maneuvers. The entire US Pacific Fleet took part in them and around and around California it was somewhat lively. At the end of the maneuvers, the formations of the ships began to disperse in their places of deployment.

The 11th destroyer flotilla, lining up in a convoy of 14 ships, began moving in the direction of San Diego.


All the destroyers in the formation were of the same type, the Clemsons, laid down at the very end of the war, from 1918 to 1919. That is actually new. Each worth 1 million and 850 thousand dollars in 1920 prices. If you count in modern - about 27 million modern.

These were the destroyers of the last series, the so-called smooth-deck, not having a forecastle. The Clemson displacement was 1250 tons, length 95 m, speed 35,5 knots. The armament consisted of 4 102 mm guns and 12 torpedo tubes. The crew in the state totaled 131 people.


Watson held his flag on Delphi destroyer.


Behind the flagship were three columns of destroyers, sub-sectional.

31st Division: Farragut, Fuller, Percival, Somers and Chauncey.

32nd Division: Kennedy, Paul Hamilton, Stoddart and Thompson.

33rd division: “S. P. Lee ”,“ Young ”,“ Woodbury ”and“ Nicholas ”.

The first link in the chain of events was the permission of Rear Admiral Sumner Kittel for the flotilla to move to San Diego with a 20-node move.

In general, in peacetime, for the sake of economy, fuel consumption was normalized. The budget, as they say, is not rubber. Because the destroyers were not allowed to exceed the speed of 15 knots at the transitions. However, from time to time it was necessary to “give a burn” in the literal sense of the word for the sake of checking all ship systems. Given that by the end of the year, after long maneuvers, no campaigns were foreseen, Kittel ALLOWED Watson to march to the base in San Diego at a speed of 20 knots.


Not ORDERED, but AUTHORIZED. There is a difference, obviously. But Watson took it not just like that, but as an order by which he would receive some bonuses and preferences. It is possible that both this and the almost 900-kilometer crossing in a short time would give something to the future admiral. Especially fast and trouble-free transition. Daily, instead of one and a half days.

The sea, as many eyewitnesses noted, was unusually calm. The destroyers were equipped with the latest radio equipment: direction finders. At that time - the most advanced equipment, an analogue of modern GPS, which really made it possible to safely navigate ships from point A to point B.

But there was a problem. And it consisted in the fact that neither the flotilla commander nor his navigator Hunter completely trusted this system. Moreover, Watson forbade subordinates to independently check the place on the direction finder, so as not to "load the channel." Then the system could only process one call per unit of time. You can call it the second part of a brewing nightmare. It is quite possible.

On the day the flotilla arrived, the weather was fine at first, but then it began to deteriorate. Fog fell on the sea, a thing not at all rare in the local latitudes in winter and autumn. And finally, the gyrocompass broke on the flagship. But real sea wolves said, “Well, okay!” and went along the magnetic compass.


And the weather continued to deteriorate. Visibility deteriorated, and Watson took a fairly logical move: he built ships from three columns into one wake. In order to avoid collisions with each other in the fog.

But Watson and Hunter did not take into account one more thing, which seems to have happened far away, on the other hand ... On the other side of the world, September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto earthquake of 7,9 magnitude occurred in Japan. It not only caused the deaths of several hundred thousand people, and almost wiped Tokyo and Yokohama from the face of the earth, but also caused 13-meter tsunamis. Waves gradually rolled across the entire Pacific Ocean to the American coast, weakening along the way, of course, but not completely. Sea currents under their influence changed their speed, which ultimately led to a navigational error. Three.

And four at once. At Delphi, in violation of all possible requirements, there was a civilian passenger - Eugene Douman, Watson's acquaintance from Japan, whom the captain kindly decided to throw up to San Diego.

Of course, many old acquaintances were united by many topics, so Watson did not greatly trouble himself appearing on the bridge, giving the reins to Hunter. And he, along with the guest, probably discussed certain prospects and all that. Over a glass. A glass.

At 14:15, the Point Arguello bearing station gave the squadron an azimuth of 167 degrees. According to the azimuth given to Delphi, the destroyers were south of Arguello lighthouse, while they were only approaching it from the north. Before it was possible to establish the true azimuth, a rather long radio exchange took place. Yes, Hunter had real complaints about the direction finding system, which in 1923 was generally normal. The imperfection of the equipment is quite an everyday matter.

In general, it would be nice to take, go to the lighthouse and accurately establish your place on the map. But Hunter did not do this. Apparently, he hoped to do without newfangled gizmos. And the column went on reckoning.


However, the excitement intensified, not only did the currents drift in unusual directions, but also the propellers of the destroyers were often above the waves, spinning idle. This also had an effect on the calculations, increasing the discrepancy between the true and estimated location of the squadron.

As the ship moves, a calculation error accumulates: the greater the distance traveled from the starting point, the less accurate the result of calculating the current location. This occurs for various reasons, both objective (lateral drift of the ship by the current or the wind, a decrease or increase in true speed due to the same factors), and subjective (all kinds of errors of the navigator).

Therefore, as you move, you need regular location updates. When sailing along the coast, the easiest way is available: observing coastal landmarks with known coordinates, for example, lighthouses. The purpose of clarifying the ship's location could also serve as a measurement of depth. But this is so ... for those who are not entirely sure of their calculations or too cautious. Sea wolves act differently.

At 20:00, when the flotilla had been on the campaign for 13 hours, the flagship handed over its estimated coordinates to the commanders of the ships, but did not require them to indicate their place, although he was obliged to do so.

Of course, on some ships, navigators noticed discrepancies between their own plotting of the course and the flagship data, but no one got to correct the coordinates. The initiative was punishable in the armies and navy at all times, and the American was no exception. Well, everyone was silent. Suddenly Watson will become Admiral?

And following this course, an hour later, at 21:00, Watson ordered the Delphi to turn east towards the Santa Barbara Strait. The wake column followed the flagship.

Five minutes later, Delphi crashed into Point Honda rock at a speed of 20 knots and plowed the bottom on the starboard side. A fire broke out in the engine room, three people died from injuries sustained in a collision.

Following the Delphi, Somers and Farragut hit the rocks. They were much more fortunate, the Somers managed to stop altogether, and the Farragut bounced off a cliff and ran aground, with which he was able to independently get off. There were no casualties on these destroyers.

"FROM. P. Lee, who was walking in the wake of the Delphi, managed to turn away by some miracle and did not crash into the flagship, but found his rock. He could not escape from the cliff. There were no victims either.





At the stern so cute packs of deep bombs look ...

The destroyer "Young". Many eyewitnesses had the opinion that either there was no one on the bridge, or everyone was numb, because the ship did not make the slightest attempt to leave the rocks. As a result, the hull was torn, water gushed inside, the "Young" fell on the starboard side. Killed 20 crew members.

The Woodbury turned right and calmly sat on a nearby rock. "Nicholas" also turned right, ran into a rock and broke in half. There were many wounded on both ships, but no one was killed.

But the show didn’t end there. The Farragut, falling down from the stones, so energetically handed back that it ran into the Fuller coming from behind. And surprisingly, “Farragut” crushed a new bucket, escaping with a slight startle, but “Fuller”, trying to avoid a collision, also expectedly hit a rock and flooded the engine room.

The Chauncey managed to stop, but then set off and went ahead in order to help the ships in trouble. And, of course, also sat on the stones.




Percival, Kennedy, Paul Hamilton, Stoddart, Thompson escaped the rocks.






























































A rescue operation was launched, and all the crews of the ships involved in the accident ended up on the shore.


All fourteen captains and eleven other officers fell under the tribunal. The court found three guilty: Watson, the flag navigator Hunter and the commander of Nicholas Resh. For company.

The most interesting thing is the sentences. No one was shot, imprisoned, expelled from service. They just didn’t even fire anyone. The penalty was the delay in awarding the next rank. Watson, however, was taken far away from the ships, and he ended up serving as assistant commandant of the 14th Naval District, which was located in Hawaii. And in 1929 he retired.

In fact, a surprisingly mild sentence to gouges who wrecked 7 ships worth $ 10 million in old money.

There is a version that relatives helped here. The fact is that the mother of captain Watson, Germine Carey Gratz, had a sister, Helen Gratz, who married Godfrey Lewis Rockefeller ... Yes, the son of William Rockefeller Jr., the younger brother of "the same" John Davison Rockefeller ...

Although it is possible that Watson’s family ties had absolutely nothing to do with it. The court, a democratic and humane American court, took into account fog, storm, imperfect communication systems ...

It remains only to say that the remains of seven new ships after the evacuation of all the equipment that survived and could be taken out were sold to the scrap metal merchant for $ 1. That is approximately 035 current dollars.
Ctrl Enter

Noticed a mistake Highlight text and press. Ctrl + Enter

63 comments
Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must to register.

I have an account? Sign in

  1. rich 4 March 2020 18: 24 New
    • 17
    • 0
    +17
    Roman, thanks for the article. I read it with interest. Did not know much before
    Such material with detailed illustrations and diagrams is precisely what VO has always been famous for.
  2. Rurikovich 4 March 2020 18: 36 New
    • 10
    • 3
    +7
    good laughing
    Heap gone laughing
    Interestingly, if today the Yankees planted some kind of thread of their vessels on the rocks from the heels, would Putin be blamed for this or not? what laughing
    Plus, written in living language good
    PS Moral - so can a cook manage the state?
    1. sabakina 4 March 2020 18: 46 New
      • 5
      • 1
      +4
      Quote: Rurikovich
      PS Moral - so can a cook manage the state?

      1. Rurikovich 4 March 2020 19: 02 New
        • 12
        • 0
        +12
        good laughing laughing laughing Respect to Vasily Ivanovich! Well, about the American "hero" we can say this:
        "There is no such donkey in the world who, contemplating his reflection in a puddle, did not find the devil of a horse in himself"
        smile
        1. volodimer 5 March 2020 10: 05 New
          • 5
          • 0
          +5
          The British were noted earlier. "Battle" on the island of May.
          The largest catastrophe in the history of diving occurred on January 31, 1918, but the general public became aware of it only 14 years later, in 1932. For such a long time, the British Admiralty kept secret information about the death of two of the latest submarines of the time, damage to three more submarines and two surface ships, the death of 115 officers and sailors.
          Welcome hi
    2. nemoXX 5 March 2020 22: 00 New
      • 0
      • 2
      -2
      Stupid statement of the question!
      If today 5 Russian ships ran into the cliffs - would there be other versions, except how "the Americans are to blame"?
      1. Rurikovich 5 March 2020 22: 07 New
        • 0
        • 1
        -1
        Quote: nemoXX
        If today there are 5 Russian ships

        This is said for those who understand the humor and love of the Western media recently blaming the Russians for everything. wink tongue
    3. zenion April 23 2020 18: 17 New
      • 0
      • 0
      0
      You probably don’t remember how the American squadron ordered the lighthouse to get out of their way? This is not a fairy tale, these are Americans.
      1. Rurikovich April 23 2020 18: 33 New
        • 0
        • 0
        0
        Quote: zenion
        This is not a fairy tale, these are Americans.

        I watch and listen to a lot of different kinds of news, both political and economic. And the rehearsals of the American judicial system are especially interesting. Because recently, "American" for me is almost a diagnosis wassat lol request
  3. ABM
    ABM 4 March 2020 19: 02 New
    • 6
    • 2
    +4
    I have not heard this story. Interesting
  4. Thrifty 4 March 2020 19: 07 New
    • 7
    • 1
    +6
    Strange, that’s why I look at American destroyers, but I see in them a huge similarity with our Noviks ???
    1. Alf
      Alf 4 March 2020 19: 48 New
      • 12
      • 2
      +10
      Quote: Thrifty
      Strange, that’s why I look at American destroyers, but I see in them a huge similarity with our Noviks ???

      Maybe because the same requirements give rise to the same look? MIG-15 is also similar to Saber.
      1. Alf
        Alf 4 March 2020 20: 16 New
        • 8
        • 1
        +7
        Quote: Alf
        Quote: Thrifty
        Strange, that’s why I look at American destroyers, but I see in them a huge similarity with our Noviks ???

        Maybe because the same requirements give rise to the same look? MIG-15 is also similar to Saber.

        Does the minded have something to object to?
    2. denplot 4 March 2020 19: 49 New
      • 7
      • 2
      +5
      “Novik” set a trend in due time. It was a really successful and modern ship. Started to imitate
      1. Ryaruav 4 March 2020 20: 35 New
        • 1
        • 6
        -5
        newcomers do not have a good arrangement of artillery
        1. denplot 4 March 2020 22: 07 New
          • 3
          • 2
          +1
          Why unsuccessful? In addition, the composition of the artillery is different for different series.
          1. Saxahorse 4 March 2020 22: 38 New
            • 2
            • 0
            +2
            Quote: denplot
            Why unsuccessful? In addition, the composition of the artillery is different for different series.

            Extremely unsuccessful, generally thought badly. Bunches of guns came across like a radish. laughing
            1. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 11 New
              • 1
              • 1
              0
              According to the original draft, there were 2 guns. Then they screwed up another 2. Where it was possible, they screwed it up there. It is unclear why, arming the Novik instead of 2 cannons of 4, the following series were designed again for 2 cannons. I had to supplement again. But this did not spoil the ships)).
              1. denplot 5 March 2020 21: 17 New
                • 2
                • 1
                +1
                Fighting different views on the concept of using Novik-class destroyers. In the tactical assignment of the MGS, the appointment of new destroyers is a powerful torpedo strike by a division of 4-5 ships. Therefore, in the series for the Black Sea Fleet they put 3, and for the Baltic 2 guns. It was believed that the number of torpedoes was more important than the number of guns. But the war made adjustments and the number of guns increased. On the Izyaslav type, even up to 5.
    3. Ryaruav 4 March 2020 20: 32 New
      • 2
      • 0
      +2
      newcomers do not have a rhombic arrangement of gk and not a chess arrangement
      1. denplot 4 March 2020 22: 07 New
        • 2
        • 1
        +1
        This is like the most interesting thing for what?
    4. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 08 New
      • 1
      • 0
      +1
      Well, American smooth-deckers, well, they don’t look like Noviki at all. And above all, because they are smooth-deck. The location of artillery and TA is generally different.
      It must be understood that the British at the same time built destroyers no worse than the Novikov in huge quantities.
    5. nemoXX 5 March 2020 22: 03 New
      • 0
      • 6
      -6
      Because, "backward tsarist" Russia was ahead of the United States by almost 10 years in the creation of modern destroyers!
      I had to slow it down by planting Bolshevism so as not to overtake too much.
    6. Usher 7 March 2020 08: 55 New
      • 0
      • 0
      0
      Quote: Thrifty
      Strange, that’s why I look at American destroyers, but I see in them a huge similarity with our Noviks ???

      Nothing in common except that they are ships and class one. The location of the GK and TA is different, the design of the case is different.
  5. Bagalan52 4 March 2020 19: 27 New
    • 10
    • 0
    +10
    The USS San Diego armored cruiser was lost during the transition from Portsmouth to New York. He blew up and sank off the east coast of the United States on July 19, 1918 in just 28 minutes. Killed 6 crew members. Most likely, the cause of the death of the cruiser was one of the mines, shortly before being exposed by the German submarine U-156 off the southern coast of Long Island.
  6. sharp-lad 4 March 2020 20: 29 New
    • 7
    • 0
    +7
    Enchanting bad luck. belay
  7. Petrol cutter 4 March 2020 20: 40 New
    • 7
    • 0
    +7
    I didn’t even know about such events.
    A terrible sight for shipbuilding. Depressing.
    In the place of Comrade Watson, I would take the Nagant and shoot myself. Without waiting for the proceedings. Bo is not even a fiasco. This is the end!!! sad
    1. Svarog51 4 March 2020 21: 10 New
      • 11
      • 0
      +11
      R'RёS,R ° F "RёR№ hi Only calm! This does not threaten you. You are already Rear Admiral, and Watson went to him, but ran into the rocks. wink
    2. tihonmarine 4 March 2020 21: 11 New
      • 4
      • 0
      +4
      Quote: Benzorez
      In the place of Comrade Watson, I would take the Nagant and shoot myself. Without waiting for the proceedings. Bo is the end!

      The American is not Japanese, he will not do hara-kiri. And how many ships in the world are sinking.
      1. Petrol cutter 4 March 2020 21: 30 New
        • 6
        • 0
        +6
        Duck, drowning, something drowning. And here, under your wise guidance, such sorrows formed, and even in such a massive order!
        As one friend of mine says: I don’t even know what to tell you! ...
        Such things ... It’s not the right way to weld, however ...
        1. tihonmarine 4 March 2020 22: 05 New
          • 1
          • 1
          0
          Quote: Benzorez
          And here, under your wise guidance, such sorrows formed, and even in such a massive order!

          It’s with Hitler, they were shot for the loss of military equipment, and with minke whales only a reprimand without entering into a private matter.
          1. Petrol cutter 4 March 2020 22: 22 New
            • 5
            • 1
            +4
            Where is this world heading! Oh my God. And these people are trying to steer the WORLD ... recourse
          2. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 38 New
            • 1
            • 0
            +1
            They had nothing to worry about. They set up so many of these smooth decks that they could not count. There was nowhere to go. Trained sailors. And you go, the fleet was created.
        2. pacific 22 June 2020 13: 38 New
          • 0
          • 0
          0
          In the Baltic, before WWI, they also learned to walk in skerries on coal EMs like the Border Guard. Then, too, a lot of EM crippled. True, they did not lose a single one, but holes and damages to the helm-steering group were not uncommon. Debriefing of course was, but I did not come across information about the punishments of commanders for these navigational accidents.
  8. businessv 4 March 2020 21: 03 New
    • 6
    • 1
    +5
    It remains only to say that the remains of seven new ships after the evacuation of all the equipment that survived and could be taken out were sold to the scrap metal merchant for $ 1. That is approximately 035 current dollars.
    Roman, thank you very much for the article! I really enjoyed the real, but nevertheless fascinating, tragic, but at the same time comic story! I heard about it for the first time, since it is far from the Navy. Based on personal experience, I believed that in peacetime there was more gouging than our military does not happen, but you were able to calm me down great! Thank!!! good
  9. tihonmarine 4 March 2020 21: 17 New
    • 1
    • 1
    0
    Good, competent article. Thank.
  10. fa2998 4 March 2020 21: 44 New
    • 1
    • 0
    +1
    Interestingly, I did not know about such a massacre. Thank you! hi
  11. Undecim 4 March 2020 22: 10 New
    • 8
    • 0
    +8
    Although it is possible that Watson’s family ties had absolutely nothing to do with it. The court, a democratic and humane American court, took into account fog, storm, imperfect communication systems ...
    The most important thing that the court took into account was that Watson took all the blame on himself, affirming under oath that he and his actions were solely to blame for the incident. All the rest carried out only his instructions.
    1. Catfish 4 March 2020 23: 44 New
      • 4
      • 1
      +3
      I don’t want to say anything bad, but for a moment I imagined what the consequences would be if there had been a similar accident in the USSR in the same years and on the same scale.
      Info for the cheers-patriots: "mattresses, pi - s about in and Anglo-Saxons I hate until you turn blue." no
  12. Saxahorse 4 March 2020 22: 41 New
    • 2
    • 0
    +2
    Great article! thanks to the author !! The set of photographs is generally excellent, all the most interesting about this incident.

    Classic epic file! Directly asked for in textbooks. On the topic of how not to manage the connection of ships.
    1. Bagalan52 4 March 2020 22: 54 New
      • 6
      • 0
      +6
      For 28 years before landing on the stones of the American group of destroyers there was also a "collective" landing of ships aground. In November 1895, out of 7 battleships of the French Mediterranean squadron, commanded by Vice Admiral Gervais, 4 ran aground. Then this "unprecedented event in the annals of the European fleets" served for a long time as the grudge of the day of the French press and the press of other countries.
      But there were a number of extenuating circumstances in the landing of the battleships. First of all, the reason for the ships landing aground was that the shallow depths at the landing site were not indicated on the map. Then, to prevent the landing of other ships, the squadron commander promptly issued the necessary signals. Finally, all 4 ships were pretty quickly taken aground under the guidance of the squadron commander himself. That is why none of the commanders of the battleships and the squadron commander himself suffered any punishment, although this case was considered in various instances. They also took into account the fact that not one of the battleships received any damage, and there were no casualties.
    2. Catfish 4 March 2020 23: 38 New
      • 7
      • 0
      +7
      So he is in all textbooks and is present, how to get around this. request
      Hmm, Admiral Watson never became, but nevertheless immortalized himself ... in the same ranks with Herostratus.
      1. Saxahorse 5 March 2020 00: 13 New
        • 4
        • 0
        +4
        Quote: Sea Cat
        Admiral Watson did not become, but nevertheless immortalized himself ...

        According to the mind, it was necessary to ask ship commanders there. Moreover, some navigators noticed a difference in turn time from the calculated one. (The author flattered Watson by recalling the tsunami .. His flagship navigator was simply mistaken.)

        What is characteristic, nobody dared to teach the flagship. request
        1. Catfish 5 March 2020 00: 19 New
          • 2
          • 0
          +2
          Yes, as for the commanders, conclusions must have been drawn, but to judge them somehow, since Watson took all the blame.
          1. Saxahorse 5 March 2020 00: 26 New
            • 3
            • 0
            +3
            Quote: Sea Cat
            but to judge them somehow, since Watson took all the blame.

            Formally, each commander is personally responsible for his ship. But apparently the navy really wanted to hush up this matter, so they closed their eyes to everything that is possible. :)
            1. Catfish 5 March 2020 00: 30 New
              • 4
              • 0
              +4
              I agree, and this is natural, no one likes to "make dirty linen in public." General rule for all countries and peoples. smile
  13. bandabas 4 March 2020 23: 09 New
    • 0
    • 0
    0
    Yes uzhzhzh ....
  14. alsoclean 4 March 2020 23: 51 New
    • 10
    • 0
    +10
    Here the other day there was an article about cruisers like Hawkins. Including the death of the cruiser Raleigh at Labrador. By the way, when evacuating hp 10 people died. But stupidity did not end there. 6 years later, the British Admiralty sends the Dauntless cruiser to the place of loss of life with the Raleigh. To erect a monument there, he was on board. On July 2, at about 14 p.m. in foggy weather, Dauntless himself jumped out onto the rocks — about the same. With great difficulty they saved ..... So the Britons can if that wassat
  15. kig
    kig 5 March 2020 03: 56 New
    • 4
    • 0
    +4
    Well, in addition:

    Captain Watson ... was commended by his peers and the government for assuming full responsibility for the disaster at Honda Point. He could have tried to blame a variety of factors for the disaster, but instead, he set an example for those others by accepting the responsibility entirely on his shoulders.

    I translate it this way: Watson's colleagues showed him respect for not kicking, not referring to many factors that led to such a sad result, and completely accepted the blame.
  16. Alex_59 5 March 2020 08: 12 New
    • 1
    • 0
    +1
    Sergei “our all” Georgievich Gorshkov, too, was a weirdo in his youth. The destroyer "Resolute" knows.
    So everyone misfires. It is human nature, etc.
    1. Alexey RA 5 March 2020 11: 41 New
      • 4
      • 0
      +4
      Quote: Alex_59
      Sergei “our all” Georgievich Gorshkov, too, was a weirdo in his youth. The destroyer "Resolute" knows.

      Oh yes ... to break on stones when towing the first and only “seven” Pacific Fleet at that time, not everyone is given.
      1. Alex_59 5 March 2020 12: 54 New
        • 1
        • 0
        +1
        Quote: Alexey RA
        to break on stones when towing the first and only “seven” Pacific Fleet at that time, not everyone is given.

        And they didn’t punish either. Even without Rockefeller relatives))
  17. Dmitry V. 5 March 2020 13: 35 New
    • 2
    • 0
    +2
    The author writes:
    the most advanced equipment, an analogue of modern GPS, which really made it possible to safely navigate ships from point A to point B.

    Immediately contradicts himself:
    At 14:15, the Point Arguello bearing station gave the squadron an azimuth of 167 degrees. According to the azimuth given to Delphi, the destroyers were south of Arguello lighthouse, while they were only approaching it from the north. Before it was possible to establish the true azimuth, a rather long radio exchange took place. Yes, Hunter had real complaints about the direction finding system, which in 1923 was generally normal. The imperfection of the equipment is quite an everyday matter.


    And one azimuth does not make it possible to determine the location, radio triangulation requires a minimum of two beacons to determine the approximate location - 1923 - radio navigation in its infancy. Bearing errors are huge.
    The method for determining that time - the amplitude (most likely to the maximum) - errors could be 3-5 degrees of angular magnitude depending on the distance from the beacon - tens of kilometers.
    There was every reason not to trust the new system.
    1. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 28 New
      • 1
      • 0
      +1
      Yes, 3-5 degrees of error on a small ship even for a compass (as well as a direction finder) for happiness. And then in calm water. Two bearings to determine the location - this is enough to be careful in a dangerous area. The sea is flat.
      1. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 29 New
        • 0
        • 0
        0
        The whole world was opened with 32 rumba (((on the card. And it was enough.
  18. Dmitry V. 5 March 2020 13: 46 New
    • 1
    • 0
    +1
    And in our age of GPS and well-studied bottom topography, there are precedents:

    USS San Francisco (SSN-711)
    On January 8, 2005 at 02:43 GMT, a San Francisco submarine 675 kilometers (364 miles, 420 miles) southeast of Guam at a speed of 30 knots, at a depth of 160 m, collided with an underwater cliff.

    The area and bottom topography have not been well explored.

    guilty of a collision of a submarine with a seamount, the submarine commander Kevin Mooney Muni was dismissed and received a written reprimand, which “will damage his career,” the newspaper said. Selton told the newspaper that, in the opinion of Vice Admiral Jonathan Grinert, commander of the 7th Fleet of the US Navy, several important procedures for planning the navigational work and route were not performed while following the submarine “aboard the San Francisco”. “By not enforcing these standard procedures, Muni endangered his ship.”
    1. Alf
      Alf 5 March 2020 19: 27 New
      • 1
      • 1
      0
      Quote: Dmitry Vladimirovich
      at a speed of 30 knots, at a depth of 160m collided with an underwater rock.

      Where is she in such a hurry? Did the crew really want a fresh beer? Or impatient for women?
  19. mmaxx 5 March 2020 15: 24 New
    • 2
    • 0
    +2
    Such cases are not unique. The British sank a bunch of ships in this way. Even armadillos.
    Our seaman is no better. "Novik" lane into the fog 33 knots. Only slowed down, flew to the stones. In the 15th year. “Zabiyaka”, a little later, also flew in good progress. Orpheus, who saved him from the stones, flew back to the stones when he returned home.
    In general, at that level of navigation, dashing commanders planted their destroyers wholesale and retail.
    Even in modern times, commanders are crazy.
    1. Alexey RA 5 March 2020 17: 44 New
      • 1
      • 0
      +1
      Quote: mmaxx
      Our seaman is no better. "Novik" lane into the fog 33 knots. Only slowed down, flew to the stones. In the 15th year. “Zabiyaka”, a little later, also flew in good progress. Orpheus, who saved him from the stones, flew back to the stones when he returned home.

      You can still recall larger ships: flying on the rocks in the Bogatyr nuclear explosives and driving along the Fare bank in the Rurik-II WWII. Or the German Magdeburg. smile

      And if you recall the connections of the ships ditched by the commanders, then the German 10th EM flotilla in WWI and her round trip by mines.
  20. nemoXX 5 March 2020 22: 15 New
    • 2
    • 1
    +1
    I do not quite understand the passionate desire of the "Soviet" to certainly execute the American candidate for admiral for the miserable 7 destroyers!
    ALL Soviet admirals, taken together for the entire 2nd World War (and from 1919 to this day) failed to sink a single (!) Enemy warship, larger than the British destroyer Vitoria with / and 1300 tons in 1919.
    Moreover, if you have a formally, fairly strong and very cheap fleet!
    And nothing - "immortalized" in the names of warships, not being seen in any serious naval battle.
    And the ships lost, and the nuclear submarines drowned ... anyway, "heroes".
    Here is what, it would be necessary, to evaluate and comprehend, and not blame the "Americans".
    1. Alexey RA 6 March 2020 12: 38 New
      • 0
      • 0
      0
      Quote: nemoXX
      ALL Soviet admirals, taken together for the entire 2nd World War (and from 1919 to this day) failed to sink a single (!) Enemy warship, larger than the British destroyer Vitoria with / and 1300 tons in 1919.

      Ahem ... actually, there was also the MM T-31, drowned by Soviet TCAs in the Baltic.
  21. Bagalan52 6 March 2020 17: 52 New
    • 0
    • 0
    0
    Quote: Alexey RA
    Ahem ... actually, there was also the MM T-31, drowned by Soviet TCAs in the Baltic.

    You can add the minigun “Konigen Louise” (3300t.) In 1941, the floating battery “Niobe” (3500t.) In Kotka 1944, the KVVP “Orion” (15700t.) In 1945 and so on trifles (PL, SKR, OPL, etc. .)
  22. xomaNN 14 March 2020 23: 20 New
    • 0
    • 0
    0
    Yes, these Yankees in those years in the Soviet Navy! Then they would have felt, as if, at best, they had been "turned out by a hedgehog out." But rather - "to the wall"!