“Criminal” and “Drinking”. Why NATO gives ridiculous nicknames for Russian weapons


NATO has always been very closely following any news from Soviet and Russian weapons and military equipment. Even a special codification has been developed, and the names of the Russian aircraft or air defense systems give the most inexplicable.


When the North Atlantic Alliance learned about the latest Russian development - the fifth-generation fighter Su-57, he was immediately given the code name Felon: “Criminal”, “Criminal”. Perhaps such associations of the alliance officers were prompted by the invulnerability of the aircraft, or perhaps they were simply struck by the "audacity" with which Russia furnishes the West on the military-industrial front.

In 1986, a fourth-generation intercontinental ballistic missile R-36M2 Voyevoda was tested at Baikonur. In NATO, she was immediately called "Satan." The Russian missile system RT-2PM2 "Topol-M" was named "Sickle", and the famous anti-aircraft missile system S-400 "Triumph" - Growler, that is, "Grumble". But if “Satan” and “Criminal” still carry some charge of hatred and fear at the same time, then it’s quite difficult to explain the other code names of Russian and Soviet weapons.

Guess what NATO officers mean by Pan. Maybe some kind of field kitchen? No, they didn’t guess. This is the name of the passenger aircraft Tu-124, used at the time of the Soviet military transport aviation. IL-86, also equipped with Soviet military transport aircraft, was called Camber - "Curved", "Convex." Although it was curved or convex no more than other transport aircraft of that time.

Operating at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Yak-28 multipurpose supersonic military jet aircraft in NATO codification was for some reason designated as Brewer - "Brewer", and the first Tu-22 model was even thought to be called Blinder - "Buster".

By the way, ordinary American soldiers first called the Tu-22 "Pretty Woman", but when the higher command found out about it, they immediately stopped such amateur activity and established the only official designation - "Drinking".

For some reason, the Ka-25, a Soviet ship-based anti-submarine helicopter in the codification of the North Atlantic Alliance, was called Hormone - "Hormone", but the Ka-50 - the famous "Black Shark" - has the more impressive name "Werewolf" or "Deceiver" in the West .

What explains the similar codification of Russian military equipment? One of the explanations that one often hears is that it is allegedly difficult for officers and generals of the army of the alliance to remember Russian-language abbreviations, they often confuse them with each other, and for their own convenience they came up with such designations.

But in fact, the reason for introducing codification is really serious. Each type of military equipment is indicated by a word starting with a certain letter. For example, fighters are designated by words starting with the letter F - and this is the “Criminal” Felon Su-57, and the MiG-17 with the much more strange name Fresco - “Fresco”.

Exactly the same model is codified by bombers, helicopters, transport aircraft, missiles, and so on. Therefore, the logic of such names is. When any soldier hears the designation, he immediately understands that we are talking about one of the types of fighters, helicopters, bombers. Moreover, by the number of syllables in a word, a soldier understands whether it is a piston or jet aircraft.

As for the general dismissive connotation of code names, NATO is convinced: giving unflattering names to military equipment and weapons of the enemy, they seem to “lower” them in the eyes of the military, laugh at the enemy and strengthen the morale of the personnel of their own armies.
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  1. Kuroneko 31 January 2020 04: 59 New
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    But in fact, the reason for introducing codification is really serious. Each type of military equipment is indicated by a word starting with a certain letter. For example, fighters are designated by words starting with the letter F - and this is the “Criminal” Felon Su-57, and the MiG-17 with the much more strange name Fresco - “Fresco”.
    Moreover, by the number of syllables in a word, a soldier understands whether it is a piston or jet aircraft.

    The author should also add that the designation in general should have no more than two syllables - for brevity in war is not a whim, but an urgent need.
    1. Hunter 2 31 January 2020 05: 22 New
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      Buddy has a favorite saying: Call at least Buoy (censorship) - Only more often Lick! laughing laughing repeat
      Buoy - a float attached to the bottom ...
    2. Finn 31 January 2020 16: 49 New
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      Brevity on the battlefield is important. Therefore, the Chinese and Japanese have nothing to catch. Ours will simply shout into the air "on the right e ** sh" and the enemy, not having time to say "youbian qiängji shijiän tänke" - everything, ours have already been shot.
    3. fyvaprold 31 January 2020 20: 35 New
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      Quote: Kuroneko
      But in fact, the reason for introducing codification is really serious. Each type of military equipment is indicated by a word starting with a certain letter. For example, fighters are designated by words starting with the letter F - and this is the “Criminal” Felon Su-57, and the MiG-17 with the much more strange name Fresco - “Fresco”.
      Moreover, by the number of syllables in a word, a soldier understands whether it is a piston or jet aircraft.

      The author should also add that the designation in general should have no more than two syllables - for brevity in war is not a whim, but an urgent need.

      The author of the "game" added. Take, for example, a "masterpiece":
      Tu-22 generally thought of calling Blinder - "Drinking".

      So “Blinder” is “Blind Man”, but in Polonsky’s version, “Drinking”. Where did the author learn English? In the video salon? belay
      1. Prisoner 31 January 2020 21: 22 New
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        If we take into account that the Tu-22 has almost half a thousand liters of “sword” on board, then the “Drinking” sounds somehow more organic than some vulgar “Blind”. laughing
        1. Range 31 January 2020 22: 29 New
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          It is necessary to give a counter name for the FU-35 "Garbage".
          1. cradle 1 February 2020 02: 35 New
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            or "sediment" laughing
      2. peta locksmith 1 February 2020 03: 50 New
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        video salon?
        kiosk at the bus stop
      3. Fitter65 2 February 2020 02: 01 New
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        Quote: fyvaprold
        So “Blinder” is “Blind Man”, but in Polonsky’s version, “Drinking”. Where did the author learn English? In the video salon?

        We open Google, you are not banned there I hope? Read
        volume_upblinder {noun} RU
        physically attractive woman
        volume_upblind {adj.} RU
        blind not giving information about himself
        another option
        blinder (also: buster, debauch, hellbender, revelry) volume_up
        blindervolume_up eye cup [eyecup] {m}
        blindervolume_upspirushka {f}
        blinder
        No wonder in the old days it was said -KNOWLEDGE FORCE
        1. TANKISTONE 6 February 2020 14: 14 New
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          Fitter65 (Alexander.)


          Open Google
          A colleague searched Google for the meaning of the word gadget (I told him about M.N.Zadornov and his version). Found - email. device. But, it was necessary to search for the meaning of the word in the Oxford dictionary, because the word is old, then there was no electronics yet! (Sorry, REN-TV). So much for google!
    4. the most important 31 January 2020 22: 03 New
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      Quote: Kuroneko
      The author should also add that the designation in general should have no more than two syllables - for brevity in war is not a whim, but an urgent need.

      Well, do not lag behind the adversary. F-16 - Snot, B - 52 - The old man loudly farts (The program does not allow writing in one word), Aircraft carrier - Trough, Abrams - Bullshit! Briefly and clearly. On the right, evil bullshit creeps ... No artificial intelligence will immediately realize what it is about.
    5. anykin 31 January 2020 22: 32 New
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      Quote: Kuroneko
      the designation in general should have no more than two syllables

      For example, "n + u + n + d + o + s".
    6. Alex Nevs 1 February 2020 12: 12 New
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      It will then look funnier- Ridged away from the “snot”, blew it up with “dung”, managed it after the “drinking”, fed it “.....”, shacked it “....”. I think you’ll think of it yourself.
  2. Same lech 31 January 2020 05: 06 New
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    Our mentality is different from the NATO people, and there are such differences in the name of the weapon.
    If for us weapons are a means of protection, hence the affectionate names Tulip, Carnations and Acacia, Peonies and Hyacinths ... Chrysanthemum, etc.
    then for the Anglo-Saxons, weapons are a means of aggression and attack, and hence their awesome names ...
    At VO there was an article on this subject ...
    smile https://topwar.ru/13180-nesereznye-nazvaniya-sereznogo-oruzhiya.html
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 05: 37 New
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      “Criminal” and “Drinking”. Why NATO gives ridiculous nicknames for Russian weapons
      they have a poor vocabulary, there is also a "looking", a "fryer", a "urka", a chaos, a dad, a master ... wassat By the way, it’s interesting to know how our nonchs are calling out okromy “penguins”, all kinds of “foreign cars”? winked
      1. NEXUS 31 January 2020 11: 32 New
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        Quote: Aerodrome
        their vocabulary is scarce

        Here I propose, for example, Sarmat to call Edren Baton ... let him break your head with a translation. wassat
    2. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 05: 39 New
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      Quote: The same Lech
      Our mentality is different from the NATO people, and there are such differences in the name of the weapon.
      If for us weapons are a means of protection, hence the affectionate names Tulip, Carnations and Acacia, Peonies and Hyacinths ... Chrysanthemum, etc.
      then for the Anglo-Saxons, weapons are a means of aggression and attack, and hence their awesome names ...
      At VO there was an article on this subject ...
      smile https://topwar.ru/13180-nesereznye-nazvaniya-sereznogo-oruzhiya.html

      how do they translate "pinocchio"? wassat
      1. Kuroneko 31 January 2020 06: 34 New
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        Quote: Aerodrome
        how do they translate "pinocchio"?

        No way. Armored vehicles and tanks in the NATO system usually do not have nicknames, because For some reason, the bourgeoisie are quite happy with them for our system of notation. Although there are exceptions - for example, "Tunguska" (SA-19 ​​"Grison"). But again, the nickname was given most likely because it still refers to "counterair "subject - and the NATO notation system is unevenly breathing precisely to everything flying (and sea).
        1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 06: 58 New
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          Quote: Kuroneko
          Yes way.

          officially yes ... but on the sidelines I suspect ...
          1. Kuroneko 31 January 2020 07: 02 New
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            And also xs, because the same Yankees in the KMP and in the army have their unofficial slang historically quite different.
      2. Golddigger 96 31 January 2020 06: 40 New
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        It’s not a good joke, especially to our Pinocchio
      3. NEXUS 31 January 2020 11: 12 New
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        Quote: Aerodrome
        how do they translate "pinocchio"?

        By the way, if sclerosis does not change me, then Pinocchio is practically unchanged. As for the other names ... let them exercise as they want. The essence of this from our weapons does not change.
        1. Mikhail m 1 February 2020 16: 51 New
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          Quote: NEXUS
          The essence of this from our weapons does not change.
          The essence does not change, it’s just all the time that it is outraged that in almost all articles about our weapons, except for our name, the authors consider it necessary to blunt the name according to NATO classification. Are you afraid that the enemy will get confused? There is a proposal to spit on their classification and forget forever. It's time to use your mind without looking back to the west.
    3. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 05: 42 New
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      Quote: The same Lech
      for Anglo-Saxons, weapons are a means of aggression and attack, and hence their awesome names.

      echoed: the Nazis loved this thing ... "tigers", "panthers", "elephants." Does not work.
      1. NEXUS 31 January 2020 11: 13 New
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        Quote: Aerodrome
        echoed: the Nazis loved this thing ... "tigers", "panthers", "elephants." Does not work.

        We had St. John's Wort on their cats.
    4. ccsr 31 January 2020 12: 22 New
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      Quote: The same Lech
      If for us weapons are a means of protection, hence the affectionate names Tulip, Carnations and Acacia, Peonies and Hyacinths ... Chrysanthemum, etc.
      then for the Anglo-Saxons, weapons are a means of aggression and attack, and hence their awesome names ...
      At VO there was an article on this subject ...

      I think that in that article the author himself obviously never chose the name of the development or modification of equipment or weapons, which is why he writes:
      The names of Russian weapons are often unusual, witty, and sometimes even flirty.

      In fact, the customer is given a list of names from which he can choose the name that he considers acceptable, and after this, the cipher is assigned to the new development, which will be used by civil structures at all stages from research to serial production. But what specific name according to the military classifier will be assigned to one or another model is decided on the basis of the classification adopted by the military, where certain letters and numbers are laid exactly. By the way, sometimes the same names of one or another development come across, but with a difference in years and types of weapons. So no one puts any originality in the name of this or that work. True, I know of a case when one R&D was named after a restaurant in which the successful completion of a previous development was washed, and that restaurant was called Zaseka.
      1. Alf
        Alf 31 January 2020 20: 40 New
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        Quote: ccsr
        True, I know of a case when one R&D was named after a restaurant in which the successful completion of a previous development was washed, and that restaurant was called Zaseka.

        Looks like they washed well ...
        1. ccsr 1 February 2020 11: 24 New
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          Quote: Alf
          Looks like they washed well ...

          I would not say the usual event of those times. There was such a tradition in Soviet times, when developers successfully completed research or development work, received awards, often quite decent, and invited customers to a banquet - after several years of working together, trusting relationships developed, and this did not contradict our traditions and did not worsen the quality of work.
          1. Alf
            Alf 1 February 2020 19: 06 New
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            Quote: ccsr
            Quote: Alf
            Looks like they washed well ...

            I would not say the usual event of those times. There was such a tradition in Soviet times, when developers successfully completed research or development work, received awards, often quite decent, and invited customers to a banquet - after several years of working together, trusting relationships developed, and this did not contradict our traditions and did not worsen the quality of work.

            I am well aware of such an event and do not consider it something indecent. I mean, such a wash is then a topic for jokes for the participants.
            '' Our comrade Sadchikov recently jumped like this in the club’s warehouse. " laughing
    5. Svetlana 31 January 2020 14: 34 New
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      >>> affectionate names Tulip, Carnations and Acacia, Peonies and Hyacinths ... Chrysanthemum, etc. <<<
      Affectionate are only pediment animated. Well, they can’t be called. hi
      1. Rostislav 31 January 2020 15: 19 New
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        "Sweet words". Is a word animate object?
  3. Errr 31 January 2020 05: 24 New
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    In this case, Blinder is not a "binge." smile
    The pilots had a poor view on the Tu-22, so the Americans called it “blind”, which is very logical.
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 05: 38 New
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      Quote: Herrr
      In this case, Blinder is not a "binge."
      The pilots had a poor view on the Tu-22, so the Americans called it “blind”, which is very logical.

      there is such a thing.
    2. NEXUS 31 January 2020 11: 14 New
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      Quote: Herrr
      The pilots had a poor view on the Tu-22, so the Americans called it “blind”, which is very logical.

      Well, we called him "Shilo".
      1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 11: 29 New
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        Quote: NEXUS
        Well, we called him "Shilo".

        pil.da ... killer thing! laughing
        1. Ka-52 3 February 2020 05: 41 New
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          pil.da ... killer thing!

          very doubtful. As "awl" some (by no means all, more often called "polets") called the plane itself. A mixture of water and alcohol 981800T in the air conditioning system VMSK called a sword. In the decanter (tu16), it was poured into azalea (jamming station SPS-64)
    3. Keyser soze 31 January 2020 13: 01 New
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      In this case, Blinder is not a "binge"


      Absolutely true. Also in the West they give the names of bombers always starting with the letter “B”, fighters on the “F” (fighter) and so on. And what should they call a technique if words are limited? I think there is no need to look for deep meaning here.
      1. Errr 31 January 2020 13: 12 New
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        Basically it is. They scorch nicknames in white light like a pretty penny. But from time to time, oddly enough, still fall into the very top of the shoe. wink
  4. Kamchatsky 31 January 2020 06: 00 New
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    Mikhail Nikolayevich Zadornov was right: the Amerz language is the transmission of information, no more. And in Russian - an explosion of emotions, a scattering of meanings.
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 06: 17 New
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      Quote: Kamchatka
      Mikhail Nikolayevich Zadornov was right: the Amerz language is the transmission of information, no more. And in Russian - an explosion of emotions, a scattering of meanings.

      and this is still without a mat. wassat
    2. Alex_59 31 January 2020 13: 15 New
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      Quote: Kamchatka
      Mikhail Nikolayevich Zadornov was right: the Amerz language is the transmission of information, no more. And in Russian - an explosion of emotions, a scattering of meanings.

      Zadornov greatly underestimates the Anglo-Saxons, including their ability to self-irony and use the English language for these purposes. For example, the aircraft carrier "Enterprise" called the patriotic American admiralty "Big E", and the sailor was cheerful in her disposition and her sharp tongue quickly modified this name. First to Biggy, then to Piggy, and eventually to Pig. laughing
      So it’s normal there they have everything with language.
  5. Gardamir 31 January 2020 06: 16 New
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    Nowadays, too much attention is paid to the opinion of the West. Yes, let them call, whatever they want. If only the action of the weapon was such as it was conceived by the developers.
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 06: 19 New
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      Quote: Gardamir
      If only the action of the weapon was such as it was conceived by the developers.

      if only THESE thought.
      1. Gardamir 31 January 2020 06: 21 New
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        Could be so.
  6. Ravik 31 January 2020 06: 27 New
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    Let's call them something like that.
    Are there really few beautiful and tender words in Russian?
  7. Amateur 31 January 2020 06: 36 New
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    The aircraft carrier Enterprise at one time had the call sign Climax. So the Americans are kidding themselves too.
    1. rich 31 January 2020 11: 49 New
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      The Chinese also called their aircraft carrier fun, and the popular vote on the Internet.
      the aircraft carrier was given the name mantis shrimp 皮皮 虾 (pipixia) - in Russian it is transcribed as "Pipi Xia." This cancer, by the way, is a famous culinary delicacy in China. smile
    2. Alex_59 31 January 2020 13: 17 New
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      Quote: Amateur
      The aircraft carrier Enterprise

      He is Big E, or Biggy for short. Or even more abbreviated as Piggy. Or even more briefly - Pig. And it's all the Americans themselves, not us))))
      He was also called Enterprison. Apparently, the service for the rank and file is far from paradise.
  8. Vladimir_2U 31 January 2020 06: 37 New
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    As for the general dismissive connotation of code names, NATO is convinced

    Mortars "Sled" or "Tray" also called NATO envious? wink
    1. Jager 1 February 2020 15: 55 New
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      "Sleds" quite accurately reflect the essence - a transportable mortar - carry it like a sled) "Tray" - is there a complete analogy here - a base plate than a tray?)
      1. Vladimir_2U 1 February 2020 17: 08 New
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        Yes, and mine enemy, get under your nose! Or, laughing on you, hyacinth on the coffin! An analogy that has no analogues.
  9. rotmistr60 31 January 2020 06: 54 New
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    If the classification of our weapons can still be understood, but this is not amenable to logic.
    the first Tu-22 model in general came up with the name Blinder - “Drinking”.
    Or maybe by the principle - who survived the bombardment can safely go into a bout?
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 11: 32 New
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      Quote: rotmistr60
      If the classification of our weapons can still be understood, but this is not amenable to logic.
      the first Tu-22 model in general came up with the name Blinder - “Drinking”.
      Or maybe by the principle - who survived the bombardment can safely go into a bout?

      second birthday, it is worth noting. yes
    2. Bersaglieri 1 February 2020 12: 39 New
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      Blinder- "Blind". This is where we got to the point: a view from the Tu-22 cockpit (not the M3, but the original one, some called "Shilo" in their native parts) - nothing that, when landing, is completely "not gut."
  10. EvilLion 31 January 2020 09: 07 New
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    They are introduced because of the frequent impossibility to determine the name (Su-57, for example, was dubbed quite late, and in Soviet times they could get a picture of some T-10 and not even know this designation) and the simplicity of understanding by ordinary Ji-ah what they’re about to deal with . Sometimes the names are funny, like Frogfoot sometimes we like, like the Fulcrum, and the crews of the Bears should flatter such a nickname.

    Well, Flanker isn’t what hunting wants to meet in battle.
    1. Aerodrome 31 January 2020 11: 36 New
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      Quote: EvilLion
      Well, Flanker isn’t what hunting wants to meet in battle.

      after Vietnam, they don’t want to meet at all. and therefore they hit air defense, and airfields in the first place.
  11. CommanderDIVA 31 January 2020 12: 29 New
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    But we are interested in the conventional designations of NATO technology? I didn’t hear something
  12. Bersaglieri 31 January 2020 12: 55 New
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    Randomly, according to the first letter of the nomenclature, where F-Fighter, A-Attack, B-Bomber, C-Cargo
    1. SovAr238A 31 January 2020 21: 32 New
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      Quote: Bersaglieri
      Randomly, according to the first letter of the nomenclature, where F-Fighter, A-Attack, B-Bomber, C-Cargo

      At least one normal and correct post ...
      Anti-aircraft mounts on G

      SA-3 GOA
      SA-4 GANEF
      SA-6 GAINFUL
      SA-7 GRAIL
      SA-8 GECKO
      SA-9 GASKIN
      SA-11 GADFLY
      SA-12 GLADIATOR
      SA-13 GOPHER
      SA-14 GREMLIN
      SA-15 GAUNTLET
      SA-16 GIMLET
      SA-17 GRIZZLY
      SA-18 GROUSE
      SA-19 ​​GRISON
      SA-22 GREYHOUND
      SA-24 Grinch
      SA-23 GIANT

      And so on.

      And the author of the article, who simply does not understand anything in military subjects, is a simpleton ...
      1. Bersaglieri 1 February 2020 12: 36 New
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        Well so, do not like "criterion" to study a materiel ...
  13. Bersaglieri 31 January 2020 12: 57 New
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    The native names of weapons themes and finished products are also funny :) For example, the "flower garden" in artillery. Or grenade launchers CH "Silence" and "Canary"
    1. sss
      sss 1 February 2020 09: 29 New
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      "Silence" is like, but in my opinion, it was removed from service. I wonder how quietly a grenade can explode?
  14. Old26 31 January 2020 13: 26 New
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    In 1986, at the Baikonur, a two-stage intercontinental ballistic missile of the fourth generation R-36M2 Voevoda was tested. In NATO, she was immediately called "Satan." Russian missile system RT-2PM2 "Topol-M" received the name "Sickle"

    The name "Satan" was not given to the R-36M2 Voyevoda ICBMs, but to the entire R-36M rocket family, that is, 15A14 (R-36M) and 15A18 (R-36M UTTKh), and of course the R-36M2 Voevoda (15A18M).
    In the same way, the name “Sickle” was given not only to RT-2PM2 “Topolu-M”, but originally to RT-2PM “Topolu”.

    In general, to look for the meaning in the names of technology, what they have, what we do not have any sense. There are nomenclature directories where all these names come from. And if the West even tries to justify giving the name to Soviet (Russian) technology by saying that it’s easier for the pilot to say “on your tail Fitter-E” than to say the phrase “On your tail Sukhoi-17 em X

    Quote: The same Lech
    Our mentality is different from the NATO people, and there are such differences in the name of the weapon.
    If for us weapons are a means of protection, hence the affectionate names Tulip, Carnations and Acacia, Peonies and Hyacinths ... Chrysanthemum, etc.

    The mentality is really different, but our names are sometimes not affectionate: “Eagle owl”, “Hawk”, “Kite”, and sometimes the name in general is not clear what they mean: Infauna, Slavyanover ...

    Quote: Aerodrome
    “Criminal” and “Drinking”. Why NATO gives ridiculous nicknames for Russian weapons
    they have a poor vocabulary, there is also a "looking", a "fryer", a "urka", a chaos, a dad, a master ... wassat By the way, it’s interesting to know how our nonchs are calling out okromy “penguins”, all kinds of “foreign cars”? winked

    Yeah. Therefore, they gave us several thousand names with a meager supply. And I repeat again. There are nomenclature guides, the names of which sometimes do not make sense, and most importantly, that one or another of our equipment, to which we give a name both at the level of research, and at the level of OCD and at the level of finished equipment, should not be associated with one or another technique. For example, with what can the name be associated, for example, "Tusks" or "Beladonna"?

    Quote: rotmistr60
    If the classification of our weapons can still be understood, but this is not amenable to logic.

    You can understand the logic embedded in our classifiers when an index is given, for example, 2Ahh or 11 Fhh. But by no means the names given to research and development work. There is no logic there either. One complex may have the name of a river (for example, “Oka” or “Volga”), the second was generally called “Pioneer”, and the third - “Speed”. As there is sometimes no logic in the names of our ships. When a series may include names that characterize a ship, for example, Grozny, another name is given in honor of the legendary cruiser, and the third is the name of the naval commander.

    Quote: CommanderDIVA
    But we are interested in the conventional designations of NATO technology? I didn’t hear something

    I also did not meet, and it makes no sense. It is we who secret both our names and our indices, and their names become known immediately after adoption. Moreover, what index do they have there - we often do not know, they are known by their names. Yes, and their classifier has been known to us almost since the 60s, but ours is still "the mystery of the seven seals." And only with the development of the Internet did our technology indices finally appear, by the way not secret ....
  15. prior 31 January 2020 13: 56 New
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    We copy the West so often that in the names of military equipment it’s a sin not to repeat their Western experience.
    They call ours, we assign slang names to their technique, in their own way, loving and with meaning.
    For example: not the F-35, but the “penguin”, not the F-22, but the “freak”, not dead, but the “trough” ..... and so on.
    The Russian language is rich, there is a decent name for any wunderwafer ....
  16. Rostislav 31 January 2020 15: 12 New
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    Yes, to neglect the enemy is the surest way to instill confidence in your soldiers.
  17. Sapsan136 31 January 2020 15: 16 New
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    Russophobia and the stupidity of the British convicts inhabiting the United States takes on various, absurd, shades ...
    1. Mikhalych 1 February 2020 13: 26 New
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      Russophobia and the stupidity of the British convicts living in the United States,

      Actually, British convicts will populate Australia.
      crying tongue
      1. Sapsan136 1 February 2020 13: 29 New
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        They were evicted to both Australia and the USA ... New York was originally Dutch and called New Amsterdam, after an unsuccessful war with England it was formally sold to the British and started ... All animals of England, murderers and repeat offenders were exiled to the USA and Australia .. In those days, exile in the colony was considered a heavy punishment ...
  18. alexey alexeyev_2 31 January 2020 15: 30 New
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    Yes, we also have our constructors, Hochmachi. A grenade with an underbarrel grenade launcher. Handcuffs, tenderness. Examples of darkness.
    1. agond 31 January 2020 17: 18 New
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      And WHY, in general, our journalists, observers and others constantly recall the Western classification of our weapons, alien to us, both to and from place and to out of place they repeat the nicknames for OUR weapons invented by someone in the West, they have absolutely no respect for their country, for those workers , engineers, scientists who created models of military equipment, or it was they who developed such a bad habit of imitation, and if you give a nickname to such a low-worshiped journalist or his children, he will probably be offended, will he?
      If someone believes that using someone else’s classification is a sign of professionalism, it’s not, it’s rather a sign of a parrot with a monkey.
      1. Alf
        Alf 31 January 2020 20: 44 New
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        Quote: agond
        they have absolutely no respect for their country,

        Judging by the frequency of expressions such as "Casting, cleaning manager, security, coffee break" it does not exist at all.
  19. Ros 56 31 January 2020 17: 04 New
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    Well dolbyotyatly what to take from them.
  20. meandr51 31 January 2020 22: 39 New
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    The meaningfulness of the name is sacrificed to sonority, brevity, entanglement and intelligibility of communication.
    Similarly, they form their callsigns. I think, and ours do the same. During the Second World War, the Messerschmitts were called "thin", the reconnaissance unit FV-189 was called the "frame."
  21. 75 Sergey 31 January 2020 22: 59 New
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    Well, you don’t have to invent and search for the secret meaning, they have to pronounce our SU-57, TU-22M3, TU-160 for a very long time and tedious, that’s what they say.
    This is just a symbol.
    1. ccsr 1 February 2020 11: 29 New
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      Quote: 75Sergey
      to pronounce them our SU-57, TU-22M3, TU-160 for a very long time and tedious, that’s what they say.

      Quite right - this is done precisely so that the human ear can distinguish a conventional name in an environment of noise and interference, which exist especially in the field.
  22. sss
    sss 1 February 2020 09: 37 New
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    "Topol-M" received the name "Sickle" - I like it. I wonder if they know the expression - "Sickle" causative place?
  23. Jurkovs 1 February 2020 11: 56 New
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    There is nothing to do with how they call names; this is their internal abominable affair. But that’s why we ape and very often repeat the names they invented. That is the question?
    1. RUBEY 1 February 2020 12: 41 New
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      And that religion does not allow its to be invented, otherwise our OCDs are sometimes no better. Take even our aviation pride - the Su-57. Not even a suitable name was invented to come up with.
  24. Mikhalych 1 February 2020 13: 22 New
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    Why NATO gives ridiculous nicknames to Russian weapons

    Why are they voiced at all in Russia? All their names must be ignored.
    stop
  25. Old26 1 February 2020 14: 17 New
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    Quote: prior
    We copy the West so often that in the names of military equipment it’s a sin not to repeat their Western experience.
    They call ours, we assign slang names to their technique, in their own way, loving and with meaning.
    For example: not the F-35, but the “penguin”, not the F-22, but the “freak”, not dead, but the “trough” ..... and so on.
    The Russian language is rich, there is a decent name for any wunderwafer ....

    Vlad! The names you listed are not officially accepted names. A "folk art." And I did not meet the official names of Western technology, given by us. We call them what they are called. Moreover, if we have appeared several names of Western technology as a result of "folk art" - this is a drop in the bucket. Well, we called their three "stealth" derogatory names. What next? You can list several dozen of their ballistic missiles, several dozen of their planes and ships, several hundred samples of riflemen. And we call everything the names that they have.
    So this is not a repetition of Western experience, but a pathetic attempt ...

    Quote: agond
    And WHY, in general, our journalists, observers and others constantly recall the Western classification of our weapons, alien to us, both to and from place and to out of place they repeat the nicknames for OUR weapons invented by someone in the West, they have absolutely no respect for their country, for those workers , engineers, scientists who created models of military equipment, or it was they who developed such a bad habit of imitation, and if you give a nickname to such a low-worshiped journalist or his children, he will probably be offended, will he?
    If someone believes that using someone else’s classification is a sign of professionalism, it’s not, it’s rather a sign of a parrot with a monkey.

    But because we do not know the overwhelming number of names of "themes" of our weapons. From the word at all. Therefore, sometimes to make it clear to everyone who is in the subject, it is easier to name the western name of the weapon and then detail it. And this is not about respect or disrespect for your country. For a long time, we simply did not know our designations, and the questions of research, design and development work or the names of finished samples were hardly known at all. This was especially true for samples of rocket, aviation and marine equipment. How many people will understand what I mean if, for example, I say the following. Was the work carried out as part of research work on the topic "Earth", or "Ural", or that the rocket was created on the basis of studies of the rocket on the theme "Hill"?
    1. 75 Sergey 2 February 2020 01: 10 New
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      We have a different mentality and thank God!
  26. Dima_Anlim 1 February 2020 15: 55 New
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    were struck by the "impudence" with which Russia furnishes the West on the military-industrial front.

    Question to the author - where does Russia furnish? Well, except for a hypersonic weapon and one that no one has yet seen in action? It is with SU-57 where exactly does Russia furnish the West? Why are such articles like that of this author laid out on a reputable VO resource?
  27. sagitch 1 February 2020 16: 57 New
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    This is a small part of the American plan for demonizing Russia. We should also call their weapons, so that it reflects their actions. F-35 - “bastard” from the word “crap”, aircraft carriers- “annexors”, cruise missiles - “termites” ..., well, that’s all.
  28. akarfoxhound 1 February 2020 19: 27 New
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    Theme sucked from the finger. In 3.14ndos, the names of the aircraft are simple sucked from the finger without the slightest nested meaning. All fighters with the letter F, bombers with B, transporters with C, attack aircraft A. And what word will they do not care, they choose from the dictionary, as from a random number generator. Su-25 frog foot, think conceived derogatory meaning? And his pandopolosatik A-10 Warthog, in the common people Thunderbolt - is it glorifying? And in the Migovsky Bassoon and subsequent Beater, Flankovy, etc., what is the difference?
  29. Old26 1 February 2020 20: 35 New
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    Quote: akarfoxhound
    Theme sucked from the finger.

    Moreover, this topic is not the first time. I frankly do not care, all these names. And if there is a need and it is convenient for me, I also use the American naming system. I use the NATO system much less frequently. Too lazy to remember all these names, especially for aviation. With rocketry simpler, unlike aviation, there are US designations, and not just NATO, and preliminary (temporary) designations at the test site (training grounds). This sometimes allows us to more accurately identify our technology ....
  30. rotkiv04 3 February 2020 18: 07 New
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    Well, we call them one capacious and exact name - pin
  31. Dedok 5 February 2020 07: 59 New
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    kindergarten - briefs with straps ...
  32. Zakonnik 30 June 2020 21: 45 New
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    Since childhood, I did not understand these names, and with age, misunderstanding grew into aversion. I began to delve into the Ov language a little (sorry, after they believe that our MiG-23 is normally called flogger, otherwise I will not call any version of English Ovsky). And here my misunderstanding became very deep. Well, to hell with them, with NATO. And ours, then, TV programs, for example, use these "nicknames" why? moreover, on completely seemingly patriotic channels, such as the same Star. Moreover, there is a one-hour transmission dedicated to one airplane, the whole message is like that, and they represent an airplane, for example, a MiG-31, according to the NATO classification of Foxhound ... Yes, WHAT does it matter to a resident of our country, what is his ENEMY calling? Who goes to international exhibitions, and so knows these vile nicknames, but why do ordinary people? But these vile nicknames are even used by official channels, and even in joint production with KB. And present it as the norm. As if not understanding that the flanker is humiliating, but not at all a wonderful fighter, which, of course, is the Su-27.