Mannerheim - an ambiguous figure in history

The figure of this person known to the whole world still causes a mixed reaction in society.


Mannerheim - an ambiguous figure in history


Swedish nobleman, he swore allegiance to the Russian emperor, showing himself in the Russian service as a talented commander. After the revolution, when the Bolsheviks hated by him appeared in power, he made a fateful decision for him to return to his native Finland, becoming the head of the Finnish army. Having cut off all ties with Bolshevik Russia, he became a sworn enemy of Soviet power. Many times his life hung in the balance, but each time fortune was on his side.

He was a spy, whom the secret services hunted, he was a smart politician, whom the leaders of the great powers reckoned with. It is no coincidence that such famous personalities as Roosevelt and Stalin, Churchill and Hitler considered him the greatest man of the 20 of the century. A separate question: who thought so?

At the end of his life, he became president of Finland. Once an ally of Nazi Germany, Mannerheim did not end up under the tribunal.

This film is about a participant in four wars, a scout and author of the famous alcoholic recipe, Karl Gustav Mannerheim, who entered history and the figure of which causes debate and fierce debate both among historians and among ordinary people, with history at least a little familiar.

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  1. svp67 13 August 2019 05: 32 New
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    Mannerheim crossed out all his merits, at least for me, becoming a Russophobe. Otherwise, how can one not explain that he did nothing to stop the direct destruction of the Russian people who, by the will of fate, ended up in the territory of the Principality of Finland after the 1917 revolutions of the year.
    1. Basil50 13 August 2019 06: 26 New
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      sergey
      Not only is the enemy of the Nazis an enemy for you, he is an enemy for all PEOPLE.
      Manerheim behaved towards RUSSIAN PEOPLE in full accordance with the attitude towards RUSSIAN people by the majority of the nobility and other officials in the RUSSIAN EMPIRE.
      Today they are trying to write enthusiastically and in superlatives about the king and his * service people *. But the attitude was exactly the same as the attitude of the Nazis.
      Imported nobles swore allegiance to the Holstein-Gottorp dynasty, which managed to establish itself as kings, but the population of RUSSIA was perceived as slaves in the colonies. It’s like in India, where there were both their maharajas and their warriors and many slaves, which they own ........
    2. Stirbjorn 13 August 2019 08: 20 New
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      Quote: svp67
      Otherwise, how can one not explain that he did nothing to stop the direct destruction of the Russian people who, by the will of fate, ended up in the territory of the Principality of Finland after the 1917 revolutions of the year.

      That is, Mannerheim was soiled in the blood of our people as early as 1918-1919, while there were many representatives of the white movement, and not just the red ones. The blockade of Leningrad was already much later
      1. Sunstorm 13 August 2019 13: 47 New
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        Quote: Stirbjorn
        That's it, Mannerheim was soiled in the blood of our people back in 1918-1919,

        And which of the Union workers did not smear his hands with our blood? Or for you, the blood of the “white” is not as red as the “red”? I'm afraid biology will not agree with you.
    3. Greg Miller 13 August 2019 09: 28 New
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      For you, for me and for all normal Russian people, Mannerheim is a traitor, a criminal and scum. But for those who rule today in Russia, Mannerheim is a hero ...
    4. tihonmarine 13 August 2019 10: 28 New
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      Quote: svp67
      Otherwise, how can one not explain that he did nothing to stop the direct destruction of the Russian people who, by the will of fate, ended up in the territory of the Principality of Finland after the 1917 revolutions of the year.

      Russian people were not destroyed there, with the exception of the Red Guards. I have many friends living in Finland whose ancestors settled there after the 1917 year. Especially military sailors from the "Sea Mine-Sweeping Forces" and did not terrorize anyone in Finland, but on the contrary fled to Suomi from Russia, unlike ....
      1. evgic 13 August 2019 13: 24 New
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        For example, the massacre in Vyborg is not familiar to you?
      2. Stirbjorn 13 August 2019 14: 47 New
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        Quote: tihonmarine
        Russian people were not destroyed there, with the exception of the Red Guards. I have many friends living in Finland whose ancestors settled there after the 1917 year. Especially military sailors from the "Sea Mine-Sweeping Forces" and did not terrorize anyone in Finland, but on the contrary fled to Suomi from Russia, unlike ....

        Grab noodles on your ears! Emigrants settled in France, in Yugoslavia, in Spain, even in Manchuzhir, but something was not heard about Finland, except for your “acquaintances” ... there is such an event as “Vyborg massacre” in history, please enlighten wink
        https://topwar.ru/143115-vyborg-finskiy-nankin-istoriya-odnoy-rezni.html
        1. tihonmarine 13 August 2019 17: 01 New
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          Thanks for the answer, of course, I have known about the Vyborg Massacre since childhood, for my aunt by mother lived and talked with the people.
          1. shura7782 13 August 2019 23: 04 New
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            Vlad, I have a different story. I know from relatives' stories that my great-grandfather (participant of the Tsushima battle) and great-grandmother with children abandoned everything and without things fled from there.
  2. lelik613 13 August 2019 05: 41 New
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    Not for us. Chikatilo, too, until a certain time was "ambiguous", and "caused discussions."
  3. Dmitry Potapov 13 August 2019 06: 00 New
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    Judging by the form on which it has its unequivocal place in the list of war criminals with the heading "no statute of limitations", at least for our country, and the articles are dedicated to it and hang signs.
    1. bober1982 13 August 2019 07: 29 New
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      Quote: Dmitry Potapov
      Judging by the form on which it has its unequivocal place in the list of war criminals

      Stalin struck Mannerheim from the list of war criminals, with his own hand.
      1. atos_kin 13 August 2019 07: 40 New
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        Quote: bober1982
        with your own hand.

        Sorry, he had no other hands for you. There were only legs.
        1. bober1982 13 August 2019 07: 42 New
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          I didn’t understand anything. Yesterday we celebrated Air Force Day?
          1. atos_kin 13 August 2019 12: 50 New
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            No offense. I explain, the addition of "do it yourself" is unnecessary, because Comrade Stalin did not use other people's hands. And my Air Force day is August 18th.
            1. bober1982 13 August 2019 12: 54 New
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              Quote: atos_kin
              And my Air Force day is August 18th.

              My too.
      2. evgic 13 August 2019 13: 28 New
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        Crossed out the truth. With this stroke, he led 400 thousand Finnish soldiers out of the war, received bases for the fleet in Finnish, and saved the lives of tens of thousands of our soldiers. For one offender, the price is acceptable.
  4. Amateur 13 August 2019 06: 02 New
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    “A plaque to the executioner of the Russians Mannerheim in St. Petersburg is an insult to the memory of the fallen soldiers and residents of Leningrad!”, “He was an accomplice of Hitler and helped maintain the blockade of Leningrad from the north-west. Installing a memorial plate in this city for him is a mockery of hundreds of thousands of dead blockade! " - Similar statements rained down in the media and in social networks.

    In the most cultured St. Petersburg, the memorial plaque quietly hung for 3 days. Then they doused it with paint, drilled it, etc., until they got it removed.
    So in Russia this is a figure with an unambiguous reputation - the executioner and the fascist.
    And Messrs. Ivanov and Medynsky, who hung the memorial plaque, would have to resign from all posts.
  5. Barmaleyka 13 August 2019 07: 46 New
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    Mannerheim - an ambiguous figure in history
    what's next !!!
    Vlasov - "an ambiguous figure in history"?
    with Mannerheim EVERYTHING EXPRESSLY UNIQUE - Hitler's Companion
  6. Cruorvult 13 August 2019 08: 23 New
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    The author of the campaign is not Russian, since he writes "The figure of this person known to the whole world still causes an ambiguous reaction in society."
    1. tihonmarine 13 August 2019 10: 35 New
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      Gustav Mannerheim was and until the end of his life remained a Russian officer and general.
  7. Stirbjorn 13 August 2019 08: 24 New
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    It was no accident that he was considered the greatest man of the 20th century by such famous personalities as Roosevelt and Stalin, Churchill and Hitler.
    The greatest ?! What nonsense ?! They could consider and consider each other as such, and not the leader of little Finland. What such a significant role in the history of the 20th century could Mannerheim play to be called the greatest, even for a whole century ?! wassat If only in Finland itself, but where then the leaders of world powers?
    1. bober1982 13 August 2019 08: 30 New
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      Quote: Stirbjorn
      What such a significant role in the history of the 20th century could Mannerheim play to be called the greatest, even for a whole century ?!

      At first, Mannerheim was an accomplice of Hitler, and then Hitler himself became an accomplice of Mannerheim.
  8. abrakadabre 13 August 2019 09: 20 New
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    Mannerheim - an ambiguous figure in history
    For whom? For normal people, this is a completely unambiguous figure - a war criminal.
    1. Ryazan87 22 August 2019 17: 47 New
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      For whom? For normal people, this is a completely unique figure

      Think close))
  9. tihonmarine 13 August 2019 10: 02 New
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    In the 1825 year, Karl Eric Mannerheim (1759 — 1837), the great-grandfather of Gustav Mannerheim, was elevated to the rank of count, after which the eldest son in the family became a count, and the younger brothers of the eldest member of the family name (to which Gustav Mannerheim belonged), as well as representatives the younger genealogical branches remained barons.
    He was a Russian nobleman, but not Swedish, like his ancestors.
  10. bubalik 13 August 2019 11: 34 New
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    ,,, how many black cats are not mine, there will be no whiter.
    1944 already decided everything and figured it out.

    Order No. 132, signed by the Commander-in-Chief of the 8 on July 1941, the day before the Finnish troops — the Karelian army launched an offensive in the direction north of Lake Ladoga. Paragraph four of the orders said: “The Russian population should be detained and sent to concentration camps”

    N.I. Baryshnikov in the book “Five myths in the military history of Finland 1940 — 1944” (Baryshnikov Nikolai Ivanovich, Soviet, Russian military historian. Doctor of historical sciences, professor, colonel. Member of the Great Patriotic War.)

    In the collection of documents “Monstrous atrocities of Finnish-fascist invaders in the territory of the Karelian-Finnish SSR” (State Publishing House of the Karelian-Finnish SSR, 1945), the Extraordinary State Commission said that by the end of 1941, there were about 20 thousand people in Finnish concentration camps, in the vast majority are Russians. At the beginning of April of 1942, there were already 24 thousand people - about 27% of the total population in the Finnish occupation zone. Concentration camps were created for the Russian population in the villages of Vidlitsa, Ilyinskoye, Kavgozero, Pogrankondushi, Paalu and Uslanka, as well as six concentration camps in Petrozavodsk.
    In total, 14 concentration camps were created for the civilian population. According to the Karelian historian K.A. Morozov, as a result of hard forced labor, poor nutrition, hunger, epidemics and shootings in the camps, over 14 thousand Soviet people died, that is, every fifth remaining in the occupation. Their only fault was that they were non-Finns and did not belong to the group of “heimokansalainen” (“tribesmen,” that is, Karelians, Vepsians, and Izhors). In relation to the "guilty" torture and executions were used. These statistics do not include data on prisoner of war camps, the first of which began to be created back in June 1941.


    Photo of the military commander Galina Sanko in the liberated Petrozavodsk in June 1944, which was presented at the Nuremberg trials.


    The newspaper "Pravda" from 18 August 1944g.
  11. Pushkar 14 August 2019 12: 28 New
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    An unequivocal person is Hitler's ally and the worst enemy of Russia and its people.
  12. aleksandaravin 16 August 2019 17: 27 New
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    Nothing new! Swedish Father of the Finnish Nation! See Pakistan - Genie! But the Cleverest Man! And I didn’t sit down! And the rest - Quisling, Vlasov, Salashi, but Duce himself! Perhaps only Generalissimo Francisco Franco compares!
  13. _TANKIST_ 16 August 2019 22: 47 New
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    The next attempt of our TV to whiten Manerheim, or to test the soil of the relationship of people, pah, you’re annoying, I would have been imprisoned for such attempts for 15 days. And scum who put on a fascist / Nazi uniform or produce similar vidosiks would have shot at the place.
  14. grumbler 22 August 2019 16: 27 New
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    with Mannerheim EVERYTHING EXPRESSLY UNIQUE - Hitler's Companion

    I perfectly understand those whose great-grandfathers died in the Karelian-Finnish snow and died in the Finnish concentration camps, in the Blockade. Yes, Finnish troops fought fiercely in the "Finnish". Finnish troops participated in battles and crimes against the population in Soviet Karelia. In the blockade of Leningrad. The Finns mined the Baltic Sea, from which our ships were locked, and our submarines died when trying to break through. This is all true. This is enough for someone to decide who Mannerheim was, I understand.

    And, nevertheless, ambiguous. If only because the "Stalin's accomplice" often also sounds like an executioner.
    For example, for the victims of the Red Terror, the Catalan socialists of the POUM or for the German anti-fascist "Trotskyists", or the Polish officers in Katyn who were destroyed by Stalin.
    An unequivocal person is Hitler's ally and the worst enemy of Russia and its people.

    But which one of the "Russia" was he the worst enemy? Tsarist Russia, under which Finland did not know serfdom and had the broadest autonomy? Whose officer and researcher in Asia was M.
    Or Tsarist Russia since the time of Nicholas, when the clumsy actions of the government to forcibly Russify and "Orthodoxize" Finland, Poland and Ukraine, pushed the nationalists there "into the arms" of the Germans and Bolsheviks? Or a bourgeois-democratic Russia, of the sample of February 1917, which gave national self-determination to Finland and Poland? Russia "Trotskyist-Leninist", which exported the "fire of the world revolution", which already burned Russia. Or a “Stalinist” Russia, which didn’t succeed in annexing Finland in the “winter war”, as they did with the Baltic republics? (Yes, it was in the war of independence that their homeland, the Finns brutally killed your grandfathers who came to their land in the ranks of the "Bolshevik hordes. Is everything" directly destined "? - but to me, not a damn thing is clear, except for the graves.)

    There is no "abstract Russia", the enemy of which was M. Russia itself split and first fought in the Civil War. And then Gr. The war continued with the Red Terror, spanning decades.

    In conclusion, an interesting book: Eleanor Ioffe "Mannerheim Lines" , St. Petersburg, ed. Pushkin Foundation, 2017 (it is in the plural, in the sense of “trajectory”, to emphasize the notorious ambiguity). In Finland, the “whites” won and this determined the possibility of independence and a bourgeois-democratic future for Finland. But it was given a lot of blood (it seems the “Reds" died 25 thousand, for Finland it is a lot). Joffe writes that this division in Finnish society at the level of family memory is still felt, despite the “Finnish consensus”.

    One thing is clear, since everything is so ambiguous, you should not rush to hang memorial plaques, so you won’t be surprised that they are being smashed. It didn’t heal.
  15. Valerikk 28 August 2019 19: 03 New
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    Quote: grumbler
    And, nevertheless, ambiguous. If only because the "Stalin's accomplice" often also sounds like an executioner.
    For example, for the victims of the Red Terror, the Catalan socialists of the POUM or for the German anti-fascist "Trotskyists", or Polish officers in Katyn who were destroyed by Stalin.

    Germans
    1. grumbler 1 September 2019 11: 42 New
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      I heard your objection. Unfortunately, this question is so ideologized that it relates more to the sphere of "faith", "ideology" than history. I, as an adherent of the "liberal-democratic" wing, proceeding from my beliefs and not being a historian, trust historians who attribute Katyn to the crimes of the Red Terror.
      I suspect that yours, the opposite opinion, is based on the same "strong" grounds.
      1. Valerikk 1 September 2019 22: 42 New
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        What weapons were the Poles killed from?
        Why are they insignia and awards?
  16. tank64rus 19 September 2019 19: 25 New
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    This is a class enemy. In 1917-18, he put a lot of red Finns and walked a skating rink over the Russians living in Finland. There is nothing to say about the siege of Leningrad. But the enemy is the enemy. But what to say about the traitors of our country, there are no words; only letters remained.