Military Review

Equestrian army of the Kaiser. H. 1

60
Before 1914, the German cavalry consisted of 103 cavalry regiments, consolidated into an 51 brigade (2-regimental composition each), distributed among the army corps - one per building. During this period, the cavalry had no higher units - in the German army there was only one cavalry division - the Guards, which consisted of the 4 brigades.


The Germans believed that in the coming war, cavalry was unlikely to play a large role, although they intensively studied the experience of using cavalry, both at maneuvers and in other armies. In accordance with the statutory requirements, the cavalry should strive to solve the tasks set before it in an offensive spirit - only where it was impossible to act with a spear, she should take on a carbine. The cavalry should not have to wait for the attack of the enemy - she should have attacked first.



After the announcement of mobilization in 1914, the cavalry received a new organization. Its smaller part (38%) was assigned to the peacetime infantry divisions as divisional cavalry (based on the squadron 3 per division); reserve divisions, which were formed only during the mobilization of the army, were assigned to the newly formed reserve squadrons. Most of the peacetime cavalry (62%) was consolidated into large organizational units — cavalry brigades were consolidated into cavalry divisions, and the latter into cavalry corps. A total of 11 cavalry divisions were formed - 10 of them comprised 4 cavalry corps. Each division consisted of three brigades — that is, of 6 regiments of four squadrons. Infantry was also included in the cavalry corps in the form of the Chasseurs battalions.



In total, the Germans launched the 1914 in August:

On the Eastern Front - in East Prussia - the 1 Cavalry Division.

On the Western Front:
1 Cavalry Corps as part of the Guards and 5 Cavalry Divisions (5 Chasseurs battalions);
The 2 Cavalry Corps as part of the 2, 4 and 9 Cavalry Divisions (5 Chasseurs battalions);
The 3 Cavalry Corps as part of the 7, 8 and Bavarian cavalry divisions (2 rangers battalion);
The 4 Cavalry Corps as part of the 3 and 6 Cavalry Divisions (2 Jaeger Battalion).

Cavalry regiments marched to the war as part of 4 saber squadrons (each of an 4 platoon). In total, the regiment had 250 officers, 6 doctors, 83 non-commissioned officers, 633 privates, 696 drill horses. The cavalry convoy consisted of 19 twin carts and 62 clockwork horses.

Each cavalry division was given: an equestrian artillery division consisting of 2 batteries and 6 guns in each; 1 - 2 Jaeger Battalion and Machine Gun Team.



At the beginning of the war, in 1914, the German cavalry corps, especially the 1 and 2, acted quite successfully and played a large role in the Marne operation. But later, in connection with the transition to a positional war, the Germans began to dismount their cavalry units, transferring horses to artillery. Another trend was that all active cavalry gradually migrated to the Eastern Front. As a result, by the end of the war, the Germans had almost no cavalry left on the Western Front - which they regretted in 1918, when large offensive operations urgently demanded the presence of cavalry masses as a means of developing a breakthrough.

All four cavalry corps of the Western Front were at the disposal of the commander-in-chief (this cavalry was called Heereskavallerie) and was assigned to the armies - moving from one army to another, depending on the situation. Therefore, the Germans gave it the above name, and did not call it "army" (The words Her and Armee have different meanings for the Germans. Armee is the next for the corps in the system of higher military units (associations) and corresponds to our concept of “army” as a specific organizational unit. In World War I, all 7 armies of the Germanic Western Front were first directly subordinate to the commander-in-chief (O.N.L. - Oberste Heeresleitung) and only during the war were permanent intermediate command and control instances formed in the form of three army groups (Heeresgruppen), which corresponds to our concept "front". But the Germans had the term “Armee Gruppe” - the army group - a temporary connection, intermediate between the corps and the army. In fact, there were army groups in the Russian army as well, for example, when P. A. Plehve was assigned to lead a group of 2 and 5 armies near Lodz. In one of the promising articles we will focus on these issues in more detail.). Such cavalry was called by the French "independent" (cavallerie independante), and by the Russians - army or strategic. Calling the German cavalry army, we remember that the Germans, in fact, it was not the army - that is, it was not included in the permanent composition of the army.

The Germans fielded 7 armies on the Western Front. The first five armies, which were deployed from Aachen to Metz, were to make a descent to the left, with the right wing through Belgium, having the Mets descent axis. Two other armies (6-I and 7-I) turned around in Alsace-Lorraine - from Metz to the Swiss border.

The 1 Cavalry Corps was ahead of the 2 and 2 Army, and the 3 Cavalry Corps was ahead of the 1 Army. The 2 Cavalry Corps, moving ahead of the 1 and 2 armies that had bypassed Lütich (Liege), 12 August attacked the Belgian forces located across the Senna River (on the way to Brussels), but could not break through the enemy infantry. But he was able to give accurate information about the location of the Belgians.

The 1 Cavalry Corps, moving ahead of the 3 Army and occupying the 16 August height to the east of Dinant, with the help of his rangers battalions and horse artillery, kept under surveillance the French-Belgian forces along the Meuse - between Namur and Givet. But the connection to the Meuse, with its rocky shores, failed.

On August 20, this corps was subordinated to the 2 Army - which sent it south of Brussels. The Belgian Plain was a more suitable field of activity.

The 2 Cavalry Corps, following further on Curtra and Denen, discovered the presence of the British. At this time he was subordinate to the 1-th Army. And 24 August dispersed one French brigade at Tournai.



During the further offensive in front of the front of the 1 Army, the 2 Cavalry Corps continued reconnaissance.

Cavalry reconnaissance complemented by actions aviation - which, with the further advance of the German 1st and 2nd armies, began to deliver more information to the Marne.

In the Marne battle, army cavalry was successfully used to fill the gap formed between the 1 and 2 armies - when the 1 I pulled their troops from Marne to Urku. For this, four cavalry divisions from the 1 and 2 cavalry corps were gradually put into operation. In cooperation with the infantry brigade, they, filling the gap, did not allow the British to break through the German front. This task was effectively carried out by the German cavalry thanks to the cavalry of operational mobility.

Before the front of the German 4 and 5 armies for the army cavalry (4 Cavalry Corps), there was no opportunity for such a broad activity as on the right flank of the German offensive - here the German cavalry soon stumbled upon the deployed masses of the enemy forces . Although the 4 Cavalry Corps hung over the retreating enemy, it always met with strong resistance, forcing it to stop.

The scope of activity of the army cavalry in front of the 6 and 7 armies (3 Cavalry Corps) from the very beginning was stopped by close contact with the enemy armies. The pursuit of the enemy after the Saarburg battle was stopped by the fact that the enemy departed under the cover of their fortresses.

On the hot days of August 1914, the German cavalry horse was very exhausted - and this applies not only to the cavalry of the right wing of the approaching German front (2 and 1-Cavalry Corps), which also had to make large transitions, but also cavalry on the inner flank (4- Cavalry Corps).

The 1 Cavalry Corps had to give one-day 8 of August a day - because the horses were very tired of the mountain roads they were not used to, and moreover, a rework was required. On August 25, one of the divisions of the 2 Cavalry Corps reported severe fatigue of their horses and loss of their performance. Another division, moved on September 2 to harass the enemy, was (for the same reason) stopped.

The cavalry’s performance was also influenced by the lack of food - due to both difficulties in transporting it and the inability (initially) to use rest minutes to feed and water the horses. Usually, late arrivals for overnight stays, mostly already in the dark, as well as early performances had a bad effect on the care and feeding of horses.

On the Western Front, horses were first given (in large quantities) fresh-cooked (with stems) oats, sometimes with an admixture of clover. Gradually introduced into the use of various feed surrogates. The latter, with increasing difficulties in supplying horses with normal fodder, led to a number of errors - for example, the use of the famous sawdust galetes (Sagemehlkuchen), which did more harm than good.



On the Eastern Front, horses sometimes had to be content with dry woody leaves, heather, woody branches, and straw from the roofs of the family houses — which, due to the presence of mold and fungus, often caused stomach and intestinal diseases in horses.

Inexperience in the use of fodder substitutes was manifested, and the horses had to be gradually accustomed to their natural food, herbal. This was a common misfortune of the European cavalry. Thus, from the beginning of the war to the arrival at Iser, the French cavalry lost horses more than people — three-quarters of its personnel. The reason is overloading horses and lack of care for them.

G. Freytag-Loringofen believes that this is a repetition of the same phenomenon that accelerated the death of Napoleon's cavalry in 1812. And, just as in the Jena operation of Napoleon in 1806, the advancing infantry were catching up with their cavalry, chasing the enemy, it was repeated in 1914 on the Western Front. Both then and now the man turned out to be a better walker than a horse.

It was a fact that already in the first two weeks of the war the army was freed from all horses unsuitable for war - but it was in the first two weeks of the hostilities that the cavalry was needed, which stood at the highest stage of its efficiency. The enemy, according to G. Freytag-Loringofen, was even worse - the horses of the French 3 divisional cavalry corps of Sordé, located in Belgium, were completely incapable of movement at the time of unification with the English army. The hull arrived without any real benefit. The whole corps served the service of patrols and traveled around Belgium in all directions - without gathering any valuable information about the Germans. The Germans, according to the above author, did not even see him.

At the beginning of the war, the Austro-Hungarian army cavalry, which possessed a splendid horse force, carried the same traveling service. Already in the second battle of Lviv (June 1915), as G. Freytag-Loringofen notes, she participated in a completely upset state.

Probably, according to the author, the overworking of horses is explained by the fact that the raid of the French and English cavalry was not carried out after the Marne operation 1914 of the year, bypassing the German right flank towards St. Quentin, which promised allies to the allies under the current situation.

During the retreat of the German army after the Marn operation 1914, its army cavalry covered the open right flank from the enemy bypass. Although, of course, the best tactical tactics against bypassing were the constant counterattacks of the German troops - which did not allow the enemy to complete the Marn battle with large-scale parallel pursuit. And when the enemy, gradually using his developed railway network, concentrated more and more troops against the right flank of the Germans, the Germans opposed him in Bapom, in addition to the 6 army units pulled here, also the 1 and 2 Cavalry Corps - the last acted in this battle in a dismounted ranks. An attempt by the 4 Cavalry Corps (brought to the 3-division) to search for the flank and to the rear of the enemy position, bypassing Lille from the north, the Germans failed. The corps could not overcome the extremely rugged (mass of buildings and mines) terrain of the industrial region of northern France.

German cavalry led a successful defensive battle here. But a limited number of shooters, as always with dismounted cavalry, did not allow her to go on to a serious offensive.

The enemy of the Germans acted similarly at that time: D. French used his cavalry to lengthen the infantry front and to fill the resulting front breaks.

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  1. heavy division
    heavy division 12 May 2018 05: 57
    +5
    Fine! So I was waiting about the German cavalry.
    Very interesting and detailed, to the author of Merci
    1. BRONEVIK
      BRONEVIK 12 May 2018 07: 42
      +16
      good
      drinks
      hi
      We look forward to continuing
  2. andrewkor
    andrewkor 12 May 2018 07: 16
    +1
    Mobile troops for maneuver warfare, bypasses, girths, pursuits, the elite of the armed forces of that war even in personnel, aristocracy! The ideological ancestors of Guderian’s tank wedges! In the British army, blindly adhering to traditions, not just tank troops, but cavalry armor, as in Buryatia (a joke)!
  3. BRONEVIK
    BRONEVIK 12 May 2018 07: 45
    +16
    Truly strategic cavalry is a branch of the army designed to solve key tasks
    Fast, large-scale, multifunctional
    And the Germans are also masters of the organization - they came to the corps with the first shots
    But ...
    But then they did not save their cavalry. However, to know where you fall - straws would spread
    1. Cheburator
      Cheburator 12 May 2018 08: 34
      +16
      By the way, jaeger battalions in the cavalry division seriously strengthened the German cavalry
      An additional valuable resource. The step was literate, "German")
  4. Cheburator
    Cheburator 12 May 2018 08: 39
    +17

    interesting sketches and pictures of the types of German cavalrymen
  5. Cheburator
    Cheburator 12 May 2018 08: 41
    +16

    captured lancers
  6. The centurion
    The centurion 12 May 2018 08: 58
    0
    "There were 250 officers in the regiment, 6 doctors, 83 non-commissioned officers, 633 privates, 696 drill horses."
    Those. 250 officers, 6 doctors, 83 non-commissioned officer, walked on foot or by 6 people per horse?
    1. Cheburator
      Cheburator 12 May 2018 09: 14
      +18
      Well, yes, what else to complain about
      then shrapnel breaks not in the air, but above the ground, then we can’t count the horses.
      In total, the regiment had 250 officers, 6 doctors, 83 non-commissioned officers, 633 privates, 696 combat horses

      However, there is nothing difficult to see - 696 combat horses were assigned to 633 lower ranks, 83 non-commissioners, 250 officers and 6 doctors. Some of these ranks are non-combatants, messengers and foot teams (it is not without reason that 62 more groovy combat horses and 19 wagon carts are mentioned). As usual - the difference between “sabers” and “eaters”.
      1. heavy division
        heavy division 12 May 2018 09: 47
        +2
        I counted good wink laughing
        696 drill and 62 clockwork horses = 758 horses.
        Man - 633 + 83 + 250 + 6 = 972.
        That is 972 people for 758 horses. Or 1,2 people per 1 horse.
        Why uncle wrote above
        6 people per horse
        nor fika is incomprehensible.
        1. soldier
          soldier 15 May 2018 07: 30
          +16
          In the regiment, of course, not 250, but 25 officers. Zero is just a typo.
  7. soldier
    soldier 12 May 2018 12: 39
    +16
    The 2nd Cavalry Corps was subordinate to the 1st Army. And on August 24 he scattered a French brigade at Tournai.

    And on the Western Front, cavalry also happened to have successfully acted against the infantry.
    Despite any machine guns. Moreover, cavalry also have them.
    I really like the episode of the Cossack attack from the Quiet Don. This is if we talk directly about cavalry such.
    Although the cavalry’s maneuverability is more important than direct attacks on the battlefield, the soil has narrowed for the latter.
  8. Black joe
    Black joe 12 May 2018 17: 39
    +1
    Informative. Quite
    We look forward to continuing
  9. serge serge
    serge serge 14 May 2018 21: 03
    -1
    Something from a respected author with a digital problem. We take only the first sentence:
    "Until 1914, the German cavalry consisted of 103 cavalry regiments, reduced to 51 brigades (2 regiment each), distributed across army corps - one per corps."
    Let's start with the terminology: cavalry is, as a rule, irregular parts. And regular ones are cavalry.
    Further, in all directories, the German cavalry at the beginning of the PMV: 110 regiments (5 squadrons - 4 active, 1 spare):
    10 cuirassiers (including 2 guards);
    28 dragoons (2 guards, 1 horse-grenadier);
    21 hussars (1 guards, 2 life-hussars);
    24 lancers (3 guards);
    15 horse rangers (including 1 guards raider and 1 carabinier);
    12 Bavarian (2 heavy, 2 lancers, 8 neck-lying).
    Hence the cavalry brigade (2 kp) 55:
    4 guards;
    1leib Hussar;
    44 license plates;
    6 license plate Bavarian.
    In peacetime, the Caucasus Brigade was not assigned to corps (if the Germans had 1914 only an army corps in 51 ... they didn’t have as many recruited as reserve troops), but it was part of the infantry divisions. Moreover, 2, 12, 34 pd included 2 cavalry brigades.
    So, I'm sorry, I do not read further. If only the first sentence has so many inaccuracies.
    PS: Yes, before sending, I looked in the comments about the staff of the regiment. Specifically, officers. Of course there were not so many of them. Even in the cavalry divisions formed after the outbreak of war, the state relied on 283 officers. And there are 34 of them in the regiment. So there were enough horses for everyone
    1. soldier
      soldier 15 May 2018 06: 37
      +16
      This is not the author of the problem, but you.
      What is the source of your numbers? Yes, no.
      Cavalry and cavalry are terms repeatedly used as synonyms. so your passage
      Let's start with the terminology: cavalry is, as a rule, irregular parts. And regular ones are cavalry.
      - pure fantasy. It’s like butter.
      Further, in all directories
      Oh really? If they would, they would.
      The author is absolutely right.
      Figures and facts given in the article. are confirmed.
      I recommend:
      1) Maksheev. German cavalry. Army and revolution. 1923. No. 3-4.
      Next, here is a guide
      1. soldier
        soldier 15 May 2018 06: 39
        +15
        We open its pages confirming the author’s figures

        We see what is called CAVALRY
        We see 103 regiments
        1. soldier
          soldier 15 May 2018 06: 44
          +15

          We see an indication of the 51 brigade, an indication of the composition - as the author rightly noted in the article.
          So you, serge serge - lie shamelessly.
          Trying after a while to cast a shadow on an excellent article. Not knowing the facts, not owning the material - because besides the Internet you don’t bother finding sources.
          And in the end, the author is right. And commentator Serge Serge is a lie.
          1. soldier
            soldier 15 May 2018 07: 16
            +15
            Yes, Soldier, you are right.
            And it’s not for nothing that the author said
            Until 1914, the German cavalry consisted of 103 cavalry regiments, reduced to 51 brigades (2 regiment each)

            During the war years there were changes
            Here is a publication of their notes
            1. soldier
              soldier 15 May 2018 07: 18
              +15

              We see that in 1915 the number of regiments and squadrons changed
              1. soldier
                soldier 15 May 2018 07: 19
                +15
                Invariably the number of horses in the train
          2. serge serge
            serge serge 15 May 2018 13: 24
            -1
            Easy cornering, bastard. Your "copyright", apparently stupidly bracketed the guards cavalry, which, alas, you do not need to understand. Then it was necessary to write "army cavalry" and everything would be clear. But for what reasons "copyright" it made this a question for him. And unlike the work of 1913, with which you are here with zeal worthy of a better application, you are brandishing, for a long time there are paintings of all units, all armies of participants in that war (both in German and in English, and imagine, even in Russian). So, according to them, the German regular cavalry regiments at the beginning of the First World War were exactly 110. No more, no less
            1. soldier
              soldier 15 May 2018 13: 34
              +15
              And can you see here scans from these works, with which you are now trumping?
              What the author should have written is probably not your business. There were 103 regiments, and then 104. Official data, repeatedly verified and cross-checked.
              Lay out your material here, pliz.
              1. soldier
                soldier 15 May 2018 13: 40
                +15
                And didn’t take anything out of brackets
                1. Bouncer
                  Bouncer 15 May 2018 14: 59
                  +15
                  This serge serge will not send any soldier scans to you - his darling just wrote. Just to write, or rather to write.
                  There are no 110.
                  That's right, 103 regiment before the war, then the 7th Horse-Ranger appears.
                  And - 104 regiment for 1915. Page 11 (above) on Armyan’s scan “Brief information about the German army” 1915 includes 104 guards in 8 regiments (they are indicated in footnotes, XNUMX guards regiments).
                2. serge serge
                  serge serge 17 May 2018 06: 56
                  -1
                  No, here, of course, you are right. For some reason, I’m confused, decided for some reason that I can read the author’s thoughts, what he thought when he wrote, and why such a digital figure popped up. Alas and ah, I do not own this gift.
                  1. Bouncer
                    Bouncer 17 May 2018 07: 35
                    +15
                    You do not even have the gift to perceive sources
                    What a sin to conceal
                    Giving your own deep thoughts to reality
              2. serge serge
                serge serge 17 May 2018 06: 54
                -1
                I understand that for some, that on the forehead, that on the forehead. Nevertheless, I would like to believe that you no less wish to establish the truth in this matter. Therefore, I will try one more time. Let's count, if, of course, trained.
                So, at the beginning of World War I, 11 cd were formed in the German army, which left 33 cavalry brigades or 66 cavalry regiments, respectively. I hope that they agree with this figure, all the more so as Alexey Oleinikov leads it.
                The remaining 22 (out of 55, if anything) cavalry brigades were disbanded, and their constituent cavalry regiments were assigned to infantry divisions.
                So, the divisions:
                1, 2 guards infantry - total 2;
                1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42 infantry divisions - a total of 30;
                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Bavarian infantry divisions - a total of 6.
                Each of them received 1 cavalry regiment in total 38.
                And the infantry divisions:
                5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 38 - only 12, each got a half of the regiment, i.e. 2 squadrons each. Total 6 cavalry regiments. (Kavpolki divided the divisions included in the same army corps).
                Total: 38 cavalry regiments + 6 cavalry regiments = 44 cavalry regiments assigned to the infantry.
                Hence:
                66 cavalry regiments (consisting of 11 cavalry divisions) + 44 cavalry regiments (assigned to infantry divisions) = ...
                Well, of course, 103, because it is also written in “copyright”.
                Something like that.
                And another mistake by the respected Alexei Oleinikov. He's writing:
                “Was appointed to the peacetime infantry divisions - as a divisional cavalry (based on 3 squadrons per division)”
                In the infantry divisions there were either 4 each (if an entire cavalry regiment was attached) or 2 squadrons (if divided between 2 divisions). And 3 squadrons were in reserve infantry divisions. They, each, were assigned a reserve cavalry regiment, and it was originally built from three operating squadrons.
                1. Bouncer
                  Bouncer 17 May 2018 07: 29
                  +15
                  So, the divisions:
                  1, 2 guards infantry - total 2;
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42 infantry divisions - a total of 30;
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Bavarian infantry divisions - a total of 6.
                  Each of them received 1 cavalry regiment in total 38.
                  And the infantry divisions:
                  5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 38 - only 12, each got a half of the regiment, i.e. 2 squadrons each. Total 6 cavalry regiments. (Kavpolki divided the divisions included in the same army corps).
                  Total: 38 cavalry regiments + 6 cavalry regiments = 44 cavalry regiments assigned to the infantry.
                  Hence:
                  66 cavalry regiments (consisting of 11 cavalry divisions) + 44 cavalry regiments (assigned to infantry divisions) = ...
                  Well, of course, 103, because it is also written in “copyright”.
                  Something like that.
                  And another mistake by the respected Alexei Oleinikov. He's writing:
                  “Was appointed to the peacetime infantry divisions - as a divisional cavalry (based on 3 squadrons per division)”
                  In the infantry divisions there were either 4 each (if an entire cavalry regiment was attached) or 2 squadrons (if divided between 2 divisions). And 3 squadrons were in reserve infantry divisions. They, each, were assigned a reserve cavalry regiment, and it was originally built from three operating squadrons.

                  Everything is written correctly by the author. Long confused reasoning of yours - to mislead. I was not too lazy here, I looked at another publication dedicated to the German cavalry. General Staff. And the author is completely right - both about 103 regiments and about 3 squadrons of division cavalry.
                  1. Bouncer
                    Bouncer 17 May 2018 07: 33
                    +15
                    Here on this page are 3 squadrons per division.
                    so this opus of serge serge -
                    In the infantry divisions there were either 4 each (if an entire cavalry regiment was attached) or 2 squadrons (if divided between 2 divisions). And 3 squadrons were in reserve infantry divisions. They, each, were assigned a reserve cavalry regiment, and it was originally built from three operating squadrons.
                    bullshit

                    Well, I refer to Maksheev. German cavalry. Army and revolution. 1923. No. 3-4. Also fully confirms everything that is given in these materials.
                    Serge Serge's thoughts are irresponsible and baseless
                    1. soldier
                      soldier 17 May 2018 09: 15
                      +15
                      Serge Serge's thoughts are irresponsible and baseless

                      Please note that this talker never once cited a source, and even more so did not show a scan of the material. Indeed, it is not valid ... Ships plow the meanders of the brain)
                      Some unsubstantiated fabrications and thoughtful thoughts.
                      Accordingly, they are worthless. This is unconditional and obvious.
        2. serge serge
          serge serge 15 May 2018 13: 11
          -1
          Mistaken, then your pre-revolutionary (and even pre-war) authority, that's all.
      2. serge serge
        serge serge 15 May 2018 13: 07
        -1
        If they were not completely identical, only 1 term would remain in the language
        1. soldier
          soldier 15 May 2018 13: 39
          +15
          If yes, if only mushrooms would grow in your mouth.
          Cavalry and cavalry are synonyms. And for the same, there are often several terms.
          This is not credibility, but official data - by the way, based on the schedules of foreign armies. One pre-war, 1913 - the Germans 103 cavalry regiment, the second military 1915 - 104 cavalry regiment. However, the Soviet military specialist Maksheyev in 1923 confirms these figures.
          Authority say it was all wrong?
          No, it’s much more likely that some Serge Serge is wrong - that's all.
          1. serge serge
            serge serge 17 May 2018 07: 11
            -1
            I already wrote about the numbers. Now in terminology. I hope you will agree what exactly to name an event, phenomenon, etc. - very important. So, please take a look at the documents of that time. Everywhere there at the mention of license plates, i.e. Regular cavalry divisions everywhere say that these are "cavalry divisions" and only so (although they included the Cossack regiment in number four). But Tekinsky, Crimean, first the divisions, and then the regiments, regiments of the Tuzemnaya, the so-called “Wild” division, and other irregularities are always “equestrian”. And only so. Of course, there were also numerous Cossack units, about which the "Cossack Division" simply wrote. But, in rare cases, when, probably, it was necessary to decipher, they wrote the "Cossack equestrian division" and never the "cavalry". Something like that.
            1. Bouncer
              Bouncer 17 May 2018 07: 21
              +15
              I already wrote about the numbers. Now in terminology. I hope you will agree what exactly to name an event, phenomenon, etc. - very important. So, please take a look at the documents of that time. Everywhere there at the mention of license plates, i.e. Regular cavalry divisions everywhere say that these are "cavalry divisions" and only so (although they included the Cossack regiment in number four). But Tekinsky, Crimean, first the divisions, and then the regiments, regiments of the Tuzemnaya, the so-called “Wild” division, and other irregularities are always “equestrian”. And only so. Of course, there were also numerous Cossack units, about which the "Cossack Division" simply wrote. But, in rare cases, when, probably, it was necessary to decipher, they wrote the "Cossack equestrian division" and never the "cavalry". Something like that.

              Your reasoning is just as mediocre about numbers as it is about terminology.
              Combat documents - zhdshki held in his hands? Of course not.
              So, even on the pages of one and the same document, the corps is called either HORSE, or CAVALERIAN. Batorsky's book is a CAVILIA service. And it writes about CAVALERY. Or does the concept of STRATEGIC HORSE include only irregular connections? You're lying brother.
              So with reference to the WWI - the CAVILITY and CAVALERY are SYNONYMS.
              1. Bouncer
                Bouncer 17 May 2018 08: 09
                +15
                Moreover, even the definition (Brockhaus and Efron, SVE) reads:
                "Cavalry (fr. cavalerie, ital. cavaleria, from lat. caballus - horse), cavalry - a type of army, previously a type of weapon in which a horse was used to conduct combat operations or movement. "Putting an equal sign.
                The old cavalryman, Marshal of the Soviet Union B. M. Shaposhnikov also uses the terms mixed up in the article “Horse masses on the flank of the army”. Well, Batorsky writes "The Cavalry of European Countries." This is based on the logic of Serge squared - I mean only one irregular ?? Probably only spagi are meant, otherwise, after all ... lol
                1. soldier
                  soldier 17 May 2018 08: 30
                  +15
                  I read your polemic, Bouncer
                  Know the old saying
                  Argue with mr - mr not worth it
                  . Dead number.
                  But ...
                  Everything is correct, cavalry and cavalry in the First World War are 100% synonyms. It is enough to say that the book of the largest contemporary specialist on this topic V. I. Karpeev sounds like this: "Cavalry. Divisions, brigades, corps. Units of the Russian army 1810-1917." M. 2012. It says about all the formations - both regular cavalry and Cossack.
                  And then without this Serge Serge we did not know that the cavalry division included 4 regiments - 3 regular and Cossack. He discovered America)) But the corps were called, for example, the 1st Cavalry (Equestrian) - that is, the equal sign. Cossack divisions were not called equestrian divisions — only Cossack divisions, it drives the serge. For example: 1st Don Cossack or Transbaikal Cossack.
                  By the way, the fact that regular connections were not called horse - This is the lie of Serge Serge, and to prove it is actually very simple.
                  1) there was such an Ussuri horse the brigade, which included, for example, the Primorsky Dragoon Regiment - the regular unit.
                  2) There were (immediately 3) Zaamursky horse brigades - which included regular Zamur border guards horse shelves.
                  etc.
                  So we decided on the terminology, for, as this serge Serge carefully writes
                  Now in terminology. I hope you will agree what exactly to name an event, phenomenon, etc. - very important.
                  really important.
                  So, the terms "cavalry" and "cavalry" in WWI (with reference to Europe and Russia) are synonyms.
                  1. serge serge
                    serge serge 17 May 2018 18: 20
                    -1
                    I answer everyone right away.
                    No, I’ll highlight one more line with another dolboklyu. Deserved, beautiful!
                    When registering, I believed that there is a club for communication and the search for truth. Bah, and here we have another sect of "copyright". Yes, please, you can put it on the goddess, and taste it as a revelation, any sound coming from it. And not only from the mouth.
                    Regarding the sources, of which you all massively hung out here (though for which, after all, I remind you of the hearts, you always have “copyright”), which is easier. Take any normal guide to the German army in August 1914. Well, at least.

                    Everything is very fast and elementary there.
                    You can delve into the “German Military Bible of that war” Der Erste Weltkrieg. Entertaining reading. (oh, I'm sorry, I forgot again, I’m talking to adherents of “copyright” here, so again, I'm sorry, this, of course, is not about you).
                    Unbeknownst to you, wretched, that really something, and the German army of August 1914 was dismantled under a microscope over the past century. It’s not that 7 such large military units as regular cavalry regiments cannot be hidden or attributed; there is every land-assault squadron, every ammunition convoy for forty rows checked: what, where, when.
                    1. Bouncer
                      Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 28
                      +15
                      Regarding the sources, of which you all massively hung out here (though for which, after all, I remind you of the hearts, you always have “copyright”), which is easier. Take any normal guide to the German army in August 1914. Well, at least.

                      Everything is very fast and elementary there.
                      You can delve into the “German Military Bible of that war” Der Erste Weltkrieg. Entertaining reading. (oh, I'm sorry, I forgot again, I’m talking to adherents of “copyright” here, so again, I'm sorry, this, of course, is not about you).
                      Unbeknownst to you, wretched, that really something, and the German army of August 1914 was dismantled under a microscope over the past century. It’s not that 7 such large military units as regular cavalry regiments cannot be hidden or attributed; there is every land-assault squadron, every ammunition convoy for forty rows checked: what, where, when.

                      Well, put the page here.
                      And while I see only one verbal diarrhea.
                      Headwind
                      1. soldier
                        soldier 17 May 2018 18: 38
                        +15
                        Lay out how.
                        Well, battle schedules, especially pre-war ones, were compiled on the basis of official German publications.
                      2. Albatroz
                        Albatroz 19 May 2018 05: 40
                        0
                        serge serge (sergey) may 17, 2018 18:20 ↑
                        Bah, and here we have another sect of "copyright".

                        So what to do if the author, relying on sources, is really right.
                        And you stupidly sculpt a hunchback, arguing about what you understand like a pig in oranges and mentioning materials that you have not seen
                    2. serge serge
                      serge serge 17 May 2018 18: 39
                      -1
                      I will continue:
                      Yes, I’ll insert the reference first. which did not enter the first part

                      This is when:
                      inevitable mixing and reassignment occurred;
                      when the masters in this matter the Germans (that in the First, that in the Second World War) began to massively form consolidated units (groups) for "patching holes" and overcoming crises;
                      when they began to use the "railway maneuver" to the fullest both in the offensive and in the defense;
                      when the farther, the more it was necessary to “interlayer” the allied forces with the German units, up to individual companies and machine-gun commands;
                      when they began to form not new corps, but simply “commands” without initially attached parts
                      - then the definition of German groupings and regroupings began to present certain difficulties
                      And August 14 ... This is not just an open book, it is a book re-read a thousand times.
                      Of course, if there is only one gyrus for the entire Bosko, the one on which you sit, and one on all those sitting. Tady, of course, "copyright" ischo such arguments and facts.
                      Therefore, do not strain, this "gyrus" is in vain. I’ll not be able to read your answers in the “myself” style (for the most part, they are not capable of anything). Do not even hope. I do not suffer from masochism. You better, tell each other, on the eternal theme of “copyright”.
                      1. Bouncer
                        Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 47
                        +15
                        Eh kulema ...
                        This is a Washington edition.

                        A liar bunny gray under the Christmas tree laid
                        Nothing to do with Der Erste Weltkrieg does not have
                        In it - about the German infantry divisions. Oh you...
                    3. Bouncer
                      Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 43
                      +15
                      And about the club "copyright" visit articles by Shpakovsky and others. "Comrades." There, people will end in emotion, constantly repeating: "thank you", and thank you a thousand times !!! Or, given the local policy of double standards, we don’t notice this?)) So - visit and be outraged
                      1. Albatroz
                        Albatroz 19 May 2018 05: 44
                        0
                        I read the unscrupulous freaks of Serge Serge and I can not contain indignation
              2. serge serge
                serge serge 17 May 2018 18: 43
                -1
                Sorry, could not resist!
                Here you share your sadness with your “goods” - where to see the documents of the First World War.
                Well done! Made my evening. Yes there evening. This is a joke of the year!
                Can I, I will tell him to my friends, military historians? Well, please ... It’s even cooler than how you sowed 7 German cavalry regiments.
                In vain, by the way, you vegetate here. On a big stage with similar "perls"
                1. Bouncer
                  Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 50
                  +15
                  you are cheating
                  posted the wrong book
                  so keep quiet, cheater
                  1. soldier
                    soldier 17 May 2018 18: 59
                    +15
                    We saw that he even had a cover, that serge serge, cropped on a scan so that the place of publication was not visible.
                    I posted the title, not the page with the cavalry regiments (because it’s not there - the book is good, but about the infantry divisions). Moreover, he cheated with the publication - he gives out an English book as a German book (so it is also in Gothic).
                    Not good...
                    1. Bouncer
                      Bouncer 17 May 2018 19: 26
                      +15
                      Not good

                      Yeah
                      I downloaded a sergeik in the internet American book (the benefit that you can download it) and builds himself a connoisseur of the German army. What is already there
                      1. soldier
                        soldier 17 May 2018 19: 30
                        +15
                        On a big stage with similar "perls"

                        then everything is just documented.
                        But he himself writes what the line. What, for example, is an indication that the Wrangel attack near Causen was the only one in the WWII. Also read recently. With SUCH pearls and the scene is not needed
  10. Bouncer
    Bouncer 15 May 2018 06: 59
    +15
    Great article, keep it up for the author!
    In general, sound studies on the topic are few in general, and on European cavalry in particular.
    I hope the cavalry cycles, the same detailed and interesting, will continue.
  11. soldier
    soldier 15 May 2018 07: 24
    +15
    And for those who want to see the distribution of cavalry among corps and divisions during the war, as well as
    to trace the tendency that out of 11 German cavalry divisions available during the war (9 license plates, Guards and Bavarian) by March 1915, 7 were already on the Russian Front (there is a corresponding plate) - I recommend this brochure
    1. Bouncer
      Bouncer 15 May 2018 10: 52
      +15
      I would recommend that you and the Soldier less post in comments such rare things as pages from publications of 100 years ago. This is a thankless task, but it is an Internet creature (the local troll and the author of the majority, as I may say, articles on the site, writing comments under a lot of nicknames - now this is Serge Serge) and is only waiting for this - thus learning. No need to pamper him, it’s better to just tear him off - after all, most of his “articles” do not withstand any criticism. And in the comments, let him write what he wants - he should write a linden tree that 2 fingers should be justified ... and not complex at the same time.
      1. serge serge
        serge serge 15 May 2018 13: 26
        -1
        He himself understood what he wrote, dear
        1. Bouncer
          Bouncer 15 May 2018 15: 00
          +15
          I understood everything golden
          And you understand what I understand
          1. serge serge
            serge serge 17 May 2018 07: 13
            -1
            Well, if so "understanding", then scat off the road. Here normal people decide the question of the German cavalry of August 1914, and you are here with your own - I don’t even know how to call it censorship.
            1. Bouncer
              Bouncer 17 May 2018 07: 17
              +15
              It's you scatter
              under the bushes
              1. serge serge
                serge serge 17 May 2018 18: 41
                -1
                To tell where, to go, or you’ll figure it out with your own “meander” at all ... So stomp on the chill
                1. Bouncer
                  Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 49
                  +15
                  Stomp stomp
                  Liar
                  Issuing an American book for the Reichsarchive
  12. Bouncer
    Bouncer 17 May 2018 18: 48
    +15
    Bouncer,
    However, I did not expect another.
    And the Reichsarchive looks like this