Military Review

The beginning of the legendary Crimean storm 1854 of the year

41
The beginning of the legendary Crimean storm 1854 of the year

Ships in Balaklava Bay


One of the first names of the Black Sea is the Pontus of Euxinus, i.e. the sea is inhospitable. And the sea got such a harsh name not only because of the warlike tribes inhabiting the coast. The Black Sea, the bluest in the world, is quite changeable and sometimes unpredictable. There are still legends among sailors about wandering Black Sea killer waves. Of course, all this is said with mocking skepticism, but a certain restraint is felt behind it. Besides, how do you know in the darkness of the storm if a flock of Harpies, daughters of the mighty god Borey, will fly out from under the keel? After all, the elements of the Black Sea periodically make a man reverence for his power. One of such days was November 14 of the 1854 year, i.e. in the midst of a bloody Crimean war.

Anxious waiting


November 1854 of the year. Russian troops are desperately defending Sevastopol, making attempts to unlock the fortified city. Anglo-French troops managed to capture Balaclava. In the Balaklava Bay there were foreign ships - both military and chartered civilian transport ships.

Already in the tenth of November, the sailors of the occupying forces began to feel unkind in an unfamiliar climate and the nature of the alien sea. Traveler George Taylor, located on the flagship battleship of the Mediterranean fleet Britain’s Agamemnon (a 70-meter 91-gun sail-screw ship of the line with a displacement of 4614 tons and a crew of 860 people), wrote in his diary:
"Strong wind. Since the parking lot in Balaklava Bay became unsafe due to the tightness and strength of the wind, Agamemnon stepped out of it and anchored in Kamyshovaya Bay, in full view of the city, Sevastopol Bay, the Russian fleet and our batteries. A lot of transports and steamboats remained in Balaklava Bay, some already had anchors crawling. ”



Rear Admiral Edmund Lyons

It is worth pointing out that Rear Admiral Edmund Lyons, holding his flag on the Agamemnon, already on November 13, having sensed something was wrong in the sea, removed the flagship from the anchor and went into the open sea, leading some of the battleships behind him. For what reason, this prudent and far-sighted old sea wolf (it had already exceeded 60 years at that time) did not insist on the departure of all ships from the coast, it is still an ambiguous question. Perhaps this is a consequence of the diversity of ships and ships off the Crimean coast, it may be a matter of jurisdiction, but in the end very soon the captains on the coast will have to bitterly regret that they did not leave behind the admiral.

Another witness to the disaster was Isabella Duberley, the wife of the treasurer of the 8 Irish Royal Hussar Regiment, Captain Henry Duberley, who was then aboard the Star of the South ship:
“A strong hurricane wind carried such terrible excitement in the crew of the ships, standing both inside and outside the bay, that some owners of the latter began to protest that they were not allowed to take refuge in the bay. A terrible hurricane began at about five in the morning. At seven o’clock, when I looked out the window of the cabin, the bay literally boiled and was covered with foam, the ships rocked terribly. ”


In fact, Captain Dakres, who was at that time managing the port of Balaclava, stopped letting ships into the bay, because The water area was clogged with warships and vehicles so much that they already threatened themselves with severe sea swell. Their masts literally piled on top of each other, threatening to collapse. Thus, in the open sea a fairly large number of ships accumulated, both sailing and steam.


"Agamemnon"

On the night of 13 on 14 on November 1854, a heavy rain fell on the Crimean coast from Yevpatoriya to Foros. Soon, the icy wind began to grow stronger, and the temperature dropped rapidly. After some time, the rain gave way to a wild blizzard, as if a deep winter had descended on the peninsula. By morning, it cleared up a bit, and even the hope appeared that the elements had subsided. But the strength of the wind continued to grow, turning into a real hurricane. The monstrous wind easily lifted roofs from houses and broke trees, like reeds. And that was just the beginning. Later, eyewitnesses testified that at some point the roar, groan and whistle of the elements merged into one common monstrous howl.

And here is how an element was described by an eyewitness who observed the element directly from the shore:
“The air was literally filled with blankets, caps, overcoats, frock coats and even tables and chairs ... The roof from Raglan’s house (Field Marshal Fitzroy James Henry Somerset, Baron Raglan) was torn down and spread out on the ground. The barns and the commissariat sheds were completely destroyed and flattened ... The large carts that were not far from us were overturned, and the people and horses, knocked down, rolled helplessly on the ground. A large flock of rams rushed along the road to Sevastopol and completely died under the blows of a tornado, which tore from the ground and scattered whole rows of beautiful high poplars, sheltering the Balaklava gorge that was cherishing them. ”


Ships in the hands of an angry sea


At that moment, when the Black Sea was furious, there were many ships and vessels in the outer raid only at Balaclava: steam vessels Retrijution, Niger, Vesuvius, Vulcan, steam transports Prince, Melbourn ”,“ Avon ”,“ City of London ”, sailing transports“ Mercia ”,“ Resolute ”,“ Lady Valiant ”,“ Caducens ”,“ Rride of the Ocean ”,“ Kenilwoth ”,“ Medora ”,“ Wild Wave ” , "Pilvan", "Winkle", "Sir Robert Sale"; chartered cargo vessels Progress, Wanderer, Peltoma, Maltese and Rip Van Winkle. These were both English and hired American ships.


Hms london

Separately, it is worth noting the English transport "Prince". It was the newest British sail-screw ship, put into operation only in the 1854 year. The ship’s two-cylinder steam engine produced 300 hp. power. This transport in the Crimean War was engaged in the supply of troops, transporting ammunition, equipment, medicines and more. He will later enter history like the legendary "Black Prince", the one that will excite the imagination of treasure seekers. This ship covered with legends will even become the subject of research by Epron specialists. But this is a different story ...

In general, it is necessary to understand that almost all Western countries attacked Crimea. Here, for example, wrote an American businessman who found a real gold mine in the war, George Francis Train, who was in the camp of the French troops in the 50 of the 19 century:
“I counted about five hundred vessels under the flags of almost all the Western powers ... Nearby stood three excellent creations of northern shipyards; the French tricolor was raised on their mizzen masts, but our star-striped banner fluttered on the main masts. Overshadowed by its restrained grandeur, the proud 100-gun “Naroleon III” of the French and the mighty “Agamemnon” of the English, our “Great Republic” seemed to be the real flagship of the Allied fleet. The “Great Republic” of Captain Lymbürner, “Queen of Clippers” of Captain Zereg and “Monarch of the Sea” of Captain Gardner were moored in the neighborhood; "I had never before felt such pride in my homeland, as at the sight of these magnificent clippers from New York."



Prince transport

In the Kachi region (north of Sevastopol), Turkish frigate “Mubbore Surur”, the English ships “Queen”, “Trafalgar”, “London”, “Aedent”, “Terrible”, “Spitfire” and “Sanson” fought for life on furious waves French “Ville de Paris”, “Firland”, “Bayard”, “Suffren”, including the transport “Turone”, “Pyrenees”, “Ganges”, “Danube” and “Arri Marseile”. Both steam and sailing ships fought with the waves.

The situation is no better in the region of Evpatoria. The English ship Cyclops and the frigate Culloden, the French sailing frigate Fultan and the 100 gun ship Henri IV, as well as the Turkish ship Peiri Messeret, became hostages to the elements, having no way to find shelter.

All of these ships were trapped in wayward weather. At that moment, when it became clear that it was no longer possible to find shelter in the Crimean bays, the Anglo-French squadron decided to go to sea - to try their luck away from the harsh rocks. But they realized it was too late. On the afternoon of November 14, the wind, which turned into a real hurricane, no longer allowed sailing and sailing-sailing ships to reach the open sea. True, it is worth pointing out that, nevertheless, one steamboat was able to overcome the wind and wave and leave for the sea.

However, on the same Crimean coasts a steam engine in some cases became a salvation, and in others it was an indirect culprit of the death of the ship. The captains of most steamboats nourished an extremely dangerous and largely exaggerated hope for the power of the steam engine, so they decided not to compete with the waves in the open sea, but to exert all the forces of technology to stay on the shore.


"Trafalgar"

One of the officers who survived during the 1854 element of the year and was directly on the ship during these events, later recalled:
“Sailors exposed to dangers on all seas do not remember that they had to witness such a storm. Imagine a terrible wind threatening to overturn the mountains; streams of rain flooding the atmosphere; "a frequent hail, with fierceness striking at everything that it encounters on the way, and, finally, an agitated sea, the ramparts of which are equal to the mountains, and you will not yet have a complete concept of a terrible hurricane.


The outcome will have a tremendous impact on the course of hostilities. Sinking ships will be dragged to the bottom not only of sailors, but also of their cargo.

To be continued ...
Author:
41 comment
Information
Dear reader, to leave comments on the publication, you must to register.

I have an account? Sign in

  1. Dalton
    Dalton 19 November 2019 06: 35 New
    0
    Yeah, element is a terrible thing
    1. Bar2
      Bar2 19 November 2019 08: 40 New
      -6
      all these stories when the adversaries Napoleon, Napoleon3, Hitler went to Russia, but they always lost not to the Russian army, but to the weather are very common in the west. Such stories are very comforting, for the bloodthirsty western psychology and vanity.
      But I think that it was the Russian troops ALWAYS that caused the defeat of the Western armies and fleets.
      The author refers to Western authors, but can they be trusted?
      For example, historians do not at all consider other versions of history and the most important historical phenomenon is Tartaria / Dardaria.
      Here is a map already late Francesco Marmochi 1858. We see many anachronisms i.e. names on the map that do not fall into the official version of the story, namely
      - Small Tartaria, right there Where is the Crimea.
      -Tartaria
      -Cossack Hordes.
      Kalmyks in the Kazakh steppes.



      https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~304679~90075091:Asia---Divisa-nei-suoi-principali-s?sort=Pub_List_No_InitialSort%2CPub_Date%2CPub_List_No%2CSeries_No#
      I suppose that this "great hurricane" is simply an attack by the Tartarians on the position of Europeans.
      1. Alexander Suvorov
        Alexander Suvorov 19 November 2019 09: 25 New
        +5
        For example, historians do not at all consider other versions of history and the most important historical phenomenon is Tartaria / Dardaria.
        Well, maybe Fomenkovism is already enough, huh? Not tired of this nonsense about "tartaria" and other rubbish?
        Here is a map already late Francesco Marmochi 1858. We see many anachronisms i.e. names on the map that do not fall into the official version of the story, namely
        - Small Tartaria, right there Where is the Crimea.
        Anachronisms in your brain, since you believe in all this nonsense. In 1858, Crimea is already 75 years old, as part of the Russian Empire and from the "mythical tartaria" there only the Bakhchisarai fountain remained ...

        Have a bite!
        1. Bar2
          Bar2 19 November 2019 09: 32 New
          -10
          Quote: Alexander Suvorov
          Anachronisms in your brain, since you believe in all this nonsense


          I try not to believe unreasonably, but I need to believe my own eyes. Is Johnson New York’s 1854 map also a lie? As we see at this time, Tartaria in its place.



          Well, you Don Cossack can continue to believe Western historiography and Western scribblers, it characterizes you very much as a "Cossack."
          1. Alexander Suvorov
            Alexander Suvorov 19 November 2019 09: 45 New
            +1
            Bar2 (Paul)
            I try not to believe unreasonably, but I need to believe my eyes. 1854 Johnson New York map wassat Is that a lie too?
            Well, you Don Cossack can continue believe western historiography and Western scribblers
            Boo ha ha laughing that is, it’s not you, but it turns out I believe Western sources are clearly “impolite”? But there are not Western, but Russian maps showing some mythical "tartaria", "historian" are you our unfinished?
            it characterizes you very much as a "Cossack"
            Well, your faith characterizes you as fool not very smart person!
            1. vladcub
              vladcub 19 November 2019 20: 02 New
              0
              Or a bad snack
            2. Bar2
              Bar2 19 November 2019 21: 41 New
              -3
              Quote: Alexander Suvorov
              Well, your faith characterizes you as a not very smart person!


              Well, you're not smart at all. Yes, still a false "Don Cossack" from Israel.
          2. evgic
            evgic 19 November 2019 10: 03 New
            0
            is the Johnson New York 1854 map is also a lie?
            I can draw you any card, especially if in the morning of 01.01, and in general I will draw such a thing, Marco Polo with his dog heads goes nuts.
            1. Alexander Suvorov
              Alexander Suvorov 19 November 2019 10: 19 New
              +4
              evgic (Eugene)
              I can draw you any card, especially if in the morning of 01.01, and in general I will draw such a thing, Marco Polo with his dog heads goes nuts.
              Notice, maps of some mythical “Francesco Marmochi” and even more mysterious “Johnson” are given (without a name, and the surname in America is as common as ours Ivanov), about which not a single search engine has ever heard of.
              For example, Yandex gives links to Francesco Marmochi’s request only to Francesco Marconi, an Italian tenor and manufacturer of leather goods from handbags to purses. Who is the "Francesco Marmochi" mystery is great. About "Johnson" I generally keep quiet, from actor Dwayne Johnson there to shampoo "Johnsons baby" ... Not to mention the two presidents of the United States! laughing laughing laughing
              1. vladcub
                vladcub 19 November 2019 20: 04 New
                +3
                This should be asked from Fomenko and his followers
      2. Alex_59
        Alex_59 19 November 2019 09: 38 New
        0
        Quote: Bar2
        Such stories are very comforting for the bloodthirsty Western psychology and pride.

        And in this particular case, what is comforting? The Western coalition won the war.
      3. Xnumx vis
        Xnumx vis 19 November 2019 16: 29 New
        0
        Western heroes have always been in Russia General Frost! Admiral Wind, Mother Off-Road, As well as diarrhea and scrofula!
      4. vladcub
        vladcub 19 November 2019 19: 59 New
        +1
        Bar, this is called: "in Kiev, uncle, and in the garden elderberry." What side are the Tartararians here? ALL at once clouded the mind, or maybe someone else has read fiction?
  2. Fevralsk. Morev
    Fevralsk. Morev 19 November 2019 06: 42 New
    -2
    It is a pity, but the elements did not help to defend Sevastopol.
    1. Crimea26
      Crimea26 19 November 2019 19: 44 New
      0
      However, there are "historians" who cry that during the storm (or immediately after it) the Russian troops had to immediately leave the city and deal a crushing blow to the adversary. )))
  3. Slavutich
    Slavutich 19 November 2019 07: 33 New
    +4
    Nature is for us: our sea, not only General Frost.
    1. igordok
      igordok 19 November 2019 12: 22 New
      +5
      In addition to General Moroz, Colonel Rasputitsa and Major Zaraza sometimes fight for Russia. In the Crimean War, Rasputitsa was not particularly involved, and Major Zaraza worked.
  4. Olgovich
    Olgovich 19 November 2019 07: 47 New
    +4
    on the main mast our star-striped banner. Eclipsing with its restrained grandeur the proud 100-gun “Narolen III” of the French and the mighty “Agamemnon” of the English, our “Great Republic” seemed to be the real flagship of the Allied fleet.

    What ...
    But recently, Russia helped and saved the United States.

    Great, interesting article!
    1. Andy
      Andy 19 November 2019 08: 00 New
      +2
      did not quite understand what you mean. if about sending a squadron, they helped America after the Crimean War. if the refusal to send troops to help the British, then yes ...
      1. Olgovich
        Olgovich 19 November 2019 10: 19 New
        +3
        Quote: Andy
        did not quite understand what you mean. if about sending a squadron, they helped America after the Crimean War. if about the refusal to send troops to help the British, then yes...

        They refused twice. But this is not the main thing: everything is well known and not disputed by anyone, I refer you to our VO:
        the United States owes much of its political sovereignty to our country. 240 years ago, July 31, 1779 years, Catherine II was read the secret report of the College of Foreign Affairs on the situation in the North American states. He finally predetermined the policy of the Russian Empire in relation to American independence fighters.

        February 28 (March 10) 1780 the Russian Empire adopted a declaration of armed neutrality, which significantly influenced the world political situation, first of all, the rules of international maritime trade, including trade with the United States of North America. Other European states joined the declaration, which allowed to significantly normalize the situation at sea. British interests were again shamed.

        Armed Neutrality Declaration was highly praised by leaders of the American independence movement. And this was not surprising, since the declaration significantly improved the situation of the United States. After all, the declaration limited the naval dominance of Great Britain and created obstacles to the naval blockade of the American continent. Thus, the position of the Russian Empire allowed the US states to quietly trade with the European powers.

        At the initiative of Catherine, the League of Armed Neutrality was created, which was joined by Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands. US Congress also announced solidarity with the position of the Russian Empire
        1. Looking for
          Looking for 19 November 2019 15: 48 New
          -2
          gets out like that. in the pan.
      2. Looking for
        Looking for 19 November 2019 15: 46 New
        -3
        Yes, such an "expert" this Olegovich-Bulkohrust
  5. smaug78
    smaug78 19 November 2019 10: 44 New
    +2
    Quote: Bar2
    But I think that it was the Russian troops ALWAYS that caused the defeat of the Western armies and fleets.
    The author refers to Western authors, but can they be trusted?

    Where in this article is it about defeat, battle, etc.? A specific weather episode is described, the rest is your imagination + conspiracy ...
  6. svp67
    svp67 19 November 2019 11: 28 New
    +3
    Yes, and even “God's help” did not help.
    But what is still the enormous benefit of photographs. It is one thing to read and listen, and quite another to see ... A photo of the ships in Balaklava Bay shows EVERYTHING ... good
  7. Ryazan87
    Ryazan87 19 November 2019 11: 47 New
    +1
    “The tents seemed to have pulled into the air like pieces of paper. The stones were blown off the ground by the force of the wind and destroyed everything in their path. Large barrels raised into the air flew everywhere like cricket balls. Heavy wagons lifted into the air along with mules. The hospital tents tore together with the sick, the soldiers jumped in horror and poked bayonets into the ground, trying to stay at the surface. In Balaklava, all the trees were uprooted. Lord Raglan stood curiously from the leeward side of the house and watched as he tiled up together with a chimney. "
    [media = https: //george-rooke.livejournal.com/816970.html]
    1. Trapperxnumx
      Trapperxnumx 21 November 2019 08: 34 New
      0
      Quote: Ryazanets87
      [media = https: //george-rooke.livejournal.com/816970.html]

      Ah, I also love to read it. He knows how to dig up interesting materials, especially about the Crimean
  8. Perun Horch
    Perun Horch 19 November 2019 11: 51 New
    -4
    I can’t understand one thing! When the Turks were smashed with the help of the fleet, everything was fine. But when an experienced and strong adversary came, the Russians flooded the fleet and moved on to defensive defenses! Why weren't there naval battles like Sinop or Chesma? Plus, the storm gave the Russian troops a break, but did not save them from defeat. Where were the brilliant commanders? Or is it one thing for the Turks to drive and another to fight a strong enemy? You noticed when the fleets of different countries became technological, then Russia and the USSR did not show themselves at sea on the good side! In the Russo-Japanese War, they stupidly lost on land and at sea. In the first world fleet practically stood against the wall, they were afraid to withdraw a good armored fleet against the Germans. In the second, they also sat in a dead defense.
    1. Military Builder
      Military Builder 19 November 2019 13: 14 New
      +2
      Aren't you Kolya from Urengoy by chance? I only have military words in your vocabulary in your post, and the admin will send them to the bathhouse for them
      1. Perun Horch
        Perun Horch 19 November 2019 19: 07 New
        -3
        You feel the Russian endless rudeness in you
        1. Military Builder
          Military Builder 20 November 2019 07: 22 New
          -1
          Well, where do we go, before your non-Russian high-school education
        2. Military Builder
          Military Builder 20 November 2019 11: 22 New
          +1
          I compared the Turkish fleet with the European team, and you consider yourself cultural and competent, compare Khalkhin-Gol and the Second World War, and say why in the first case for 4 months. managed, and in the second they dragged on for 4 years
    2. Catfish
      Catfish 19 November 2019 17: 17 New
      +10
      Colleague, well, what kind of battle with the combined fleet could there be? Compare the entire size of the Russian fleet with at least one Britain. Especially in modern, steam ships. And not our admirals, officers and sailors are to blame, but those who stood at the top of the pyramid of power in tsarist Russia. They did not even bother to build a railway in the direction of the Crimea, and this is in the European part of Russia! And what did the British do first? That's right, they built such a road from Balaclava.
      So by flooding obsolete ships, the Black Sea Fleet command received the maximum benefit from what could be obtained from them, and their crews and artillery brought much more benefit on land than in a obviously losing hypothetical naval battle.
      But neither in the Baltic Sea, nor in Kamchatka, the Allied fleet did NOT succeed! And the Kamchatka disgrace of the vaunted British fleet is worth a lot, and this despite all their technical superiority. They managed there, of course.
      Yes, in the Baltic, they safely “tested” our naval mines, for which thanks. “Merlin”, although it didn’t sink, they didn’t dare to go further.
      So much has been said about the Russo-Japanese and World War I here that I won’t bother my colleagues, they already know everything.
      As for the Great Patriotic War, the fate of the fleet there depended on the actions of the land armies, at the Pacific Fleet and the Black Sea Fleet, the ships did what they could, and this with an almost complete lack of support for our aviation (Black Sea Fleet).
      We heard about the “soup with dumplings” in the Baltic Sea, will we discuss it again? But in the Pacific, the fleet as such was not there. But all this is a separate issue.
      Well, something like that, just in this passage you can not write. hi
      1. Ryazan87
        Ryazan87 19 November 2019 18: 12 New
        +7
        Let me join the discussion. The question is really interesting.
        Compare the entire size of the Russian fleet with at least one Britain. Especially in modern, steam ships.

        It will be more correct to compare the specific units of forces operating at the Black Sea theater. It is impossible to deny the significant numerical superiority of the allies. However, this cannot be recognized as a sufficient reason for abandoning active operations at sea. And do not exaggerate the power of the then steam or quasi-steam ships, especially since the Russians had them, albeit in limited numbers, (the same "Vladimir", British-built, by the way).
        The Russian fleet had to solve two problems:
        1. Tear off the landing of allies in the Crimea. To do this, at the cost of any losses, attack the transports carrying soldiers and artillery. There were opportunities for this. Can you imagine what the Empress Maria’s bombing guns will do with a ship that is packed with troops? Although a fire attack, grandfathers would be remembered. A firm will was needed, and common sense. What is better to die in the mud of the Malakhov mound six months later?
        2. Later, to prevent the Allies from breaking into the Sea of ​​Azov and cutting communications with “mainland” Russia.
        Nothing was done to solve these problems, which in many ways predetermined the loss of the Crimean campaign.
        And not our admirals, officers and sailors are to blame, but those who stood at the top of the pyramid of power in tsarist Russia.
        - Admirals are part of the top of the pyramid. It is the unsatisfactory quality of personal and professional qualities of the vast majority of generals and admirals that is one of the key causes of defeat.
        They did not even bother to build a railway in the direction of the Crimea, and this is in the European part of Russia!

        To understand the answer to this question, it is enough to find out where the most numerous groups of Russian troops were located, powerful fortresses were built and infrastructure was developed. That's right, in Poland. This is a pure "1812 syndrome", everyone was afraid of the classic Western invasion. The emperor somehow no longer wanted the ruin of 8 internal Russian provinces, burned Moscow and 2 million dead.
        As for the British railway from Balaclava, you know, probably, that the strained Turks carried cargo along it? The power of the locomotive "uphill" was not enough. So the "know-how" of the industrial age looked very specific. The key was to own maritime communications.
        So by flooding obsolete ships, the Black Sea Fleet command received the maximum benefit from what could be obtained from them, and their crews and artillery brought much more benefit on land,

        The first ships were drowned without even removing artillery and equipment. Having made such a decision (only Kornilov sharply objected), the Black Sea Fleet command signed that the war was lost. Sevastopol in 1854 I go and had some significance only as the base of the fleet. Well, the heroic annual agony on land is such a thing .. The fleet must fight at sea, otherwise it is simply "very expensive infantry."
        1. vladcub
          vladcub 19 November 2019 20: 22 New
          +2
          Ryazanets, about the landing in Balaclava, perhaps you are right. Lack of will and strategic thinking is the reason
        2. Trapperxnumx
          Trapperxnumx 21 November 2019 08: 49 New
          0
          Quote: Ryazanets87
          Let me join the discussion. The question is really interesting.

          I support you colleague. They wrote everything very well.
    3. Alexey RA
      Alexey RA 19 November 2019 17: 27 New
      +3
      Quote: Perun Horch
      In the first world fleet practically stood against the wall, they were afraid to withdraw a good armored fleet against the Germans.

      Nice armored fleet - Is this a pair of EDB of the Dotsushima project, a pair of transitional EDBs and four first-generation thin-skinned LCs? wink
      In addition, the linear fleet in the Baltic simply did not have worthy goals. And when they came, they did it in such numbers that nothing shone on our LK. In the same Irben operation of 1915, breakthrough forces covered the 1st FOM squadron and the 1st FOM Reconnaissance Group - 8 LC and 3 LKR.
  9. Looking for
    Looking for 19 November 2019 15: 43 New
    -1
    God is not Yadvoshka-sees a little bit.
  10. Grandfather Mansour
    Grandfather Mansour 19 November 2019 17: 36 New
    -3
    Quote: Perun Horch
    I can’t understand one thing! When the Turks were smashed with the help of the fleet, everything was fine. But when an experienced and strong adversary came, the Russians flooded the fleet and moved on to defensive defenses! Why weren't there naval battles like Sinop or Chesma? Plus, the storm gave the Russian troops a break, but did not save them from defeat. Where were the brilliant commanders? Or is it one thing for the Turks to drive and another to fight a strong enemy? You noticed when the fleets of different countries became technological, then Russia and the USSR did not show themselves at sea on the good side! In the Russo-Japanese War, they stupidly lost on land and at sea. In the first world fleet practically stood against the wall, they were afraid to withdraw a good armored fleet against the Germans. In the second, they also sat in a dead defense.

    Friend hearted, learn materiel!
    1. Perun Horch
      Perun Horch 19 November 2019 19: 09 New
      0
      Taught! I understood one thing! If the Russians are never ready for war!
  11. Aviator_
    Aviator_ 19 November 2019 21: 25 New
    +1
    There are still legends among sailors about wandering Black Sea killer waves.

    A killer wave is a so-called soliton formed among ordinary waves. The physical phenomenon is this. In the oceans - a common occurrence. In the Black Sea - it is extremely doubtful. V. Konetsky described how in the South Atlantic on the way from Antarctica his ship managed to meet such a wave. The result is broken glass in a series of portholes. But this is still 1976 a year, a hundred years ago a boat would just somersault.
  12. Viktor HanelisBogatishev
    Viktor HanelisBogatishev 30 November 2019 21: 53 New
    0
    In difficult times for Mother Russia, the Creator does not forget about us. And this will always be so, as long as we remain a HUMAN civilization, and not a Western animal civilization - liberals should always remember this, the problem is that they are all completely stupid people, BUT IN THIS AND A PLUS FOR Russian Civilization. With the help of God, we will grind in the meat grinder the stories of non-people.