Military Review

"Igor Belousov" went in search of submarines since WWII

9
Pacific Rescue Ship fleet Igor Belousov is looking for Soviet small submarines M-63 and M-49, drowned in the waters of Peter the Great Bay during World War II, said Nikolai Voskresensky, head of the information support department of the BBO press service for the Pacific Fleet.


"Igor Belousov" went in search of submarines since WWII


As part of the development of the elements of the second course problem, the rescue ship of the Pacific Fleet, Igor Belousov, is solving the problems inherent in it in the waters of Peter the Great Bay. So in order to determine the marginal capabilities of onboard search and rescue systems taking into account the local hydrology of the sea (the equipment was previously tested on the Baltic Sea and in the Atlantic Ocean), the vessel searches for the dead supposedly in the area during the Great Patriotic War of the Soviet small submarines M-63 "and" M-49
- noted Resurrection.

To search for submarines, the vessel uses a towed sonar with a magnetometer at depths not exceeding one kilometer. If the submarines are found, it is planned to use the Panthera Plus, a remote-controlled submersible, to survey them.

In August, two small U-boats of the Pacific Fleet, M-1941 and M-49, disappeared during the combat mission in the south-western part of Peter the Great Bay in August. Submarines of this type were called "Baby" for the size, which allowed to transport ships by rail without disassembly. The submarines of the "M" series had a displacement of 63 tons, two torpedoes in nose machines and a 258-mm cannon at the deckhouse.
Photos used:
yandex.ru/images
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  1. Glory1974
    Glory1974 5 December 2017 16: 21
    +1
    the vessel carries out a search along the way for the presumably in the region during the years of World War II, Soviet small submarines M-63 and M-49

    Good deal. And training the crew, and a tribute to the dead sailors.
    Why didn’t you do it before? Or tried to search, but did not find?
    It would be nice if the article had a brief reference about the dead boats.
    1. svp67
      svp67 5 December 2017 17: 02
      +6
      Quote: glory1974
      It would be nice if the article had a brief reference about the dead boats.

      “At 15.59 on August 9 [1941], the M-2 left for the next campaign to position No. 49 south of the Ussuri Bay. A day later, at 15.45 on the 10th, M-1 headed to the position west of position No. 63. . At 23.00:9 p.m. on August 49, the commander [M-XNUMX] reported on his arrival at the position, and then several more times on the weather and the ship. It did not cause concern. The last message from the boat was received at 08.30 on the 15th “Unknown transport with the SW course”. It was determined at the headquarters of the fleet that the submarine had discovered the steamer Red, what kind of submarine it was: our M-49 or M-63, or a foreign boat. Contacting P.V. Bozhenko from the Moscow History Club Vladimirovich] Bozhenko. From these two letters [-] the story and clarification [-] and the article mentioned by me [above] appeared, this refers to 1999. ,] that they,] were addressed with (] was raised or ”] (although the Pacific Fleet took part in the war with Japan only from August 9 to September 3, 1945,] that the submarine was discovered in 1954. It is unambiguous [that] that [it was] the manuscripts] of my article that I lost and there is no way to forward it] at a mine fence 15 miles southeast of Posyet Bay [Peter the Great Bay of the Sea of ​​Japan]. In addition, the mine line was exposed at a depth of 150 - 180 meters in the immediate vicinity of a dump of depths of more than 500 meters. Considering, when navigating a submarine, a dangerous isobath of 500 meters, for which it is dangerous to go in a mine, the submarine M-63 having a depth of more than 500 'under the keel])]). In the Gulf of Peter the Great there is a constant current directed to the south-west, [with] a speed of 0,2 - 0,4 knots. In addition, a southwind wind flow from a cyclone that had passed the day before could have acted [at] speeds of up to 0,4 knots. Mines torn from anchors from drift under the influence of wind and currents in 20-30 hours could be in areas of submarine positions. In this case, the place of death of the submarines can be estimated by the coordinates of the designated positions, taking into account the accuracy of the submarine’s navigation: PL M-63: 41 ° 58,0 ['] full-time;] 42 ° 13,0 ['] full-time.] PL M- 49: 42 ° 01,0 ['] full-time]. 42 ° 19,0 ['] full-time]. ” Speaking about the third probable reason - “The destruction of submarines on minefields due to unaccounted drift from the wind (demolition of minefields)”, M.I.Sazhaev writes that the M-49 and M-63 “could have been blown up on defensive minefields under adverse hydrometeorological conditions (limited visibility and strong wind drift), when the drift from the wind was not taken into account. A significant northward drift could occur when a typhoon or deep cyclone passed through the northern part of the Sea of ​​Japan. In this case, the area of ​​death of the submarines [-] is rather sick and is located in the place of laying minefields. For the fourth probable reason - “The death of submarines due to adverse hydrometeorological conditions” - the manuscript author states that “submarines could die in stormy conditions of navigation if they were unable to dive,” and that “in this case, the place of their death is in the area of ​​his assigned positions. ” And, finally, mentioning the last possible reason for the death of both "babies" - "The death of submarines in battle when meeting with an armed vessel of the enemy", the manuscript author, mentioning that theoretically they "could die in battle with an armed vessel of the enemy from artillery or a ram" , believes that "in this case, the place of death of submarines may be outside the positions assigned to submarines." Concluding that “the most likely causes of the death of the M-49 and M-63 submarines” should be considered the first three of the five above, the Pacific Fleet Chief Navigator, a member of the Council of the Far Eastern Pacific Fleet Submariners Club captain 1st rank M.I. Sazhaev makes a recommendation: "It is advisable to search for submarines in the supposed (estimated) places of death, as well as to examine the areas of possible submarine bombing at minefields and their sentinel positions." In an interview with us, the manuscript author emphasized that the search for two “babies” who died in August 1941 in Posyet Bay should be carried out until they are found. “Some people still believe that the M-49 and M-63 were killed due to the elementary illiteracy of their crew members, who mistakenly brought them to their minefields,” M.I.Sazhaev said. “Establishing the exact places and the reasons for their death will allow us to clear the names of 43 Pacific submariners forever back in the sea from such accusations.”
      During the Second World War of 1939 - 1945, the Pacific submarine lost 8 submarines for various reasons - M-49, M-63, Sch-138, Sch-118, A-16, Щ-130, Щ-139 and A-19. Moreover, half of them, both “babies” and both “Leninists” were irretrievably lost, and the death of each of these 4 submarines was associated with the conduct of hostilities in the Pacific basin. In total, from 1941 to 1945, together with their ships 212 Pacific submariners died.
      1. Glory1974
        Glory1974 5 December 2017 20: 22
        +1
        Thank. Very interesting. hi
    2. In100gram
      In100gram 5 December 2017 19: 25
      0
      Quote: glory1974
      Why didn’t you do it before? Or tried to search, but did not find?

      I suspect that there was no technical possibility hi
      1. Orionvit
        Orionvit 6 December 2017 08: 26
        0
        Quote: In100gram
        I suspect that there was no technical possibility

        There was no funding in the first place. Now probably there. Great news, and combat training for sailors, and the ability to remove "white spots" from history. Where are all-throat gulps? Where are the screams that in Russia everything is "worse than nothing"?
  2. Topotun
    Topotun 5 December 2017 16: 39
    +3
    And at the same time he will look after the situation! Suddenly the mattresses sailed ...
    1. svp67
      svp67 5 December 2017 16: 57
      +1
      Quote: Topotun
      And at the same time he will look after the situation! Suddenly the mattresses sailed ...

      Yes, more than once or twice ... but there were precedents ...
  3. ZVO
    ZVO 5 December 2017 20: 23
    +1
    Most likely they discovered the suspicious activity of enemy submarines ...
    Which "then" watched Vladivostok through the periscopes. and now they continue to do this ....

    Maybe some enemy bookmarks will find ...
  4. Nemesis
    Nemesis 5 December 2017 21: 07
    0
    As a training, you can search for the missing D-1 medium diesel submarine