Military Review

The same "Spencer." Rifles by country and continent - 10

76
Many VO readers, having become acquainted with the story about carbines and rifles developed in the USA and used in 60-70 years of the 19th century, in a number of comments commented on why the famous Spencer carbine was not mentioned among them. Accordingly, many would like to look at him and, accordingly, read about him. And the reason for such a “bad attitude” was very simple: according to the plan, the materials in the series “Rifles by Countries and Continents” were to go first about the samples that preceded the sliding gate and, mainly, with reloading on one cartridge. About the famous "Winchester" M1866 on the VO materials have already been, so it hardly made sense to repeat, but about the "Spencer", yes, it was already time to tell in more detail.



Spencer Carabiner M1865, .50 caliber.

Well, the story about this interesting system should be started with a story about its designer, who at the time of creating his famous carbine barely turned 20 years old! A typical “Connecticut Yankee” Christopher Miner Spencer was born in 1833 in a poor family. And so poor that the education of young Crete (as he was called as a child) and could not get it, and everything was forced to learn independently. Already 12 years he left his home and entered the disciples of the hero of Connecticut, unsurpassed gunsmith and the shooter of the well-known then "Kentucky rifle" - Josiah Hollister, who was known for doing weapon to George Washington himself. He taught Crete a lot, and he also infected him with a passion for hunting, in which he excelled and which he practiced until old age.

The same "Spencer." Rifles by country and continent - 10

Christopher Spencer in his youth.

In 1854, Spencer began working at the Samuel Colt factory in Hartford, but then went to work for Robins and Lawrence, whose company produced Sharps rifles. And so, having studied this rifle, Spencer thought that its design fully allowed the possibility of turning it into a weapon from which it would be possible to shoot without bothering with the long and troublesome procedure of reloading it. In the very rifle he was fascinated by the simplicity of design: vertically moving in the grooves of the receiver shutter, driven by a long lever, convenient in work, but made in the form of a separate part, bending around the trigger bracket.


Schematic device Sharps rifle.

The work was arguing, and now 6 March 1860, Christopher Spencer received a patent for his invention - the magazine rifle - and the "Spencer carbine." Outwardly, this weapon looked like the most ordinary single-shot rifle with a shutter controlled by a lever arm. But he had a "zest": inside the butt there was a magazine in the form of a tube with a spring inside, in which seven cartridges were inserted forward one after the other. At the same time, the spring was compressed, and then in the process of reloading it pushed them out of it one by one to be sent into the chamber. It was necessary to reload the carbine by dragging the lever under the receiver, which, unlike the Sharps system, was designed as a trigger hook. The trigger, however, was not automatically cocked, it had to be manually cocked before each shot. It was possible to store pre-equipped shops in specially designed tubular canisters that contained 6, 10 and 13 shops.


Spencer carbine device diagram

Smith and Wesson cartridges of the 1854 model of the year with a copper sleeve and a pointed pure lead bullet were used for shooting. The first carbines had a .56-56 caliber, well, and the actual bullet diameter was .52 inches. The 45 gran (2,9 g) of black smoke powder was placed in the sleeve, and ammunition of the .56-52, .56-50 and wildcat .56-46 calibers were used. It should be understood in such a way that at that time the calibration of the bullets was somewhat different from that adopted later and had two notations. The first number - showed the diameter of the liner, the second - the diameter of the bullet in the place where it entered the grooves of the barrel. The most popular were carbines of the .52 caliber or 13,2-mm. It should be noted that the .56-56 cartridge was almost as powerful as the cartridges for the largest-caliber musket of the American army .58 caliber, and therefore differed in high lethal force.

The Spencer immediately showed itself as a very reliable and rapid-fire weapon, from which it was possible to fire with a rate of fire exceeding 20 rounds per minute. Compared to conventional blasting rifles, which gave 2-3 shots per minute, this was, of course, fantastic. However, the lack of effective tactics prevented him from appreciating. Detractors pointed out that when shooting there is so much smoke that it was difficult to see the enemy behind him, and that the situation on the battlefield would be as if the soldiers were standing in thick fog, and therefore there would be no point in fast shooting.


Spencer M1865 carabiner open-bolt. Above it is the cartridges and the shop.

Weapons capable of shooting several times faster than existing single-shot carbines would also require a significant restructuring of the supply lines and create a greater load on the already overloaded railways, would require tens of thousands more mules, wagons and locomotives. In addition, with the money that cost one Spencer carbine, it was possible to purchase several rifles of Springfield, which was also not in his favor.


Spencer's infantry rifle.

On the other hand, the advantage of the “spencer” was its ammunition, which was waterproof and could withstand long-term storage and transportation in shaky carts. Meanwhile, the experience of the war showed that the same, for example, paper and linen ammunition for the Sharps rifle, transported in railcars by rail or after long storage in warehouses, were often dampened and therefore spoiled. Spencer's ammunition had no such problem.


The principle of the mechanism of the Spencer carbine: extraction of the spent cartridge and the filing of the next cartridge.


The principle of the mechanism of the Spencer carbine: the shutter is closed and locked, the trigger is cocked.

The war between the North and the South created an excellent market in the country for weapons of sometimes dubious quality, and Spencer, who believed in the high combat characteristics of his model, hastened to enter it as soon as possible. In the summer of 1861, at the Chickering Boston factory, he placed an order for the first prototypes of his carbine, and then began to look for ways to the White House. Fortunately for him, his friend in Washington turned out to be a friend of the Minister of the Sea, Gideon Welles, who helped Spencer get an audience with the Minister. Welles immediately ordered a comparative test of his carbine, comparing it with Henry's rifle. The result of the competition was the first government order for 700 carbines for the American fleet.


American poster showing samples of Spencer rifles and carbines. From top to bottom: a rifle for the Navy with a bayonet-yatagan, an infantry rifle, a “big carbine”, a “small carbine”, a sport rifle.

It is believed that the first shot at the enemy from the Spencer carbine was made on October 16 1862 of the year during a shootout near Cumberland, Maryland. The carbine was used by a friend of its creator - Sergeant Francis Lombard from the 1-th Massachusetts cavalry regiment. Soon carbines at their own expense began to buy and other mobilized. Shipments of carbines to the fleet began in December 1862 of the year. All 700 units were made in six months, after which these carbines armed the Mississippian airborne brigade, and Spencer began to seek to extend the contract with the federal army, although the rate of fire of this weapon still caused great doubts from the federal generals.


Carabiner and shop.

The first commander of the Armed Forces of the Union, General Winfield Scott, turned out to be the most decisive opponent of the armaments of the northerners with the Spencer carbines, because he believed that this would only lead to a waste of ammunition. However, Spencer was able to get through to the reception to Abraham Lincoln himself, and he personally tested his carbine, was very pleased with them and immediately ordered his production for the army to begin. With this sanction of the supreme commander and began his triumphal march on all fronts of internecine war in the States.


Receiver. Right view.

First of all, Spencer's carbines were sent to the elite units of the “Army of the Potomac” - “Arrows of the United States”, which made up the brigade of Colonel Hiram Berdan.


Receiver. View from above.

From the middle of 1863, not only the elite, but also the usual infantry regiments of the northerners began to arm it with magazine rifles. There are cases of their use in the Battle of Gettysburg, in the “Battle of Hoover”, where the “Lightning Brigade of Colonel John T. Wilder” armed with them operated very effectively, as well as in other places. They showed themselves well in the Battle of Hanover, in the Chattanooga campaign, during the Battle of Atlanta, and in the Battle of Franklin, where the Northerner soldiers inflicted great damage on the Southerners in manpower. Well, the last "military" carbine Spencer entered service 12 April 1865 of the year.


View of the reload lever. The internal mechanism is well protected from contamination.

In the battle of Nashville 9 000, mounted riflemen armed with Spencer carbines, commanded by General Major James Wilson, bypassed General Hood's left flank and attacked him from behind, exposing his troops to a killing attack. By the way, the assassin of Lincoln President John Wilkes Booth also carried Spencer's carbine at the time when he was captured and killed.


Aim.

At the end of 1860, Spencer’s company was sold to Fogerty Rife Company and, ultimately, Winchester. After that, Oliver Winchester stopped the release of Spencer carbines, and sold the remaining butts for firewood to get rid of the only worthy competitor. Many Spencer carbines were later sold to France, where they were used during the Franco-Prussian war in 1870. Despite the fact that Spencer’s company went out of business in 1869, cartridges for its carbines in the United States were made even in the 20s of the last century.


Butt and shop with a characteristic protrusion to extract it from the nest.

It can be said that the “spencer” of the 1860 of the year became the first American magazine rifle, moreover, produced in the USA in more than 200 000 copies by three manufacturers from 1860 to 1869 a year. It was widely and successfully used by the army of the Union, especially the cavalry, although it did not replace completely old single-shot samples that were used at that time. The Confederates sometimes captured them as trophies, but since they could not make ammunition for it due to the lack of copper, their ability to use it was severely limited.


Butt plate and store lug
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  1. tanit
    tanit 19 March 2018 15: 46
    +1
    I imagine the joy of soldiers from carrying a pencil case. Kilogram 4 weighed?
  2. hohol95
    hohol95 19 March 2018 16: 28
    +1
    And how many shops were supposed to be soldier? And how did he carry them?
    1. tanit
      tanit 19 March 2018 16: 36
      +3
      So from 10 to 13, the article is written. And how I transferred ... https: //zbroya.info/ru/blog/8288_kris
      tofer-spenser-i-ego-semizariadnaia-chudo-vintovka
      / Yes, it was just 4 kilos.)
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 19 March 2018 16: 42
        +1
        Thank! Overlooked! good
  3. hohol95
    hohol95 19 March 2018 16: 44
    +13

    Such an image would not be out of place in the article.
    1. voyaka uh
      voyaka uh 19 March 2018 17: 22
      +6
      Very compact! good Bag already at 10 stores. And convenient to carry.
    2. Curious
      Curious 19 March 2018 21: 08
      +7
      The pencil case depicted was developed by Erastus Blacksley of the 1st Connecticut Cavalry Volunteer Regiment (US patent 45 of December 469, 20). In the manufacture of used three species of wood and high quality leather.
    3. Saxahorse
      Saxahorse 19 March 2018 23: 21
      +1
      And where, in these stores in a pencil case, has a characteristic ledge at the end? Or is it removable?
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 20 March 2018 08: 18
        +5
        Most likely HE IS REMOVABLE.

        Internet reports -
        Of course, there was a store, only permanent. But there were devices for quickly filling Blakesley's designs. The pouch contained 6, 10 or 13 tubes with 7 rounds in each tube.
      2. hohol95
        hohol95 20 March 2018 16: 24
        +3
        I misled you -
        these pencil cases for 7 rounds were invested in a tubular butt magazine!
        And then a tube was inserted with an emphasis and a spring for feeding cartridges!

        Fig. 2a.
        Initially, apparently loading the application store was carried out on one cartridge!
        1. Saxahorse
          Saxahorse 20 March 2018 22: 29
          +1
          It turns out this is not a store, but a peculiar skid-charger, like a tubular clip.
          1. hohol95
            hohol95 20 March 2018 23: 24
            +1
            Error again...
            Judging by these figures, the cartridges from CARTRIDGE (clips) got enough sleep in the butt shop! And the butt was closed with a "tubular feeder."
            1. Saxahorse
              Saxahorse 21 March 2018 23: 03
              0
              That's right, clip.
              1. hohol95
                hohol95 21 March 2018 23: 16
                +1
                In the usual sense, ammunition is inserted into the rifle magazine!
                Here, the ammunition from the tube poured into the butt shop! But even this accelerated the reloading of a carbine or rifle! Only with a long-barreled rifle was it difficult to “control (reload)” in the Lying position!
                On English-language sites, this entire design of tubes with cartridges and a cartridge belt is called - CARTRIDGE BOX (cartridge box), that is, a CARTRIDGE BOX.
                1. Saxahorse
                  Saxahorse 22 March 2018 23: 21
                  +1
                  The one that is inserted with the cartridges is called a "pack". And the clip is just a device for equipping several cartridges at a time. Like brackets in Russian and German rifles. She allowed to push 5 rounds into the store right away. This tube is also a clip, allows you to stuff 7 rounds at a time.

                  But below the right question was asked, why the latch was not made to the store. Then it would be possible to shove the store into these tubes and equip it with one movement. So lying could be equipped. And so a bunch of uncomfortable movements with these long tubes is obtained.
  4. voyaka uh
    voyaka uh 19 March 2018 17: 20
    +6
    Good article. And then I met a lot in American novels:
    "Spencer, Spencer," but he never really knew what kind of beast it was.
    From the point of view of the center of gravity of the weapon, the tubular magazine in the butt is better,
    than under the barrel, like in Winchester.
    1. tanit
      tanit 19 March 2018 17: 27
      +2
      Yes thing. Admirable.
    2. Mordvin 3
      Mordvin 3 20 March 2018 22: 34
      +1
      Comrade Shpakovsky still in the "Technique of Youth" balabol. I remember .. laughing
  5. Nikolaevich I
    Nikolaevich I 19 March 2018 17: 32
    +8
    By the way, Spencer’s carbine scandalously “became famous” in the historically famous battle of General Custer with the Sioux Indians at Little Birghorn in 1876. Custer was defeated by the Indians “thanks to” Spencer’s carbines. And what’s interesting ... you can find two different versions in the literature concerning Spencer’s weapons. One narrates that Custer’s cavalrymen were armed with Spencer’s carbines and provided them with low-quality cartridges, which “fanned” when fired ... and another version was that a significant part of Custer's detachment was armed with single-shot and Springfield rifles (after Spencer’s end of the Civil War, Spencer’s carbines were sold by the army to “everyone, including the Indians ...). As a result, the Sioux Indians won the battle thanks to fire superiority, having those Spencer’s notorious store carbines ... Honestly I’ll say .... it turned out in such a way that I never asked: where is the truth?
    1. tanit
      tanit 19 March 2018 17: 35
      +4
      The truth is in one. The Indians destroyed them in that battle. hi
    2. voyaka uh
      voyaka uh 19 March 2018 18: 26
      +2
      The legend says that the victory of the Indians was provided by the famous
      Chief Siu "Raging Horse".
      He galloped-rushed there and back in front of the rows of soldiers. Shot at him
      many did not hit and ... defused their guns. There was sports excitement, and the soldiers relaxed.
      The Indians rushed at them and chopped tomahawks.
      1. tanit
        tanit 19 March 2018 19: 08
        +2
        Well yes. The script and summary of the film Jeronimo. laughing That's just Sioux in general and Dakota in particular this Apache was not wink
        1. tanit
          tanit 19 March 2018 19: 09
          +1
          The Americans were torn down in a matter of minutes. There was hardly time for racing. hi
          1. kalibr
            19 March 2018 19: 28
            +4
            No! Just the battle was very long and hard.
            1. tanit
              tanit 19 March 2018 19: 36
              +2
              Vyacheslav Olegovich, they dug themselves up. The battle was not long. I tend to believe you, but the Americans seem to be more in the subject.
              1. kalibr
                20 March 2018 20: 03
                +1
                I had articles about Big Horn and the Battle of Rosebad here. Search by profile and read ...
        2. voyaka uh
          voyaka uh 19 March 2018 19: 14
          +5
          Sioux, if you are interested in the details, not a tribe at all.
          And the name of the tribal union. Mad Horse was from the Lakota tribe (or Cheyenne, I don’t remember), a member of the Sioux alliance. He commanded them all Sedentary Bison.
          And what I described, and called at the very beginning of the post: "legend" fellow
          1. tanit
            tanit 19 March 2018 19: 32
            0
            Keyword
            Quote: voyaka uh
            I do not remember
            laughing
            1. tanit
              tanit 19 March 2018 19: 34
              +1
              Without any malicious intent. smile
    3. kalibr
      19 March 2018 19: 40
      +3
      I had an article here at VO at the very beginning about the Battle of Little Big Horne on excavation materials at the site of the battle with the restoration of its course. Dial and look.
      1. tanit
        tanit 19 March 2018 19: 44
        +1
        I watched how I miss your articles. But there were also new excavations. This is not a Bulgarian fortress near Penza. Who wants what, he draws conclusions.
        1. tanit
          tanit 19 March 2018 19: 46
          +2
          And on the "excavation". The most recent and “right” soldiers were demolished quickly. Even more.
          Sincerely. hi
        2. kalibr
          20 March 2018 20: 06
          0
          I don’t know anything about the latter. Got a magazine from there, "Battleplace" is called. Translated ... added a photo. I can’t say anything else. But I liked the article.
  6. Raccoon
    Raccoon 19 March 2018 19: 11
    +3
    This carbine is presented in the feature film "Unforgiven" 1992
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5Vb_FUuRDE
    1. tanit
      tanit 19 March 2018 19: 32
      +2
      Р
      Oh yeah. And caused a wave of popularity. That's what Clint Eastwood (and pulls write life-giving) could create
    2. Curious
      Curious 19 March 2018 21: 20
      +3
      This film uses modern weapons replicas, which are produced by the American company Cimarron Firearms. It produces a replica of Spencer rifle both under the original cartridge and under the modern .45 Colt. Here from such a carbine Eastwood shoots in the film.
  7. hohol95
    hohol95 19 March 2018 22: 37
    +3
    So it was before using "SPENCERS" -

    The main weapon of the infantry was now the Springfield rifle of the 1855 model. It was this system, or the somewhat more advanced Springfield rifle of 1861, that the infantry of the northerners during the civil war was armed with.
    Springfield was the last and most advanced of the American muzzle chargers. It was a massive rifle 4 feet 8 inches (about 142 cm) long, which adjoined an 18-inch (23 cm) flat bayonet. The caliber of the weapon was .58 (such is the diameter of the Mignet bullet). The firing range, as well as the distance of the aimed shot were significant - 1000 and 400 yards respectively. The penetration power of these weapons was also great. As tests have shown, a bullet fired from Springfield, for 300 yards pierced 11 boards with a thickness of an inch (2,54 cm), arranged in a row in an inch from each other. For 300 yards, the same bullet made a hole in 6,4 boards, and for 500 yards it went through 5,6 boards.
    To bring the rifle in a state of readiness required nine tricks:
    Lower the butt to the ground, placing it between the feet. Hold the trunk with your left hand.
    With your right hand, get the cartridge out of the belt pouch (the cartridge was a bullet with a paper sleeve glued to it, which was filled with gunpowder and covered with a waterproof composition).
    Grip the powder end of the cartridge between the teeth. Tear off part of the sleeve with teeth.
    Pour gunpowder into the barrel. Push the bullet with the thumb of the right hand.
    Remove the ramrod from under the barrel and set its end in the barrel opposite the bullet. [98]
    Send the bullet with a ramrod into the barrel until it stops.
    Remove the ramrod and insert it into the slot under the barrel (or stick it in the ground until the next loading).
    With the thumb of your right hand, cock the trigger in the half-cock position. Take a capsule from a purse on a belt and put it on a peg.
    "Aim, fire."
    For example, of the 24 thousand rifles found on Gettysburg Field, only 2536 were loaded correctly, 50% were charged twice, another 25% had from 3 to 10 rounds in their barrels, and some even up to 23.
    Nevertheless, in the hands of an experienced soldier, a muzzle-loading rifle was a formidable weapon. A test conducted in 1860 showed that a trained shooter armed with such a rifle can fire 10 shots in 5 minutes and at the same time hit a square 2x2 foot target six times from a distance of 100 yards. At 300 yards, he hit a 2,5x2,5 ft target with all 10 bullets.
    1. Saxahorse
      Saxahorse 19 March 2018 23: 19
      +1
      Quote: hohol95
      a trained shooter can take 10 shots in 5 minutes and at the same time hit a square target 2x2 feet six times from a distance of 100 yards. At 300 yards, he hit a 2,5x2,5 ft target with all 10 bullets.

      The farther the more accurately shot? :)
      1. cth; fyn
        cth; fyn 20 March 2018 05: 19
        0
        Rather, I understand that I achieved at least one hit out of 10 shots
      2. hohol95
        hohol95 20 March 2018 08: 21
        0
        The phrase is taken from here:
        Kirill Markovich Mal
        US Civil War, 1861–1865 (Development of military art and military equipment)
      3. your1970
        your1970 21 March 2018 16: 56
        0
        Quote: Saxahorse
        2x2 feet six times from a distance of 100 yards.
        - 6 times (out 10) to the target 60 * 60cm from a distance in 90 m????? !!!!!!!!!!!!!
        they have big problems shooting (I’m silent about the hit !!!) were .........
        1. hohol95
          hohol95 21 March 2018 17: 08
          0
          Have you shot such a rifle?
        2. Saxahorse
          Saxahorse 21 March 2018 22: 56
          +1
          I suppose they mixed up the distances in the brochure. "2,5x2,5 feet with all 10 bullets." 100 yards it looks like. For a long-barrel revolver, normal. And at 300 yards, 60% is unlikely.
  8. hohol95
    hohol95 19 March 2018 22: 58
    +2
    “We packed the attacking rebels in piles,” a Connecticut soldier wrote admiring the new weapons. “The rebels do not like our rifles.” They say that the Yankees have a devilish “coffee” mill, which they charge on Saturday morning and then shoot all week. This is a good rifle. ”
    1. Nikolaevich I
      Nikolaevich I 20 March 2018 02: 04
      +2
      Quote: hohol95
      “We packed the attacking rebels in piles,” a Connecticut soldier wrote admiring the new weapons. “The rebels do not like our rifles.” They say that the Yankees have a devilish “coffee” mill, which they charge on Saturday morning and then shoot all week. This is a good rifle. ”

      Actually .... it's about Winchester! wink
      1. hohol95
        hohol95 20 March 2018 08: 24
        +1
        The phrase is taken from here:
        Kirill Markovich Mal
        US Civil War, 1861–1865 (Development of military art and military equipment)
        Part II Infantry and Artillery
        Chapter 1 Weapons and infantry tactics
        [quote] Somewhat later, at the end of the war, not only elite, but also ordinary infantry units of the northerners began to equip breech-loading and magazine rifles. So, in the Sherman’s army during his Atlanta campaign, three infantry regiments were equipped with Spencer’s store infantry rifles - an improved version of his short-barreled carbine. These rifles worked well during the Battle of Atlanta and at the Battle of Franklin, where the soldiers they armed inflicted sensitive damage on the enemy.
        “We packed the attacking rebels in piles,” a Connecticut soldier wrote, delighted with the possibilities [/ quote] of a new weapon. “The rebels do not like our rifles.” They say that the Yankees have a devilish “coffee” mill [105], which they charge on Saturday morning and then shoot all week. This is a good rifle. "[/ Quote]
        1. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I 20 March 2018 10: 06
          +2
          Well .... then, I'm sorry! hi For it was misled, because. the expression: "... they charge on Saturday morning and shoot all week ..." I met in an article "dedicated" to the Winchester rifle (carbine) (the history of creation and use ...) what
      2. Kibb
        Kibb 20 March 2018 11: 43
        +1
        Quote: Nikolaevich I
        Quote: hohol95
        “We packed the attacking rebels in piles,” a Connecticut soldier wrote admiring the new weapons. “The rebels do not like our rifles.” They say that the Yankees have a devilish “coffee” mill, which they charge on Saturday morning and then shoot all week. This is a good rifle. ”

        Actually .... it's about Winchester! wink

        Picked up a paper book. This is about Spencer
        1. Nikolaevich I
          Nikolaevich I 20 March 2018 12: 48
          +2
          Quote: Kibb
          This is about Spencer

          I do not argue now ... was misled after reading one of the articles "dedicated" to Winchester. Thank you for the enlightenment.
          1. Kibb
            Kibb 20 March 2018 13: 13
            0
            Well, the Winchester as such then did not exist at all - there was Henry (or Henry - whichever is more convenient for anyone) until 1864 emnip. And so there the devil breaks his leg - everything that shoots was used - the main ones are still muzzle loading. But I wonder what has been done far from on the knee - everything is up to par. How do you like this sample: http: //popgun.ru/viewtopic.php? F = 149 &
            t = 38598
            1. Nikolaevich I
              Nikolaevich I 20 March 2018 13: 34
              +1
              Quote: Kibb
              Well, the Winchester, as such, did not exist at all then - there was Henry (or Henry

              You are right ... I used the name, which later became more famous.
          2. kalibr
            20 March 2018 20: 08
            +1
            I also came across this in a book ... about the Henry rifle!
            1. Nikolaevich I
              Nikolaevich I 21 March 2018 10: 01
              +2
              Quote: kalibr
              I also came across this in a book ... about the Henry rifle!

              Let's try to "compare in an elementary way ... Spencer's store carbine: 7 charges ..;. Henry store rifle: up to 15 charges. To which “subject” is it more logical to attribute the phrase: “... they charge on Saturday morning and then shoot all week ...”? wink
              1. hohol95
                hohol95 21 March 2018 17: 10
                +1
                Perhaps the southerners did not distinguish between Henry and Spencers!
                And they dubbed all the recharges of the northerners DIAVOLIC Coffe grinders ...
                1. Nikolaevich I
                  Nikolaevich I 22 March 2018 01: 20
                  +2
                  Quote: hohol95
                  Perhaps the southerners did not distinguish between Henry and Spencers!
                  And they dubbed all the recharges of the northerners DIAVOLIC COFFEE GRINDERS

                  And I have such an assumption "arose" ... hi
              2. Kibb
                Kibb 22 March 2018 22: 15
                0
                I do not think that such a direct comparison, but really Henry takes longer to charge.
          3. hohol95
            hohol95 20 March 2018 23: 28
            +2

            The weapons of the army of the Northern States.
            1. Kibb
              Kibb 22 March 2018 22: 09
              0
              But Henry couldn’t be charged with a store, he wasn’t pulling on the “coffee grinder.” You could quickly throw cartridges into the “window” of the hard drive, but how to quickly charge Henry so that he becomes a coffee grinder?
              1. hohol95
                hohol95 22 March 2018 23: 29
                +1
                Look for a video with replicas from replicas of Henry M1860. The videos show how Henry's carbines reloaded! Pretty fast ...
                1. Kibb
                  Kibb 24 March 2018 10: 51
                  0
                  I looked. The main problem is that the entire regiment will not be able to do this, individual craftsmen will always be
              2. Nikolaevich I
                Nikolaevich I 23 March 2018 00: 29
                +1
                Quote: Kibb
                but how to quickly charge Henry so that he becomes a coffee grinder?

                As I understand it, the expression about the "coffee grinder", reflects, not the speed of loading a weapon; but its multi-charge ...
  9. Catfish
    Catfish 20 March 2018 01: 52
    +3
    Christopher Spencer was clearly a capable designer. I wonder how his life went on and why did he abandon the business that he started so well and successfully?
    Guys, if anyone has information on this, share it if it's easy. We are grateful. hi
    1. Curious
      Curious 20 March 2018 08: 27
      0
      Open the English-language Wikipedia, then follow the links in it. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Miner
      _Spencer
    2. Kibb
      Kibb 20 March 2018 12: 00
      0
      Lee's shops appeared, the French inserted a grenade launcher into an army rifle. In general, application stores were not in demand, but otherwise ... yes, interesting (especially the story with Mosin's application store in 1898 ohm was always interesting) hi
      1. Kibb
        Kibb 20 March 2018 13: 21
        0
        oh, in 1988 ohm
    3. voyaka uh
      voyaka uh 21 March 2018 13: 59
      0
      After the Civil War, the demand for guns sharply
      fell and Spencer went bankrupt. But Winchester bought his company.
      Spencer lived to 88 years. Well done!
  10. cth; fyn
    cth; fyn 20 March 2018 05: 27
    +1
    A smart article, a very interesting rifle, I don’t understand why they didn’t want to take it into service, because the advantages are so obvious that there’s nothing to say, the rifle is quite light, the ammunition is convenient to store, transport, equipment and most likely to reload, the rifle itself is quickly charged , solid pluses.
    It would be possible to adopt elite units with good rifle training. Yes, not everyone could be handed such a quick-fire rifle then, it really would have led to an excessive consumption of ammunition, but there are huntsmen, cavalry, and the same units that went through more than one battle and after retraining could use new weapons with great efficiency .
    1. Saxahorse
      Saxahorse 20 March 2018 22: 38
      0
      The ammunition is weak, the cartridge is generally revolving. By that time, the Draise rifle was already mass-produced in Europe. With an aiming range of 700 meters.
      1. your1970
        your1970 21 March 2018 10: 57
        0
        and the Winchester? is also a pistol cartridge ... Well, they did not fight at great distances ... they did not have a regular army as an adversary ...
        1. Saxahorse
          Saxahorse 21 March 2018 23: 01
          0
          And the Winchester is just as sweet. Actually for the army, it’s only suitable as an auxiliary weapon, like our PPSh.
  11. diglator
    diglator 20 March 2018 11: 28
    0
    Question ... From the pictures it is not clear how the cartridges were held under the spring in the curb shop? Apparently fed by gravity, that is, not holding onto the exit ... was there some kind of “latch” on the spring?
  12. hohol95
    hohol95 20 March 2018 16: 19
    0
    The article is good, but the loading process is not described! It turns out that at first loading was carried out on one cartridge. And only after the development of Erastus Blacksley from the 1st Connecticut Cavalry Volunteer Regiment (US patent 45 of December 469, 20), the 1864-round pencil case accelerated the loading process!
  13. Catfish
    Catfish 21 March 2018 00: 15
    +1
    Quote: Curious
    Open the English-language Wikipedia, then follow the links in it. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Miner
    _Spencer


    Thank Victor I’ll definitely look. drinks
  14. Catfish
    Catfish 21 March 2018 01: 11
    +1
    Quote: Curious
    Open the English-language Wikipedia, then follow the links in it. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Miner
    _Spencer


    Thank Victor hi
  15. Kibb
    Kibb 24 March 2018 10: 54
    +1
    Quote: Nikolaevich I
    Quote: Kibb
    but how to quickly charge Henry so that he becomes a coffee grinder?

    As I understand it, the expression about the "coffee grinder", reflects, not the speed of loading a weapon; but its multi-charge ...

    I agree, most likely closer to reality, that the southerners did not greatly distinguish Spencer from Henry, as already mentioned
  16. Ivanov IV
    Ivanov IV 26 March 2018 12: 39
    0
    In the war against the Zulus, when the Zulus attacked the fort, the British managed to make only one shot ........