Military Review

Rise of the Czechoslovakia. How did the Civil War in Russia

44
17 May 1918, exactly 100 years ago, the uprising of the Czechoslovak Corps began in Russia, from which many historians count the beginning of the Civil War. Thanks to the rebellion of the Czechoslovak Corps, which engulfed a large part of the Volga region, the Urals, Siberia and the Far East, Soviet authorities were eliminated over vast territories and anti-Soviet governments were created. It was the performance of the Czechoslovakia that became the starting point for the start of large-scale hostilities of the “white” against the Soviet power.


History The Czechoslovak Corps is inextricably linked with the First World War. In the autumn of 1917, the command of the Russian army decided to create a special corps of Czech and Slovak prisoners of war who formerly served as part of the Austro-Hungarian army, were captured in Russia, and now, considering their Slavic affiliation, expressed their desire to fight against Germany and Austria-Hungary in the Russian troops.



By the way, Czech and Slovak volunteer formations, which were recruited from among the Czechs and Slovaks who lived in the territory of the Russian Empire, appeared in 1914, when the Czech squad was created in Kiev, but they operated under the command of Russian officers. In March 1915, the Supreme Commander, Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolayevich, allowed to take into the ranks of the Czechoslovak formations of Czechs and Slovaks from among the prisoners of war and defectors of the Austro-Hungarian army. At the end of 1915, the First Czechoslovak Rifle Regiment named after Jan Hus, numbering 2100 soldiers, and by the end of 1916, the regiment was transformed into a brigade numbering 3500 soldiers. The commander of the brigade was Colonel Vyacheslav Platonovich Troyanov, who was given the rank of Major General in June 1917.

After the February revolution of 1917, a branch of the Czechoslovak National Council, founded as early as 1916 in Paris, appeared in Russia. The Czechoslovak National Council assumed the authority to lead all Czechoslovak military units on both the Eastern and Western fronts. The Provisional Government favored the Czechoslovak movement, recognizing the Czechoslovak National Council as the sole legitimate representative of the Czechs and Slovaks in Russia. Meanwhile, the CNS was entirely under the control of Great Britain and France, the influence of Russia on him was minimal, since the leadership of the CNS was in Paris. The Czechoslovak Brigade, which fought on the Eastern Front, was transformed into the 1 Hussite Division, and on July 4 of the year 1917, with the permission of the new Supreme Commander, General Lavr Kornilov, the formation of the Czechoslovak 2 division began.

26 September 1917, the Chief of Staff of the General Headquarters of General Headquarters Lieutenant-General Nikolai Dukhonin signed an order to form a separate Czechoslovak corps, which included both Czechoslovak divisions with a total of 39 thousands of soldiers and officers. Although the main part of the corps’s servicemen were Czechs and Slovaks, as well as the Yugoslavs, Russian became the command language of the corps. Major-General Vyacheslav Nikolaevich Shokorov was appointed commander of the Czechoslovak Corps, and Major General Mikhail Diterikhs was appointed Chief of Staff.

By the time of the October Revolution in Russia, units and subunits of the Czechoslovak Corps were located in the Volyn and Poltava provinces. When the corps command received news of the victory of the Bolsheviks and the overthrow of the Provisional Government, it expressed support for the Provisional Government and advocated the further continuation of hostilities against Germany and Austria-Hungary. Such a position was in the interests of the Entente, which controlled the Czechoslovak National Council in Paris. From the very first days of the October Revolution, the Czechoslovak Corps took an unequivocal position against the Bolsheviks. Already on October 28 (November 10), units of the Czechoslovak Corps took part in street battles in Kiev, where the junkers of military schools opposed the local Red Guard detachments.



After the October Revolution, the leaders of the Czechoslovak National Council began to seek recognition of the Czechoslovak military formations that were in Russia as a foreign allied army subordinate to the French military mission. Professor Tomash Masaryk, who represented the Czechoslovak National Council, insisted on the incorporation of Czechoslovak troops into the French army. 19 December 1917, the French government decided to subordinate the Czechoslovak Corps in Russia to the command of the French army, after which the corps received an order to be sent to France. Since the Czechoslovaks were to go to France through the territory of Soviet Russia, the leadership of the Czechoslovak National Council was not going to spoil relations with the Soviet authorities.

Tomas Masaryk even went to the resolution of Bolshevik agitation in the Czechoslovak units, as a result of which Czechoslovak soldiers and officers joined the BNS about 200. At the same time, Masaryk refused cooperation offers from Generals Lavr Kornilov and Mikhail Alekseev. Gradually, Russian officers were removed from the main command posts in the Czechoslovak Corps, and Czechoslovak officers took their places, including those who sympathized with left-wing political ideas.

26 March 1918 in Penza between Soviet Russia, which was represented on behalf of the Council of People's Commissars of the RSFSR Joseph Stalin, and representatives of the Czechoslovak National Council and the Czechoslovak Corps signed an agreement on the unimpeded movement of units of the Czechoslovak Corps through Russia to Vladivostok. However, this alignment caused discontent of the German military command, which pressed on the Soviet leadership. Georgy Chicherin, people's commissar of foreign affairs of the RSFSR, demanded that the Krasnoyarsk Council of Workers' Deputies stop the further advancement of the Czechoslovak divisions to the east. By this time, around Penza, Syzran and Samara there were about 8 thousands of Czechoslovak servicemen, another 8,8 thousands of servicemen were in the area of ​​Chelyabinsk and Miass, 4,5 thousands of servicemen in Novonikolayevsk and the surrounding area, 14 thousands of servicemen in Vladivostok. Naturally, such a large number of armed and organized people with military training and combat experience was a solid force, which the Bolshevik leadership did not think about. When the Czechoslovak servicemen learned that Chicherin had ordered not to let the Czechoslovak units east, they took this decision as a hidden attempt by the Soviet authorities to extradite them to Germany and Austria-Hungary as traitors.

16 May 1918 in Chelyabinsk began the congress of Czechoslovak military personnel, which lasted four days. At the congress, it was decided to break with the Bolsheviks, to stop the surrender weapons Soviet authorities and follow their own order in Vladivostok. Meanwhile, on May 21, the Soviet government decided to completely disarm the Czechoslovak units, and on May 25 the relevant order was issued by the people's commissar for military and naval affairs Leo Trotsky. However, in Maryanovka, Irkutsk and Zlatoust, where the Red Guards tried to disarm the Czechoslovak units, the latter put up strong resistance. The Czechoslovak Corps took control of the entire Siberian road. Rise of the Czechoslovakia. How did the Civil War in Russia

At the congress, a provisional executive committee of the congress of the Czechoslovak army was formed. It consisted of the chiefs of three echelons. Lieutenant Stanislav Chechek (1886-1930), an accountant by profession, at the time of the outbreak of the First World War, worked in the representative office of Skoda in Moscow. He volunteered to join the Czech squad, participated in the war, commanding a company, and then a battalion. 6 September 1917 of the Chechek was appointed deputy commander of the 4 Infantry Regiment named after Prokop Naked. In May 1918, he headed the largest group of troops of the Czechoslovak Corps - Penza.

Captain Radol Gaida (1892-1948), a pharmacist by profession, passed military service in the mountain rifle regiment of the Austro-Hungarian army, then married an Albanian and settled in Shkoder. When World War I began, he was again called into the Austro-Hungarian army, but in 1915, Gaida surrendered and joined the Montenegrin army, and in 1916 he arrived in Russia and served as a doctor in the Serbian regiment, then in the Czechoslovak brigade. 26 March 1917, Gaida was appointed commander of the company of the 2 Czechoslovak Infantry Regiment. In the spring of 1918, he led all Czechoslovak troops stationed east of Omsk.

Lieutenant Colonel Sergei Voitsekhovsky, a native of the nobles of the Vitebsk province, served in the Russian army since 1902, graduated from the Konstantinovsky Artillery School and the Nikolaev Military Academy of the General Staff. In January 1917, he was appointed Chief of Staff of 176-th Infantry Division, in February - Operations Chief of Staff 3-th Caucasus Grenadier Division, and then served as chief of staff 126-th Infantry Division, from August 1917 years actually served as chief of staff 1-th Czechoslovak division of the Russian army. In February 1918, he became the commander of the 3-th Czechoslovak behalf of Jan ижižka Rifle Regiment, and in May 1918 was appointed senior military commander of the Czechoslovak troops in the Chelyabinsk region. Under his command, on the night of 26 on 27 of May 1918, part of the 2 and 3 of the Czechoslovak infantry regiments without loss established control over Chelyabinsk. In June 1918, Wojciechowski was promoted to colonel and led the Western Group of Forces, which included the 2 and 3 Czechoslovak infantry regiments and the Kurgan Marching Battalion. Czechoslovak troops under the command of Colonel Wojciechowski occupied Troitsk, Zlatoust, and then Yekaterinburg.

Since the beginning of the uprising of the Czechoslovak Corps, its units and subdivisions no longer submitted to the Czechoslovak National Council in Moscow and did not comply with the order of Tomas Masaryk about surrendering weapons. By this time, the Czechoslovakians had already considered the Bolshevik government as potential allies of Germany and were going to continue the war with Germany and Austria-Hungary in alliance with the anti-Bolshevik Russian formations. It was under the control of the Czechoslovak troops that the formation of alternative to the Soviets authorities in those cities controlled by units of the Czechoslovak Corps began. Thus, in Samara, the Committee of members of the constituent assembly (Komuch) was organized on June 8, and the Provisional Siberian Government was established on June 23 in Omsk. The People’s Army of Komuch was created, whose chief of staff was Colonel Nikolai Galkin. The Independent Infantry Brigade of Lieutenant Colonel Vladimir Kappel became the most reliable part of the People’s Army of Komuch.

In July, the Czechoslovak units, in alliance with the Kappelists, took Syzran 1918, then the Czechoslovak troops took Kuznetsk, Tyumen, Yekaterinburg, Irkutsk and Chita. However, the command of the Red Army managed to quickly mobilize impressive forces of the Red Army to suppress the uprising of the Czechoslovak Corps. Soon the Czechoslovaks managed to knock out of Kazan, Simbirsk, Syzran, Samara. By the autumn of 1918, the great losses of the Czechoslovak troops led the command of the Czechoslovak Corps to the decision to withdraw the Czechoslovak units to the rear. Czechoslovak units dispersed along the Trans-Siberian Railway and did not take part in the hostilities against the Red Army. Separate Czechoslovak units continued to serve for the protection of objects and even for the liquidation of partisans in Siberia, but the activity of the Czechoslovak Corps in the 1919 year was becoming less and less. During the retreat of the Kolchak troops, the Czechoslovak Corps largely impeded the movement of Kolchak troops to the east. Along the way, the Czechoslovakians took part of the gold reserves of Russia, which was under their control during the retreat. They also issued a red admiral Kolchak.

In December 1919, the first parts of the Czechoslovak Corps began to go on ships from Vladivostok to Europe. In all, 42 72 military personnel from the Czechoslovak Corps were evacuated from Russia on 644 ships. Corps losses in Russia amounted to about 4 thousand people killed and missing.

Many veterans of the Czechoslovak Corps subsequently made serious military and political careers in independent Czechoslovakia. Thus, the former commander of the Czechoslovak Corps, General Jan Syrovy, served as Chief of the General Staff, then Minister of National Defense and Prime Minister. Sergei Voitsekhovsky served in Czechoslovakia to the rank of army general, by the time the country was seized by the Nazis, he commanded the Czechoslovak 1 army. Lt. Gen. Radola Gaida served as deputy chief of staff of the Czechoslovak army, then actively engaged in political activities. Stanislav Chechek reached the general, commanded the 5-th Infantry Division of the Czechoslovak Army.

Given the complexity of the situation at that time, it is not possible to evaluate the actions of the Czechoslovaks unequivocally. But it must be recognized that the uprising of the Czechoslovak Corps played a very important role in the history of revolutionary Russia, becoming one of the key impulses for the beginning of the Civil War in the country.
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  1. rkkasa xnumx
    rkkasa xnumx 18 May 2018 06: 12
    +4
    it must be recognized that the uprising of the Czechoslovak Corps,who obeyed France, played a very important role in the history of revolutionary Russia, becoming one of the key impetus for the start of the Civil War in the country
    And in today's Russia, they are now erecting monuments.
    1. Basil50
      Basil50 18 May 2018 07: 30
      +8
      So is the power of the counter-revolution now. And about the Czechs as it is bashful and veiled. * Participated in guards and battles against partisans *. In fact, they were engaged in robbery and murder. Even then, the Czechs considered themselves much higher than the RUSSIANS, and therefore considered themselves entitled to robberies and killings.
      1. igordok
        igordok 18 May 2018 07: 32
        +5
        They were often called "cheshosobaki".
        1. MrK
          MrK 18 May 2018 21: 29
          +5
          Even in the mid-seventies (!) In feasts where you still remembered
          they sang an old, unbroken folk song composed in the twentieth:
          - Father was killed by evil Czechs,
          And they burnt their mother alive in a fire ...
          Similar folk songs are born for a reason!
          And Polonsky writes: it’s definitely not possible to evaluate the actions of Czechoslovakians..
    2. svp67
      svp67 18 May 2018 09: 00
      +5
      Quote: rkkasa 81
      And in today's Russia, they are now erecting monuments.

      And who sets? The Embassy of the Czech Republic puts it, but with the permission of our government ... Something seems to me that would not hurt our Embassy in the Czech Republic to take care of installing monuments to our soldiers who died in the events of the Prague Spring of 1968, so to speak, "an eye for an eye, a tooth by the tooth ... "
      1. Gopnik
        Gopnik 18 May 2018 13: 16
        +2
        In the Czech Republic, there are monuments to Soviet soldiers.
        1. svp67
          svp67 18 May 2018 13: 52
          +5
          Quote: Gopnik
          In the Czech Republic, there are monuments to Soviet soldiers.

          Dead in 1968? You understand the difference. In our country, too, there are monuments to Czechs and Slovaks who died on the fields of World War II, for example, in the city of Buzuluk, very important for the Czech army ... Honor to them ETERNAL MEMORY

          But the article deals with the Czechs who died during our Civil War, and there they showed themselves, to put it mildly, ambiguously. So I ask if there are monuments in the Czech Republic to our soldiers who died in 1968, in events that are also ambiguously perceived by our Czech partners
          1. Gopnik
            Gopnik 18 May 2018 14: 01
            +3
            There are monuments to Soviet soldiers who fought for the liberation of the Czech Republic from Germany. In Russia, a monument is being erected to Czech soldiers who fought for Russia against Germany and its minions. In the end, in the USSR, in honor of the red-internationalist Hasek, who fought with the Russian people and the Russian army, not only monuments and boards - streets were called, for symmetry, it is necessary for the legionnaires who fought for Russia.
          2. Gopnik
            Gopnik 18 May 2018 14: 11
            +4
            The events of 1968, our Czech partners perceive absolutely UNIVERSALLY - an armed invasion of a sovereign state. Ambiguously - this is about the civil war in Russia, there are monuments to Hasek - let there be monuments to the legionnaires - who showed himself perfectly in the war against the German invaders in 1914-18
          3. Olgovich
            Olgovich 19 May 2018 06: 55
            +3
            Quote: svp67
            But the article deals with the Czechs who died during our Civil War, and there they showed themselves, to put it mildly, ambiguously.

            The Czechs did not change their views: they were created for the war with Germany, they did not change this goal even after the Thief. This is Russia from a fierce adversary of Germany, it became, after the Thief its practically, an ally. The Czechs, of course, automatically became opponents of the forces of the BOP.
            This does not in any way justify what they did in some places, but this is the cost of the Citizens. a war that they did not start, but those who attacked the VP on October 25th.
            Quote: svp67
            So I ask if there are monuments in the Czech Republic to our soldiers who died in 1968, in events that are also ambiguously perceived by our Czech partners

            But such a monument in the Czech Republic should be unambiguous, I agree. hi
        2. rkkasa xnumx
          rkkasa xnumx 18 May 2018 16: 49
          +5
          Quote: Gopnik
          In the Czech Republic, there are monuments to Soviet soldiers

          Quote: Gopnik
          let there be monuments to the legionnaires - who showed himself perfectly in the war with the German invaders in 1914-18

          To equate the soldiers of the Red Army, who liberated the Czech Republic from the Nazi occupiers, with the Czech mercenaries of the Entente, largely due to which we had a Civil War, yes ... fool
          Brain anti-Sovietism is a serious illness leading to the complete degradation of this very brain stop You are more careful there, otherwise you will lose the last remnants of it.
          1. RUSS
            RUSS 19 May 2018 10: 19
            +2
            Quote: rkkasa 81
            Brain anti-Sovietism is a serious illness leading to the complete degradation of this very brain. You will be more careful there, otherwise you will lose the last remnants of it.

            Sovietism leads to stagnation of the brain, because of a pricey country collapsed
            1. onix757
              onix757 19 May 2018 10: 24
              +2
              Quote: RUSS
              Sovietism leads to stagnation of the brain, because of a pricey country collapsed

              Is this the reason for the hatred of the West for everything Soviet?
    3. ism_ek
      ism_ek 18 May 2018 14: 04
      +2
      Quote: rkkasa 81
      And in today's Russia, they are now erecting monuments.

      What are the monuments? We have a small memorial in the cemetery in Yekaterinburg. There are no monuments. .
      1. rkkasa xnumx
        rkkasa xnumx 18 May 2018 16: 29
        +3
        Quote: ism_ek
        What are the monuments?

        https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Памятники чехословацким легионерам
    4. Silvio
      Silvio 18 May 2018 19: 35
      0
      Quote: rkkasa 81
      And in today's Russia, they are now erecting monuments


      Monuments are being erected for them so that in Czechoslovakia the monuments of Kr. armies were not demolished. They are now members of another military bloc and the monuments of military-political opponents on their territory they do not need. The same goes for the Hungarians. The ex-brothers have a reason to demolish Soviet monuments, remembering the 56 and 68 years of the last century. And the Hungarians are still 1845. remember. The Poles brought a lot to themselves.
  2. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 06: 36
    +7
    The Czechs in this case, puppets and women of easy virtue, went through the front door, flew out through the rectum, I think they lay so easily in front of the Fritz afterwards, because they were afraid of reprisal.
    1. bober1982
      bober1982 18 May 2018 07: 42
      +2
      Quote: grizzly bear
      I think they lay before the Fritz so easily afterwards

      The Chechens were subsequently surrendered to the Fritz by the British and French, the Germans then set up a terror, destroyed local Jews and those who resisted them, there were many of them.
    2. svp67
      svp67 18 May 2018 09: 02
      0
      Quote: grizzly bear
      I think they lay before the Fritz so easily afterwards, because they feared reprisals.

      You will get acquainted with the history of the surrender of the Czech Republic by Western countries. Not everyone in the Czech Republic dutifully raised their hands then, there were strong centers of resistance, though not numerous, but they were.
      1. Grizzly
        Grizzly 18 May 2018 22: 59
        0
        And with what to get acquainted with the fact that the Czech Republic had potential? And the fact that the generals consisted of those same Czechoslovakians did not read the BB?
      2. Grizzly
        Grizzly 18 May 2018 23: 01
        0
        Yes, I am familiar with the fact that the Czech Republic armed fascist Germany
      3. Grizzly
        Grizzly 18 May 2018 23: 03
        0
        Hence the direct connection that they would be destroyed at the root, and they are cowardly Czechoslovakians
      4. Grizzly
        Grizzly 18 May 2018 23: 14
        0
        Angles with the French passed? Did the French surrender themselves and surrender the Czechs? This only proves that they are intermediaries. About partisans and the underground this is not the topic by the way
      5. Grizzly
        Grizzly 18 May 2018 23: 40
        0
        My grandfather was the first secretary of the borzia district committee, so I’d like to talk to him
  3. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 06: 39
    +1
    All the same, not that the main, but the fuse of the Entente, intervention forces
  4. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 06: 43
    +1
    I have more respect for the French who remained Napoleon’s posse in Russia and practically assimilated here
  5. bober1982
    bober1982 18 May 2018 07: 25
    +5
    It is unlikely that the beginning of the civil war can be linked with the performance of the Czechs, by the way finally (it was constantly changing) the date of the Czech speech was set on May 25, 1918 (according to the Soviet version)
    It is strange that the author of the article did not mention the episode from which the Czechs began their performances, namely, the clash between the Czechs and the Hungarians in Chelyabinsk on May 14, 1918, which led to armed unrest.
    The meeting of the Czechs mentioned by the author in Chelyabinsk on May 16, 1918. (which lasted four days) - this is apparently the pogroms that were carried out not too organized, without any command of the Czech legionnaires.
  6. sib.ataman
    sib.ataman 18 May 2018 08: 11
    +4
    Troyanovskaya horse is this corps on the territory of Russia! Also, the thieves that stole part of the gold reserve from the Kolchak echelon!
    1. Reptiloid
      Reptiloid 18 May 2018 15: 12
      +1
      Quote: sib.ataman
      ....... and the thieves that stole part of the gold reserve from the Kolchak echelon!
      It was probably most of that gold. Bigger and better ++ looting during the promotion. There are words that it was this gold that gave the development of their economy, and then Hitler was fueled, in the sense of German industry, for the possibility of war with the USSR.
    2. kalibr
      kalibr 18 May 2018 22: 37
      0
      They took him not from the train, but right in Kazan!
  7. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 10: 19
    0
    If memory serves me, the Americans landed in Vladivostok under the pretext of saving these devils, and we marched in front of the GUM and the home of the fleet officers, until our Red Army scared them along with the Yap
  8. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 10: 25
    +2
    Simple fighters of the Entente interventionists, the Angles and the French refused to fight with the Russians, so the White Guard was stupidly pumped up, well-known bigwigs were to blame for the civilian, and Kolchak should not be represented as a Russian officer, he betrayed his homeland
  9. bubalik
    bubalik 18 May 2018 14: 37
    +1
    “Czech mining struck not only with its quantity, but also with its diversity. What, what just did not have the Czechs. Their warehouses were bursting with a huge amount of Russian uniforms, weapons, cloth, food supplies and shoes. Not content with requisitioning state-owned warehouses and state-owned property, the Czechs began to take away everything that came to hand, completely disregarding who owned the property. Metals, all sorts of raw materials, valuable cars, thoroughbred horses - were declared Czechs military booty. They took medicine alone for more than three million gold rubles, rubber for 40 million rubles, a huge amount of copper was removed from the Tyumen region, etc. The Czechs did not hesitate to declare even the library and laboratory of Perm University their prize. The exact amount of stolen Czechs can not even be counted. By the most conservative estimate, this kind of contribution cost the Russian people many hundreds of millions of rubles and significantly exceeded the contribution made by the Prussians to France in 1871. Part of this production was the subject of open sale and sale to the market at inflated prices; and is intended for shipment to the Czech Republic. In a word, the celebrated Czech genius flourished in Siberia in full color. True, this kind of commerce is rather approaching the concept of open robbery (or armed theft), but the Czechs, as a practical people, were not disposed to reckon with prejudice. ”

    To this we add that the Czechs seized and declared their property a huge number of locomotives and over twenty thousand wagons. One carriage accounted for approximately two Czechs. It is clear that they needed such an amount of rolling stock for the transportation and storage of the indemnity taken from poor Russia. and not for the needs of feeding the corps and combat service.


    Lieutenant-General K. V. Sakharov "Czech Legions in Siberia"
  10. _TANKIST_
    _TANKIST_ 18 May 2018 15: 03
    +2
    My grandfather told me, and my great-grandfather told him how these dead and whole families hung 7 people each on telegraph poles (((.
  11. pepel
    pepel 18 May 2018 16: 28
    +1
    It is necessary for this reptile, who gave the go-ahead to erect a monument to the Czechs, to hand in a sledgehammer and force to gouge this monument together with the foundation. They remember us in 1968, it is time to begin to muzzle them in full 1918. am angry
  12. Tomato
    Tomato 18 May 2018 20: 23
    +4
    Let's look at the events calmly and impartially:
    1. "On March 26, 1918, in Penza, between Soviet Russia, represented on behalf of the Council of People's Commissars of the RSFSR Joseph Stalin, and representatives of the Czechoslovak National Council and the Czechoslovak Corps, an agreement was signed on the unimpeded movement of Czechoslovak corps through Russia to Vladivostok."
    2. Georgy Chicherin demanded that the Krasnoyarsk Council of Workers' Deputies stop the further advance of Czechoslovak units to the east.
    3. they perceived this decision as a covert attempt by the Soviet government to betray them to Germany and Austria-Hungary as traitors.
    Everything is logical and logical. What were the Red-eyed counting on?
    Czechs and Slovaks wanted to return home calmly. But the leader of the red bastard and the Bolshevik scum Lenin, signed the Brest Peace, gave the most economically developed part of the country to the Germans, saving his syphilis skin. This once again confirms who was the puppeteer burry.
    What did the Czechs have to do? Break through home with fights.
    That's because they opposed Kolchak, they have no forgiveness.
  13. ALEA IACTA EST
    ALEA IACTA EST 18 May 2018 20: 59
    +1
    Sergei Nikolaevich Wojciechowski - Russian Major General, Army General of Czechoslovakia. Member of the First World War and the Civil War in Russia. He held a defensive position during the Sudeten crisis, was a member of the anti-Nazi organization "Protection of the people." Upon a proposal from the Germans for cooperation, he stated that "he does not recognize the Soviets, he hates the communist system, but he will not fight against Russian soldiers - children and grandchildren of those who made the coup in Russia." Arrested in May 1945. He died in 1951 in a Soviet camp.
  14. kalibr
    kalibr 18 May 2018 22: 34
    +1
    "The truth!" must be read in 1918 year. The Czechoslovak Corps has sided with the Soviet regime! Then ... then vice versa ... And how well it started. But ... Germans needed war prisoners Germans and Hungarians from camps in Siberia and had to choose ... either Germans or "Slav brothers".
  15. Grizzly
    Grizzly 18 May 2018 23: 09
    +1
    The layer of eastern Slavs unequivocally strive for the west, which they can never reach, therefore they are hostages of our relations with the west
  16. Sugar Honeyovich
    Sugar Honeyovich 19 May 2018 04: 03
    +1
    “For example, captive miners, participants in the Kolchugin uprising and their like-minded people, were transported through Topki to subsequently transfer them to prisons. The trains with prisoners could stand at the station for several days ...
    According to the memoirs of the old-timers, when the whites who kept the whole district in fear had nothing to do at night, they got drunk in the train station restaurant, went out into the street, took out several prisoners and shot them in a birch grove, on the site of which, by the way, is now the city stadium. Almost every morning, locals found dead people in a grove. They also say that once a dog brought a human hand into the mouth ... "http://mkkuzbass.ru/2008/02/20/legendy-kuzbassa-t
    opki.html
  17. Alex
    Alex 20 May 2018 22: 04
    0
    What can I say, Trotsky was an unsurpassed master of political provocation. And the story with the Czechoslovak Corps is a vivid illustration. He had to drag Russia into a new war at any cost, and that’s what he wanted by all means.
    1. ver_
      ver_ 30 May 2018 13: 19
      +1
      .. Well so God's chosen one ..
      1. Alex
        Alex 30 May 2018 21: 23
        +1
        Quote: ver_
        .. Well so God's chosen one ..

        I think that the matter is not God's chosen people as such. It was just that the man was from the then “common people”, who viewed Russia (and its people) as firewood in the “world revolution” firebox, by which he understood the power of supranational capital. The fact that "God's chosen nation" best of all succumbed to these ideas, is already a second question.
    2. ver_
      ver_ 30 May 2018 14: 34
      +1
      ..and is there anything for this tribe to love? ..