Military Review

Admiral Makarov. The genius of the Russian fleet

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31 March (13 April) 1904 of the year, 114 years ago, Admiral Stepan Makarov died. Russia knew many talented naval commanders who had defeated the enemy in naval battles, but Makarov was not just a heroic officer, but a brilliant theoretician — an innovator, in many ways ahead of his time.


Admiral Makarov. The genius of the Russian fleet


Stepan Osipovich Makarov was a hereditary naval officer. His father Osip Fedorovich Makarova (1813-1878) served in Nikolaev, and then in Nikolaevsk-on-Amur. Stepan Osipovich was born in 1849 in Nikolaev and, like his father, chose for himself the career of a naval officer. In 1865 Stepan Makarov graduated from the Naval School in Nikolaevsk-on-Amur, where he trained personnel for the Corps naval navigators.

After graduating from the school, the 16-year-old non-commissioned officer was assigned to the Varyag corvette, commanded by rank 2 rank captain Robert Alexandrovich Lund, an outstanding man, a navigator and a participant in a world tour. The commander spoke of the young Makarov as a very promising sailor, who demonstrated great success in maritime art. Makarov served on corvettes for two years - first on the Varyag corvette, then on the Askold corvette, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Peter Ivanovich Polozov. In 1867, he was promoted to the midshipmen of the Naval Cadet Corps, and only in 1869 was he granted the first officer title of midshipman of the Russian fleet. Already at that time, the young midshipman not only served in the service, like most other naval officers, but sought to combine it with research work.

The battleship Rusalka, to which Makarov was assigned, was a new type of coastal defense for Russia at that time. First, the Mermaid's corps was armored, and secondly, the main caliber guns were placed in a rotating turret. When the ship followed the narrow skerries, it collided with a pitfall. A large amount of water got on the ship, after which the commander decided to ground the “Mermaid” and start diving work. The young navigator was very interested in the reasons for the flooding of "Mermaids" and soon an article by midshipman Stepan Makarov, "The Battleship of the Mermaid", appeared in the Sea Collection. Studies of the buoyancy of the boat and the means proposed to eliminate this quality. ” In it, the midshipman offered his vision of a solution to the problem in detailed recommendations that were approved by the Russian Maritime Ministry. The essence of the proposals of midshipman Makarov was reduced to the separation of the ship by impenetrable partitions, which would preserve its buoyancy even in the case of flooding of individual compartments of the vessel. In addition, with the help of a stationary water pumping system, the crew was able to quickly remove the water that entered the ship through the damaged hull.

Makarov's further service was associated with the numerous wars waged by the Russian Empire. The young officer, being a good commander, did not forget about technical innovations. When the Naval Ministry mobilized civilian steamboats for military needs during the Russo-Turkish War, one of them, the “Grand Duke Konstantin”, was given the command of Lieutenant Makarov. He made a large-scale re-equipment of the vessel, turning it into a base for mine-boats. It was the steamer "Grand Duke Constantine" after the outbreak of war that first went out to carry out combat missions into the Black Sea. During the fighting in December 1877 - January 1878. in the Batumi area, Makarov successfully used the advantages of the steamer, including mineboats, for the first time using self-propelled mines - torpedoes.

In 1880-1881 Russia embarked on the famous Akhal-Teka expedition with the aim of conquering the warlike Turkmen tribe of Tekins. The main role in the Akhal-Teke expedition was played by ground forces, but combat missions were found for the fleet. The ships supplied Russian troops in Turkmenistan, transporting cargo from Astrakhan to Krasnovodsk. Served on the Caspian Sea at this time and Makarov. He was even honored to exchange St. George's crosses with General Mikhail Dmitrievich Skobelev, who commanded the Russian troops on the Akhal-Tekinskaya expedition. Participation in the Russian-Turkish war, in the Akhal-Teke expedition, technical inventions allowed Makarov to make a quick career. In 1881-1882 he commanded the steamer Taman, and in 1885 the frigate Prince Pozharsky, then in 1886-1889. commanded the corvette "Vityaz", making a voyage around the world.



Makarov’s participation in world voyage is another great page in the life of the legendary sailor. In 1886, 37-year-old Makarov was the captain of the 1 rank - a very good maritime career for that time. Having received under the command of the corvette "Vityaz", he took him on a world tour through the Atlantic Ocean, then circled South America and arrived in Yokohama, and then, almost a year later, arrived in Vladivostok. During the world tour, the crew of the ship carried out priceless oceanographic and other studies. Thus, the temperature and specific gravity of sea water were measured during the trip every four hours. The crew measured the depths in different parts of the ocean, explored the sea currents.

After a round-the-world voyage, during which the Maritime Ministry received a huge amount of valuable information, the authority of the captain 1 of Makarov's rank both in the fleet and in the scientific community ascended to unprecedented heights. The merits of an outstanding officer appreciated. Already in 1890, he was promoted to rear admiral and appointed junior flagship of the Baltic Fleet. Makarov was just 41 year. A year later, serving as the junior flagship of the Baltic Fleet, Stepan Makarov was transferred to the post of chief inspector of naval artillery. This was a very serious assignment - artillery always played a key role in sea battles, and Makarov was to be responsible for the combat effectiveness and effectiveness of the entire naval artillery of the Russian fleet. And he coped with this task with honor, making a personal contribution to the strengthening of naval artillery. For example, it was Stepan Makarov who developed the so-called. "Makarov caps" - tips for armor-piercing shells, which the fleet adopted for use after the death of the admiral. After serving for about two years as chief inspector of naval artillery, Rear Admiral Makarov assumed command of a squadron in the Mediterranean in 1894, and the next year he was at the head of the squadron transferred to the Pacific Ocean.



The relations of the Russian Empire with neighboring Japan were exacerbated. "The Land of the Rising Sun" had its far-reaching plans for the Pacific coast of China and Korea, which the Russian Empire considered as its potential sphere of influence. Since Makarov was well acquainted with the military-political situation in the Pacific, he insisted on the need to strengthen the Russian naval forces in the region. Ten years before the start of the Russian-Japanese war, Rear Admiral Makarov was well aware that sooner or later the Russian and Japanese empires would enter the stage of direct military confrontation, and believed that the Russian fleet should prepare very well for the inevitable war. According to Makarov, the Japanese naval forces should not be underestimated. The admiral was well aware that Japan was striving to modernize its armed forces and fleet in the first place, therefore Russia should not ignore the Pacific direction, being engaged only in the development of the Baltic and Black Sea fleets.

However, Makarov did not succeed in checking with his own hands the situation with the development of the fleet in the Pacific. In 1896, he was again transferred to the European part of Russia - to the Baltic Sea, where Makarov was appointed commander of the Practical Squadron of the Baltic Fleet, and in 1899 he was appointed chief commander of the Kronstadt port and governor of Kronstadt. This was, above all, an administrative position, but the admiral did an excellent job with such work, not forgetting about scientific research. In 1896, Stepan Makarov was given the rank of vice-admiral of the fleet.

Back in 1895, Admiral Makarov developed the Russian semaphore alphabet, which is still used in the navy. The alphabet is compiled in accordance with the Russian alphabet and includes 29 alphabetic and 3 service marks. Each letter or symbol in the semaphore alphabet corresponds to a certain position of the hands with flags, and the semaphore message, respectively, includes words composed of letters denoted by the positions of the hands with flags. Only in 2011, the semaphore alphabet was excluded from the training programs for the training of junior communications specialists of the Russian Navy.

It is noteworthy that it was Admiral Makarov who became one of the most ardent supporters of the development of the Northern Sea Route, about which the foremost minds of the Russian fleet spoke more and more often. A traveler and naval commander, Stepan Makarov, understood that it was the detour through the northern seas that was the fastest and safest from a military-political point of view by sea from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean. However, to open the Northern Sea Route, special conditions were required for the passage of ships through the ice, and Makarov began to actively develop the theory of icebreaking vessels. He took the most active part in managing the construction of the Yermak icebreaker, and in 1901, while on this icebreaker, he made an expedition to the islands of Franz Josef Land.

In his post as commander-in-chief of the port of Kronstadt, Vice-Admiral Makarov served for more than four years - until February 1904. In early February, he wrote an analytical note in which he emphasized that in a few days Japan would start a war against the Russian Empire. As it turned out, the vice admiral was really right. 27 January (9 February) 1904, the Russian-Japanese war began. The naval ministry immediately recalled the “genius of the Russian fleet” - Vice-Admiral Stepan Makarov, who commanded the port of Kronstadt. As the most valuable specialist, he was transferred to the Far East - 1 (14) in February 1904, Vice-Admiral Makarov was appointed commander of the Pacific Squadron. February 24 (March 8) 1904, he arrived in Port Arthur - on one of the main bases of the Russian fleet in the Pacific.

Stepan Makarov literally breathed new life into the Russian crews stationed in Port Arthur. He immediately began organizing regular combat training for the crews - training sessions at sea, maneuvering and firing, laying mines, mines were started. Stepan Makarov was able to convince the Russian naval officers and sailors of the possibility of victory over the Japanese fleet, although earlier enough pessimistic moods prevailed in the crews. Two times the fleet under the command of Makarov prevented the attempts of the Japanese admiral Togo to block Russian ships in the outer roads and to begin the blockade of Port Arthur. The Vice Admiral demanded that the Marine Department send the 8 destroyers and 40 destroyers in a disassembled form by rail to Port Arthur, but the leadership of the Ministry did not satisfy the admiral’s demands. The battleship Petropavlovsk, where Stepan Makarov personally participated in the hostilities, became the flagship of Vice-Admiral Makarov.



30 March 1904, Vice-Admiral Makarov sent a detachment of destroyers to the reconnaissance raid, and in the morning 31 March found out that the destroyer "Terrible" had entered an unequal battle with Japanese ships. The commander sent the Bayan cruiser to help the Terrible, and then decided to go to the aid of the destroyer himself. The squadron commander set sail on the flagship battleship Petropavlovsk and managed to ward off the Japanese ships, but soon collided with the main forces of the Japanese fleet. Departing from the superior enemy forces, the battleship Petropavlovsk turned towards Port Arthur harbor, but two and a half miles from the coast the flagship was blown up on an anchor mine. From the explosion of a mine detonated ammunition in the bow artillery cellar. Battleship "Petropavlovsk" sank. From the other ships, whose crews observed the Petropavlovsk blast, the lifeboats were lowered. It was possible to pick up 80 people, among whom were the commander of Petropavlovsk, captain of the 1 rank Nikolai Matveyevich Yakovlev, and chief of the naval department of the headquarters of the Pacific Fleet captain 2 rank Grand Prince Kirill Vladimirovich (cousin of Emperor Nikolai II). But Vice-Admiral Stepan Makarov was not found - he was missing. The brilliant Russian naval commander died along with 10 staff officers, 17 or 18 ship officers and 650 or 652 sailors of the battleship Petropavlovsk. The tragic death of 55-year-old Vice Admiral Makarov, who could serve Russia for a long time and make an even greater contribution to the development of the Russian fleet, was a colossal loss for the country.

The name of Stepan Osipovich Makarov is inscribed in gold letters in history Russian fleet, the navy’s educational institutions are named after him - both military (Pacific Naval Institute in Vladivostok) and civilian (State University of Maritime and River Fleet and St. Petersburg College of State University of Maritime and River Fleet in St. Petersburg), Streets of Russian cities, ships. In a number of cities in the country, monuments have been erected in memory of Admiral Makarov.
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  1. svp67
    svp67 April 1 2018 06: 36
    +6
    Unfortunately, Admiral Makarov made a monstrous mistake by dying. As a result, the fleet ceased to conduct active operations and accelerated the fall of Port Arthur, and this, in turn, played the defeat of the 2nd and 3rd squadrons.
    1. avt
      avt April 1 2018 07: 25
      +13
      Quote: svp67
      . As a result, the fleet ceased to conduct active operations and accelerated the fall of Port Arthur

      request Well, it’s not a fact that Makarov would have beaten Togo in one goal. It was an OUTSTANDING scientist, engineer. BUT he was not destined to become a naval commander at the same level that he had achieved in science. So all fantasy about how it would be ... this is already a symbol of faith of some kind. Personally, the sinful Az believes that Nikolashka lost the war BEFORE it started with Witte's help, when they miscalculated the timing of the construction of ships in Japan and illiterate, contrary to their own tactics and strategies, occupied Port Arthur (and having torn the loot from the Japanese, the question of war with them was only a matter of time) and the distribution of its own ship's composition is rather mediocre. Well, something like that in a nutshell.
      1. svp67
        svp67 April 1 2018 07: 28
        +6
        Quote: avt
        Well, it’s not a fact that Makarov would have beaten Togo in one goal.

        I agree, but he could at least play a draw ... Still, he was very active in acting, which could disrupt the transfer of troops and siege artillery, respectively, this could affect the fate of Port Arthur
        1. avt
          avt April 1 2018 07: 30
          +2
          Quote: svp67
          I agree, but he could at least play a draw ...

          request Could ... could not .... fortune telling or
          Quote: avt
          this is some kind of creed.
          1. co-creator
            co-creator April 2 2018 23: 16
            +2
            Quote: avt
            Could ... could not .... fortune telling or

            He not only could, he acted. Under Makarov, the Japanese did not land on Liaodong. He established military service, etc. His death buried it all.
        2. sigdoc
          sigdoc April 1 2018 09: 27
          +1
          In my opinion, they ended up playing like that, ours lost access to the Pacific Ocean, and with it the additional opportunities for the economic development of the Far East, and the Japanese remained in debt taken for war.
          1. antivirus
            antivirus April 1 2018 12: 18
            +1
            I agree - a draw was made before the start of the war.
            Other world maritime powers wanted this draw and achieved it.
      2. Denimax
        Denimax April 1 2018 19: 44
        +1
        It was still possible to give an order for the fleet so that their linear fleet forces were based only in their bases. Then in the PA you can leave a couple of cruisers and a detachment of destroyers, purely for the security service. Then Makarov will come to command the squadron in Vladivostok. And there is its own land and space for hostilities.
        1. co-creator
          co-creator April 2 2018 23: 17
          +1
          Quote: Denimax
          It was still possible to give an order for the fleet so that their linear fleet forces were based only in their bases

          Vladivostok froze for several months a year like that, and specifically it froze.
      3. not main
        not main April 1 2018 22: 19
        0
        Quote: avt
        Quote: svp67
        . As a result, the fleet ceased to conduct active operations and accelerated the fall of Port Arthur

        request Well, it’s not a fact that Makarov would have beaten Togo in one goal. It was an OUTSTANDING scientist, engineer. BUT he was not destined to become a naval commander at the same level that he had achieved in science. So all fantasy about how it would be ... this is already a symbol of faith of some kind. Personally, the sinful Az believes that Nikolashka lost the war BEFORE it started with Witte's help, when they miscalculated the timing of the construction of ships in Japan and illiterate, contrary to their own tactics and strategies, occupied Port Arthur (and having torn the loot from the Japanese, the question of war with them was only a matter of time) and the distribution of its own ship's composition is rather mediocre. Well, something like that in a nutshell.

        Well done! And most importantly, the logic! It turns out we had to give up before the fight! Something like that deciphering "briefly"!
      4. DimerVladimer
        DimerVladimer April 3 2018 15: 48
        +1
        Quote: avt
        when they criminally miscalculated the timing of the construction of ships in Japan and ignorantly, contrary to their own tactics and strategies, occupied Port Arthur (and having wrested the loot from the Japanese, the question of war with them was only a matter of time) and the distribution of their own ship structure was rather mediocre. in short.


        You can also mention that even dredging was not carried out at low tide, not like armadillos, but even cruisers could not go on an external raid.
      5. andrew42
        andrew42 April 3 2018 16: 28
        +3
        If the admiral is engaged in science, this does not mean that to the detriment of the qualities necessary in combat work. What, what, and Makarov’s cabinet was never. It is enough to compare the style of command of the entrusted forces - Makarov against Rozhdestvensky. The first "jumped out" from Arthur like a fighting cock, while the second sadly and stupidly dragged the squadron to the slaughter with the task of "passing through" rather than "hitting". So much for the personnel clerk, Rozhdestvensky, whom even the “cabinet” Witgeft really arranged for in all respects regarding the command of the squadron.
      6. dzuar saubarag
        dzuar saubarag April 11 2018 13: 04
        +2
        Admiral Heihatiro Togo had a very high opinion of Admiral Makarov. At the initiative of Togo, Makarov’s works were translated into Japanese, in particular, “Reasoning on Naval Tactics,” which became the handbook of Japanese naval officers. After the death of Makarov, Togo ordered to lower the flags, as a sign of mourning. Later, the Japanese poet Ishikawa Takuboku dedicated a poem to the Russian naval commander - "In memory of Admiral Makarov." There are such words: Friends and foes, throw away the swords,
        Do not strike violently,
        Freeze with your head bowed
        With the sounds of his name: Makarov!

        I praise him in the hour of enmity blind
        Through the formidable roar of the flood and fires.
        In the deep sea, where the shaft boils,
        The protector of Port Arthur is now sleeping.
    2. g1v2
      g1v2 April 1 2018 09: 04
      +2
      Makarov was an excellent scientist and modernizer. but horseradish naval commander. if he had not died, then nothing would have changed. Only for the worse.
      1. fdgf
        fdgf April 1 2018 09: 37
        +18
        Quote: g1v2
        Makarov was an excellent scientist and modernizer. but horseradish naval commander. if he had not died, then nothing would have changed. Only for the worse.

        As for the "excellent scientist and modernizer," I would argue. And then, that's right.
        At least during his sitting in the PA he could easily make a mine can like the one that Vitgeft later made. But the "ordinary Witgeft" did a mine can. A "brilliant Makarov", no. Yes, the risk was huge. But Witgeft went to him.
        In addition, the “ingenious Makarov” drove the flagship battleship in the role of a battle-cruiser, which contributed to his death along with the entire crew. But "ordinary Witgeft", no.
        In total, Makarov’s net balance is minus one Russian battleship with the entire crew and an absurd death. But he is "brilliant."
        Witgeft has two Japanese squadron battleships and a heroic death in battle. But he is "mediocre."
        History is extremely unfair to personalities.
        1. co-creator
          co-creator April 2 2018 23: 26
          +2
          Quote: fdgf
          At least during his sitting in the PA he could easily make a mine can like the one that Vitgeft later made. But the "ordinary Witgeft" did a mine can.

          He didn’t actually sit in the port, so he actually died. But Bethget sat and the Japanese constantly fired at the base, which is why it was possible to put a can.
          Quote: fdgf
          In total, Makarov’s net balance is minus one Russian battleship with the entire crew and an absurd death. But he is "brilliant."
          Witgeft has two Japanese squadron battleships and a heroic death in battle. But he is "mediocre."

          These are generally personal assessments no more.
          1. fdgf
            fdgf April 2 2018 23: 52
            0
            Quotation: blooded man
            He didn’t actually sit in the port, so he actually died.

            I sat. And he died ridiculously.
            Quotation: blooded man
            But Bethget sat and the Japanese constantly fired at the base, which is why it was possible to put a can.

            This is where they fired from? From the sea? Are you joking or are you really arguing?
            Quotation: blooded man
            These are generally personal assessments no more.

            Of course, they have nothing in common with historical facts. Right?
            1. co-creator
              co-creator April 3 2018 14: 42
              +1
              Quote: fdgf
              I sat. And he died ridiculously.

              If he sat, then he did not die like the other admirals. Whether it’s ridiculous or absurd is a secondary question, Nakhimov also died ridiculously if you think in your terms.
              Quote: fdgf
              This is where they fired from? From the sea? Are you joking or are you really arguing?

              Well, from where the fleet can shoot, of course from the sea, otherwise it would not have sailed around Port Arthur.
              Quote: fdgf
              Of course, they have nothing in common with historical facts. Right?

              Personal assessments are a historical fact; they are slightly different things. Kutuzov and Barclay-de-Toli, by and large, used the same tactics, and received different ratings from contemporaries and descendants. Moreover, Kutuzov for the surrender of Moscow among the majority of contemporaries was "not shaking hands", and the descendants think differently. Personally, I also consider the surrender of Moscow a betrayal for which Kutuzov had to be tried.
        2. DimerVladimer
          DimerVladimer April 3 2018 16: 06
          +2
          Quote: fdgf
          At least during his sitting in PA, he could easily make a mine can like the one that Wittgeft later made


          Setting a mine can in territorial waters was a war crime if a civil steamboat were blown up on it - Witgeft would be tried as a war criminal.
          Including for this reason, Makarov did not install a mine can in that area.
          And Witgeft did not want to - insisted, because the situation had become so hopeless that he already had nothing to lose.
          The Japanese, on the other hand, placed mines in territorial entries near the PA, which was not a violation.

          In addition, if it had not been for the shift organized by Makarov on the external roadstead, the Japanese would have blocked the fairway for the squadron to exit with firewalls:
          There were 12. All fire barriers. Four, knocked out or simply unable to withstand the fire, turned back into the sea, 8 - reached.
          Everyone sank, away from the entrance, but still the two managed to penetrate behind the Hailar, in a winding channel.
          Fortunately, they did not lie across the road, but it was not their fault, nor was it our merit, but simply fate.
          In any case, one cannot fail to admit that the second time brilliantly justified itself was a system for repelling the attack of firewalls, developed in detail under Makarov and announced by his orders. Coastal batteries, patrol and guard vessels and boats - acted as if by notes.

          One way or another, thanks to God, access to the sea remained free, and the newly sunken Japanese fireworks only strengthened the underwater parapet created by Makarov from the flooded steamers, making the new attempt to block almost hopeless.

          Vladimir Ivanovich Semenov "Payback"
    3. 210ox
      210ox April 1 2018 13: 53
      +2
      Having died a monstrous mistake ... He honestly did his duty and died unfortunately. This is fate. And yes, the Russian fleet lost a wonderful commander and man ..
      Quote: svp67
      Unfortunately, Admiral Makarov made a monstrous mistake by dying. As a result, the fleet ceased to conduct active operations and accelerated the fall of Port Arthur, and this, in turn, played the defeat of the 2nd and 3rd squadrons.
    4. Proxima
      Proxima April 1 2018 16: 11
      +8
      Quote: svp67
      Unfortunately, but Admiral Makarov made a monstrous mistake by dying ...

      The evil paradox of history, among those who survived at Petropavlovsk, was Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich (cousin of Emperor Nicholas II). Then they joked bitterly that the gold drowned, but th ... but it surfaced ..
      And on the account of whether Stepan Osipovich was a great naval commander, they say the grandmother for two said - I strongly disagree. The fact that he marine genius - it was visible a mile away! The Japanese knew about this and, to their honor, gave him (as a warrior) their due.
      The Japanese poet Ishikawa Takuboku responded to the news of the death of Makarov in the following lines:

      Friends and foes, throw away the swords,
      Do not strike violently,
      Stand with bowed head
      At the sound of his name: Makarov.
      I praise him in the hour of enmity blind
      Through the menacing roar of the flood and fires.
      In the deep sea, where the shaft boils,
      The protector of Port Arthur is now sleeping.
      hi hi hi
      1. dzuar saubarag
        dzuar saubarag April 11 2018 13: 13
        0
        I quoted these lines too! And we must pay tribute to the Japanese - they are this poem, accepted very favorably. It came together and patriotism and respect for a strong enemy. It is too different from those congratulatory messages sent by the Russian liberal "public" Mikado in honor of the drowning of the Varyag.
    5. Boa kaa
      Boa kaa April 1 2018 16: 48
      +5
      Quote: svp67
      Unfortunately, but Admiral Makarov made a terrible mistake,

      And not only what you indicated ... The fact is that the naval guns of the Russian fleet were less long-range than the Japanese. I had to reduce the weight of the projectile to increase the range ... In the end, they got what they got. Armor-piercing shells pierced Japanese ships but did not explode ... And their stuffed with shimoza - poisoned Russian sailors with gases and incendiary personnel set fire to everything around them ... But the caps are a good thing, but the shells did not ricochet, they simply did not explode!
      1. co-creator
        co-creator April 2 2018 23: 27
        0
        Quote: Boa constrictor KAA
        .And their stuffed with shimoza - poisoned Russian sailors with gases and incendiary composition set fire to everything around them ... But the caps are a good thing, but the shells did not ricochet, they simply did not explode!

        What does Makarov have to do with it? He was engaged in the supply of the fleet.
        1. fdgf
          fdgf April 3 2018 00: 02
          +3
          Quotation: blooded man
          What does Makarov have to do with it? He was engaged in the supply of the fleet.

          12 "guns and shells for them were of the sample of 1891. And Makarov headed the GIMA just in 1891-94. This, like the GAU, was only naval. That is, he was the main naval artilleryman. And, therefore, it was he who introduced this artillery to the fleet.
          And the unsuccessful 8 and 6 "guns, they are also the model of 1892. And also Makarovsky things.
          Such sour things.
          But the successful 10 "guns, this is not his. This is from the land GAU. The only decent guns at the RIF were, so it's 10". Those to whom the hands of the admiral-innovator, what can I say, genius, did not reach.
          1. co-creator
            co-creator April 3 2018 14: 44
            0
            Quote: fdgf
            12 "guns and shells for them were of the sample of 1891. And Makarov headed the GIMA just in 1891-94. This, like the GAU, was only naval. That is, he was the main naval artilleryman. And, therefore, it was he who introduced this artillery to the fleet.

            You write nonsense. NEVER ONE PERSON can decide such things. Although someone and Putin is a king who can do anything.
    6. bone1
      bone1 April 8 2018 21: 20
      0
      How can you make a mistake by bending?
  2. Updown
    Updown April 1 2018 06: 39
    +4
    Sorry for Mr. Vereshchagin. I studied OKSH (it was a long time and unlucky). I studied his works! Further it is possible longer but communication is not enough.
  3. Olgovich
    Olgovich April 1 2018 06: 39
    +9
    It was blown up on mine banks not only by Petropavlovsk but also by another ship ..
    HOW could you go out to sea without wiping the approaches to the base?
    It was an obvious and obligatory event, but ..... request
    1. Rurikovich
      Rurikovich April 1 2018 07: 55
      +7
      Quote: Olgovich
      HOW could you go out to sea without wiping the approaches to the base?

      Silently ... With the advent of Makarov, the squadron began to go to sea to establish cooperation (we will not deny that experience is gaining practice). The Japanese constantly watched Port Arthur and toss mines along the routes is a trifling matter. You can trample the exit from the base and go out to sea in the firm belief that the rest is clear. By the way, the Russians did a similar trick with the Japanese (the death of Hatsuse and Yashima) hi
      1. Olgovich
        Olgovich April 1 2018 09: 20
        +1
        Nothing was tainted, alas.
      2. fdgf
        fdgf April 1 2018 09: 45
        +4
        Quote: Rurikovich
        With the advent of Makarov, the squadron began to go to sea to establish cooperation (we will not deny that experience is gaining practice).

        Bosh what.
        Quote: Rurikovich
        The Japanese constantly watched Port Arthur and toss mines along the routes is a trifling matter.

        Chunky thing to knock on the keys. And to throw mines so that no one would notice them, near a naval base, this business is far from trifling. And without the slovenliness of the personnel of this naval base, this is practically impossible.
        But there was no sloppiness of the support forces, Makarov was informed about the incomprehensible movements of obscure ships in that area. But he ignored this fact. The result is known.
        Quote: Rurikovich
        and you go out to sea in the firm belief that it’s clean next

        Petropavlovsk did not manage to go into any “sea” and died right next to the base. In the area of ​​responsibility of the security forces.
        Quote: Rurikovich
        By the way, the Russians did a similar trick with the Japanese (the death of Hatsuse and Yashima)

        There was nothing in common between Russian and Japanese mine banks at all. In addition to the term "mine can."
        1. Rurikovich
          Rurikovich April 1 2018 09: 52
          +4
          Quote: fdgf
          Petropavlovsk did not manage to go into any “sea” and died right next to the base. In the area of ​​responsibility of the security forces.

          Of course, he is not a “battleship-raider” “Retvisan” and not a “small near cruiser-fighter” “Boyarin” laughing fool
          And the "sea" is that when the coast is not visible then the sea what
          Nikolay, maybe enough with its enchanting delirium to embarrass people ???? wink
          Quote: fdgf
          There was nothing in common between Russian and Japanese mine banks at all. In addition to the term "mine can."
      3. bone1
        bone1 April 8 2018 21: 23
        0
        The task of an intelligent komflot is to organize a sentinel, reconnaissance service, so that any muck near the port does not go around and does not throw mines.
    2. Huumi
      Huumi April 1 2018 09: 19
      +1
      Duck, he went the same way a second time — the first exit the Japanese saw and set mines along the route. Here’s a big article — it’s described there thoroughly. The question is: who walks on the same route twice?
      1. Olgovich
        Olgovich April 1 2018 10: 18
        +4
        Quote: Huumi
        Duck, he went the same way a second time — the first exit the Japanese saw and set mines along the route. Here’s a big article — it’s described there thoroughly. The question is: who walks on the same route twice?

        From an article on VO for 201 4 The Fatal Eight by Admiral Makarov
        The narrow exit from Port Arthur’s internal raid entrusted Makarov with the task of achieving such a cruising regime under the protection of coastal batteries that would provide the opportunity to fire from ships while concentrating the squadron forces. So the famous The Makarov Eight, which Russian ships leaving the internal raid described opposite to a strictly local section of the coast - from the eastern rumba of the Cross Mountain to the southern rumba of the White Wolf Mountain. The GXNUMX was good because in any evolution every Russian ship could fire with one full board. Her weakness was in an absolutely stereotyped, repeated from time to time cruising route. One had only to block the main reference points of this route with mine banks, and undermining the most deep-seated Russian ships became inevitable.
        Against mines, however, there was an effective “antidote” - high-quality, methodical work of minesweepers, the benefit of the limited, actually constant route of the GXNUMX sharply narrowed the scope of work.

        From there:
        When Makarov was informed about the approach of the Japanese cruisers, he allegedly instructed to immediately clear the mine raid and the GXNUMX water area with anti-mine trawls. Why is this an absolutely must not carried out - again unclear. it is possible that the order was canceled by Makarov himself.
    3. co-creator
      co-creator April 3 2018 14: 46
      +1
      Not the Admiral should think about this, but those who are obliged to trawl. This is an ordinary combat service.
      1. Olgovich
        Olgovich April 4 2018 06: 52
        +1
        Quotation: blooded man
        ro it should not think the Admiral, but those who are obliged to trawl

        His business, since he leads ships: he knew that the probability of installing cans on a standard route was great (other people's ships were spotted the night before) and anyway went there without information. This is a blunder.
        1. co-creator
          co-creator April 4 2018 09: 45
          0
          Quote: Olgovich
          he knew that the probability of installing cans on a standard route was great (foreign ships were seen the night before) and still went there without information. This is a blunder.

          He didn’t go out in three minutes, and not even in an hour. Trawling should take place before the squadron exits or if foreign ships were noticed without the order of the fleet commander. Makarov should not give orders to each service and commander of each ship every single day during normal combat work. If Makarov was mistaken, it was only because he did not pick up a man who would check these usual combat missions.
          1. Olgovich
            Olgovich April 4 2018 09: 47
            0
            Quotation: blooded man
            If Makarov was mistaken, it was only because he did not pick up a man who would check these usual combat missions.

            To learn the results of trawling and swimming safety in that area is obliged.
  4. Hurricane70
    Hurricane70 April 1 2018 07: 40
    +2
    Great man, sailor and explorer, covering himself and Russia with glory! Now there is an acute deficit in such people ...
    1. baudolino
      baudolino April 1 2018 08: 52
      +2
      Quote: Hurricane70
      Great man, sailor and explorer, covering himself and Russia with glory! Now there is an acute deficit in such people ...

      Such people are always in short supply.
  5. bionik
    bionik April 1 2018 07: 47
    +7
    Usually we see the image of Stepan Osipovich with a large beard combed into two, and here he is a completely young man.
    Cadet of the Nikolaev Maritime College S. Makarov. 1865, Varyag corvette, Hong Kong.
  6. Rurikovich
    Rurikovich April 1 2018 08: 02
    +2
    Well, the “Mermaid” was not an innovative ship, as the author described it. It was the development of monitors like "Hurricane", which we called armored boats, which also had on-board reservations and a rotating turret. Simply, the Mermaid was already larger, had two towers, but it did not solve the problem of seaworthiness due to the low height of the side
  7. Reptiloid
    Reptiloid April 1 2018 08: 17
    0
    The name of Admiral Makarov is the embankment in St. Petersburg.
  8. kvs207
    kvs207 April 1 2018 08: 20
    +5
    "Stepan Osipovich Makarov was a hereditary naval officer. His father Osip Fedorovich Makarova (1813-1878) served in Nikolaev and then in Nikolaevsk-on-Amur. Stepan Osipovich was born in 1849 in Nikolaev and, like his father, chose for himself career as a naval officer. In 1865, Stepan Makarov graduated from the Naval College in Nikolaevsk-on-Amur, where he trained personnel for the Naval Naval Corps. "
    With all due respect to the author and, especially, to Admiral Makarov, this paragraph does not reflect the actual state of affairs.
    Father Stepan Osipovich, rose from the lower ranks to the rank of ensign for the Admiralty (I will clarify later) and his son could not count on studying in the Marine Corps, so he went to the "sailor".
  9. Huumi
    Huumi April 1 2018 09: 17
    +1
    Then I read a large article about the Japanese War and it says that when Makarov came to Port Arthur there were 6 ships, there were 4 left with him. And he died, allegedly because he went the same way the second time — the Japanese tracked the route for the first time at night set mines and Makarov went a second time along this route ran into mines ... and that's the whole story ...
  10. fdgf
    fdgf April 1 2018 09: 20
    +2
    Quote: Ilya Polonsky
    Admiral Makarov. The genius of the Russian fleet

    I would like at least some evidence of the genius of the "brilliant naval commander." Well, here are some, even the most elementary.
    The essence of the matter, however, is that they are not there.
    1. Rurikovich
      Rurikovich April 1 2018 09: 55
      +3
      Quote: fdgf
      The essence of the matter, however, is that they are not there.

      Where are Makarov to the great genius of classification !!! laughing
      Accidentally, the classification table of the same type of ships didn’t dream at night? lol
      1. Alf
        Alf April 1 2018 23: 00
        +1
        Quote: Rurikovich
        Accidentally, the classification table of the same type of ships didn’t dream at night?

        On the morning of January 2nd.
  11. midshipman
    midshipman April 1 2018 09: 39
    +4
    A monument to him in Kronstadt is installed. He brought his grandchildren from Moscow to bow to him. My mother’s grandfather, an officer, participated in that war. He was seriously wounded and left for the Minsk province for treatment.
  12. fdgf
    fdgf April 1 2018 09: 57
    +5
    Quote: Ilya Polonsky
    Brilliant Russian naval commander

    Makarov never commanded the fleet.
    Quote: Ilya Polonsky
    destroyer "Terrible" entered into an unequal battle with the Japanese ships. The commander sent the Bayan cruiser to help the Terrible, and then he decided to go to the aid of the destroyer himself. The squadron commander went to sea on the flagship battleship "Petropavlovsk" and managed to drive off Japanese ships

    Think about these lines:
    1. The Minoan cannot "join the battle." And he cannot enter the “battle” either. In those days, it was a very small ship. He can join the battle, but nothing more.
    But this is so, little things.
    2. With whom is the "terrible" led the battle? Not more than with destroyers of the enemy. Because even a light cruiser would leave him a wet place for a couple of minutes. But Makarov on the flagship battleship !!!!!!!!! advanced against Japanese destroyers. Before that, sending Bayan (a rather small armored cruiser) against them. What then can be called such an admiral? And is it really an admiral? Were they wearing epaulets?
    1. Rurikovich
      Rurikovich April 1 2018 10: 16
      +5
      Quote: fdgf
      But Makarov on the flagship battleship !!!!!!!!! advanced against Japanese destroyers. Before that, sending Bayan (a rather small armored cruiser) against them. What then can be called such an admiral? And is it admiral

      You’re our genius, if you weren’t too lazy and set out the whole course of events that morning, then people unfamiliar with you would understand the essence of why Makarov came out with armadillos wink
      That's why for some reason I’m not personally surprised at your posts. laughing
      1. fdgf
        fdgf April 1 2018 10: 27
        0
        Quote: Rurikovich
        You are our genius

        Well, so is yours. Not at all.
        Although, after reading your (and your "like-minded") comments on naval topics, even the most ordinary and just sane person can easily feel like a genius.
        Quote: Rurikovich
        then people unfamiliar with you would understand the essence of why Makarov went out with armadillos

        Well, so tell us the gist. Open all the horror stories. Poke my nose in ignorance of the material.
        You can not. You can litter any forum with garbage, but as for business, they are weak. There is no knowledge, just verbiage.
        Quote: Rurikovich
        That's why for some reason I’m not personally surprised at your posts.

        The least that interests me is your surprise.
        1. Rurikovich
          Rurikovich April 1 2018 16: 16
          +5
          Quote: fdgf
          You can not

          Eee, dear, more modest cornering. On "weakly" only children take each other in the gateways
          Quote: fdgf
          You can litter the forum with any garbage, but as for business, they are weak

          Quote: fdgf
          There is no knowledge, just verbiage.

          Well, you, our genius, did not continue further in your enchanting remarks that Bayan entered into a shootout with the 3rd detachment of cruisers Rear Admiral Dev (Chitose, Kasagi, Takasago and Ioshino "), reinforced by the armored cruisers" Asama "and" Tokiva "and that Makarov therefore began to go out with combat forces to support his cruisers (" Diana ", who was still on duty at the external raid, joined the Bayan)
          Are you our genius ??? So who else is engaged in forgeries (shortcomings for the sake of his opinion) ??? !!! angry
          Quote: fdgf
          The least that interests me is your surprise.

          So what do you answer? wink tongue
          1. fdgf
            fdgf April 1 2018 16: 47
            0
            Quote: Rurikovich
            The Bayan entered into a shootout with the 3rd detachment of Rear Admiral Dev’s cruisers (Chitose, Kasagi, Takasago and Ioshino), reinforced by the armored cruisers Asama and Tokiva

            Of course, I have a low opinion of Makarov’s naval talents, but even I’m far from thinking that he sent Bayan against the detachment, which included Asam and Tokiva. Any of these battleships would have erased the Bayan powder for a very short period of time. Because they were armadillos of different classes.
            Quote: Rurikovich
            and that Makarov, therefore, began to go out with combat forces to support his cruisers

            What to support? On the approach to the PA was a detachment of Togo. He would have erased all this 1TOE in its entirety (and it was not in its entirety) into powder. And very fast.
            And the output on plywood Petropavlovsk against the Togo detachment was completely ridiculous.
            He went out to once again have fun with his eight. But the Japanese were ready for this. And he, no.

            Once you need to understand that Makarov very little commanded various naval combat formations. Practical (training) squadron (2 years), this is not a combat formation. The Mediterranean squadron is one year old.
            But basically it was a high-ranking official in the naval department. And he earned his epaulettes by wiping his pants in the offices. In many countries, similar posts are occupied by civilians at all.
            Quote: Rurikovich
            So what do you answer?

            I can not answer. I’m less trouble.
            1. Rurikovich
              Rurikovich April 1 2018 17: 05
              +3
              Quote: fdgf
              but even I’m far from thinking that he sent the Bayan against a detachment that included Asam and Tokiva

              May not confuse cause and effect wink The “Bayan” was sent BEFORE the appearance of the Deva! Only the appearance of the Japanese forces made the “Bayan” to retreat and forced Makarov to hurry, WITHOUT TRAWNING the area around the outer raid, to go out with serviceable battleships, so that, if the main forces of Togo appeared, they would take up the battle UNDER COVERED coastal batteries. All the same, an additional 5-254mm guns of battery No. 15 instead of the disabled “Retwisan” (according to your classification “battleship-raider”) and “Tsesarevich” (bag with sewage) is also help. Or is logic not known to you?
              Quote: fdgf
              Because they were armadillos of different classes.

              Oops ... This is something new - cruisers suddenly became armadillos. laughing
              Quote: fdgf
              And the output on plywood Petropavlovsk against the Togo detachment was completely ridiculous.

              "Plywood" "Petropavlovsk" is identical in booking of non-plywood "Yashima". Even their booking location is almost the same
              Quote: fdgf
              I can not answer. I’m less trouble.

              You can’t - psychologically you need attention and for someone to listen to (read) you. because every time you get banned, come back with your ideas back under different nicknames. But the essence does not change laughing wink
              1. fdgf
                fdgf April 1 2018 17: 24
                0
                Quote: Rurikovich
                Only the appearance of the Japanese forces forced the Bayan to retreat and forced Makarov to hurry, WITHOUT TRAWNING of the area around the outer raid, to go out with serviceable battleships, so that, if the main forces of Togo appeared, they would take up the battle UNDER COVERED coastal batteries.

                When you write this, you get the feeling that you are raving.
                Quote: Rurikovich
                All the same, an additional 5-254mm guns of battery No. 15 instead of the disabled “Retwisan” (according to your classification “battleship-raider”) and “Tsesarevich” (bag with sewage) is also help. Or is logic not known to you?

                I've always been wondering when people carry outright nonsense, that's how you are, what do they count on?
                It turns out 5 shit guns of some kind of coastal battery there could solve the whole thing.
                There are even no words to comment on this nonsense.
                Quote: Rurikovich
                Oops ... This is something new - cruisers suddenly became armadillos.

                Gee-gee-gee.
                This ignoramus doesn’t even know what an “battleship” is.
                Bayan is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                Asama, this is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                Russia is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                At the same time, okay?
                Quote: Rurikovich
                "Plywood" "Petropavlovsk" is identical in booking of non-plywood "Yashima". Even their booking location is almost the same

                No, how can this be read without periodically dropping the tabletop from homeric laughter?
                Milai Daragoi, Fuji and Yashima in the aggregate of their performance characteristics were only very slightly inferior to Tsesarevich. And no Poltava (the old 1st-class EDB) was even lying next to them. Not to mention Petropavlovsk, with its cheap (and weak) armor.

                Remember once and for all, strong ships were not appointed flagships in those days. They were needed for fighting in the thick of things. It concerns Petropavlovsk, it concerns Mikasa, it concerns Tsesarevich.
                1. Rurikovich
                  Rurikovich April 1 2018 17: 34
                  +5
                  Quote: fdgf
                  Bayan is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                  Asama, this is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                  Russia is a cruiser and an armadillo.
                  At the same time, okay?

                  "gee-gee-gee", isn’t it easier to say, according to the generally accepted classification, "armored cruiser"?
                  Although the genius of the new, open only to him by higher powers, the classification only knows how to name the ships laughing
                  Quote: fdgf
                  it concerns the Tsesarevich.

                  So this is your classification, "child with ... sewage." And suddenly he became the flagship of Wittgeft, just like Mikasa was the flagship of Togo ..
                  What, the glory of genius is already crushing our brains and are starting to contradict ourselves?
                  Quote: fdgf
                  Remember once and for all, strong ships were not appointed flagships in those days

                  wink
                  1. fdgf
                    fdgf April 1 2018 17: 44
                    0
                    Quote: Rurikovich
                    isn’t it easier to say, according to the generally accepted classification, an “armored cruiser”?

                    But an armored cruiser, is it not an armadillo?
                    In addition, the term "armored cruiser" in those days was not in use. Such cruisers were called either a cruiser or an armadillo.

                    I'm tired of your rudeness. I don’t need you. Be healthy, do not cough.
                  2. Comrade
                    Comrade April 1 2018 18: 45
                    +4
                    Quote: Rurikovich
                    the genius of a new classification, open only to him by higher powers, only knows how to name ships correctly

                    Exactly. And the British 120 years ago simply read RuNet, and therefore mistakenly called the battleship Izumo a cruiser.
                    1. fdgf
                      fdgf April 1 2018 23: 04
                      0
                      Quote: Comrade
                      And the British 120 years ago, they simply read Runet, and therefore they mistakenly called the battleship Izumo a cruiser

                      I don’t care what and how the English called 120 years ago.
                      I wrote about the terms adopted by 115 years ago in the Russian press.
                      If you do not understand Russian well, don’t be alarmed. Or first read 100 times, make sure that everyone understands correctly, and only then write.
                      1. Comrade
                        Comrade April 1 2018 23: 40
                        +5
                        Quote: fdgf
                        I wrote about the terms adopted by 115 years ago in the Russian press.

                        Well, let's take a look at the Russian official source, 1897, together. There is a table with the Japanese shipbuilding program, which also includes six armored cruisers.
                        How is it said about them?


                        Quote: fdgf
                        If you do not understand Russian well, don’t be alarmed. Or first read 100 times, make sure that everyone understands correctly, and only then write.

                        Do not be offended, but thank for the educational program. Now, thanks to my comments, you will know that in England and in Russia Izumo was not classified as battleship, but as armored cruiser.
                    2. fdgf
                      fdgf April 2 2018 00: 17
                      +1
                      Quote: Comrade
                      You will know that in England and in Russia, the Izumo was not classified as an armadillo, but as an armored cruiser.

                      Oh really?
                      But why didn’t they call the Garibaldians so?
                      Quote: Comrade
                      Do not be offended, but thank for the educational program.

                      Gee-gee-gee. Likbesnik found.
                      1. Comrade
                        Comrade April 2 2018 04: 23
                        0
                        Quote: fdgf
                        But why didn’t they call the Garibaldians so?

                        Yes, they called it, Nikolasha, as they called it, you just don’t know other sources besides Niva.
                        Here is the "Navy"

                        But the magazine "The Engineer", read, the same officialdom.
                    3. fdgf
                      fdgf April 2 2018 00: 23
                      0
                      Quote: Comrade
                      because of this they mistakenly called the battleship "Izumo" a cruiser.

                      And not just a cruiser, but a class 1 cruiser. But not an armored cruiser.
      2. Antares
        Antares April 4 2018 00: 01
        +2
        Quote: Rurikovich
        why Makarov went out with armadillos

        before the arrival of all the princes, he did not shy to go on Askold and Novik, preferring speed over Bayan. Although Viren kept the model cruiser.
        1. Rurikovich
          Rurikovich April 4 2018 19: 28
          +1
          Quote: Antares
          about the arrival of all princes did not shy away from going out on Askold and Novik

          On Novik or Askold you can drive the destroyers out, conduct a close reconnaissance of the approaches to the base for the presence and refinement of the enemy’s blocking ships, to divert the same blocking forces, in order to allow time for the main ships to calmly leave the base. In short, to carry out the actions for which these cruisers were intended. But on that day Makarov went on an armadillo precisely to support his cruisers in view of the Japanese forces that were superior to ours at sea at that time. Here already on the “Novik” or “Askold” against the pair “Asam” and “Tokiva” you do not run hi
  13. fiberboard
    fiberboard April 1 2018 10: 55
    +3
    Well, you read the comments and you understand that there are some talented naval commanders on the site whom Admiral Makarov is not good for soles. Well, what can I say, except that ,, Everyone imagines himself a hero seeing a battle from the side ,,.
  14. Alexander Greene
    Alexander Greene April 1 2018 13: 00
    +6
    Stepan Osipovich Makarov died in the very initial period of the war, and of course there is no point in guessing how further events would have developed under his leadership. But the main thing is that the great, diversified scientist, a wonderful person died, and from this his loss is very bitter.
    When they caught the Grand Duke, and they didn’t even find Admiral Makarov, the sailors bitterly said: “Gold is sinking, but dwelling always floats up”
  15. Okolotochny
    Okolotochny April 1 2018 14: 34
    +3
    And the artist Vereshchagin? Why is it not said for him at the end of the article?
  16. uizik
    uizik April 1 2018 14: 55
    +1
    And not his merit in radio intelligence?
  17. Bakht
    Bakht April 1 2018 14: 56
    +3
    It is difficult to deflect the "genius" of a commander (naval commander). Knowing all the facts, it is easy to judge from afar. Having only one base (not very strong), having damaged armadillos (the result of the first attack of the Japanese). Knowing that the Japanese fleet is stronger ... Will the "ingenious" fight a lot? The merit of Makarov, that with his arrival, ships began to go to sea more often, carried out active actions. Makarov hastened the commissioning of damaged ships, meaning to give battle to the Japanese Navy. With his death, Russian ships froze in the base and gave the Japanese sea.
    Similarly, in Japan there is much criticism of Admiral Togo. Not all of his decisions turned out to be "brilliant." In World War II, the inflated fame of Yamamoto also played a cruel joke with the Japanese. But ... passed for the "ingenious"
    The commander who tried to turn the tide, repair ships and give battle to the enemy certainly deserves great respect.
    And yet - here the events are interpreted a little incorrectly. Petropavlovsk did not go to the aid of the destroyer and was not used as a "firewall". Petropavlovsk was at the head of the squadron. More such commanders.
    1. fdgf
      fdgf April 1 2018 16: 57
      0
      Quote: Bakht
      And yet - here the events are interpreted a little incorrectly. Petropavlovsk did not go to the aid of the destroyer and was not used as a "firewall". Petropavlovsk was at the head of the squadron. More such commanders.

      Squadrons? Which squadron?
      There was no such squadron that the RIF could put up against Togo's squadron.
      Togo had 4 modern and 2 old class 1 EDBs.
      In 1 TOE there were 2 (Tsesarevich with a big stretch) modern and 1 old EDB of 1 class. As well as the outdated (at birth) EDB class 2. And a few more rust troughs, one of which was Petropavlovsk.
      But both Russian first-class EDBs were under repair.
      Which squadron in this case went out to meet Togo?
      I recall that in the battle of ZhM Togo, forces of 4 EDBs (3 modern + 1 old) ceased to exist 1 TEO (4 EDBs listed above + buckets with nuts). I imagine what would happen with the 1st TOE, if on the day that Petropavlovsk died, she would decide to go out to meet the Japanese. After all, that day Togo had + 2 EBRs of the 1st class. And at 1 TOE, minus 2 EDBs of the 1st class.
      1. Bakht
        Bakht April 1 2018 21: 00
        +1
        In the ranks were Petropavlovsk, Poltava, Victory, Relight. Sevastopol, it seems did not have time to join the squadron
        “After the rebuilding, Makarov on Petropavlovsk again turned to meet Japanese ships with the intentions of giving them battle under cover of coastal batteries. But at 9 hours 43 minutes, 2 miles from the Peninsula, Tiger Tail Petropavlovsk ran into a mine can.”
        1. fdgf
          fdgf April 1 2018 21: 55
          0
          Quote: Bakht
          After the rebuilding, Makarov on Petropavlovsk again turned towards the Japanese ships with the intentions of giving them battle under the cover of coastal batteries.

          Ask yourself for how far the guns of coastal batteries could hit.
          Then specify for yourself at what range these guns could effectively hit the enemy’s EDB. However, do not work, this is only about 40 cabs. 4 m.m. about 7,5 km.
          And then try to imagine how a bunch of rusty pelvis (any of the six Japanese EDBs was stronger than any Russian armadillo, and there were only 2 of them among the EDBs) led by plywood Petropavlovsk and with the support of the coastal 10 "pukalok will attack 6 Japanese 1st class EDBs, which are closer than 45 cabs to the shore obviously will not fit.
          There was not and could not be any attempt to "give battle". Because there was nothing to give battle.
          And what they write so lies. Again, they traditionally lie supposedly for the good of the cause. Like, the Japanese should have come full kapets, but a stray bullet ruined everything.
          Should not have come.
          And the mine didn’t change much. Yes, and not really, just did not change anything. In addition to the lives of the crew of Petropavlovsk.
          1. Bakht
            Bakht April 1 2018 22: 09
            +4
            You have a too radical view of things. I can remind you that against the "rusty pelvis" Togo did not dare to fight. War is not just one battle. For example, the Battle of Jutland did not name anything in the war. In the Russo-Japanese War, the Japanese could not risk landing on the Korean Peninsula. While Makarov was alive and the Russian squadron went to sea, Japanese dominance was not decisive. In contrast to you, Togo and Makarov understood this. Which made them, albeit not brilliant (I'm just against such epithets), but strong enough commanders. Who understood what a war was and what a battle.
            Why did Makarov send destroyers to the sea? By the way, the same canister on the way of the Japanese squadron was ordered to put the same Makarov. About trawling ... What trawling forces did the fleets of that time have? In particular, the Russian squadron?
            1. fdgf
              fdgf April 1 2018 22: 39
              0
              Quote: Bakht
              I can remind you that against the "rusty pelvis" Togo did not dare to fight.

              This is the same fake as the tales that if it weren’t for Makarov’s mine, the Japanese would be pulverized.
              I just, unlike you, understand what Peresvet was. Petropavlovsk. Sevastopol And other ships. Moreover, Togo usually allocated 3 of his EDBs to block these ships minus Petropavlovsk. He believed that this would be enough for them. I don’t think so, but Togo had his own opinion.
              In my opinion, the battle in the LM 1TOE (4 EBR + 2 pelvis) was applied at the Japanese level (4 EBR). But after the death of Vitgeft, "brave gentlemen officers" scattered through the cracks, like cockroaches. And nobody could pick them out from there. 1TOE actually ceased to exist without losing a single ship in battle.
              And you want to add Togo 2 EDB, and RIF 1 pelvis (Petropavlovsk) and naively count on success.
              Quote: Bakht
              While Makarov was alive and the Russian squadron went to sea, Japanese dominance was not decisive.

              Who told you that? Japanese dominance only staggered after the Witgeft mine can, when the Japanese lost 2 EDBs, including their most powerful EDB Hatsuse.
              In general, it must be said that the Navy is given too much attention to the Navy. In fact, he did not participate in the hostilities and did NOT have any influence on the course of hostilities.
              There is much more talk about him than he deserves. In vain spent.
              Quote: Bakht
              Unlike you, this was understood by both Togo and Makarov.

              Do not make up. Makarov had no strength to fight. And he either didn’t think of a mine can, or simply didn’t decide on it. Unlike Witgeft.
              But Togo had the task of neutralizing the 1st TOE. What he did very well.
              What did you want the Japanese ships to stand quietly in Japan?
              Quote: Bakht
              By the way, the same canister on the way of the Japanese squadron was ordered to put the same Makarov.

              Like this? By the time the mine can was staged, he was already quite long dead.
              1. Golovan Jack
                Golovan Jack April 1 2018 22: 48
                +6
                Quote: fdgf
                I don’t think so, but Togo had his own opinion

                good laughing good
                You, that ... the crown does not press, by chance?
                1. fdgf
                  fdgf April 1 2018 22: 50
                  0
                  Quote: Golovan Jack
                  You, that ... the crown does not press, by chance?

                  No, everything is fine.
                  And what, I have no right to my opinion?
                  1. Golovan Jack
                    Golovan Jack April 1 2018 22: 51
                    +4
                    Quote: fdgf
                    And what, I have no right to my opinion?

                    Yes, of course there is. Like Togo laughing laughing laughing
                    But the phrase you built ... well, neither add nor take away good
                    1. fdgf
                      fdgf April 1 2018 22: 54
                      +1
                      Quote: Golovan Jack
                      But the phrase you built ... well, neither add, nor take away

                      I'm glad you enjoyed it.
              2. Bakht
                Bakht April 1 2018 23: 17
                +2
                "To counter another bombardment S.O. Makarov ordered establish a coastal battery and observation post in Liaoteshan, and to the Amur mine layer, place a mine can (20 minutes) in the area of ​​maneuvering enemy armadillos. At the same time, he supported the initiative of the Retvisan commander, Captain 1st Rank E.N. Schensnovich and senior artilleryman of this battleship lieutenant K.F. Ketlinsky on the organization of "cross-over" firing of ships of the squadron through Liaoteshan. "
                I was not there, so I use literature. So he was not quite dead, if he gave orders.
                Dominance at sea is not a comparison of the performance characteristics of ships. Without neutralizing the Russian squadron, all shipping by sea was in jeopardy. Togo understood this very well. You are not.
                “The blockage failed, and Togo Vice Admiral had the opportunity to make sure by appearing with the United Fleet at Port Arthur on the morning of March 14. The Pacific Fleet quickly went to sea, led by S.O. Makarov at Petropavlovsk. Despite the favorable balance of power, X. Togo stubbornly did not want to risk a general battle. Once again he retreated, realizing that the bombing and blockage operations failed to paralyze the activity of the Russian fleet. However, S.O. Makarov, due to an unfavorable balance of forces, was forced to template maneuver near Port Arthur - according to the GXNUMX under the cover of coastal batteries. Forced and noticed by the Japanese, the template prompted X. Togo and his staff the possibility of effective use of mine weapons. "
                1. fdgf
                  fdgf April 1 2018 23: 39
                  0
                  Quote: Bakht
                  and to the Amur mine layer, to put a mine can (20 minutes) in the area of ​​maneuvering enemy armadillos.

                  Why are you retelling the contents of the Murzilka magazine to me?
                  Was the mine bank delivered?
                  Was not.
                  The rest of the printed tales have no meaning.
                  Quote: Bakht
                  therefore I use literature. So he was not quite dead, if he gave orders.

                  Use it. But wisely.
                  Makarov died in April. And Witgeft ordered the mine bank to be delivered in May. You can specify the dates yourself.
                  Quote: Bakht
                  Dominance at sea is not a comparison of the performance characteristics of ships. Without neutralizing the Russian squadron, all shipping by sea was in jeopardy. Togo understood this very well. You are not.

                  What? I do not understand? Do you yourself understand what you write? It seems to me that no.
                  Quote: Bakht
                  The Pacific Fleet quickly went to sea, led by S.O. Makarov at the Petropavlovsk. Despite the favorable balance of power, X. Togo stubbornly did not want to risk a general battle. Once again, he retreated, realizing that the bombing and blockage operations could not paralyze the activity of the Russian fleet. However, S.O. Makarov, due to an unfavorable balance of forces, was forced to template maneuver near Port Arthur - according to the GXNUMX under the cover of coastal batteries.

                  You will soon become “proving” something with children's coloring.
                  This nonsense you brought here is not even worth reading. Togo retreated, but Makarov ... also retreated. So who eventually retreated?
                  And Makarov retreated. The same simply did not begin to approach the coastal batteries closer to the range of their effective fire. And it was pathetically called "Togo once again retreated."
                  That's just what it says there. But since the task was to let in as much fog as possible, they still let him in. To embarrass those unaware of those events.
                  1. Bakht
                    Bakht April 2 2018 00: 09
                    +3
                    Then you write that the battery ranges were insufficient. That Togo did not begin to approach. I use a fairly authoritative source. For example, "Fleet in the Russo-Japanese War" Not Murzilka at all.
                    By the way, Wittgeft was against the production. mine cans. In many respects, this is the merit of the Amur captain.
                    In general, everyone remained of their own opinion. I do not consider any commander a genius. Everyone had errors. But supremacy at sea is not achieved by comparing ships. Under Makarov, the fleet carried out active operations. And the Japanese were forced to reckon with this. After the death of Makarov, the Russian fleet froze. What ensured the Japanese complete dominance of the sea. This must be clearly understood.
                    And do not use words such as "nonsense" and so on. Togo retreated, having an advantage in ships. And what you think is “not even worth reading” was written by V.Yu. Gribovsky. Look at the bibliography and then you can claim that this person writes nonsense. I am afraid, however, that no one will agree with you.
                  2. fdgf
                    fdgf April 2 2018 22: 59
                    0
                    Quote: Bakht
                    Then you write that the battery ranges were insufficient. That Togo did not begin to approach.

                    I am not writing that the battery range was insufficient. Batteries could hit the range that their guns were designed for.
                    That is quite reasonable within the range of their effective fire "swim" did not.
                    Quote: Bakht
                    By the way, Wittgeft was against the production. mine cans. In many respects, this is the merit of the Amur captain.

                    There is no special merit of Ivanov in that mine can. Except for the exact execution of the order.
                    Specify what kind of mine a can it was, WHERE IT HAS BEEN, and why WITGEFT MUST have had nothing to do with it. And everyone should have been unprincipled, except for the "stupid boy-captain."
                    Related to this is the fact that the Japanese until the last thought that their ships were torpedoed by submarines. And they didn’t think about mines at all.
                    Quote: Bakht
                    Under Makarov, the fleet carried out active operations.

                    Can you give at least one example of such "active actions"?
                    Quote: Bakht
                    After the death of Makarov, the Russian fleet froze.

                    Indeed, it "froze" in such a way that in less than a month it sank a third of the Japanese linear fleet.
                    It is only a pity that he "froze" once, and not three.
                    Quote: Bakht
                    What ensured the Japanese complete dominance of the sea. This must be clearly understood.

                    I clearly understand that with the help of 4 EDB the Japanese have become easier to control the sea than it was with the help of 6 EDB.
                    Quote: Bakht
                    Togo retreated, having an advantage in ships.

                    Togo did not back down. Togo did not approach, so as not to fall under the fire of coastal batteries. These are fundamentally different things.
                    Quote: Bakht
                    And what you think is “not even worth reading” was written by V.Yu. Gribovsky.

                    How many people have ever written what stupidity?
                    Quote: Bakht
                    Look at the bibliography and then you can claim that this person writes nonsense.

                    I have not met a single author without jambs. Most respected by me on this subject is S. Suliga. But he also has "moments" in places.
  18. Comrade
    Comrade April 1 2018 17: 12
    +1
    Quote: fdgf
    At least during his sitting in the PA he could easily make a mine can like the one that Vitgeft later made.

    No, Makarov could not.
    The Japanese began to walk on the same route not to, after the death of Petropavlovsk. Do not read "Runet", a colleague, especially before dinner.
    1. The comment was deleted.
    2. Antares
      Antares April 4 2018 00: 05
      +1
      Quote: Comrade
      Do not read "Runet", a colleague, especially before dinner.

      Even Stepanov has written about this fact ... Runet in general, it just supports the version "after"
  19. 1970mk
    1970mk April 1 2018 17: 13
    +4
    Not for profit .... let's stop myths multiplying .... Admiral Makarov, as a person, was probably good ... was brave ... but as a naval commander, to put it mildly, he was "so-so." The death of the battleship "Petropavlovsk" - the circumstances of the death of the ship and the admiral - a direct confirmation of this. No patrol service - you yourself read what happened. Then - Makarov, if my memory serves me, he was in charge of the entire naval artillery of the Russian Empire. It was sharply expressed that on cruisers no protection of the servant of guns of the main caliber was needed. What this led to on the same "Varyag" is known - the losses of the service staff of the guns are great - the shell burst nearby - the hail of a fragment - everyone ends at the gun. Russian shells for tactics of combat at a distance of a "pistol shot" - this is also "the brainchild of Makarov." He died for the empire - his country - glory to him for this. But the Great Naval commander can be called it only if there are no such real ones at all!
  20. 1970mk
    1970mk April 1 2018 17: 24
    0
    Quote: avt
    Outstanding scientist, engineer.

    You say wonderful things. Could you elaborate on his outstanding? In the artillery department, what did his genius lead to? But he did not say that the protection of guns on cruisers is not needed at all?
    1. Alf
      Alf April 1 2018 23: 05
      0
      Quote: 1970mk
      But he did not say that the protection of guns on cruisers is not needed at all?

      "To protect the guns, it is enough to disperse them throughout the ship."
    2. fdgf
      fdgf April 1 2018 23: 43
      0
      Quote: 1970mk
      But he did not say that the protection of guns on cruisers is not needed at all?

      In fairness, it should be noted that shields were not installed on fighter cruisers in those days. Since their main weapon was speed. And it was believed from the smaller class enemy high-speed ships that, thanks to a larger caliber, they could fight off even without shields. And from afar.
  21. Comrade
    Comrade April 1 2018 18: 36
    +3
    Quote: fdgf
    the term "armored cruiser" in those days was not in use. Such cruisers were called either a cruiser or an armadillo.

    So, look into the English technical journal dated September 22 1899 Mr. Red, specially for you, emphasized (translated into Russian) the armored cruiser Izumo.

    Now the question is: did you lie that there was no such term as "armored cruiser", or is it just subtracted in Runet?
    1. Rurikovich
      Rurikovich April 1 2018 19: 41
      +4
      Valentine hi , Matt, ch. 7, st6 wink
      This merchant has a different view of certain things, alas, our mind lol wink hi
      1. Comrade
        Comrade April 1 2018 23: 53
        +3
        That's for sure, you just look, he denies that cruiser in Russian means cruiser. In gives, before he did not reach this.
        1. Rurikovich
          Rurikovich April 1 2018 23: 57
          +2
          Quote: Comrade
          That's for sure, you just look, he denies that cruiser in Russian means cruiser. In gives, before he did not reach this.

          Develops request winked
    2. fdgf
      fdgf April 1 2018 23: 00
      0
      You never cease to amaze me with your misunderstanding of what is written in Russian.
      Armored cruiser, this is an armored cruiser. There is nothing to do with the words "cruiser" and "battleship" there. Even the letters are not similar.
      And I sneezed into your English magazines. As in their later translations into Russian. It was about the terms adopted in the Russian press and literature of that period.
      Damn, well, he doesn’t understand anything from what they write in Russian.
      1. Comrade
        Comrade April 1 2018 23: 47
        +3
        Quote: fdgf
        Armored cruiser, this is an armored cruiser. There is nothing to do with the words "cruiser" and "battleship" there.

        "Armored cruiser"translated from English means"armored cruiser".

        Quote: fdgf
        It was about the terms adopted in the Russian press and literature of that period.

        No problem, look at the Russian officialdom of 1897.

        What is underlined in red? Read aloud!
        1. fdgf
          fdgf April 2 2018 00: 12
          0
          Quote: Comrade
          "Armored cruiser" in English means "armored cruiser."

          Who would have thought. And I did not know.
          Quote: Comrade
          Read aloud!

          Read it out loud:
          1. Comrade
            Comrade April 2 2018 03: 55
            +1
            My friend, we’re talking about official terms, and you palm off on me journalistic errors.
            Look, I have presented you with an official directory specially designed for naval officers, and you answered me with a clipping from the Niva magazine. And what is the "Niva"? Fiction for the layman.
            1. fdgf
              fdgf April 2 2018 10: 00
              0
              Quote: Comrade
              Look, I have presented you with an official directory specially designed for naval officers, and you answered me with a clipping from the Niva magazine. And what is the "Niva"? Fiction for the layman.

              It’s all because the Russian language is not native to you and you don’t understand what is written in Russian.
              I wrote to you:
              Quote: fdgf
              fdgf Yesterday, 23:04 PM ↑
              Quote: Comrade
              And the British 120 years ago, they simply read Runet, and therefore they mistakenly called the battleship Izumo a cruiser

              I don’t care what and how the English called 120 years ago.
              I wrote about the terms adopted by 115 years ago in the Russian press.
              If you do not understand Russian well, don’t be alarmed. Or first read 100 times, make sure that everyone understands correctly, and only then write.

              I wrote to you about how all this was called in the Russian press. And it is written in black and white. But you, apparently out of ignorance of the language, did not understand this. And mutter to me about some official directories and British catalogs. Moreover, they themselves admit it.
              Quote: Comrade
              Where do the terms come from? From the directory "Military Fleets" and the magazine "The Engineer".

              Nevertheless, try to understand what is written in Russian. I understand this is not easy for you. But if you can’t, then keep quiet.
        2. fdgf
          fdgf April 2 2018 00: 25
          0
          Here's another one for the collection:

          Read aloud.
          An 1 class cruiser, not an armored cruiser.
          1. Comrade
            Comrade April 2 2018 03: 59
            0
            Quote: fdgf
            An 1 class cruiser, not an armored cruiser.

            Just reduced to save space horizontally. Well, raise your eyes higher, is there in my screenshots what is written in Russian and English? Two identical terms are written there:
            1 class armored cruiser и First-class armored cruiser.
            Where do the terms come from? From the directory "Military Fleets" and the magazine "The Engineer".
      2. Rurikovich
        Rurikovich April 1 2018 23: 48
        0
        Quote: fdgf
        Armored cruiser, this is an armored cruiser

        So it translates as "armored cruiser" lol And literally yes
        Nicholas, is the sky in your world by chance not pink? what belay
  22. kan123
    kan123 April 2 2018 04: 31
    0
    Makarov very successfully laid mines, but the irony is that he apparently blew up his own mine. The problem with these mines is that when you lay them down, the fleet turns out to be locked up - they still haven’t invented a jeepies - in the fog, at night, even during the day, there was no way to go to sea. In addition, Makarov could be a genius ten times, the RI fleet was already defeated, respectively. Her Highness’s actions.
  23. Comrade
    Comrade April 2 2018 05: 06
    +1
    Quote: fdgf
    But why didn’t they call the Garibaldians so?

    Go to the board, take a pointer and lead along the lines, reading aloud. There at the end on the right is the answer to your question.

  24. Engineer
    Engineer April 2 2018 09: 02
    +2
    But what is ingenious in the naval commander who did not participate in any naval battle? The clash of Peresvet and Sevastopol and the conclusion of the latter for a long time out of order? Loss of destroyers? The loss of Petropavlovsk? And all this is not in battle. A good engineer - yes, a researcher - yes, but not a naval commander.
  25. Valera Kozelko
    Valera Kozelko April 2 2018 10: 08
    +2
    Yes, the great was the naval commander. Stay alive, maybe Port Arthur would not be surrendered ...
  26. Valera Kozelko
    Valera Kozelko April 3 2018 10: 50
    0
    By the way, he became interested in the history of the Russian-Japanese war and the influence of Admiral Makarov on it. Encyclopedias say very little. I re-read Stepanov’s book “Port Arthur”, it seemed to me very politicized, still written under Stalin. There, more and more are being blamed on General Kuropatkin, the commander of the ground forces, they say the navy and Makarov are well done, and the army is to blame. I found modernized sources, where the authors are less adapted to the situation. But you know, Stepanov’s opinions and theirs coincide. For example - "Having put his army in order, General Kuropatkin went on the offensive and tried to release the Kwantung fortified area cut off from his forces. A major battle unfolded in the Shahe river valley: there were more Russians, but Japanese Marshal Oyama managed to restrain the onslaught. Port Arthur was doomed." (Source: http://histerl.ru/lectures/20_vek/russko_iaponska
    ia_voina.htm). So the book is still fair, I recommend reading it ..
    1. dzuar saubarag
      dzuar saubarag April 11 2018 13: 38
      0
      Fyodor Petrovich Rerberg, a participant in the war, and later a member of the military-historical commission at the GUGSH on the description of the Russian-Japanese war, wrote a lot about Kuropatkin. He wrote a lot, but definitely nothing good. Characteristically, Rerberg himself was the head of the chancellery at the headquarters, and was generally more concerned with rear issues. That is, there was no conflict of interests with Kuropatkin in the field of military operations. I highly recommend his book “Historical secrets of great victories and inexplicable defeats. Notes of a participant in the Russo-Japanese War ”- very interesting and well written!
  27. DimerVladimer
    DimerVladimer April 3 2018 15: 43
    +1
    From a mine explosion detonated ammunition in the bow artillery cellar.


    An eyewitness - Semenov Vladimir Ivanovich (Payback. Trilogy), believed that from the detonation of a mine cellar.

    .... standing at the right six-inch bow pluton, I gave the usual orders to the senior boatswain, when a deaf, rolling blow forced to startle not only me, but the whole cruiser. As if somewhere close enough from a twelve-inch. I looked around in bewilderment ... The blow was repeated even more menacingly ... What is it? .. - "Petropavlovsk!" “Petropavlovsk! ..” - scattered and frightened exclamations shouted around me, immediately making me rush to the board in anticipation of something terrible ... - I saw a giant cloud of brown smoke (pyroxylin, mine cellar - flashed into brain) and in it it’s somehow absurd, oblique, hanging in the air, either flying, or falling fock mast ... To the left of this cloud was visible the back of the battleship, exactly the same as always, as if there, on the nose, nothing happened ... The third blow ... Clubs of white steam that obscured the brown smoke ... - Boilers! .. - - The stern of the battleship suddenly began to rise so abruptly and abruptly, as if it were drowning not in the nose, but in the middle of breaking ... For a moment, the screws still flashed through the air ... Were there any new explosions? - I don’t know ... but it seemed to me that this, the only aft part of Petropavlovsk, visible behind a cloud of smoke and steam, suddenly seemed to open, and a hurricane of flame surged from it, like from a crater of a volcano ... It seemed to me that even a few moments after the remains of an armadillo disappeared under the sea, the sea still threw this flame ...
  28. Antares
    Antares April 4 2018 00: 13
    +2
    He was a wonderful person.
    Monument in his homeland. Fleet Boulevard. GPS Coordinates 46 ° 58'40``N, 31 ° 59'26''E
  29. alsoclean
    alsoclean April 7 2018 00: 12
    +1
    If the fighting efficiency of the fleet depends on one, even brilliant, leader, the fleet is gone. If Makarov did not understand this, what kind of leader is he? And if you understood, but did nothing ..... even more so. The commander of the Pacific Fleet is not only a naval commander. But also the personnel officer, administrator and much more. In a war they kill, they suddenly kill. Where is the change? Why Wittgeft and Ukhtomsky? Why Stessel and Fock? What, there were no sensible commanders?
    1. bone1
      bone1 April 8 2018 21: 28
      0
      Stessel and the Fok Army and Makarov did not obey, but, according to the concepts of those years, even the commanders of the ships of the fleet could be replaced only with the permission of almost Nikolasha.
      1. alsoclean
        alsoclean April 8 2018 23: 54
        +1
        The Fleet Com, according to the old Russian tradition, had very broad powers:
        1) He commanded, among other things, the defense of Ch. fleet bases - including army ones. ALL troops in the Port Arthur fortress obeyed him. And all the commanders. The fact that Stark and Vitgeft were cowardly before Stessel does not prove anything.
        2) The Navy Commander led not by concepts, but by charter. Well, with an eye on Alekseev. But Alekseev is far away, Base in the ring. So Makarov simply had to decide personnel matters himself.
        3) Makarov himself was a brave man and in this case had not only the highest deignment (it was approved in Petersburg), but he was also very independent in character.
        4) But Makarov launched personnel work and rushed headlong to fight. Alas, miracles do not happen .....
        1. bone1
          bone1 April 9 2018 19: 34
          0
          Heavy casefellow
          1. alsoclean
            alsoclean April 9 2018 20: 57
            +1
            With the beginning of the RPE, the GMS had a question from Komflot. 3 candidates were nominated - Makarov, Dubasov, Chukhnin. Do not guess ..... No.
  30. bone1
    bone1 April 8 2018 21: 25
    +1
    Of course, Makarov stands out from the Starks, Rozhdestvensky and other Virenovs, but to call a genius, you really bent it.
  31. geniy
    geniy April 11 2018 09: 22
    +1
    Quotation: blooded man
    Vladivostok froze for several months a year like that, and specifically it froze.

    Yes, indeed - because of this, Vladivostok was uncomfortable. However, in the century before last, Russia always dreamed of an ice-free port. But at that time circumstances changed radically: it was thanks to Makarov that powerful icebreakers appeared, the first of which was the Ermak. But here we must understand that the "Ermak" was linear icebreaker, and to work in the port it’s enough to have several times less powerful and less expensive port icebreaker. And in Vladivostok there was a small and low-powered port icebreaker. Now, if they had built more powerfully, then the ice in Vladivostek would cease to be an obstacle, especially since Vladivostok is still a rather southern city, and it is located at a latitude approximately like that of Crimea.
  32. 1970mk
    1970mk 26 May 2018 21: 35
    0
    Makarov anyone just is not a "genius of the Russian fleet." As an admiral, he ruined so many portacs and his death is a consequence of how he set up the service. This is purely in fact, nothing more.